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Full text of "City record"

•^3311 Fac#5469 



By sending these Tigures this order 
can be duplicated 

CITY OF BOSTON- PRINTING SECTION 

No. 174 HORTH STREET. 
BOSTON 13. MASS. 



vv 



CITY RECORD 



Official Chronicle of Boston Municipal Affairs. 



Saturday. May 21. 1960. 



CITY RECORD INDEX TO VOLUME 51, JANUARY 3, 1959, TO DECEMBER 26, 1959. 



Page 



217 



628 



648 



Administrative Services Department: 
Administrative Division: 

director asks department heads to keep within budget 

director explains budget situation to department 

heads 238 

director publishes "Finding List for the City of 

Boston" 327 

director issues bulletin, urban renewal activity 347 

director requests department heads study space 
requirements, new City Hall 361 

director approves basketball games report — Park 
Department Association of Basketball Leagues 364 

submits compilation of city and county employees, 
etc 754, 503 

director advises department heads, vacation schedul- 
ing 566 

director approves temporarj' employment to Boston 
College student nurses. Hospital Department 602 

director approves new pay schedule, house officers, 

etc.. Hospital Department 620 

dirtM tor designates Lawrence A. Costello, Acting 
.\dmiiii.strative Director 

ilircclor authorizes Hospital superintendent to name 
l)hysi( ians. East Boston Relief Station, Hospital 
Department 

director issues to department heads, memorandum 

No. 12 on "Safety" 681 

director analyzes 1959 tax rate 813, 809 

director issues memorandum No. 15, Fourth Con- 
ference on Municipal Administration 938 

Administration Conferences, Municipal: 
Third Annual Conference — 

address. Dean PhiUp H. Ragan, "A Common Ground 
for Business and City Management" (Third Con- 
ference) 22 

Panel I "Old Problems — New Approaches', 

Gregory B. Wolfe, moderator 45 

OUver "W. Park, panelist, "Equalization Survey".. 45 
Donald W. Graham, panelist, "Neighborhood 

Improvement and Problems " 48 

William J. Bird, paneHst, "Transportation 

Problems" 50 

Fred Smith, panelist, "Boston's Outlook" 52 

Panel II — State Control of Municipal Finance in 

Massachusetts, James A. Maxwell, moderator . 74 
Herman B. Dine, panelist, "State Control of 

Local Borrowing " ■ 75 

Joseph R. Barresi, paneUst, "Balanced Budget 

Requirement" 77 

Edward C. Wilson, panehst, "Property Tax 

Assessment" 79 

Joseph P. Lally, panelist, "Control and Supervi- 
sion of the City of Boston as a Special Case".... 80 
Panel III — "Modern Business Techniques", Charles 

M. Evans, moderator 

Donald F. Cotter, panelist, "Savings through 

Modernized Telephone Operations" 104 
John J. Connors, paneUst, "Central Mailing Unit ' 



105 



Administrative Services Depart.ment: 
Administration Conferences, Municipal: 

John V. Moran, panelist, " Addressograph Op(;ra- 

tions" 

Arthur E. Feenan, panelist, "Univac 60" 

Charles M. Evans, moderator, "Summation" 

Panel IV — " Medical and Institutional Administra- 
tion and Costs, " Theodore W. Fabisak, moderator 
David S. Sherman, M.D., panelist, "Present and 

Future Needs for Tubercular Treatments" 

John R. McGillivraj-, panelist, "Present and 

Future Needs for the Chronic Sick" 

John F. Conlin, M.D., panelist, "Present and 

Future Needs for a Municipal Hospital" 

Dean A. Clark, M.D., panelist, "Major Costs in 
the Operation of a Privately-Owned Institution" 
Panel V — "Municipal Maintenance Problems," 

Thomas J. Galligan, Jr., moderator 

Francis X. Moloney, panelist, "Library Buildings" 



i07 
108 
109 



130 



139 



159 
160 



Michael J. Kane, panelist, "Police Buildings" 163 

Charles A. Callanan, panelist, "School Buildings" 166 

John H. Cauley, M.D., panehst, "Health Units" . 168 
Panel VI — "Procedures and Operations, City Prints 

ing Plant," C. Stanley Whyte, moderator 201, 187 

Douglas F. Reilly, panelist, "Management Under 

Private Auspices" 187 

William C. Gibbs, panelist, "Plant Operations".,.. 103 

Joseph P. Kennedy, panelist, "New Business" 107 

James J. Duffj% panehst, "Administration" 109 

Fourth Annual Conference, William Arthur Reilly, 

general chairman, announces agenda, etc 973 

Budget Division: 

John T. Leonard named Acting Supervisor 647 

supplementary budget signed bj' Mayor 683 

Personnel Division: 

supervisor advises, 25-year emploN'ees, benefits, 

Rule 10, Compensation, etc. Plan 112 

application for jobs. South Bay Incinerator available 

(correction 498) 475 

receives directive on vacation scheduling (Memo- 
randum No. 9) 566 

corrected salary figures, Hospital Department 633 

supervisor designates Frank P. McDonough, Acting 

Supervisor ■■• 863 

supervisor designates John T. Leonard, Acting 

Supervisor 1027 

Purchasing Division: 

designates Eugene K. Welsh, Acting Purchasing 

Agent 123, 366, 498, 776, 807 

Assessino Department: 

Earle H. Barnard appointed assessor of taxes I 

Oliver W. Park named principal assistant to assessor ... 73 
Assessor submits to Mayor, summary of abatements 

(1955-1958) 170 

Assessor announces pohcy, taxation of home improve- 
ments 841 



2 



CITY RECORD INDEX 



AroiTiNfi Department: J'aoe 
Auw Hwir talkH to BuilclinR OwncrH, etc., "Nine Months 

(IS Xs-xT'twDr" 

\..i^-.,r «ul.ii»it« to Mayor, "Manual of SUuidanls" 

. ihmtioiiB •• 

\ I iskH AMHwtont AsBesmrs review new asseasmcnt 

iii.l inlH ''^'^ 

.IcHiKtuiU-s Martin A. Fulton Acting City Auditor .12^ 6^, 

r< KulationB, oflicial out of state travel • 477 

c.inpil.ition of city and county employees, March 31, 



.onipiUilion of city and county employees, February 1, 

19r,0- February 1, 19-^ • V ^ 

oinpilation of citv ami county employees, February 1, 

1955-F< bru(iry 1, 19.'i9 correcting page 844 861 

auditor answers Moody's Investors Service, City s 
credit rating 

Ai i)iT<iRn M Commission: 

Hcalf mcxlel. Municipal Auditonum 

contitrurtion bi<ls to be ojx.Mied December 16 975 

B 

Ho.sTON CoLI.EdE SkMINAR 

(Sre S<-niinar, lioston College) 
Boston HorsiNc Ai thority 

(.SVc Housing Authority) 
Boston Rkdkvklopmknt Authority 

(Sre Rp<ievel()pment Authority) 
Boston Kent Board 

(Src Rent lioard) 
Boston Traffic Commission 

(.SVc Traffic Commission) 
Boston Waterfront Rehabilitation Committee 

(.Sfc Waterfront Rehabilitation Committee) 

Brii.DiNo Department: 

reiKirt, new construction etc. for 1958 

re|><)rt, 1 12,18.') srparato buildings in City 

R"IK)rt. building.s constructed in 1958, by wards 

n'lKirt, tlwellings constructed 1953-1958 

re|K)rt, buildings demolished 1953-1958 

statistics, January 1959 172, 

statistics, February 1959 268, 270 

rejMjrt buildings demohshed: 

35 Iloivokc street, Ward 4 

17 Tavlor street. Ward 9 

12 Dilwortli street. Ward 9 

37 llolvoke street, Wanl 9 

statistics, March 1959 •• 

statistics (consoUdated), January, February and March 

1959 

statistics, March 1959 — five-year comparison 

j^l.iti'^lics April 1959 and January to April 412, 443, 

st,itisli.'.-<! Mav 19r)'.» 528 

■iiiiioinK cs Peter Bent Brigham Hospital building plan.. 

t.itisli. s, June 1959 021, ti2<), (i30, 

also 835 

report buildings demolishe<l: 

4 Tili'ston place, Ward 3 

122 Hudson street, Ward 3 

2 and 1 Ivanhoe street. Ward 9 

59 Williams street. Ward 9 

til Williams street, Ward 9 

-i.ilistics, July 1959 

n iKu t building demolished, 130 Camden street, Ward 9 

stati.stics. Augu.-^t 1959 835, 836, 

reixirl building di iiiolished, 69 Williams street, Ward 9 

statistics. S'ptcnilH'r 1959 

extends eiuploymenl. William J. Dolan „ 

statistics, Octobir 1959 999, 

statistics, N'oyember 1959 



37 
47 
121 
122 
122 
174 
■272 

327 
327 
327 
327 
337 

345 
354 
429 

-532 
583 
631 

-837 

647 
647 
647 
647 
()47 
71)7 
824 
837 
848 
1K)4 
9S9 
IIXKI 
1054 



c 

Christmas Fi';stival Balk 
(See Festival, (Christmas) 

City Council: 

hears Mayor's annual a<ldn'Ks 17 

elects Councillor Ixlward F. McLaughlin, Jr., President _M 
receives Mayor's letter, Whitney Redevelopment Proj- 
ect " 1 1 

President appoints standing committees sj 

receives Mayor's recommendations, borrowing for hos- 
pital repairs I 1 I 

receives budget and message from Mayor 1 J " 

receives Mayor's request for further budget cuts 217, 2: 

receives Mayor's applications. Federal aid, urban re- 
newal projects, Ilo.xbury '2 . 

reduces Mayor's budget recommendations 'S2 7 

approves Jfousing Authority plan, dwellings for aging 

people Id'. I 

receives from Mayor, SupplemcntJiry Budget (7 ; 

receives from Mayor, loan orders for highway construc- 
tion 1^2 

receives from Mayor, order for sale of surplus inciner- 
ator steam 5(111 

passes order, pay increase to city employees ")til 

receives Finance Commission report, proposed Rox- 

bury housing plan f i I ' • 

receives from Mayor notice, Massachusetts Parking 
Authority may take Boston Common land by eminent 

domain <i77 

receives Finance Commission report, lease of plant and 

sale of steam (incinerator) (i7' ' 

accepts Cardinal Cushing's gift. Long Island Hospital, 

Chapel. Hospital Department S27 

receives Redeyelopment Authority vote, extend New 

York Streets area 97.5 

City Planning Department: 
(Sec Planning Department) 

"City Record": 

statement of ownership 91 1 

index, 1 958 follows page 912 912 

front cover, Michael Duran and Nurse Joan Bowler, 

Christmas at City Hospital 1085. lOsT 

Civic Auditoriu-m Co.mmi.s.sion: 
( See Auditorium Commission) 

Claims: 

approved 27, 33, 57. 65, 115, 236. 248 

257, 273, 300, 330, 340, 347, 391 
403, 423 425, 469, .'537, .S48, 552 
555, 573, 590. 591, 636, 63S 
676, 776, 806, 835, 856, SSW, !»0S 

disipproved 847 

Contracts Awarded: 

Administrative Services Department — Purchasing Division : 

tea and coffee, various departments 1099, 852, 634, 2S4. 9 

Hour, various departments 1099, 852. 9 

.«)ap. various departments 634, 28.5, 9 

tnictor shovel. Automotive Division, Public Works 

Department 'J 

carryall, .\utomotive Division, Public Works De- 
partment 

copper tubing. Water Division, Public Works De- 
partment 1007, 63 

X-ray equipment, City Hospital, Hospital Depart- 
ment ll« 

p.itching mix, Highway Division, Public Works De- 
partment 149 

gasoUnc, various departments 1 79 



CITY RECORD INDEX 



3 



Contracts Awarded: Page 
Administrative Services Department — Purchasing 
Division : 

park plugs, various departments 179 

book paper, Printing Section, Administrative Serv- 
ices Department 180 

crushcfi stone, various departments 180 

toweling, Parks and Recreation Department.. 

automobile batteries, various departments 21 1 

tires, various departments 21 1 

motor oil. various departments 212 

sectional liners, Cemeter.y Division, Parks and Rec- 
reation Department 212 

edgestone, Paving Division, Public Works Depart- 
ment 212 

broom wire. Sanitary Division, Public Works De- 
partment 212 

ready-mixed concrete, designated locations. Public 

Works Department 247 

iron castings, etc.. Sewer Division, Public Works 

Department 247 

air compressor. Parks and Recreation Department. .. 265 

park equipment, Parks and Recreation Department 265 

grass seed etc., various departments 265 

dry goods etc.. City Hospital, Hospital Department 284 

janitor supplies, various schools 284 

ice-cream mi.x, 284 

dry goods, various departments 284 

milk and cream, various departments 909, 285 

laundry supplies, various departments 296 

window envelopes, various departments 297 

waste and wiping cloths, various departments 297 

sand and gravel, various departments 319 

loam, various departments 321 

water meters. Water Division, Public Works Departs 

ment 321 

X-ray solutions, various departments 321 

paper drinking cups, various departments 321 

cast-iron castings. Water Division, Public Works De- 
partment 321 

billing-accounting machine, Water Division, Public 

Works Department 322 

metal castings. Water Division, Public Works De- 
partment 322 

cast-iron water pipe. Water Division, Public Works 

Department 322 

ice cream, various departments 322 

flour, various departments 634, 322 

gases (industrial and medical), various departments 322 

gas mask canisters, Fire Department 658, 180, 338 

corned beef, various departments 338 

Albino rats, various departments 970, 338 

fuel oil etc, various departments 338 

panel trucks. Traffic Department 355 

fire helmets, Fire Department 355 

window envelopes. Collecting Division, Treasury 

Department 355 

wheatlitc lamp parts, Fire Department 372 

drugs, various departments 555, 372 

groceries and canned goods, various departments 853, 372 

coal, various departments 372 

X-ray materials, various departments 372 

stationery supplies. Printing Section, Administra- 
tive Services Departments 555, 394 

tobacco, various departments 397 

recreation suppHes, Parks and Recrcatiuii Di part- 

ment 397 

laboratory and surgical supplies, various drpai tments 

555, 445, 421 

air compressor, Parks and Recreation Department. .. 421 

lamps, incandescent etc., various departments 445 

uniform caps. Fire Department 445 

Portland cement, various departments 445 

surgical dressings, various departments 964, 445 



Contracts Awarded: Page 
Administrative Services Department — Purchasing 
Division: 

automobiles, Public Works Department 468 

laundry maf:hinery. House of Correction, Penal In- 
stitutions Department 468 

cupper tubing, Water Division, Public Works De- 
partment 732, 486 

dry goods and general clothing, City Hospital, Hospi- 
tal Department 

paper products, various departments 508 

pig lead. Water Division, Public Works Department 

555, 509 

office furniture, Fire Depart luciit 534 

•ni cloth. Fire Department 535 

automotive vehicles. Health l)ei)artment 555 

automotive vehicle.s. Municipal Garage, Public 

Works Department 555 

rubber coats, Fire Department 555 

spotlight poles, Highway Division (flighting Service) 

Pubhc Works Department 572 

meters, Water Division, Public U mi ks Department... .774, 572 

typewriters. City Hospital, Ho.spital Department 572 

ice, Water Divi.sion, Public Works Department 572 

shorteninir .and oil, various departments 1099, 821, 609 

signal equipment. Traffic Department 658, 634 

ice-cream cups. Parks and Recreation Department.. ..964, 634 

lollipops. Parks and Recreation Department 634 

alarm boxes, Fire Department 634 

Fire Department 634 

anti-freeze, various ( lepn 1 1 mrnts 634 

fire-fighting supplie-. 1 iie De partment 634 

office supplies (furniture), vaiious departments 634 

fire hose. Fire Department 635 

automobile tire chains, various departments 635 

pumps. City Hospital, Hospital Department 657 

supplies, Water Division, Public Works Department 657 
post hj^drants. Water Division, Public Works Depart- 
ment 732 

panel body trucks. City Hospital, Hospital Depart- 
ment 753 

oxygen equipment. City Hospital, Hospital Depart- 
ment 750 

inhalation therapy equipment, Citv Hospital, Hospi- 
tal Department .". 774 

dump trucks, Automotive Division, Public Works 

Department 774 

signs, Paving Division, Public Works Department ... 774 

steel cabinets, City Hospital, Hospital Department.. 775 

automotive vehicles, various departments 775 

pump oxygenator and equipment. City Hospital, 

Hospital Department 802 

alarm cable, Fire Department 802 

fuel oil, Sanitary Division, Public Works Department 803 
bulldozer tractor, Gardner Street dump. Public 

Works Department 821 

ice cream mi\, various deparlnients 821 

automotive vehicles, various departments 910, 835 

i.solation gowns. City Hospital, Hospital Depart- 
ment 835 

X-ray equipment, City Hospital, Hospital Depart- 
ment 835 

X-ray equipment. Sanatorium Division, Hospital 

Department 836 

hospital furniture. City Hospital, Hospital Depart- 
ment 853 

automotive equipment. Traffic Department 909 

truck and snov\T)low, INIunicipal Garage, Public 

Works Department 910 

radio equipment. Fire Department 910 

dairy barn equipment. House of Correction, Deer 

Island, Penal Institutions Department 910 

dictating etc., equipment. City Hospital, Hospital 

Department 948 



CITY RECORD INDEX 



4 



CoNTRAf'Ts Awarded: Page 
AdininiHtrativc S<'rvirfB Dcj)ar(mc'nt — Purchasing 
Division: 

Ford truck, Houflf of Corn-ction, DecT Ixland, Penal 

Institutions Department 948 

siilt for snow removal, various de|)artment8 964, 948 

dry K<>"ds, etc., Ivong Island Hospital, Hospital 

Department 964 

tnu for, Parks and Recreation Department 964 

furniture. Sanatorium Division, Hospital Depart- 
ment 965 

water works supplies, Water Division, Public Works 

Deiwrtment 965 

safety be<l8ides, City Hospital, Hospital Depart- 
ment 1038 

nurse callcords, City Hospital, Hospital Depart- 
ment. 1038 

milk ewler, Penal Institutions Department 1058 

litter l)askel,'«, Sanitary Division, Public Works 

Department 1099 

t ractor loader, C'emetx-rv Division, Parks and Recrea- 
tion Department 1099 

snowplow piirts, Sanitary Division, Public Works 

Department 1099 

Assessing Department: 

processing negative print* and tracings, etc., Engi- 
neering Division 572 

Boston Fair Rent Board: 
{See Rent Board) 

Boston Housing Authority: 
(.See Housing Authority) 

Boston Retirement Board: 
(iS'cc Retirement Board) 

Boston Traffic Commission: 
{See Traffic Department) 

Cemetery Division: 

(.Sec this title under Parks and Recreation Depart- 
ment) 



Fire Department: 

laundry work 322 

cleaning windows, Headquarters Building (115 

Southampton street) 322 

underground conduit, etc., Cummins Highway Fire 

Station, West Roxbury 510 

underground conduit, etc., Allston and West Trem- 

lett streets, Dorchester 572 

uniform overcoats, sack coats, etc 635 

construction facilities, Fire Department Training 

School, Moon Island, Quincy 836 

electrical work. Fire Department Training School, 

Moon Island, Quincy 836 

heating etiuipment installation. Engine House 17, 

Parish street, Dorchester 870 



painting and repairing fircboat — Engines 31 and 47 1007 



Health Department: 
Registry Division: 

electrosUitic prints, birtlis, deaths and marriages, 

etc 374 

indices, births, deaths and marriages, etc 673 

Hospital Department: 
elevator installation, Wards AA and BB, Long 

Island Hospital 373 

window cleaning. City Hospital 373 

window cleaning. Sanatorium Division 447 

extermination of vermin, Main Division, South 

Department, etc 447 



Contracts Awarded: Paoe 
.\dministrative Services Department — Purchasing 
Division: 

painting. Nurses' Home, South Department 510 

n-jwirs to tunnels. Ixjng Island Division 510 

re|)airing walls, City Hospital 589 

repairing lx)ilers, Xos. 4 and 5, Citv Hospital 609 

equipment. No. 3 lal)orator>-, I'avilion Building, 

City Hosnital " 732 

painting, Burnham and Pavilion Buildings, Citv 

Hospital 870 

n placifig glass ceiling. Premature Nursery, City 

Hospital 870 

electrical work, various buildings. Sanatorium Divi- 
sion 948 

brickwork, Ixiilers, Nos. 1 and 2, power house. 

Sanatorium Division 948 

cleaning windows, Ix)ng Island Division 949 

repairs in morgue. City Hospital 1007 

paving main roadway hospital and parking areas, 

Sanatorium Division 1007 

painting Nurses' Home. Sanatorium Division 1008 

interior painting. Building G, Sanatorium DiNnsion . 1008 

new elevators and alterations, Long Island Hospital 1008 

Library Department: 

tran.sportation, books, etc., Branch and Central 

Libraries 286 

cleaning windows, Central Library building 286 

rental uniforms, etc., various libraries 286 

cleaning, polishing, etc., Central Library Building .. 338 
1960 ijeriodicals and serials. Branch and Central 

Libraries 910 

Mayor's Office: 

fireworks display, Fourth of July, various locations . 609 

Parks and Recreation Department: 

developing playing areas, etc.. Veterans of Foreign 

Wars Parkway Playground 298 

construction. West Stre<>t Plaza, Boston Common 373 
grading and sanding, L Street B;ithing Beach, South 

lio.^ton 398 

planting trees, various streets and |jarkways 422 

[)lanting shrubs, LaFayette Mall 447 

construction, j)lay area, DeFilli|)iK) Playground 447 

floodlight equipment rental, various playgrounds 486 

reconstruction, play area, Harrison avenue, City 

Property 535 

removal, dead trees 589 

repairing greenhouse, etc.. Franklin Park, West Rox- 
bury 635 

reconstruction, roads, service yard, Franklin Park, 

West Roxbury 673 

trimniing trees, various parks and parkwjivs 673 

improvements, etc., .lefTerson Pla> gn)und, Roxbury 732 

improvements, etc., McConiiell Park, Dorchester 775 
roofing, etc., gvmnasium building, Paris street. East 

Boston " 8(« 

boiler repairs, L Street bathhouse. South Boston. 836 

re.«odding, etc., George Wright Golf Course 910 

surfacing roadways, Arnold .\rboretum 94'.t 

Christmas trees, various locations 1008 

maintenance, convenience station, Boston Common.. 1008 
Cemetery Division: 

development, burial areas, Mt. Hope Cemeterv, 

West Roxbury 609 

subsoiling and concrete liners, Mt. Hope Cemetery, 

Cemetery Department 949 

Penal Institutions Department: 

electrical work, dairy barn, Deer Island. "75 



CITY RECORD INDEX 



5 



Contracts Awarded: Page 
Public Works Department : 

sewerage works. Weld street, Wext Roxbury 10 

spotlight poles, various locations 10 

sewerage works (east side), Veterans of Foreign Wars 

Parkway. West Roxbury 97 

sewerage works, Sherrin street and other locations, 

Hyde Park 228 

minor works, Manchester street and other locations, 

Dorchester 26(5 

sewerage works, Magee street, Hyde Park, and other 

locations in Hyde Park 388 

earth excavations, etc., to aid Water Division, West 

Roxbury, Brighton, City Proper, and Dorchester.. 338, 373 
rebuilding and testing water meters. Water Division.. 373 
laying, etc., water pipes, Neponset River Reservation 
and other designated locations in Wards 18 and 19.. 398 

refilling street sweepers (Elgin) 398 

refilling street sweepers, brooms (Wayne) 398 

repairs, underground intersection, Huntington and 

Massachusetts avenues 398 

paving Curve street, Harrison avenue, and designated 

streets. Ward 3 447 

paving Beach street and Exeter street, and designated 

streets. Wards 3 and 4 447 

paving AUston and Lvndhurst streets, and designated 

streets. Ward 17 447 

paving Boyd street, Dunlap street, Kenberma road, 

and designated streets, Wards 15, 16, and 17 447 

sewerage works, Vogel street, etc.. West Roxbury 447 

steam main. South Bay Incinerator to City Hospital.. 447 

laying water pipes, Castle .street. Ward 3" 447 

sidewalks, Arlington street. Ward 5, etc., and desig- 
nated locations, Wards 3, 5, 6, 12, and 22 468 

sewerage works. Child street 468 

sewerage works, Manion road and Westminster street, 

etc., Hyde Park 468 

repairs. Northern Avenue Bridge 468 

repairs, sewer and maintenance work, various loca- 
tions 486 

pavements, Atkinson street, W'ards 6, 8, and 15, etc., 

plus designated locations 486 

sewerage works, Maplewood street, West Roxbury.. . 510 
sewerage works. Enterprise street, Clapp street, and 

Massachusetts avenue, Dorchester 510 

paving Constitution road, etc., and designated loca- 
tions. Wards 12 and 18 510 

laying water pipes. Child street and designated loca- 
tions. Wards 18 and 20 510 

paving Castle street. Ward 3, and designated loca- 
tions, Ward 3 572 

replacing pavement, excavations, by Water Depart- 
ment ". 610 

replacing sidewalks, excavations, by Water Depart- 
ment ." 610 

fences, locations designated, Wards 3, 7, 13, 18, 20, 

and 21 610 

sewerage works, Hereford street, City Proper 610 

repairs, etc.. Temple street, railroad underpa.ss. West 

Roxbury, and River Street Bridge, Hyde Park 635 

sewerage works, etc., across Prudential site, City 

Proper 635 

sewerage works, etc., Bickford street, Roxbury 635 

sewerage works, etc.. Meadow road, Hyde Park 635 

electrical repairs, various drawbridges 6.35 

office building. Water Division, Public Works De- 
partment 673 

paving and reducing sidewalks, Harrison avenue, etc., 

and designated locations. Wards 3 and 8 673 

sewerage works, Beaver place. City Proper 673 

sewerage works, Banfield avenue, Dorchester 775 

sewerage works, Mej^er street and Aldwin road. West 

Roxbury 775 



Co.NTRACTS Awarded: Page 
Public Works Department: 

laying, etc., water pipes, Gurney street, Ward 9, and 

additional locations in Wards 9, 18, and 20 775 

paving Drury road, Ward 18, and additional locations 

in Ward 18 775 

paving Bradlee street, Ward 18, and additional loca- 
tions in Ward 18 775 

paving Aldwin road, Ward 19, and additional loca- 
tions in Wards 18, 19, and 20 775 

paving Arborview road. Ward 19, and additionalloca- 

tions in Wards 10, 18, 19, and 20 791 

cleaning catch basins, various locations 836 

paving Farrington avenue. Ward 21, etc., plus addi- 
tional locations. Wards 21 and 22 830 

paving Auckland street, Ward 15, etc., plus additional 

locations. Wards 13, 15, and 18 S^U 

sewerage works, Tacoma street, Hyde Park 8^37 

repairing drawspan. Maiden Bridge, Alford road 

(over Mystic River) 870 

cleaning and painting, various bridges 870 

paving Bogandale road, etc., Ward 20, plus additional 

streets, Ward 20 870 

paving Atherton >^tn'i t, Ward 11, etc., plus addi- 
tional streets. Wards 8. i». 11, and 12 870 

sewerage works. ( Uciiclldi ri)ad, etc.. West Roxbury.. 870 

sewerage works, Hiadlec street and Metropolitan 

avenue. West Hoxl.urv 870 

paving ("eiiar i.ane \\ av, Ward 5, and other streets 

in Ward .">. " 910 

sewerage works, Me\ er street and Meyer court. West 

Roxbury. 949 

paving Meadow road. Ward 18, etc., plus additional 

locations. Wards 16, 18, and 21 949 

laving, etc., water pipes. Eastern avenue. Ward 3, 

plus additional locations, Wards 3, 18, and 19 949 

removing lampposts, various streets 949 

sewerage works, Windham road, Hyde Park and West 

Roxbury ! 965 

pavement, Charlotte street, Ward 14, etc., plus addi- 
tional locations. Wards 14 and 17 965 

making borings, Dalton street. Summer Street 

Bridge 984 

sealing masonry walls. Blacksmith Shop Building, 

650 Albany street, City Proper 1023 

snow removal contracts listed 1038 

sewerage works. Alley No. 933, Roxbury and various 
streets in West Roxbury, Hyde Park and Dorches- 
ter 1083 



Purchasing Division : 

{See subtitle under Administrative Services Department) 



Real Property Department: 

lease. Franklin, Pearl and Hartford streets parking 

facility. City Proper 10 

lease, Clinton street parking facility. City Proper 247 

maintenance services, Quincy Market Building, City 

Proper 732 

maintenance services, Veterans' Services Department 732 
lease, Kingston and Bedford streets parking facility. 

City Proper 1023 

construction, parking facility, under Fitzgerald E.x- 

pressway. City Proper 1038 

School Buildings Department: 

fuel oil tank, South Boston High School 10 

shop machinery and equipment, Technical High 

School 96 

stage equipment, James P. Timilty School, Roxbury 149 

stage, window drapes, etc., various schools 149 

alterations, etc., oil burner equipment, 26 Norman 

street, City Proper 266 

egress alterations, Lewis School, Ro.xbury 285 



CITY RECORD INDEX 



Contracts Awarded: Pace 
S< h<xil MiiildiriKH Deiwrtniciit: 

window (liirkcniiiK drajx-H, Itico-Fraiikliii District 

S<-1hk.1 338 

nM)fiiiK, <'U:. I-<^wiH School, Iloxhurv 33S 

addition, David A. Kllis School " 373 

lihi<' prinli*, vaiionn whools 373 

roolinu. ct<., Mostoii Trade llinh School Annex 

(I Icnrv L. I'icrcc School Hiiiidinn) 

paintiiiK, Solomon Ix'wcnhcru S(;hool -421 

lin- cxtinn"'-'''"''""*. various schools 447 

roolinn, «■(<•.. Williams S<-hool 4(i8 

ton vert inn st-winj? machines, Trade High School for 

Cirls 4(;S 

plumbinn facilities nioderniziHl, Juhi! Cheverus 

School (Cheveriis) r,m 

rooliiiK, etc., Donald McKay School, East Itost^in ."ilO 

i-oolinn, etc., Jamaica Plain High School, Jamaica 

Plain nin 

iKiinting, etc., Jamaica Plain High School, Jamaica 

JMain ,. 510 

c'onstruct curbs and fence, Washington .\llston School 510 

construction, Dorchester High School, addition 5(58 

additions, etc., heating system, Mather School 572 

l>oilcrs, Christopher (libson School 572 

electrical work, lOliot School, City Proper 572 

n-pairing boilers. District No. 1 659 

furniture and e(|uipnient, Martin School District 672 

l)lumbing work, (irover Cleveland School 672 

plumbing work, linglish High School 672 

roofing, etc., Champlain School 672 

carix-ntry work. South Ho.ston High School 673 

])ainting fire escajx-s, etc., various schools 673 

repairing furniture, Latin School and English High 

Sch(K)l 732 

n'pairing, etc., boilers. District A 775 

paving, etc., at Latin School 775 

fire alarm etjuipment, 26 Norman street, City Proper 775 
repairing masonry, Ixiilers and incinerator, various 

schools in District 1 791 

repairing masonry, toilers and incinerator, various 

schools in District 2 791 

repairing maa<inrv, boilers and incinerator, various 

schools in District 3 791 

repairs, etc., Dorchest«r High School 803 

relocation, nurses' unit, English High School 803 

carjx'ntry work, English High School 806 

additions, etc., heating system, M. Gertrude Godvin 

School Anne.v " 836 

grading, etc.. Trade High School Addition 836 

oil burning e(|uipnient, Eliot School 836 

furniture, etc., addition, David A. Ellis School, 

Ro.Nbury 910 

roofing, etc., Williams School 948 

roofing, etc., George H. Conley School 948 

stealing masonry walls, Abraham Lincoln School . .. 948 

additions and alterations, Roxbury Memorial High 

School 984 

alterations heating and ventilating systems, various 

schools 1007 

carp«!ntry work, Donald McKaj' School 1007 

new curbs and chain link fence, Oliver Hazard Perry 

School 1007 

locker rejjair. Public Latin School 1007 

<lcmolition, 16 buildings. Harvard- Warren School 

District, Charlc.stown 1023 

electrical work, Ivi.st Boston High School 1038 

painting, 26 Norman street, City Proper 1058 

(Miinting, Jeremiah E. Burke High School 1083 

furniture, 26 Norman street, City Proper and various 

.schools 1099 

carjH-ntrv work. Mary E. Curley SchcM)l 1099 

eltrtricai work, 26 Norman street, City Proper 1100 

stage curUiins, various .schools 1 100 



Pa«:k 



1100, II 



Contracts Awarded: 
Sch(M)l Conimittee: 

lumlK-r, various schools 

custodians' supplies, etc., various schools IM) 

electrical supplies, etc., Charlestown High School IKO 

kindcrgarden supolies. various schrxils ISO 

owgen and acetylene, et<'., ga.scs, various schools 18(1 



educational mat<'rials, various sch<M)ls 
breafi, rolls, fU-., various s<'h(M)ls 

electric lamps, various schtxjis 

Salk poliomyelitis vaccine, various schools, 
groi-erie-i, various school-* 



baseball uniforms and supplies, various scluxtls 



<lish trucks, various scIkmiI cafeterias 



IK(| 



diploma cases, various sch<xils 374, 212 

soap .solid, various scIumiIs 2(i<> 

pajM-r. blank books, etc., various schools 2i><> 

cleansing, etc., football e<|uipment, various st-hoois 267 

general supplif!s, various schools and oflices 2x6 

art.s, etc., various 8ch(X)l8 2H(> 

new.sprint paper, various schools 2St] 

fuel analy.sis, various schools 373 

fuel oil, various schools 373 

coal, various sch(x>ls 373 

scis.sors and shears, various schools 373 

metlical suppli(?s, various schools 374 

CMC' truck, various schwjls 422 

physical education supplies, various schools 422 

shop eciuipment and supplies, various schools 422 

football uniforms and su()plies, various schools 422 

truck transiM)rtation. food, various sc-hools 422 

cleaning glass, windows, ventilators, etc., .Vdmini.stra- 

tion Building, School Committee Building Annex 

and Supply Room 422 

cleansing basketball and hockey equipment, various 

schools 468 

musical instruments, ete., various schools 510 

kitchen etiuipment, etc., various schools 510 

basketball, track and hockey equipment, various 

schools ' 610 

pianos and benches, various schools 610 

rebinding Ixxjks, various schools 610 

reconditioning baseball and track shoes, various 

schools 610 

rebuilding, etc., pianos, various schools 610 

sewing supplies, various schools 610 

motor vehicles, various schools 635 

laboratory supplies, various schools 635 

tool and knife grinding, various schools 636 

pa|X'r towels, various schools 636 

rock .salt, various schools 753 

iron casting.s, various schools 7.53 

toilet paper, various schools 753 

groceries for cafeterias, various schools 753 

groceries for kitchens, various schools 75.3 

printing school manual, various schools 753 

cleaning windows, door.s, etc., various schools 775 

sound motion picture projectors, screens, and tape 

recorders, various schools 949 

milk, croam and ice cream, various schools 10.58 

towels and aprons, various schools 10S3 

candy, various schools 1 1 00 



Sheriff's Office: 
jail van 



1.73 



Tniflic Department: 

traflic control signals, 10 intersections 339 

roadway painting 422 

traffic control .signals, 2 intersections 919 

traflic control signals, Castle street and Harrison 

avenue intersection 1023 



CITY RECORD INDEX 



7 



Contracts Awarded: Pack 
Welfare Department: 
air conditioning, etc., administration building, 43 

Hawkins street, City Proper 1100, 212 

Contracts Awarded Without Advertising: 
Administrative Services Department: 

Ford automobiles, Fire Department and Automotive 

Division, Public Works Department 30 

Buick sedan, Purchasing Division, Administrative 

Services Department 30 

street cleaning eciuipment, Automotive Division, 

Public Works Department 181, (13 

drugs, various departments 1 1 <) 

check, etc., writing machine, Veterans' Services De- 

psirtment 119 

perishable food.s, various departments 356, 298, 28() 

422, 535, 1 19 

bathrobes. City Hospital 181 

Technicon Autoanalyzer, etc., Biochemical Labora- 
tory, City Hospital 228 

parking meter parts. Traffic Department 267 

water meter parts, Water Division, Public Works 

Department 1058, 267 

addressograph equipment. City Hospital 286 

fire alarm boxes and gongs, Fire Department 298 

doughnut mix, various departments 339 

maiUng equipment. City Hospital 355 

tiix bills, lists, etc.. Assessing Department 355 

cast-iron fittings. Water Division, Public Works De- 
partment 535 

boiler repairs. Printing Plant, Administrative 

Services Department 589 

automotive repair parts, various departments 837 

fire alarm equipment. Fire Department 970 

office forms. Welfare Department 1008 

Assessing Department: 

consultant services, real estate assessment system 374 

office equipment 610 

Auditorium Commission : 

test borings, site of proposed auditorium 298 

reproduction, plans, etc., proposed auditorium 1023 

Boston Fair Rent Board : 
(-See Rent Board) 

Boston Housing Authority: 
(<S'ee Housing Authority) 

Boston Retirement Board: 
(iSee Retirement Board) 

Boston Traffic Department: 
(6'ee Traffic Department) 

Building Department: 

demolition, Bethany Baptist Church, 60 West 

Cottage street, Roxbury 63 

Election Department: 

transportation, voting machines 535, 949, 63 

printing of ballots. Preliminary Municipal Election .803, 910 

Fire Department: 

electrical protection system, Headquarttsra building.. 339 

Government Center Commission : 

space utilization ijlanning consultants, proposed city 

haU 636 



Contracts Awarded Without Advertising: 
Health Department: 
Registry Division: 
additional prints of records 



Hospital Department: 

maintenance, elevators, etc. (Otis Company), City 
Hospital 

public relations services. City Hospital 

maintenance, elevators, Vose House (Portland Com- 
pany), City Hospital 

maintenance, elevators (A. B. See Company), City 
Hospital 

niaintcnaiice, clcvatois (Otis Company), Sanatorium 
I )ivi.sioii 

nuiiritciKUKtc, t lcv.iloi .s (1''. S. Payne Company), Sana- 
torium Divi.sion 

iii.sl.ili.it ion, tiiirit; .s\stcm, Heart Station, City Hos- 
pital 

expert services, planning and operations, all buildings. 
Hospital Department 

expert services, conver.sion electrical power facilities, 
Hospital Department, City Hospital 

removal, etc., generator set. Medical Building, City 
Hospital 

engineering services, steam supply, City Hospital 

bus service, Fields Corner to Long Island Hospital 

amendment to contract, engineer's services, electric 
power convcr.sion. City Hospital 

engineer's services, electric power conversion, City 
H„s|.it:,l 

plunibiug and heating repairs, various buildings 

repairs, power plant. City Hospital 

Library Department: 
inspection service, watchman recording, etc., Central 

Library 

storage of books and other materials. New England 

Dei.osil Library 

lease, Orient Heights Branch Librarj^ East Boston.... 

lease, Alt. Howiloin Branch Library, Dorchester 

purchase of books and other library material 

maintenance, etc., bookmobiles 

leasing AUston Branch Librarj' 

service agreement, preparation of reports, purchase 

of books, etc 

purchases, micro filmers and readers 

Licensing Board: 

extension stenotypist services, Edward Charles Lucas 

Mayor's Office: 
Animal Rescue League, dog officer's duties 



Parks and Recreation Department: 

transportation, children, Cummings Estate, Wobm-n 

tree spraying, various streets, parks, etc 39 

roping and staking fields for athletic contests 

fountain, etc., plaza, LaFayette Mall, Boston Com- 
mon 

license, operation, weighing machines, various build- 



arcliitecluial services, Field House, etc., Veterans of 
Foreign Wars Parkway Playground, West Roxbury 
cable and repairs, engine, gradall machine 

Penal Institutions Department: 

construction boiler plant, etc.. Deer Island House of 

Correction 

photograph persons comniitted. Deer Island House of 

Correction 



Page 



356 
356 

374 

374 

374 

374 

399 

399 

399 



510 
610 



732 
803 
803 



299 
299 
299 
299 
447 
448 

486 
803 



374 
422 

339 
356 
448 

468 

535 

871 



181 
339 



8 



CITY RECORD INDEX 



f'oNTRACTs Awarded Withoot AovBimsiNr.: Pace 
I'l.inniiin Di'iMirtinont: 

< iirt4)({niplu'r wrvicos 

ptililic rcliitioiiH wTviceH 422 

s<'rvic<'n, n-visioii of contract Scollay wjuari' (icvdop- 

meiit pliiii, NovomlH-r 17, 1958 f)73 

l'iii)lic Works Department: 

:iin< luliiiK lftl< rHof NovcinlMT 19, 1958, snow removal 10 

an iiitect, coiistniction, KiTi^K''. Saiiitarv Division (i4 

i :irth excavation refill, etc., Water Division lOOS, 370, 149 

liiUir anil material for temiwrarv heat incineration 

plant ■ 149 

DeMatteo contract, garbage and refuse removal ex- 

t4'n(leil. Sanitary Division 226 

e\t«'n<is 1958 garbage, etc., removal contract, West 

Koxbury district 247 

st<'am main. South Bay Incinerator to boiler room, 

Citv Hospital " 299 

use of land as dump site, Salem Turnpike, Saugus 339 

additional bridge rei)air8, see lett<*r, Martin J. Kelley 

Company (August 22, 1958) 358 

sewerage works, I^ii Grange street and Hackensack 

road. West Iloxbury 358 

agreement, Calf Pasture as dump site (Boston Gas 

Company) 374 

additional work, omissions, ete., South Bay Inciner- 
ator (.see letter May 17. 1957) _ 394 

eiiifineering s<'rvices, construction. South Bay Inciner- 
ator 448 

amending contract. St)uth Bay Incinerator (Novem- 
ber 12, 19.57). placing fittings, etc (ilO 

engineering .xeivices, replacement of fill. Summer 

Street Bridge 804 

engineering services, construction, Dalton Street 

Bridge, etc 805 

construction, .surface drain, Greenbrook road, Hyde 

Park 837 

repairs, snowfighters and Public Works Department 

trucks. Automotive Division 1008 

commissioner submits list of contractors, emergency 

snow removal 1083 



I'lirchasiiig Division: 

(Nee this subtitle under Administrative Services De- 
j)artment) 



Heal Property Department: 

maintenance of elevators, Citv Hall Annex 340 

repairs to elevators. City Hall Annex 803 

School Buildings Department: 

metal working machines. New Technical High School 181 

burglar alarm, 26 Norman street 212 

inspection and mainU-nance, Payne Company ele- 
vators, buildings designated 468, 298 

in.spi'ction and MKiinli nance, Portland Company ele- 
vators, buildings dcsigiiat^Hl 298 

repair brick wall. Parkman S<'hool 399 

•irchitect's s<>rvices, construction, school, Harvard- 
Warren District, Charle.stown 776 

SufTolk County: 

Coint house Commission: 

towel service. County Court Hou.se 286 

window cleaning service. County Court House 286 



elevator service (Otis Company), County Court 

Hnnm. 300 



Co.VTRACTS Awarded Wmiorr ADVERTWixr;: Pa<.k 
.•^ufTolk Count \ : 

Uegistry of I'robate: 

photostat and photographic paper, etc I.'jO 
ltost/)n .Municip:il Court (Criminal Business): 

traffic violation slips 181 

parking registration index l>ooks lOOS 

Traffic Department: 

painting iiavenient markings (tin 

Treasury Departmt-nt : 

trans|)ortation of money, City Hall to banks, etc. 37t> 

office machinery. Collecting Division 44s 

Welfan- Department: 

medical consultant 268 

I.B.M.C. office machinery 268 



D 

Da.mace.s (Land) Awardeo: 
.\mendnients to original awards: 

65, 144, 213, 231, 400. 416, 514, 
537, 615, 753, 791, 806, 871, 890, 
949, 965, 1007, 1075, 1033, 1 KM) 

Demolition and Re.-<toration, Director ok: 



submits to .Mayor re|)ort and pnigram 221 



E 

Flection Department: 

chairman named to head 1959 "Heart Drive'' 1 12 

Municipal Election Calendar, 1959 498 

preliminary election candidates certified 763 

ward registration places, municipal election 862, 7(i9 

reduction of registered voters since 1955 795 

announce nominees for municipal election 843 

ballot positions drawn for municipal election 862 

ward totals, municipal election 953 



F 

Festival, Christ.mas: 

acting Major Kdward F. M<d.,iiughlin, Jr., and Harry J. 

Blake open Festival 1031 

Finance Commlssion: 

reports to Mayor, "School Fire Safety" 39 

reports to Mayor, Redevelopment Board 71 

n'ports to Legislative Committee, State Aid for Public 

Library 115 

reports to Legislative Committee, State Aid for School 

Buildings 128 

reports to I>egislative Committee, reimbursement for 

State Highway Takings 169 

report.s to Ix'gislature, Municipal Control, Government 

Center Kxpenditures 383 

reports to Mayor, City not to assume duties, Boston 

Protective Department 384 

reports to Legislative Committee, MDC water charges 432 

reports to Mayor on sale, etc., of water 595 

reports to Mayor, psiymeots by educational institutions 

in lieu of taxes 617 

ts to Mayor, etc., propo.sed Koxbury housing plan 619 

ta to Mayor, sale of George T. .\ngell School 643 

ts to City Council, lease of plant and S!ile of steam 

nnerator) 679 

Is to Mayor, single salary plan for school teachers 81 1 
Is to -Major, interest rates on unpaid taxes 879 



engineering services, damage to Countv Court repor 

llouw ' 448 repor 

Pcgistry of Deeds: repor 

photostat photographic paper 212 (in 

microfilm 212 repor 

grantor, grantee indices, etc 212 repor 



CITY RECORD INDEX 



9 



Fire Department: Pace 
new quarters, Engine Company 16 and Ladder Com- 
pany 6, etc., Gallivan lioulevard, Dorchester 541, 39 

Commissioner Francis X. Cotter dies 236 

T. Joseph O'Connor named Commissioner 238 

Commissioner P'rancis X. Cotter's last report 277 

chief orders two ladder companies to respond on first 

alarms 495 

Roslindale fiie station opened 541 



commissioner designates John F. Howard, Acting Chief 1077 

Q 



CiOVERXMENT CENTER COMMISSION: 

vote Becker, etc., Associates, space planning service, 

new City Hall 347 

Finance Commission seeks city control of expenditures 383 

federal authorities assure participation 453 

preliminary plans for Center 475 

new boundaries set by Redevelopment Authority 661 

sale agreement site of new Federal Building 761 

lease, Commonwealth oHice building 793 

Mayor in Washington, D. C, on Commission matters.. 827 

H 

Health Department: 

report for 1958 43 

commissioner extends time of anti-polio vaccination 

drivie... 377, 303 

commissioner reports onlv five polio cases in citj', 

January 1 to August 21," 1959 787 

commissioner designates Dr. George Kahn, Acting 

Commissioner 939 

Registry Division: 

statistics, October, 1959 995 

Hospital Depart.ment: 

trustees receive Mayor's recommendations, borrowing 

for hospital repairs 1 1 1 

trustees name consultants to study hospital 127 

trustees accept salary schedule, special nurses 1 70 

to sell surplus steam to Edison Company 501 

director administrative services approves house officers, 

etc., pay schedule 620 

corrected salary figures 633 

Gerald T. Mahoney named Acting Superintendent, 

Long Island Division 647 

Cardinal Gushing presents Chapel, Long Island Divi- 
sion 083 

Mayor approves full time X-ray staff. City Hospital 763 

director designates Dr. James V. Sacchetti and Robert 

G. Curran Acting Superintendents, City Hospital 921 
director's report, structural and physical improvements 

City Hospital 929 

trustees submit to Mayor, reorganization plan 1065 

Housing Authority: 

takes title, Old Harbor Village 25 

submits to Federal agency plans for housing aging 

persons 409 

clarifies status of fire fighters and policemen as tenant.^.. 41 1 

answers criticism. Franklin Field Project 455 

chairman announces architects for "Housing Aged" 

projects 805 

Victor BjTioe named member 827 



I 

Index for 1958: 
(See City Record) 

Industrial Advisor: 

(See this subtitle under Mayor's Office) 



L 

Law Department: Pace 



(for other claims, see heading "Claims .Mlowcd ") 
rules, Mas.sachusetts Parking .Vutlmi il \- r an take Com- 
mon l)y eminent domain 677 

rules. Common Garage not a sulijcct lui jjopular poll ... 828 
announces 130 claims disapproved 847 

Library Department: 
reports on circulation of books for "direct home use".,.. 171 
report of Examining Committee to Trustees 543 

Licensinc Hoard: 

i.ssucs stati iiii rit on sale of alcoholic beverages during 

polling hours 828 

Edwin J. Thomas named secietary 828 

M 

Mayor's Office: 

Mayor John B. Hynes, Activities of: 

signs ordinance reorganizing .Vsscssing Department ... 1 

a.i)pr(i\-r,- .■iiiiruilniciii , I'ulirr l)i •[ Ki It 1 1 1( '1 1 1 Compensa- 
tion IMan 3 

approves Martin A. Fulton Acting City Auditor 

831, 684, 12 

delivers annual address to City Council 17 

presides at swearing in, Zoning Commission 25 

appoints James E. (Jildca, < liairman "1959 March 

of Dimes Campaign" 25 

receives from ]''inanic ( 'omini.ssion, report, School 

I n- Sal. tN 39 

send- conniiiinici I inn to Council, Whitney Re- 

dcvclopni. nt ri,,i-- t 44 

discusses l intcd Sl.ilcs i:iilrn:iil crisis 57 

announces Inti rn.ilionMl >\ii>r .M.it liini' ( 'orporation 

to Iniy land, Soldiers iMcId roail, Hiiglitoii 57 

at Inni-iicon to President of Prudential Insurance 

C.HnpanN , Canol Shanks 69 

receives Mnance C'oniinissioii report, Redevelopment 

Board 71 

aimounces Oliver W. Park, principal assistant to 

Assessor 73 

releases report. "Realtv A(lvisor\- Committee" 83 

experts more I'nited Stales nrliaii renewal funds 101 

sends to ('it\ ('ouneil and Hospital Trustees recom- 
mendations, l.orrowiiifi lor hospital repairs Ill 

enuneiales views on .\IT.V otlicials .salaries 112 

names David Lasker, Chairman I95i» ■il.'art Drive" 112 
ai)iiro\-es lumeiie K. Welsh, .Vetinu- Purchasing 

A-ei,t ' S07, 498, 366, 123 

submits lo ( 'itv ( 'oiineil, Imd-et and message 125 

further .■xplam; tart,, is in l-nd-el liH'lva.-^e 127 

approves >:,\:n\ >elied,,le, ^pirial imr.ses. Hospital 

Deparlinenr 170 

letter on lO.V.t luiduel inereas, to .Municipal Research 

Bureau and R.'al Instate Board 185 

further cuts 1959 budget 217 

sends communication, budget cuts to Citj' Council. ...220, 217 
receives Irom ^^'ater^ront Committee, progress report 219 
approves .\rthur J. O'Keele Acting Commissioner, 

Parks and Recreation 1060, 813, 220 

seeks Federal aid, twd iiih.an renewal projects, 

Roxbury 233 

names William T. Doyle, fralhe ( omnn-sioner 235 

attends funeral sei-vices, I'liv ( 'omniissioner Francis 

X. Cotter 236 

name-.- 'J', .luseph ( )'( •,)nii.,r, I'iiv ( 'oinnii-sioner 238 

holds nieeiin^, ,)oinl Technical Committee, inner 

b' lt Innhuav- 253 

issue s siat( inent as Prudential Center files application 

loi l)iiilding permit 255 



10 



CITY RECORD INDEX 



Mayor's OmcE: I'ace 
Miiyor John It. Ilym-n, Activities of : 
n-lciiiM's lust oHicial ri'|>ort of Fin- ( 'onunissioiicr 

Fnmcin X. CotttT 277 

wclcomi-H Prosideiit of In-liind, St-an T. O'Kelly 279 

n-lciiHC K iKM'iu of Cilv HiiU rt'ijortt-r "liob" Aldrich, 

llic "H-Ht of I'atri( k" 280 

iipprovi'H awiini, Ki""'>iigt' ""d refuse colleetion con- 

Inict.x 289 

ri'ccivcH from Pliiiiiiiiig lioard, capital improvement 

pn)|{r!im 305 

.•iiiiioiinccs "Anli-Litter CampaiKn" 457, 433, 325 

City ('oiiiicil n'duc«'.s hiKigct 327 

.■iiiii<)(iri(-cs arciiilcci for fpacc phiniiiiiK, new ( 'ilv llall 347 

.•iiinoiiiiccs datr of Mayor's Aimiiai i-'icid Day ' 3fi3 

auri-es lo rcdiK lioii in School l{udK<'t 3(>3 

s|M'aks, nronnil-i)rfakinn ciTcnionv, s<'cond vehicular 

tnnnil 381 

s|H'ak.s on need for s<'cond veliicular tunnel 381 

(i( plorcs Mississippi race violence 383 

is advised not to assume duties of Boston Protective 

Department 38-i 

Municipal Research Bureau asks Law Department 

rule on Attendance Officers' raises 384 

approves Housing Authority plans, dwellings for the 

aging 409 

reap|x)int8 21 officials 411 

receives citation. Massachusetts Committee of Catho- 
lics, Jews and Protestants 412 

orders School Committee to cut budget 412 

announ< ( s Lalu \ Clinic removal, Huntington avenue 431 

announces i>olicy, 3()Hlay appointments 433 

is assured of Federal (iovernment participation in 

(Jovernnient Center 453 

urges collencs contribute in lieu of taxes 455 

asks department heads to supjjort Charity Field Day 455 

facilitates proci-ss, \ eterans' Tax Exemption 45fi 

states views, Auto Towing Law 457 

submits Supplementary jiudget 473 

cites hospitals as economic asset to city 477 

is notified, election of officers, overseers of Public 

Welfare 480 

submits to Council, loan orders for construction of 

public ways, etc 482 

rejects Municipal Research Bureau's recommenda- 
tion, curtailment public bath services 493 

apjiroves Joseph M. (Jaleota, Acting Traffic Commis- 
sioner 498 

submits orders, sfde of surplus incinerator steam 500 

announces Federal oflice building site chosen by 

United States authorities 517 

presides at oix-ning of Roslindale Fire SUition 541 

asks college authorities to expand building in less 

costly areas 544 

signs City Council order, paj- increase to citv em- 
ployees ' 561 

instructs department heads on current problems 563 

approves contract, Dorchester High School addition.. 568 

attends Inde|)endence Day observance 577 

orders extended use, Tyler Street Municipal Building 

for Chinese Community 581 

releas<'s letter. Cerel-Druker Corporation, expansion, 

\ew York Streets area 582 

at o|M'ning. Riverside line, Metropolitan Transit 

Authority 582 

is informed Boston-Plymouth, United States park- 
way pn>p')sed 593 

n-ceives Finance Comnussion report, sale, etc., of 

water 5<),5 

receives Finance Commi.s.sion n>iKjrt, payments* by 

educational institutions in lieu of taxes (>17 

n'<'eives Finance Commission reiK)rt, proposed Rox- 

bury housing pl.in. (jl*) 



Mayor's Office: Page 
Mayor John B. Hyncs, Activities of: 
approves control, parking facility, Central and Kilby 

streets 620 

approves I.Awrence A. Costello, Acting Director of 

.\dministrative Services 628 

receives P'inance Commission report, sale of George T. 

Angell Sch»Mjl 643 

approves ( leorge P. Donovan, Acting Real Property 

Commissioner (i47 

approves ( ;erald T. Mahoney, .Vcting Superintendent, 

liong Island Division, Hosjjital DeiKirlment 647 

appn)vcs John T. I/<sinard. Acting Budget SupiTvi.'«)r, 

.Vdininistrativc S<Tviccs Department 647 

appn)vcs condemnation, buildings, Wards 3 and 9. 647 

appi-oves land taking, .school purposes, High, School 

and Pearl strcet-s, Charlcstown 663 

!idvis«'s City Council, Ma.s.saehuMettH Parking .\u- 

thority, to Uike C3<jmmon I*'uid by eminent <lomain.. 677 

signs supplementary budget 683 

accept.s from Cardinal Cushing. Chajx-l, Ix>ng Island 

Ho.spital, Hospital Department 827, 683 

announces 1959 tax rate, $101.20 (A Message to the 

Taxpayers) 741 

oixjns city's first incinerator. Sanitary Diviaon, 

Public Works Department 743 

announces agreement for sale, site of new federal 

building 761 

approves full-time X-ray staff, City Hospital, Hos- 
pital Department 763 

deplores Boston Real Estate Board's opposition to 

Fcdcnil Building site 781 

rescinds veto of teacher increased pension order 785 

announces execution of lease of Commonwealth office 

building 793 

receives Finance Commission report, single salary 

plan, school teachers 811 

issues statement, ob.servance, Constitution Day 825 

asks City Ck)uncil to accept Catholic Chapel, Long 

Island Division, Hospital Department 827 

receives letter from Cardinal Cushing, Long Island 

Chapel 827 

names Victor Bynoe to Housing Authority . . 827 

names Thomas j. Sheehan Commissioner of Veterans 

Services 827 

in Washington on Ciovernment Center matters 827 

receives Law Department ruling. Common Garage ... 828 

receives ten-\('ar progress report. Welfare Depart- 
ment ■ 857 

approves Frank P. McDonough, Acting Supervisor of 

l'(!rsonnel, .\ilniinistnitive Services Department .. 863 

receives Finance Commission report, interest rates on 

unpaid taxes 879 

receives Arthur J. O'Keefe report, "Nationwide 

Thoughts on Parks and Recreation" 880 

api)roves attendance, Joseph B. Carroll and Joseph J. 
(Jrifono Conference, Contributorv Retirement 
Boards " 886 

receives rejwrt of Commi.ssioner Edward L. Friel, 

ten years of progress. Deer Island 893 

reveals scale model of "Municipal Auditorium ' 913 

approves Dr. James \'. Sacchetti and Robert G. 
Curran .\cting Sufxrintendents, City Hospital, 
Hospital Department 921 

receives Superintendent Dr. John F. Conlon's reiHirt, 
jilnsical and structural improvements, City Hos- 
pital. Ilospilal Department 929 

Federal llousinit .\dininistrator i.ssues "certificate of 

feasibility ", West End Development 9.50 

congratulates Mayor-IOlect John F. C-ollins 955 

luges Typographical Union and Boston newspaper 

owners to n-ach agreement 955 

notified by Redevelopment Authority of vote to ex- 
tend "New York Streets"' area 975 



CITY RECORD INDEX 



11 



Mayor's Office: Pac;e 
Mayor John B. Hj'nes, Activities of: 

answers "Moody Investors Service on City's financial 

rating 976 

approves extension, employment, William J. Dolan, 

Building Department 989 

eulogizes Joseph A. Mitchell, Planning Board 995 

announces opening, Bedford-Kingston Streets park- 

uig garage 997 

names David Lasker, Acting Real Property Commis- 
sioner 998 

grants leave of absence to Real Property Commis- 
sioner, Herman Carp 998 

accepts resignation, Herman Carp, Massachusetts 

Parking Authority 998 

approves leave of absence, Patricia Taosevich, As- 
sessing Department 1009 

receives report, V\'aterfront Committee 1013 

list of improvements 1015 

approves John T. Leonard, Acting Supervisor of 

Budget 1027 

approves award lease, Lincoln, Essex, etc., Streets 

Parking Garage 1032 

announces approval, lease, "West End Project" 1045 

receives Hospital Trustees reorganization plan. Hos- 
pital Department 1065 

approves Assessing Department's "Manual of Stand- 
ards" for valuations 1067 

approves designation, John F. Howard, Acting 

Chief, Fire Department 1077 

approves snow removal pay schedules 1082 

extends Christmas greetings 1087 

urges all to acclaim tour of President Eisenhower 1087 

Mayor-Elect, John F. Collins, Activities of: 

presents legislative program 1029 

meets with Prudential Center Executives 1047 

approves Assessing Department's "Manual of Stand- 
ards" for valuation 1067 

Mayor John B. Hynes' Addresses: 

Annual Address to City Council 17 

Memorial Day address, Cedar Grove Cemetery, Dor- 
chester 499 

cites basic causes of high tax rate 783 

P 

Parking Authority: 

construction, facilitj', Central and Killjy streets 620 

to take common land for garage by eminent domain 677 

Commissioner Herman Carp resigns 998 

Parks and Recreation Department: 

Commissioner designates Arthur J. O'Keefe, Acting 

Commissioner 220, 813, 1060 

Commissioner is designated Chairman of Mayor's 

Annual Field Day. 363 

Board rejects Municipal Research Bureau's curtail- 
ment of bath services 493 

Board readj' to vote, transfer land on Common to 

Massachusetts Parking Authority 641 

re<iuest of Massachusetts Parking Authority for con- 
veyance of Common land withdrawn 677 

rejKjrt, Arthur J. O'Keefe, "Nationwide Thoughts on 

Parks and Recreation" 880 

to sponsor "Halloween Parties" 934 

snow removal pay schedules established 1082 

Penal Institutions Department: 
Commissioner submits to Maj'or, report, ten j'cars 

progress, Deer Island 893 



Planning Board: Page 
chairman submits to Mayor, capital improvement 

program 305 

Mayor notes death of Joseph A. Mitchell 995 

antiounces formal tribute to Joseph A. Mitchell 1049 

Zoning Commission: (Zoning Act amended Acts 1956, 
c. 665, Acts 1958, c. 77) 

members take oath of office 25 

decrees variance, 99 Commonwealth avenue. 

Ward 5 1 44 

decrees change in building height. Embankment 

road area 813 

Police Department: 

compensation plan amended 3 

entrance (!xaminations, Septemi)er 12 683 

Public Celehrations Department: 
Dinner to Picsidciit of Ireland, Sean T. O'Kelly and 

others 299 

Rear Adniind Carl V. \:<\>r. U.S.N, delivers "Inde- 

peiulciu-e Day Oration" 577 



Public Safety Commission: 
{See Safety Commission) 



PuKLic Works Department: 

Commissioner plans drain, land near Grandview 

avenue, West Roxbury 14 

Commissioner plans catch basins, etc., Altacrest road, 

Florian Way, Brookstone street, and Brookway 

road, West Roxbury 14 

Commissioner plans sewer and drain. Weld street. 

West Roxbury 14 

Commissioner plans catch basin, etc., Chelsea street, 

Charlestown 150 

Commissioner plans catch basins, etc., Metropolitan 

avenue, Hyde Park 150 

Commissioner plans drain and catch basins, West- 
minster street, Hyde Park 150 

Commissioner plans sewer. Veterans of Foreign Wars 

Parkway, West Roxbury 150 

Commissioner plans sewei-, etc., private land between 

Austin street and Grew avenue, Hyde Park 271 

Commissioner plans sewer, etc., Austin street, Hyde 

Park 272 

Commissioner plans sewer, etc., Sherrin street, Hyde 

Park 307, 272 

Commissioner plans sewer, etc., Grew Avenue Exten- 
sion, Hyde Park 272 

Conunissioiicr plans sewer, etc., Windham street, Hyde 

Park 272 

Coniiuissiuiicr aiiiiuurices award of garbage, etc., 

collection contracts 289 

Commissioner plans sewers, ets., Faunce road, James- 
town terrace, Constitution road, etc 300 

Commissioner plans sewer, etc., Magee street, Hyde 

Park 307 

Commissioner plans sewer, etc., La Grange street, 

West Roxbury 307 

Commissioner plans sewer, etc., Hackensack road, 

West Ro.xbury 307 

Commissioner plans drain, etc., Lodgehill road. West 

Roxbury 307 

Commissioner plans drain etc., Goff street, Hyde 

Park.... 307 

Commissioner plans catch basin. Ruffing and Beech 

streets, Hyde Park 307 

Commissioner urges sale of surplus incinerator steam 500 
Commissioner plans drain, Birchwood road, West 

Roxlmry 521 

Coniniissioner plans clay pipe (replacing wood sewer) 

Beaver place. City Proper 521 



12 



CITY RECORD INDEX 



Pi'BLic Works Department: Pace 
Coniniiwiuncr plaiiM flav pipe; newt-r, Bickford strwt, 

Uoxhiiry ■ .521 

( 'oniniitwioiHT pluiiM drain, cU*., Maplewood street, 

West Koxlmry 522 

( oinniisiiidncr plans drain, etc., Westminster street, 

Mctroixjlitjin avenue, N'orris road and Manion 

road, ilydi- Park 522 

('<)mn»is.si()ncr plans sewer, etc., Canterbury street, 

Wi'fit lloxWiiry 522 

C'innnii(*.Hion(T plans sewer, etc., Child street, Hvde 

Park ^ " 522 

KJi.H main |»erniit, l-jistwood Circuit, West Koxljurv 57.5 
( DMinii.-'sioncr rfccivcs Finance C>)ninii.xsi(>n report on 

sale, etc., of water .'>!)5 
' .>inniis.'<ioner plan.s .sewer siphon between Boylston 

street and Huntington avenue (at Fairfield street) 620 
( <)ninii.s.sioner plans reconstruction. Beaver place, Citv 

I'roiK-r ;. 647 

f 'omnii.>t.xioner plans drain, etc., private land (Millstone 

road) Hyde Park 647 

C"onimi.ssioner plans sewer, reconstruction, Bickford 

street, Roxburv 647 

( oinniissioner plans sewer, etc., Banfield avenue, 

Doichester 791 

( iiiiuiiissioner plans drain, etc., Mever street. West 

Ho\l)ury ; 791 

( otiiinis.sioner plans catch basins, etc., Bryant road, 

Slimson and Salman streets, West Roxbury 848 

( niniiiissioner plans drain, etc., Greenbrook road, 

H vile Park 848 

{ 'i)mniis.sioner plans drain, etc., Itasca street, Mattapan 848 
( tiniiiiissioner plans drain, etc., Miami terrace and 

Powell street, West Roxbury 848 

('oinniis.sioner plans drain, etc., Glenellen road, West 

Roxbury 848 

('oniniis.sioner plans drain, etc., Tacoma street, Hyde 

Park ; 848 

Commi-ssioner plans sewer, etc., Windham street, Hyde 

Park 921 

Commissioner plans sewer, etc., Meyer street, West 

Roxbury 921 

Public Improvement Commission: 

gas main permit, Wachusett street, Hyde Park 12 

nas main jM^rmit, \'alley road, Dorchester 12 

Has main jHTmit. Baker street, West Roxbury 13 

jjiis main |j«'rmit, Boutwell street, Dorchester 13 

(jas main iK'rmit. New Haven street, West Roxbury 13 

catch basins, .\ltacrest road. West Roxbury 14 

repairs. .Massjichu.-setts avenue, Dorchester 14 

repairs, Chel.s«'a street, Charlestown 14 

traHic island, Columbus avenue, Roxburv 14 

repairs, Commonwealth avenue, Brighton 14 

abandoimient, sower easement, Bertson avenue. West 

Roxbury 14 

construction, etc., Pleasantdale road. West Roxbury 15 

sewerage works, Child street, Hyde Park 15 

sewerage works, La Grange street, West Roxbury 15 
s«'werage works, Wterans of Foreign Wars Parkwav, 

West Roxbury ' ., 21 

pn'pare for public travel, Mansur street, West 

Roxbury, refund to contractor 99 

prepare for public travel, Mansur street, West 

Roxiniry 123 

gas main [XTmit, Bowditch road. West Roxbury 123 

.•M'werage works. Willow court, Dorchester 123 

laying out, Woodruff way, Dorchester 150 

laying out extension, Standard street, Dorchester 152 

laying out, Woodbole avenue, Dorchester 152 

laying out, etc., .Metro|X)htan avenue. Hyde Park 152 

laying out. Woodgate street, Dorchester 171 

revision of grade. Court street. City Proper 172 

.sewerage works, Magec street, Hyde Park 203 



Pi Bi.KJ Works Departme.nt: PA<iE 
I'ublic Improvement Commission 

diH<-ontinuance, Lynde street, City Proper 207 

laying out, etc., .Meatlow roatl, Hyde Park 213 

laying out, etc., Swift street, ^:ast Boston 226 

laying out. etc.. N'orris road, Hvde Park 248 

laying out. etc.. Swift terrace, f^st Boston 248 

widening, etc., Clapp slre(?t, Dorchester 257 

wat<'r main project, Dover street. City Proper 257 

laying out. Woodmen- stn-et, Dorchester 257 

laying out, etc., .Marsden stre«'t, I>(jrche«ter 272 

laying out, etc., Dover street. Citv Proper 272 

sewer. et< ., .Macullar road. West Roxbury 272 
change name, .\s<ent street to Fairbne road, West 

Roxburv 279 
change name, highway adjacent to northeast<'rly 

line of Pulaski Skyway to \'on Hillern street, 

DonhesU-r 279 

change name, highway adjacent to southwesterly line 

of Pulaski Skyway to Sydney street, Dorchester.... 279 
change name. Willow court to Enterprise street, 

Dorchester 279 

sewer project, Sherrin street, Hyde Park 302 

gas main permit. Central avenue and Webster 

street, Hyde Park 328 

gas main permit, Westminster street, Hvde Park. 328 

gas main permit, Grossman street, Dorclhester 328 

gas main permit, Davis<jn street, Hyde Park 328 

gas main permit, Fairmount street, Hyde Park 328 
termination of contractor's bond, Margo road, 

Brighton 330 

gas main permit, GlenclifT road and Poplar street. 

West Roxbury 330 

gas main permit, Fairmount avenue, Hyde Park 364 

laying out, et<-., Salman street, W«'st Roxburv 366 

laying out, etx-.. Stimaon street, We-st Roxbury 366 

discontinuance, Hartford street. City Proper 387 

repairs, Massachusettj) avenue (at Clapp street). 

Dorchester 393 

repairs. Commonwealth avenue (at Washington 

street), Brighton 393 

refund to contractor, Birchland terrace. West 

Roxbury 393 

gas main permit, Hyde Park avenue, Hyde Park 400 

gas main permit. Prospect .street, Hyde Park 400 

gas main permit. Victory road, Dorchester 400 

partial discontinuance. Falmouth street. City Proper 402 

partial discontinuance, Belvidere street. City Proper 402 
partial discontinuance, West Newton street. City 

Proper ". 402 

laying out, etc., Ascent street. West Roxbury 402 

lav ing out, ete.. Riverview street. West Roxbury 403 

sewerage project, \'ogel street. West Roxbury 403 

catch basin, etc., Metropolitan avenue, Hyde Park 412 

catch basin, etc., Maplewood street. West Roxbury 412 

catch basin, etc., Canterbury street. West Roxburv . 412 

gas main fiermit, Geneva avenue. Dorchester 424 

gas main permit, Huntington avenue, Hyde Park 424 

prepare for public travel, Lodgehill road, Hyde Park 424 
widening, etc., Albany street (at Mas.sachusetts 

avenue) Roxbury 433 

sewerage works, Birchland terrace. West Roxburv 434 

repairs, intersection Massachusett.s avenue and 

Southampton street, Roxbury 450 

con.struction, traffic island, Massachusetts avenue and 

Southampton street, Roxbury 450 

pn'pare for public travel, Maplewood street, West 

Roxbury 450 

steam service conduit, Stuart street. City Proper 450 

prepare for public travel, Wachusett street, Hvde 

Park ! 450 

gas main permit. Weld street. West Roxburv 450 

gas main permit, Gladstone, Leyden and Breed 

streets, Kast Boston 450 



CITY RECORD INDEX 



13 



Public Works Department: Pace 
Public Improvement Commission: 

sanitary drain, Massachusetts avenue (at Clapp 

street) Dorchester 450 

sewerage project, Meyer street, West Roxbury 462 

abandonment, order, laying, etc., Quincy place, 

Roxbury 469 

laving out, etc., Bradlee Street Extension, Hyde 

"Park 481 

laying out, etc., Colorado street, Dorchester 482 

permit underground structures, Massachusetts ave- 
nue, Harrison avenue and Albany street (City 

Hospital), Roxbury 482 

gas main, etc., permit, Central avenue and Webster 

street, Hyde Park 514 

stt'am conveying conduit, etc.. West Newton street, 

City Proper 514 

laying out, etc., Bryant road, West Roxburj- 518 

prepare for public travel, Ban field aven ue, Dor- 
chester 520 

prepare for public travel, Manchester street, Dor- 
chester 520 

repairs, Stuart street. City Proper 520 

laving out Shandon road. West Roxbury 521 

widening, etc., Southampton street, Roxbury 521 

laying out, Fermoy Heights avenue, West Roxbury 521 

la>ing out, etc., extension, Milton street, Dorchester 523 

sewerage works, Maplevvood street, West Roxbur.\' 523 
steam conveving conduit, etc.. Public Allev No. 442 

(Fairfield street) ".. 534 

.'^ewerage works, Meyer street. West Roxbury 544 

la>-ing out, etc., Braeburn road, Hyde Park 545 

gas main permit, Weybosset street, Hyde Park 548 

semi-high pressure main (permit)' Metropolitan 

avenue, Hyde Park 548 

drain, Taconia street, Hyde Park 565 

drain, Bradlee street, Hyde Park 565 

sewerage works, Goff street, Hvde Park 568 

fuel oil storage tank. Public Alley No. 439, City 

Proper 573 

gas main permit, Eastwood circuit. West Roxbury . 575 

laying out, etc., Faywood avenue. East Boston 583 

abandonment, sewer easement, private land between 
Boylston street and Himtington avenue. City 

Proper 583 

Asylum street changed to William E. Mullins way.... 598 

repairs to Morrison avenue. City Proper 598 

sewerage works, Banfield avenue, Dorchester 599 

laving out, Orient avenue, extension. East Boston 599 

la\ing out, etc., Oakcrest road (formerly Woodland 

Voad) Hyde Park ^ 603 

drains, etc., Bennington street. East Boston . .. 603 

drain, etc., Glenellen road, West Roxbury 603 

drain, etc.. Meadow road, Hyde Park 603 

catch basins, etc., Salman street. West Roxbury 603 

catch basins, etc., Stirason, Centre and Crosstown 

avenue. West Ro.xburv 603 

drain, etc., Goff street, Hyde Park 603 

revision of grade. Meadow road, Hyde Park 621 

laying out, Fidelis way, Brighton 625 

sewerage works, ^^■indham road. West Roxbury and 

Hyde Park 625 

widening, etc.. Walk Hill street. West Roxburj' 627 

laying out, Vallar road. East Boston 627 

sewerage works, Powell street, and Miami terrace, 

West Roxbury 627 

permit, open for public travel, Manchester street, 

Dorchester 628 

permit, prepare for public travel, Miami terrace, 

West Roxbury 628 

permit, semi-high pressure main, Navarre street and 

Ramsdell avenue, Hyde Park 628 

gas main permit, West street, Central avenue and 

Elm street, Hyde Park 628 



Pi BLic Works Depart.me.nt: P.\(;e 
Public Improvement Commission: 

gas main permit. North square. City Proper 628 

permit, prepare for public travel, Windham road, 

Hyde Park and West Roxbury 628 

drain, etc., Bradlee street, Hyde Park 633 

drain, etc., Tacoma street, Hyde Park 633 

drain, etc., .Maplewood street'. West Roxbury 633 

drop inlets, etc., Stuart street, City Proper 633 

concrete overflow, Hereford street. City Proper 633 

.sewer, etc.. Enterprise street, Dorchester 633 

permit steel mains. Savannah avenue, Dorchester 636 

fuel oil tank permit, 23-33 Hayward place, City 

Proper ".. 636 

approves land taking for school purposes High, 

School and Pearl streets, Charlestown 663 

discontinuance. Summer street, Charlestown 667 

discontinuance, Bartlett street, Charlestown 667 

drop inlet, etc., Broadway, South Boston 681 

catch basins, etc.. Swift terrace. East Boston 684 

catch basins, etc., .\ldwin road. West Roxbury 684 

catch basins, etc., Bryant road. West Roxbury 684 

repairs, Columbia road, Dorchester 733 

repairs, Norfolk street, Dorchester 733 

repairs. Walk Hill street, Wext Roxbury 733 

permit, prepare for public travel, Itasca street, 

Dorchester 734 

gas main permit, Dorchester street, S3uth Boston. . 736 
gas main permit, Cranston and Sheridan streets. West 

Roxbury 736 

gas main permits, Custer street, West Roxbury 736 

discontinuance, partial. Orchard Park street, 

Roxbury 746 

relocation and extension, partial. Orchard Park street, 

Roxbury 746 

laying out, Parker street, Roxbury 755 

sewerage works, Itasca street, Mattapan 795 

discontinuance, portion, Ambrose street, Roxbury 805 

catch basins, Birchland terrace. West Roxbury 806 

sewerage works, Greenbrook road, Hyde Park 807 

gas main permit, Brucewood street, West Roxbury. .. 815 

gas main permit, Laurie avenue. West Roxbury 815 

permit, relocate oil fill connection, Bolton street. 

South Boston 815 

permit, construction, steam service, Boylston street. 

Ward 4 816 

drain, etc., Braeburn road, H\'de Park 843 

drain, etc., Bradlee street, Hyde Park 843 

laying out, Patterson way. South Boston 843 

catch basins, etc., Oakcrest road, Hyde Park 843 

catch basins, etc., Milton street, Dorchester 843 

catch basins, etc., Vogel street, West Roxbury 843 

catch basins, etc., Gladstone street, East Boston 843 

catch basins, etc., Lodgehill road, Hyde Park 843 

catch basins, etc., Kilby street. City Proper 843 

permit, open for public travel, Itasca street, Mattapan 864 
permit, open for public travel, Wachusett street, 

Hyde Park 864 

permit, open for public travel, Orlando street, Dor- 
chester 864 

ix'rmit, open for public travel, Messinger street, 

Dorchester 864 

permit, open for public travel, Mattapan street, 

Dorchester 864 

laying out, Ames street, Dorchester 885 

laying out. extension, Stratton street, Dorchester 885 

sewer project, Meyer court. West Roxbury 901 

sewerage works, Mej^er street. West Roxbury 901 

sewer project. Baker street, West Roxbury 901 

ix>rmit, prepare for public travel, Meyer court. 

West Roxbury 901 

catch basins, etc.. Baker street, H\-de Park 921 

prepare for public travel, Greenbrook, Hyde Park 921 



14 



CITY RECORD INDEX 



I'i ni.ir WORKH nEPAHTMENT: I'A<iE 

I'lihlic Itiiprovcniciit ("otnmiHsion: 

liind taking for kcIkioI piirjtoscH, Silver Htn-cl :iiitl 

WcHt Fourlli striM-t, Sjiilli Ii<isl4>ii (for Depart nu-iit 

of Scli.M.I Huil(liiiKs) >XiS 

liiyiiiK out, clc, W cNtvicw street, Uorchest«r 'XM 

Hewer project. ( iladKtone Htreet, l-^UHt lioKton !(5<» 

KJif niHiii jM-rinit, Miitt^iimii Htreet, norrhest^-r 9(U\ 

^^HH main iM-rmit, \\'alk Hill ntri-et, West Uoxhury 9(ili 

KUH main ixrmil, Thatcher street. Hyfle Park ' OfUi 

[M-rmit, Hteam .«ervice, Hatteryniarch street. Ward 3 Ofifi 

IH'rniit, Ht<'ani nervice, Summer Ktn^et, Ward 3 960 

IM-rmit, steam service, Stuart street, Ward 5 9f)() 

IH-rmit, new steum pipe, Stoughton street, Bostoa 

I'mper 966 

|KTmit, relocation, brixie main, Cross street, Boston 

ProiKT 966 

IM-rmit, extension, steel main, Neponset Valley 

Parkway, Hyde Park 966 

g.-is in.iin ix rniit, Hnmks street, liast lioston 966 

^as m;iin ix-rmit, Wyvern street. West Roxhury 966 

Ras main ix-rmil, PleasanUlale road, We.st Iloxbury. . 966 

gas mnin permit. Porter street, Ivist Boston 966 

Has main jK-rmit. Webster street. East Ik)st«n 966 

^as main permit, Hoiiedale and Windom streets, 

Allston 966 

IM-rmit, regulators, M.-iverick street, JCast Boston 966 

si'werage pn)j(-ct, Lcseur road, Hyde Park 998 

sewerage works, Alley No. 933, City Proper 998 

repjiirs. Commonwealth avenue at Chestnut Hill 

avenue, Brighton 1026 

repairs, West Milton street, Ilj-de Park 1026 

repairs, Tairmount avenue, Hyde Park 1027 

repairs, liiver street (at Fairmount avenue), Hyde 

i*!ii-k 1027 

IM-rmit to prepare for public travel, Prospect street, 

Hyde Park 1027 

permit to prepare for public travel, Delhi street, 

Dorchester 1027 

laying out, etc., Hallet-DavLs street, Dorchester 1027 

laying out, etc., Bellevue street, \\'ost Roxbury 1028 

widening, etc., West street, Hyde Park 1033 

gas main iM^rmit, Baker .street, West Roxbury 1033 

sewerage project, Pros|)oct street, Hyde Park 1043 

ga.s main permit, Chel.sca .street. East Boston 1047 

laying out, Cambridge Street avenue, City Proper 1050 

laying out, etc., Marist road, Dorchester 1051 

widening, etc., Ceylon street, Dorchester 1053 

IM-rmit, construction, steam service, Stuart street, 

^Vard 4 1060 

IM-rmit, construction, utility lines, Kenwood road, 

Roxbury 1060 

ix-rmit, store canopy, Adams street and Gallivan 

lioulevard, Dorchester lOliO 

di.scontinuance, streets absor))ed in West End Dcvel- 

<>l>»"'n<' 1070 

s<-wer.ige pn)ject. Alley No. 933, City Proper 1073 

laving out, et<-.. Summer Street Ext^-nsion, Hyde 

, '/"-k 1074 

laying out, et(-., lyorna l{oad i:\ten.sion, Dorchestt-r 1074 
l.-ind taking, school purposes. Holster street, Roxbury, 

for Department of School Buildings "... 1075 

relocation, tradic island, Foster street, Brighton 1077 

relocation, traflic island, Poi)lar street, \\ est Roxbury 1077 

increasing curb r.-idii, Ivory street, \\est Roxbury 1077 

increa.sing curb nidii, Centre street. West Roxbury ... 1077 

incrca.sing curb radii. Temple strei-t, West Roxbury ... 1077 

incrt-asing curb radii, Bowdoin street, Dorchester 1077 

increasing curb radii, Foster street, Brighton (at Mt. 

Vernon street) jQ-y 

increasing curb radii, Foster street, Brighton (at Rose 

(•arden Circle) 1077 

increasing curb radii. Parsons street, Brighton 1077 



Pi RLic Works Department: PACiK 
Public Imprt)vement CommiHsion: 

increasing curb radii. Commonwealth avenue-, 

Brighton |077 

incre i.sing curb nidii, Brighton avenue, Brighton 1077 

Living out, etc., l'lex-*;int.lale road. West Roxburv lOSs 

laying out, etc.. (^ua-lev Road lAteiision, \Ve.st 

Roxbury lo.so 

laying out, <-lc., M<-yer court, West Roxbury I01»;( 

<lisc .ntiiiuancc. Wigglesworth strcn-t, Roxburv 109,) 

disc )ntinuance, Worthington strt-et, Roxbury 1091) 

disf-ontinuance, Fay wood avenue, Rfjxburv " 1090 

construction, Meyer street, We.st Roxbury llOO 



PuRcHAsi.NG Division: 

(iSVc this heading under •Administrative Services De- 
partment") 

R 

Real Property Department: 

(Jeorgc- P. Donovan iiam(-d Acting Commissioner t>l7 

Commis.sion(-r Herman ("arp re(iue,«t« leave of abwnce !)9S 

David Lasker appointed .\cting Commissioner 99.S 

votes to accept bid for Essex. Lincoln, Columbia 

Streets Parking (jiarage 1032 

Record: 

(See Citij Record) 

ReDEVEI.OPMKNT .\rTH(IRITY: 

report on Whitney Redevelopment Project 44, 619 

chairman endorses Finance Commis-sioii audit plan 71 

studies expansion. New Vork Streets area 582 

establishes new boundaries. Government Center project 661 
agreement with federal authorities, sale of site, new 

Federal Building 761 

issues statement, Federal Building site 781 

votes expansion, New Vork Streets area 975 

votes approval, lease, "West End Project" 1045 

Registry Division: 

(Sec this subtitle under Health Department) 



Reports: 

(For other reports under ix-rtinent heading) 

Mayor's Realty Advisory Committee 83 

Albert Ixje O'Banion, International Municipal Signal 

Association §4 

Edward I. F>iel, New England Police Chiefs' Associa- 
tion 84 

Timothy J. O'Connor and William T. Doyle, Institute 

of Traflic Engineers 85 

John V. Flaherty, American Public Works Association, 

Congress 8.5 

Walter J. Malloy, National Institute of AIunicip.-ii 
Clork.s .. S.5 

John F. Fitzpa-trick, Martin A. Fulton, William .1. 
Ke.iiK-, and lOdwin .1. Sullivan, .\fas.s:ichii.-«-tts .\sso- 
ciation of Municipal Accountant*) and .Viiditors 85 

Frank R. Kelley and .\rthur A. I jiglish, American In- 
stitute of Park Executives 8,') 

Priscilla Richard, Sch<Mjl Food Services Association 85 

Henry F. Barry, International Association of Pupil 

Personnel Workers s.*! 

Thomas A. Roche, Directors of V^ocational ICducation. 85 

Pauline Ehrlich, .\nierican Speech and Hearing Associa- 
tion 85 

Francis X. Cotter's last report 277 

Helen M. Moraii, National Retail Merchants Associa- 
tion 280 

Daniel F. O'Connell, National Council of Teachers of 

Mathemati(-s 2.S0 

Richard O. Hcnsley, National Microfilm Association 431 



CITY RECORD INDEX 



15 



Reports: Pacie 

District Chi(!f Andrew J. McElaney and Lt. George J. 

Hoy, Fire Department Instructors' Conference 431 

Milton E. Lord, National Library meetings 431 

E(lniund J. Morgan, Eastern Stiites Building Officials 

P'ederation 431 

John V. Moran, Board of Directors of the National 

Institute of Government Purchasing 431 

James B. Mullin, at Seminar Community Conflicts 431 

Dennis C. Halej-, Experiment in Manhattanville Junior 

High School 432 

Frederick J. Gillis, Council on Exceptional Children 432 

Maurice J. Downey, Special Guidance Project 432 

Maurice J. Downey, American Personnel and Guidance 

Association 432 

Regina J. Driscoll, National Society for Prevention of 

Blindness ' 432 

Joanna T. Dalv. ( 'oiitrn'iicc lor Suprrvi.- >i - ni l ilfmen- 

tarv Education 432 

John "P. Regan, National School Board Association 432 

Marguerite G. Sullivan, ' (lieat Cities School Improve- 
ment Studies Meeting" 644 

Elizabeth H. Gilligan, National Art Education Associa- 
tion 644 

Joseph McKenne,\-, American Association for Health, 

Phj'sical Education and Recreation 644 

William G. Tobin, Elementary School Principals, Na- 
tional Education Association 645 

Daniel D. Tierne}-, Jr., National Conference Music 

Educators 645 

Dr. Dennis C. Haley, "Large Cities Program for School 

Improvement" 645 

John F. McCarthy, National Conference of Weights 

and Measures 645 

Walter J. Malloy, Institute of Municipal Clerks 645 

Donald H. Graham and Thomas E. ^IcCormick, Ameri- 
can Society of Planning Officials 645 

Dennis C. Haley, Culturally Deprived Children 646 

William F. Lally, Public Welfare Seminar 646 

Charles H. Mackie, Massachusetts C'it\ C lerks Associa- 
tion 646 

Milton E. Lord, Conference, Pulilic Lilnary Problems 1031 

Edmund J. Morgan, conference, Building Officials of 

America 1031 

Frederick B. Sullivan, National Jail Association 1031 

Joseph M. Dunlea and Charles H. Mackie, Massachu- 
setts City Clerks 1031 

Martin A. Fulton and John T. Leonard, State and 

Municipal Finance Officers 1031 

Charles V. O'Brien, Edward F. Groden, and Paul H. 
Keating, Massachusetts Municipal Auditors and 
Accountants Association 1031 

Timothy J. O'Leary, Pubhc Works Congress 1031 

John V. Moran, National Institute of Government 

Purchasing 1031 

Leo P. Driscoll, International Association of Fire Chiefs 

Institutt> 1031 

.John F. Cloughcrty, National Fire Prevention Associa- 
tion Convention 1031 

Frederick J. Gillis, National Safety Congress and E.xpo- 

sition 1050 

Leo J. Burke and James S. Reardon, Association of 

School Business Officials 1050 

Henry F. Barry, International Association of Pupil 

Personnel Workers 1050 

Retirement Allow.\.\ces for Veter.ws' Widows: 

reports: 119, 534, 571, 1027, 1059 

memo to veterans' widows (A 1958, c. 614) 208 

Retireme.xt Bo.\rd: 

reports 30, 150, 249, 307, 511, 591, 732 

752, 837, 871, 977, 1010, 1059 



Retirement Board: Pa(;e 

veterans' 9, 30, 64, 96, 119, 144, 179 

228, 249, 269, 302, 311, 400 
421, 433, 468, 492, 507, 534 
552, 571, 633, 667, 774 
835, 870, 950, 989, 1007 
1027, 1060, 1082, 1100 
autliorizes Joseph B. Carroll and Joseph J. Grifone, 
attendance. Conference Contributory Retirement 



Boards 886 

s 

School Buildings Department: 

awards contract, Dorchester High School addition 568 

land taking for school purposes, Roxbury 1075 

School Committee : 

John P. Regan elected chairman 24 

agrees with Mayor on budget reduction 363 

^Iayor orders further budget reduction 412 

Dennis C. Halev, text of report "Culturally Deprived 

Children" 646 

"A Curriculum Guide— Elementary Guide," in great 

demand 939 

Dennis C. Halev, reports, meeting of School Superin- 
tendents , 1049 

School Committee, Proceedings of: 

opposite 84, 156, 181, 287, 304. 408 

428, 452, 472, 492, 516, 540 

560, 576, 592, 616, 640, 660 



808, 824, 840, 928 

T 



Traffic Department: 

commissioner reports on traffic fatalities 157 

Wilham T. Doyle named Commissioner 235 

commissioner designates Joseph M. Galeota, Acting 

Commissioner 498 

commissioner asks motorists avoid Huntington avenue 

and South Huntington avenue intersection 6S3 

study of accidents, 1954 to 1958 776-778 

issues emergency snowstorm traffics rules 984 

announces Bedford-Kingston streets parking garage to 

open December 1 997 

Treasury Depart.ment: 

Collector-Treasurer named chairman, "1959 March of 

Dimes Campaign" 25 

notice of tax takings 922, 685 

First Xalioiial Bank of Chicago and City of Boston 

bonds 996 



u 

Urban Redevelopment Authority: 
{See Redevelopment Authority) 

Urban Renewal Division: 

(See this title under Housing .Authorit.x ) 

V 

\'eterans' Services Depart.ment: 



reports: 

October, 1958 5 

November, 1958 27 

December, 1958 328 

January, 1959 348 

February, 1959 . 413 



16 



CITY RECORD INDEX 



VctERANk' SKRVIfKS Dki'Ahtmknt: 
ri'port.": 

March, I «.')!» 
Aj)ril, I'.m 
.Nliu, \'.m 
July. i:m 

AiiKUxl, I {)'><.) 

S«'|)t<-ml>iT, l!>o!) 

OcIoImt, 1'J5» 

Mayor iianio Tlionia.H J. Shcchan, CommiHsioncr. 



w 

\VATER-Fno\T Hkiiaiiilitation C'ommittek: 

siil>iiiits |)ri)Kn-ss report (o Mayor 

rc|)ort (o Mayor (liHt of iiiiprovi'iiii-iils, 101')) 
iiaiiii'H of committee meniherH 

\\ KKillTS AM) MEAsrUKS DIVISION: 

(Sec Ueallli Department) 



rm 

521 
(i22 
S20 
HH<i 

'.m 

l()!»2 
X27 



2l!t 
10 1.1 
1017 



Welfare Departmext Pa<;e 

mimmary of reiwrt, Dereml)or, 1958 1 |(l 

summary of re|H)rl, January, 1959 2t)i) 

nummary of re|»ort, Felmiary, 1959 291, 2!t3 

summary <if rejHirl. Mareh, 1959 :iss 

nummary «jf re|)ort, .\i)ril. 1959 IVi. l.")7 

summary of re|x)rl. Nlay, 1959 

summary of rejxtrt, June, 1959 (i| t 

summary of rcjwrt, July, 1959 7(U 
summary of report. AuKUst, 1959 s).5. KHi 

summary of rejxjrt. Si ptemlxT. 1959 <I|7 
summary of rejK)rt, Oefoher, 1959 I0I5 
summary of rf|)ort, NovenilM-r, 1959 I0,S7 

overseers eleet oHiecrs 4S{) 

secretary to overseers submits lO-ycar progress report S57 



Zn\lS<; AoJt'.STMKNT, IJoAKlJ OK: (uow kiiowii as ;^iiiiiK 
( 'ommi.Ksion) 

(See PlaniiinK Board ) 



Crrv OF Boston 
Apministkath-b Skrvicbs Dbfartmint 
Printwo -^^^ Sbction 



CITY RECORD 

Official Chronicle of Boston Municipal Affairs. 

Vol. 51 Saturday, January 3, 1959 No. 1 

NEW ASSESSOR OF TAXES NAMED 



Ma^or John B. Hynes, on December 24, 
signed the ordinance replacing the city's three- 
man assessing board with a single assessor, and 
named Earle R. Barnard, 232 Bay State road, 
to the post. Mr. Barnard is 67 years of age. 

The new Assessor of Taxes is a widely- 
known appraiser and real estate consultant 
who has done much appraising work for the 
city on major projects. He was sworn into 
office on Frida}', December 26. 

]\Ir. Barnard said he did not intend to effect 
any wholesale shifting of the tax burden onto 
the city's home owners. He said he agreed 
with the city's present policy, in which small 
homes are assessed on 40 to 60 per cent of 
market value. He stated, however, that any 
inequities his appraisers turn up from time to 
time will be corrected. 

The Boston Real Estate Board, of which 
Mr. Barnard is a member, in a statement 
issued after announcement of the appointment 
said: "We think it is a tremendous step for- 
ward. No other single thing could happen in 
the city to do more to restore the confidence of 
real estate investors." 

In addition to his new post, Mr. Barnard 
serves on the three-man Board of Review 
which acts on tax abatement pleas. He will 
step into a vacancy on the board. The other 
members are Chairman Thomas A. Flaherty 
and Edward F. Mullen. 

John J. Chapman, chairman of the three- 



man board which went out of existence with 
the appointment of Mr. Barnard, was officially 
retired, December 24, from the city serince. 
A second member, Lawrence Moore, resigned 
several months ago. The third member, 
James H. Alphen, will be retained as assistant 
in assessing valuations. 

Mr. Barnard's salary on his new job will be 
S13,o00 a year. Mr. Chapman received 
$12,000 as chairman of the old board of 
assessors. 

The new assessor is vice-president and 
trustee of the Massachusetts Board of Real 
Estate Appraisers, treasurer and director of 
the American Bridge, Tunnel and Turnpike 
Association, and vice-chairman of the Mj^stic 
River Bridge Authority. He formerly con- 
ducted extension courses in real estate prac- 
tices at Harvard University for the State 
Department of Education and has served as 
real estate consultant and manager for the 
trustees of Boston University. He was made 
appraiser for the Boston Housing Authority 
on developments, for urban renewal projects 
in the South and West Ends, for the city's off- 
street parking program, and for the new 
Central Artery. 

In making the appointment. Mayor Hj-nes 
stated that Mr. Barnard would not be subject 
to interference in his new assignment but that 
the new assessor will consult from time to 
time with the Mayor's Advisory Real Estate 
Board. 



INDEX TO 
CITY HALL 



THE PRINCIPAL MUNICIPAL SERVICES 



LA i SlOO 



Telephone 

A DM I N ISTIIATI V K SKUV 1( IvS 

5lh Hooi 

AdminiHlriilivr DiviKioii 

HikIkcI DiviHioii 

IVmonncI Diviniun 

I'lirrhiwinK IJivimoii 

Onice Miirhini- Kepuir IJiiil Hawincnt 

At.DITINC . . iHlllfKjr 

Hills mid Arrmiiit* 

CITY CI.KUK 2nd flw.r 

Hont I.icciiiMii (Council appr.) 
Iluodilacka (l(> 21 yni.) 
iiufiiniwH (VrlilirntcB 
(,'fmi'trrv IVrniitx (Council uppr.) 
Cily Ordinances 
Claims 

KishinK and IIiintinK I.icvniHW 
dun ('lull l,iccn«-8 ((Council appr.) 
Jitney l.icciiM'S ((\iuncil appr.) 
Ncwslioys (10 21 yr».) 
Slicll Kish I'crmita (Council appr.) 
Sunday S|>orU (Council appr.) 

CITY COUNCIL ... 4lh floor 
Clerk of Commitleos 
('ouncil Commit leea 
(Uegular Weekly Meetings, .Mondav«, 
2 r.M.) 

CITY MICSSICNGKU . . 4th floor 

City Documents 
CITY HIOCOUD ... 3rd floor 
COMI'LAl.NTS DIVISION 2nd floor 
CKl'.DIT I NION . . 3rd floor 

Cily i:n)pl<iyc-«s 
.MAYOK S OKKICK . . 2nd floor 

MAKIH's (IKKICK TKLEI'IID.Nt: LA 3-1100 

I'lililic Cclclirations . 2nd floor 

I'jitertainmenI Licenses 3rd floor 

.NewslHjys (Boston Common) 

l'l{i;SS I{(«)M 3rd floor 

I{|:TIUI:MI:NT HOAUD . 3rd floor 

T1{I;ASI KV DIVLSION l.^t floor 

CITY HALL ANNEX 

Telephone . LA 3 SlOO 

ASSKSSINC .... 3rd floor 

.\batoment IVtitiotis 

A».ie8sors Certificates 

ICxcise Taxes 

lU ILDINC; ... '.nil floor 
.\ppc:il.f — HuildiiiK Code 
.\p|)c.ils ZoiiiiiK Law 
HiiiUliiiK rtTiiiil.^ * Plans 
Demolition I'ermits 
Klectrical Installations 
lOlovator Operators 

Caragrs, Luliritoriums & Repair Shops 
Gaf Installations 
IleatinK Installations 
Ojien .\ir Parking Sp.nces 
I'lumliing Installations 



I'lililir Safely C 
Committee on Licenses 

COLLKCTING DIVISION 2n(l floor 
.Municipal Liens 
Tax Colleclion.< 

KLIXTION . . 1st H.mr 

Voting Certificates 
A'liliug Ucgislralioit. ... 

rilNAL INSTlTfTIONS Sth floor 



I'LANNINC BOAltD 
//oning Adjustmeiils 
Zoning .MafMi 

I'l BLIC WORKS 
.Automotive Division 
Bridge Division 
Highway Division 

StrM't Cleaning A Repairs 

Strwt 0|>eningH 
I'ermil OflTice 

Strwt < Iccupaiicies 

I'rtijections over Highways 

.Si<lewalk Lic4>n«<ii 
Sanitary Division 

(iarl large /c Rubliish CoIUm 
S«-wer Division 

S<-wer Ivntrance Permits 
Stbkkt Ln;im\(; 
Survey Division . 

Street Accc-plances 

Street Linra 
Water Division . 

.Meter Reading 



Sth floor 
6th floor 
.5th floor 



.5th floor 
tions 
7th floor 



4tli floor 
61 h floor 



Pulilic Improvement Commission 

4th floor 

RICAL PR()P1:RTY . . Sth floor 
I'tireclosi-fl Real IjiUtc 
.Markets 

0(T-Strcct Parking 
Pulilir Buildings 
RKCISTRY DIVISION . lOlh floor 
Births, Deaths & Marriage 
Certificates 

WKICHTS A .MKASI RKS Ist floor 

Measuring Devices 
WOR K M ICN 'S ( O.M I'KNS ATION 

71 h floor 

OUTSIDE CITY HALL 

CIVIC i.\ipr()vi:.\ii;nt co.m.mittki-; 

14 SUU- Street . LA 3 1100 

civil DKFK.NSK hi 2 .3020 

11.5 Southampton St«-et 
DKMOLITION (Ceneial) 

14 Slate Street LA 3-1 1(K) 

KINANCK COM.MISSION LA 3-1622 
24 ScIkmiI Street 

KIRK HI 2 8000 

11.5 Southampton Street 
Flammalile A i;xplo.sive Materials 
Fuel Oil Burners A Storage 
Inspections 

Fin- .Marm He.id(|uarters 

5!1 Fenway KIC 6-1100 

IlKALTII ... CA 7-1300 

Ilaymarket .Square 
Burial Permits (.\ight.<, City Hospital) 
Dump Permits 
Frozen Desserts Licenses 



CITY RECORD 



Publishrd wnkly in Boston, under the dir 
lion of the Mftyor, in accordance wi 
lecislative act and city ordinance. 



Thomas K. O-Day. Editor. 

P. NlcllfiLAS Peraocn-LI. Aaaociate Editor. 

Editorial Opfick. Room 35. City Hall. 



to subway. Also News Stand, fint floor. City 
Hall Annex. 

Advertisinir. 
A rate of 14 per inch of 12 lines (set solid) 
has been escablished for such advcrtisemenU 
aa under the law must be printed in the City 
Record. AdvertisinK and other copy must be 
in hand by 6 P.M. Wednesday of each week to 
insure its publication in the .Saturday issue. 



Funeral Direi l/irs Liicnwa 
Carhage Transport Permits 
Hawkers A l'e<idlcni Licenses 
Health lC<lucatioii I.al>oratfiry 
H«-alth Suiislira .Milk Ijcenses 
Health I'nits .Motels 
HOSPITAL 

81H Harrison Avenue KK ft-SCfT) 
I'^Lsl Itoston Relief Station 

II Porter .St r.-et I/) 7-.360O 

U.iig Isbiid Hospital PR 3-J371 
S:in.'it<inum 

2i;i River Street BL S-7'MV) 

ll(»l Si;OFCORRi;CTION OC 3-2700 

IXir Island 
HOI SINC AI THORITY 

( ieneral Ottim. ZU) C«iigT<i« Street 
LI 2-64i') 

Applic-itions, 141 .MilkSl. LI 2-645;) 

LAW LA 3-6200 

1 1 Beacon Street 
LIBRARY KK 0-5400 

Oipley Si|Uare 
LICKNSINC BOARD CA 7-2470 
24 Province Street 
Alcoholic li<-verages 
Automatic .Amusement Devices 
Bowling Alleys 
Club Licenses 
Common Victuallers 
ICmplovment Agencies 
Hotels 

Ixxlging Houses 
Pool Rmims 
Shooting Calleries 
.MtjRTlARY 

818 Harrison Avenue KK 6-C7G7 
KK 6-6766 

NKICHBORHOOD UKIIABILITA- 
TION COMMITTKICS 

14 State Street . LA 3-1 100 
PARKS A RKCRKATION CA 7-69:0 

:« Biscon Street 
Beach and Pools 
Cemeteries (City-owned) 
(!olf Courses 
Parkways Occu|iancies 
Playgrounds 
Public Baths 
Trees 

POLICK KK 6 6700 

154 Berkeley Stri-et 
Auctioneers Hackneys 
Bicycles .luiik Dealers 

Dogs I'awnbrokers 
Firearms I'sed Cars 

Wagon A Hand Carts 
PRINTINC. SKCTION LA 3-6;5G:; 
174 North Street (Street Books) 

rkdkvi:lopmknt aithority 

73 TremonI Street . Rl 2-0500 
I'rban Renewal 
SCHOOL BI ILDINC.S, 
Boar<l of C'ommissioners of 
26 .Norman Street . . CA 7 STot) 
SCHOOL CO.MMITTKK 

15 Beacon Street . . CA 7-5.500 
Bootblacks. .Newslmvs (12-16 veam) 

45 Myrtle Street ". . CA 7-550'J 
TRAFFIC HI 2-770;) 

1 12 Southampton Street 
leading Zones Parking Meters 
Traflic Signals Parades 

VirrKRANS' CRAVICS LA 3-:'X!.) 

14 Slate Street 
VKTERANS' SKRVICICS RI 2-4Gf;y 

18 Comhill 
WKLFARK . . CA ,7-8320 

43 Il.iwkins Street 
.\id to De|)endeiit Children 
Chardon Stre<'t Homt! 
(ieneral Relief 
Disiibility .Assistance 
Old .\ge .Assistance 
Permits for Street Solicitations 



Jax. 3 



CITY RECORD 



3 



Police Department 
Compensation Plan 
Amended Upward 

The Mayor, on DrccmlxT 22, apijiDve 1 
the following amendment to th;' I'olicc 
Department Compensutioa Plan: 

The Police Department Compensation 
Plan established on .May 2IJ, l.)53, by the 
Police Commissioner of tiie Cit\- of Boston, 
with the approval of the Ma\-or of the 
City of Boston, is hereby amende;! to 
read as follows, ett'ective .J um uy 7. r.).5!): 
Rule 1. Pay ScheJule. Until other- 
wise provided, the pay schedule of the 
i Police Force of the Boston Police Depart- 
ment shall be as follows: 

I II III 
Group A Si,880 $5,030 S5..500 

Patrolman 

A Patrolman (Supervisor 
of Stables) shall receive $200, 
and a Patrolman (Radio 
Operator) shall receive S'JOO. 
• in excess of the salary to 
which he would otherwise be 
t entitled under this plan. 



Group B I II III 

Detective (Third Grade) $5,180 S5.330 $5,800 

Detective (Third Grade- 
Draftsman) — — 6,000 

Detective (Second Grade) . . — — 5,900 
Detective (First Grade) ... . — — 6,000 
Detective (First Grade-Ad- 
ministrative Officer, Su- 
perintendent's Office) ... . — — 6,500 

Sergeant — — 6, -'80 

Sergeant (.\ssistant Chief 

Radio Operator) — — 6,580 

Sergeant Detective — — 6,580 

Sergeant (.■Vutomotive 

Equipment Supervisor) . . — — 6,960 

Lieutenant — — 6,960 

Lieutenant Detective — — 7,260 

Lieutenant (Harbor Master) — — sioOO 
Lieutenant (.Automotive 

Equipment Supervisor) . . — — 8,000 
Lieutenant Detective (In 

Charge of Homicide Unit) — — 8,000 
Lieutenant Detective (In 

Charge of Robbery Squad) — — 8,000 

Captain — _ 8,000 

Deputy Superintendent ... . — — 9.840 



Each amount above stated shall be in- 
creased by $25 in the case of the holder of 
a departmental medal. 

Rule 2. Starting Salar\-. Ever\- 
patrolman shall, upon appointment, be 
compensated at the rate set against such 
office in Column I. Every person ad- 
vanced to an office in Croup B who has 
completed one year of service on the 
Police Force of the Boston Police Depart- 
ment shall be compensated at the rate set 
against his office in Column II, and such a 
person who has completed two vears of 
service on said Police Force sliall be 
compensated at the rate set against his 
office in Column III. 

Rule 3. Step-Rate Increments. A 
patrolman .shall, effective the first Wednes- 
day of the calendar month next succeed- 
ing the calendar month in which he com- 
pletes his first year of s.^rvice in the office, 
!)(• advanced to the rate specified in 
Column II, and effective the fiist Wednes- 
day of the calendar month ne.xt succeeding 
the Ciilendar month in which he completes 
his second year of service in "the office, be 



advanced to the rate sp'_>cified in Column 
III. 

Kd.k 4. ('()ini)u1atio)i of Service. 
Onlv service on the I'oliee Fore:' ol the 
Boston Police Department slrdl l>e in- 
<'luded in computing ieiifith ol seiviee. 
except that all leaves of al)seiice ioi 
militai-y servii'e teiininatiiiK with th- 
reinstatement or re-emplo>inent ol the 
person o!) the Police Foree'of the Boston 
Police Department shall he so included. 
.\ reappointment to, o|- icir)sta1eineiit on. 
said Police Foi'ce, shall he t)cated as if the 
prior service on said Polii-e Force ha 1 been 
performed immediately prioi- to the ic- 
appointment or reinstatement. 

Leo ,1. Sullivax, 
Police Commissioner. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT ORDERS 

December 29 
'General Order No. 57 
I. De.\ctiv.\tion \sd Reloc.vtion of 

COMP.VNIES. 

Kfifective at 8 .\.m., Wednesday. December 
1958, Ensine Company 19, 128 Babson street, 
.Mattapan, will be deactivated and shall be deleted 
from all assignment cards. 

District 8 Headquarters will be relocated from 
its present location at 1884 Dorchester avenue, 
Dorchester, to the new fire station at 9 Gallivan 
Boulevard. Dorchester, at the same time. 

At the same time and date. Engine Company 10 
will be relocated from its present address at 1884 
Dorchester avenue, Dorchester, to the new fire 
station at 9 Gallivan Bo\ilevard, Dorchester. 

-Also effective at tlie above time and date. 
Ladder Company fi will be relocated from its 
present address at 128 Babson street, Mattajjan, 
to the new fire .station at 9 Gallivan Boulevard, 
Dorchester. 

II. Promotion. 

The following promotion, which will become 
effective at 8 .\.m., Wednesday, December 31, 
1958, is hereby announced; 

Fire Captain James J. Murphy, Engine Com- 
pany 3, to district fire chief. 

III. Tn.VNSFERS. 

The following transfers, which will become 
effective at 8 .\.M., Wednesday, December 31, 
1958, are hereby announced: 

Di.strict Fire Chief Edward .T. McNulty, from 
Districts 7 and 8 to District 8. 

District Fire Chief George Thompson, from 
Special Service Unit and District 6 to Districts 7 
and 8. 

District Fire Chief Edward F. Sullivan, from 
Special Service Unit to Special Service Unit and 
District 6. 

District Fire Chief James J. Murphy, from En- 
gine 3 to Special Service Unit. 

Fire Captain Francis M. Connell, from Engine 22 
to Engine 3. 

Fire Captain William H. Doherty, from En- 
gine 34 to Engine 22. 

Fire Captain William J. Reynolds, from Engine 7 
to Ladder 29. 

Fire Captain John E. McLane, fi-om Engine 19 
to Engine 16. 

Fire Captain Wilham R. Lovett, from Engine 16 
to Engine 34. 

Fire Lieutenant Casimer Baltusis, from En- 
gine 19 to Engine 16. 

Fire Lieutenant Thaddeus T. Lewis, from En- 
gine 19 to Engine 16. 

Fire Lieutenant George L. Rooney, from En- 
gine 16 to Engine 17. 

Fire Lieutenant Gerald F. Stamm, from En- 
gine 16 to Engine 41. 

Fire Fighter Frank R. Altimar, from Engine 10 
to Ladder 0. 

Fire Fighter Charles -V. Burns, Jr., from En- 
gine 10 to Ladder (i. 

Fire Fighter Joseph P. Cleary, from Engine 10 
to Ladder 6 

Fire Fighter Samuel J. Craddock, from En- 
gine 16 to Ladder 6. 



Fire r'igliter Louis Crifo, from Engine 16 to 
Engine 24. 

l ire Fighter Thomas E. Donlan, from Engine 10 
to Engine 4.3. 

tiiT^ riL'litcr Daniel R. Emery, from Engine 16 

TiK I iKlit. r .lames F. Holland, from Engine 16 

1 ir. I iiilit. I Daniel Kelleher, Jr., from Engine 16 

I iiT I i^'lit. 1 Gerald R. LaFlamme, from ICngine 

Ki t., I,;,<lilrr 8. 

I'ire Fightei Daniel \', Milligan, from Engine 16 
to Engine S<iuad 18. 

Fire Fighter Williaiu .1. Mullen, from Engine 16 
to Engine S(|ua<l I.'.. 

Fin- Fighter (■Iiir<,i<l L. Sargent, from Engine 10 
lo Engine .S.|ua,i 18. 

1 ire I'lL'liKr Ccort:." E. Stanton, from Engine 16 
t'l Engine 17. 

Fire Fighter .lulin .1. Trementozzi. from Engine 16 
to Ladder 8. 

Fire Fighter Edward E. Wright, from Engine 16 
to Rescue Company. 

Fire Fighter (ierald F. Roche, from Engine 
Squad 45 to Engine 34. 

Fire Fighter Ralph N. Deane, from Engine 19 to 
Engine 16. 

Fire Fighter Vsaya W. DiRosario, from Engine 
19 to Engine 16. 

Fire Fighter George P. Duclos, from Engine 19 
to Engine 10. 

Fire Fighter .\cacio J. Gazo, from Engine 19 to 
Engine 16. 

Fire Fighter John J. Hanley, from Engine 19 to 
Engine 10. 

Fire Fighter Thomas J. Hanley, from Engine 19 
to Engine 10. 

Fire Fighter Paul C. Hannigan, from Engine 19 
to Engine 16. 

Fire Fighter John H. Hartford, from Engine 19 
to Engine 16. 

Fire Fighter Edmund L. Keif, from Engine 19 
to Engine 16. 

Fire Fighter Nicholas Mazza, from Engine 19 
to Engine 16. 

File Fighter Donald R. Mullen, from Engine 19 
to Engine 10. 

Fire Fighter Robert F. Newell, from Engine 19 
to Engine 16. 

Fire Fighter Chester D. Ovesen, from Engine 19 
to Engine 16. 

Fire Fighter Thomas C. Reardon, from Engine 

19 to Engine 16. 

Fire Fighter Dominic D. Vitale, from Engine 19 
to Engine 16. 

Ch.\nges in Assignments. 
Company commanders shall make the following 
changes in the assignment books to become effective 
at 8 A.M., Wednesday, December 31, 1958: 

Engine Companies 

Boxes: 2.562, 2.564 , 2.571, 2573 , 2574, 2.577,2578, 
2581, 2584, 2.580, 2.588, 2.59, 2591, 2593, "2594, 
2.598, 2010, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2021, 2024, 2625, 
2620, 2028, 2631, 2632, 26.34, 2635, 2636, 2638, 
2639, 2641, 2644, 2047, 2649, 2651, 2658. 

5th Alarm: Drop Engine 52 to fire; add Engine 
16 to fire. 

Boxes: 2.589, 2.597. 

5th Alarm: Drop Engine 21 to fire; add Engine 
16 to fire. 

Boxes: 2666, 2668, 2S76, 2678, 268, 2681, 2682, 
2683, 2684, 2685, 2686, 2687, 2688, 2693, 2695, 2696. 

5th Alarm: Drop Engine 41 to fire; add Engine 
10 to fire. 

5th Alarm: Drop Engine 52 to Engine Squad 45. 
Boxes: 3148, 3186. 

1st Alarm: Drop Engine 16 to fire; add Engine 

20 to fire. 

2nd Alarm: Drop Engine 52 to Engine 16; add 
Engine 52 to Engine 20. 
Box 31.55. 

2nd Alarm: Drop Engine 16; add Engine 52 to 
fire. 

2nd --^larm: Drop Engine 52 to Engine 16. 

4th Alarm: Drop Engine 52 to fire; add Engine 

20 to fire. 

Boxes: 3165, 3166, 3174, 3175, 3176, 3182, 3184. 
2nd .4hirm: Drop Engine 16 to fire; add Engine 

21 to fire. 

2iid .\lariu: Drop Engine 52 to Engine 16; add 
Engine 52 to Engine 20. 

Box 319, . . ... 

1st Alarm: Drop Engine io to fire; add ^ngioe 
20 to fire. 



4 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. -a 



.•n.l Al.iriii: i)ru|. lit.KUir .'() I.. Lticii.'' H.. 
KnKiric .'iJ to Kiik'Qi' -0. 
Hnx 310 1. 

Jnd Alarm: Drop Engine 10 to fire; add Engine 
20 I" fm-. 

2nfl Alarm: Drop Engine 20 to Engine 16; add 
Engine 52 to Engine 20. 
Box 3195. 

Ist Alarm: Drop Engine 16; add Engine 17 to 
fire. 

2nd Alarm: Drop Engine 17 to fire; add Engine 

20 to fire. 

2nd .Alarm: Drop Engine 20 to Engine 16; add 
Engine 52 to Engine 20. 

Boxes: .321, .3213. 3215. 3225. 

Ist Alarm: Drop Engine 16 to fire; add Engine 17 
to fire. 

2nd .\larra: Drop Engine 17 to fire; add Engine 

21 to fire. 

2nd .\lBrm: Drop Engine 52 to Engine 16; add 
Engine 52 to Engine 20. 
Boxes: .3217, .3218. 

Ist Alarm: Drop Engine 16; add Engine 17 to 
fire. 

2nd Alarm: Drop Engine 17; add Engine 21 to 

2nd .\larm: Drop Engine 12 to Engine 16; add 
Engine 12 to Engine 20. 

3rd Alarm: Drop Engine 53 to Engine 16; add 
Engine 63 to Engine 20. 

Box 3221. 

Ist Alarm: Drop Engine 16; add Engine 17 to 
fire. 

2nd Alarm: Drop Engine 17; add Engine 24 to 
fire. 

2nd Alarm: Drop Engine 12 to Engine 16; add 
Engine 12 to 20. 

5th Alarm: Drop Engine 24 to fire; add Engine 
10 to fire. 

Box 3223. 

Ist Alarm: Drop Engine 16 to fire; add Engine 17 
to fire. 

2nd Alarm: Drop Engine 17 to fire; add Engine 

21 to fire. 



Boxes: 3227, .323, 3232, 3235. 
Ist Alarm: Drop Engine 16 to fire; add Engine 17 
to fire. 

2nd .\larm: Drop Engine 17 to fire; add Engine 
52 to fire. 

2nd .\larm: Drop Engine 12 to Engine 16; add 
Engine 12 to Engine 20. 

3rd .Alarm: Drop Engine .53 to Engine 16; add 
Engine .53 to Engine 20. 

Box 3272. 

1st Alarm: Drop Engine 17. 
2nd .\larni: .\dd Engine 17. 
Boxes: 3385, 3387, 3393, ,3396. 3397. 
2nd .\larm: Drop Engine 16 to fire; add Engine 
20 to fire. 

2nd .Marm: Drop Engine 2 to Engine 16; add 
Engine 2 to Engine 20. 
Boxes: 341. 3426. 

1st .Alarm: Drop Engine 16 to fire; add Engine 
Squad 18 to fire. 

2nd .Alarm: Drop Engine Squad 18 to fire; add 
Engine 20 to fire. 

2nd .Mann: Drop Engine 2 to Engine 16; add 
Engine 2 to Engine 20. 

Box 3412. 

Ist .\larm: Drop Engine 16 to fire; add Engine 
Squad 18 to fire. 

2nd Alarm: Drop Engine Squad 18 to fire; add 
Engine 21 to fire. 

2nd .Alarm: Drop Engine 2 to Engine 16; add 
Engine 2 to Engine 20. 

Boxes: 3242. 3244. 3246, 3247, 3249, 325, 3251- 
32.53, 3254, 32.55, 3256, 3257, 326, 328. 

1st .Alarm: Drop Engine 16 to fire; add Engine 17 
to fire. 

2nd .Alarm: Drop Engine 17 to fire; add Engine 
16 to fire. 



1st .Alarm: Drop Engine 16 to fire; add Engine 17 
lo fire. 

2nd .Alarm: Drop Engine 17 to fire; add Engine 
20 to fire. 

2nd .Alarm: Drop Engine 2 to Engine 10; add 
Engine 2 to 20. 

Boxes: 3383. 3417, 342. 3421, 3422. 

Ist Alarm: Drop Engine 16 nj fire; add Engine 
52 10 &re. 



Jmi AliirMj; Drop l.utiiw r,^ c. lin-; u.i.l l.ni;int 
20 to fire. 

2nd Alarm: Drop Engine 2 to Engine 16; add 
Engine 2 to Engine 20. 
Boxes: 3427, 3428. 

4tli Alarm: Add Engine 20 to Engine 16. 

.51 li .Alarm: Drop Engine 53 to fire; add Engine 
20 to fire. 

Boxes: 3429, 3432, 3435, 3445. 

4th Alarm: Add Engine 20 to Engine 16. 

5tli Alarm: Drop Engine 55 to fire; add Engine 
20 to fire. 

Boxes: 344. .34.34. 3442. .3451. .34.52, 3454, 3456, 
34.57. 34.59, 3461. 3487. 3488. 3489, 3492. 
4th .Alarm: .Add Engine 49 to Engine 16. 
5th .Alarm; Drop Engine 55 to fire; add Engine 

41 to fire. 

Boxes: 3446. 3447. 

Ist Alarm: Drop Engine 16; add Engine 18 to 

fire. 

2nd Alarm: Drop Engine 18 to fire; add Engine 
16 to fire. 

4th Alarm: Add Engine 20 to Engine 16. 
5th .Alarm: Drop Engine 65; add Engine 20 to 
fire. 

Boxes: 3462, 3463, 3465, 3467, 3469, 3481. 
4th Alarm: .Add Engine 49 to Engine 16. 
Sth Alarm: Drop Engine 65: add Engine 42 to 
fire. 

Boxes: 347, 3471, 3474, 3476, 3477, 3478. 

1st Alarm: .Add Engine 20 to fire. 

2nd Alarm: Drop Engine 20 to fire. 

4th Alarm: Drop Engine 49 to Engine 16. 

5th Alarm: Drop Engine 56 to fire; add Engine 

42 to fire. 

Boxes: 3483, 3485. 

4th Alarm: Add Engine 49 to Engine 16. 
5th Alarm: Drop Engine 53 to fire; add Engine 
41 to fire. 

Boxes: 3495. 3496, 3515, 3516, 3517, 3518, 352, 
3522, 3524, 3526. 

4th Alarm: Add Engine 20 to Engine 16. 

5th Alarm: Drop Engine 55 to fire; add Engine 
20 to fire. 

Box .3512. 

4th Alarm: Add Engine 20 to Engine 16. 

5th Alarm: Add Engine 20 to fire. 

Boxes: 3528. 3531, 3533, 3.535, 3636, 35.37. 3.5.38. 
3.541. 3542, 3.544. 

1st Alarm: Add Engine 16 to fire. 

2nd .Alarm: Drop Engine 16 to fire. 

4th Alarm: Add Engine 20 to Engine 16. 

5th Alarm: Drop Engine 55 to fire; add Engine 
20 to fire. 

Boxes: 3.547. 3.551. 3553. 3555. 3556, 3591. 

Ist Alarm: .Add Engine 16 to fire. 

2nd .Alarm: Drop Engine 16 to fire. 

4th .Alarm: Add Engine 20 to Engine 16. 

5th .Alarm: Drop Engine 43 to fire; add Engine 
20 to fire. 

Boxes: 3561. 3563, 3571. 3572. 

1st .Alarm: .Add Engine 52 to fire. 

2nd Alarm: Drop Engine 52 to fire. 

4th Alarm: Add Engine 49 to Engine 16. 

5th Alarm: Drop Engine 55 to fire; add Engine 
41 to fire. 

Boxes: 3577, 358, 3581, 3582, 3583, 3584, 3585. 
3586. 3.587. 3594, 3.595. 

1st -Alarm: .Add Engine 16 to fire. 

2nd .Alarm: Drop Engine 16 to fire. 

4th Alarm: Add Engine 49 to Engine 16. 

5th .Alarm: Drop Engine 55; add Engine 41 to 
fire. 

Boxes: 3574, 3575. 

1st .Alarm: Add Engine 52 to fire. 

2nd Alarm: Drop Engine 16 and 52 to fire; add 
Engine 20 to fire. 

2nd Alarm: Should read Engine 18. 21. 20, 53. 

4th Alarm: .Add Engine 49 to Engine 16. 

5th -Alarm: Drop Engine ,55 to fire; add Engine 
41 to fire. 

Box .3593. 

1st -Alarm: -Add Engine 16 to fire. 

2nd .Alarm: Drop Engine 20 to fire; add Engine 
20 to Engine 16. 

4th Alarm: -Add Engine 20 to fire; add Engine 49 
to Engine 16. 

oth -Alarm: Drop Engine 13 to Engine 53; add 
Engine 13 to fire. 

Boxes: 3618. 362. 3621, 3623. 3624. 
2nd Alarm: Add Engine IQ to fire; add Engine 55 
to Engine 16. 



»l .Alarm: Drop Engii 



; add Engn 



2nd Alarm: -Add Engine 18 to fire;add Engit 
to Engine 16. 

Boxeji: .3625. 3628, 3627. 3631. 3632. 36.33, . ■ 
.36.38, .36.39, .3641, 3644 . 3645, 3647, 3648, : 
365, .3651. 3654, :«555. 

1st .Alarm: -Add Engine 16 to fire. 

2nd .Alarm: .Add Engine 55 to Engine 16. 

Box .363. 

2nd Alarm: Add Engine 16 to fire; add Engii ' 
to Engine 16. 

3rd .Alarm: .Add Engine 17 to Engine 16. 

Boxes: 3656. 3657, 3658. 367. 3671. 

Ist .Alarm: .Add Engine 16 to fire. 

2nd Alarm: Add Engine 21 to Engine 16; i. 
Engine 39 to Engine 20. 

3rd Alarm: Add Engine 43 to Engine 16. 

4th .Alarm: Drop Engine 20 lo fire; add Engine .' 
to fire. 

4th Alarm: .Add Engine 2 to Engine 16. 

Boxes: 366, 3662. 

1st Alarm: .Add Engine Ifl to fire. 

2nd .Alarm; .Add Engine 21 to Engine 16; add 
Engine 2 to Engine 20. 

3rd Alarm: Add Engine 12 to Enpine 16. 

4th .Alarm: .Add Engine 2 to Engine 16. 

Sth Alarm: .Add Engine 2 to fire. 

Boxes: 3661, 3663. 3693. 3696, 3697„371, 3: 
3712, 3714, 3715. 3717. 

1st .Alarm; .Add Engine 16 to fire. 

2nd .Alarm: .Add Engine 21 to Engine 16. 

3rd .Alarm; .Add Engine 12 to Engine 16. 

4th .Alarm: Add Engine 20 to Engine 16. 

Boxes: 3672. 369. 3694. 

1st .Alarm: Add Engine 16 to fire. 

2nd Alarm: Add Engine 21 to Engine 16. 

3rd .Alarm: Add Engine 43 to Engine 16. 

4th Alarm: Add Engine 20 to Engine 16. 

Boxes: 368. 3681. 3692. 

Ist .Alarm: Add Engine 16 to fire. 

2nd Alarm: Add Engine 21 to Engine 16. 

3rd Alarm: Add Engine 43 to Engine 16. 

4th .Alarm: .Add Engine 25 to Engine 16. 

Boxes: .3713, 3718. 

1st .Alarm: .Add Engine 49 to fire. 

2nd -Alarm: Add Engine 21 to Engine 52. 

3rd Alarm: Add Engine 12 to Engine 52. 

4th .Alarm: .Add Engine 20 to Engine 52. 

5th Alarm: Drop Engine 49 to fire; add Engine 
16 to fire. 

Boxes: .372, .3721. .3722, .3723. 3731. 3733. 3812, 
3813. .3814, .3815. .3816. .3817. .3818. 

2nd .Alarm: .Add Engine 16 to fire; add Engine 
21 to Engine 16. 

4th .Alarm: -Add Engine 20 to Engine 16. 

Boxes: .3724, 3725, 3732, 3734. 37.35, 37.36. 
3741. 3743, 3744. 3745, 3746, 3747. 3751. 3752, 
3753. .3754. 3755, 3756. 3757. 3758. 3759, 3761. 
.3762, 3763. 3764. 3765. 3766. 3771. 3772. 3773. 
3774. 3775, 378, 3781. 3782. 3783, 3784. 3786. ,3787. 
3789. 3791, 3792, 3821, 3822, 3823 , 3824 . 3825, 
3826, 3827, .3828. 3831. 3832. 3833 , 3834 . 3835, 
3836. 3837 , 3841. 3842. 3843. 3844 . 3845. 3851, 
3852, 3853, 3854. 3855, 3856. 3857, 3858. 3859, 
.3861. .3862, 3863. 3871. 3872. 3873. 3874 , 3875. 
3876. 3877. 

2nd Alarm: .Add Engine 16 to fire; add Engine 
21 to Engine 16. 

3rd Alarm: .Add Engine 12 to Engine 16. 

4th Alarm: -Add Engine 20 to Engine 16. 
Ladrirr Companu 

Boxes: 2581, 2584, 2588. 259. 2591. 2593, 2594, 
2598. 2634, 2635, 26.36. 2638. 2639, 2649, 2658. 

1st -Alarm: Drop Ladder 6 to fire; add Ladder 10 
to fire. 

2nd Alarm: Drop Ladder 10 to fire; add Ladder 6 
to fire. 

Order of arrival: Udder 16, Ladder 10. 
Box: 2647. 

l9t Alarm: Drop Ladder 6 to fire; add Ladder 25 

2nd Alarm: Ladder 23 to Ladder 6; add Ladder 
23 to Ladder 2.5. 

3rd .Alarm: Drop Ladder 23 to fire; add Ladder 6 
to fire. 

Order of arrival: Ladder 16. Ladder 25. 

Boxes: 3261, 3263, 3234, 3256, 3268. 3272, 3273, 
3274, 3275, 3276. 3278. 3279. 32il. 3282, 3284, 
3286, 3291. 3293. 3295, 3297, 3299. 

1st .Alarm; Drop Ladder 7 to fire; add Ladder 6 
to fire. 

(Continued on next page.) 



l\ Jan. 3 



CITY RECORD 



5 



VETERANS' SERVICES DEPARTMENT. 



Expenditures for veterans' benefits for |Oftober. 1958, show a decrease of §23,189.37 
in comparison with expenditures for the corresponding period of 1957. 

The 1.592 cases aided during the month of October, 1058, represented a total of 
3,385 individuals bene'ited through the facilities of the \'eterans' Services Department. 

There were 76 cases closed during the month of October. 1958, because of oljtaining 
employment, having been awarded unemployment compensation, receiving social 
security and becoming ineligible to receive financial assistance for miscellaneous other 
reasons. 

Expenditures for October, 



1958 



Regular Rolls. . 
Emergencies. . . . 

Bills 

Burials 

Hospital 

Supplementary . 



60 $1,221 00 
24 00 
260 76 



Mexican 
War 
Si07 00 



World 
War I 
.521.889 20 



SS.254 59 
3,348 00 
700 52 



Totals 
SS3.621 20 
15,765 30 
10,944 46 



$132 60 Sl,o0o 76 $407 00 $29,173 07 $80,369 09 



Relief Expenditures Comparison 



Civil War 

Spanish 

Mexican 

World War I . . . 
World War II . . 

Korean 

Emergency 

Bills 

Burials 

H(xspital 

Supplementary . 



Civil War 

Spanish 

Mexican 

, World War I . . 
World War II . 
Korean 



Oct., 1958 
$132 60 
1,221 00 
407 00 
21,889 20 
51.716 90 
8.254 ,50 
15,765 30 
10,944 46 



$126,755 .54 

Total Cases Aided 

Oct., 1958 



43 



,,592 



Sept.. 1958 
$16 40 
1.127 50 
369 00 
20.646 70 
48.979 80 
8,006 .50 
11,303 00 
.35.311 28 
2.59 50 
39.640 00 
2,120 20 



1958 
1 
37 



Oct., 1957 
S90 20 

2,041 55 
415 00 
23,713 60 
48,803 75 

7.377 75 
11,390 ,50 

1,403 95 
21,687 35 
26,052 00 



,572 



Classification of Cases Aided 

Civil Spanish Mexican World World Korean 

War War War War I War II War 

Unemployed veterans 1 1 183 273 61 

Emplbyed veterans 21 173 36 

Wives 3 12 4 

Widows 2 42 4 269 49 3 

Children 4 30 2 

Mothers 10 331 44 

Fathers 1 29 4 

2 43 5 491 897 154 

Original Applications 

Brought forward 13 

Made 122 

Granted 67 

Rejected 30 

Referred 7 

Investigation not completed 31 

Reapplications 

Brought forward 76 

Made - 284 

Granted 208 

Rejected 20 

Referred 2 

Investigation not completed 130 

During the month of October, 1958, the department collected $2,581.50 which 
represents refunds by former beneficiaries of veterans' beneSts who were found to have 
drawn aid under circumstances which warranted its return to the City of Boston. 

Victor C. By.noe, Commissioner. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT ORDERS 
(Continued from previous page.) 

2nd Alarm: Drop Ladder 23 to fire; add Ladder 
7 to fire. 

Order of arrival: Ladder 27, Ladder 6. 
Boxes: 3427. 3446, 3447. 

l.*t Alarm: Drop Ladder 23 to fire; add Ladder 6 

Order of arrival: Ladder 29, Ladder 6. 

Boxes: :J432, 3434, 34.35, 3445, 3451, 3452, 3454. 

1st .Alarm; Drop Ladder 27 to fire; add Ladder 6 

to fire. 

2nd .\larm: Drop Ladder 23 to fire; add Ladder 
27 to fire. 

Order of arrival: Ladder 6, Ladder 29. 
Boxes: 344. 3442, 34.59. 

1st Alarm: Drop Ladder 29 to fire; add Ladder 6 

to fire. 

2nd .\larm: Drop Ladder 23 to fire; add Ladder 

29 to fire. 

Order of arrival: Ladder 6, Ladder 27. 

Bo.xes: 3456, 3457, 3461. 

1st alarm: Drop Ladder 29 to fire; add Ladder 6 
to fire. 

2nd .\larm: Drop Ladder 6 to fire; add Ladder 29 
to fire. 

Order of arrival: Ladder 6, Ladder 27. 
Boxes: 3478, 3481, 3487. 

1st alarm: Drop Ladder 27 to fire; add Ladder 29 
to fire. 

2nd .\larm: Drop Ladder 29 to fire; add Ladder 
27 to fire. 

Order of arrival: Ladder 6. Ladder 29. 
Boxes: 3483. 3485, 3488, 3489. 
1st .\larm: Drop Ladder 27 to fire; add Ladder 6 
to fire. 

2nd .\larm: Drop Ladder 6 to fire; add Ladder 
27 to fire. 

Older of arrival: Ladder (>, Ladder 29. 
Boxes: 3515. 3516, 3517. .3518. 3522. 3524, 3618. 
.\larm: Drop Ladder 6 to fire; add Ladder 23 



to fir 
to fir 



.Alar 



Drop Ladder 



fire; add Ladder 6 
:o cover Ladder 6 



2nd Alarm: Add Ladder 
on 2nd alarms. 

Order of arrival: Ladder 29, Ladder 23. 
Box: .3718. 

1st Alarm; Drop Ladder 6 to fire; add Ladder 16 
to fire. 

3rd Alarm: Drop Ladder 16 to fire; add Ladder 6 
to fire. 

Order oi arrival: Ladder 28, Ladder 16. 

Boxes: 3734. ,3735. 3736, 3741, ,3744, 3745, 3746, 
3747, 3751, 3752, ,3754, 3761. 3762, 3763, 3764, 
3765, 3766, 3771, 3772. ,3773, .3774, .3775, 378, 3781, 
3782, 3783, 3784, 3786, 3787, 3789, 3791, 3792, 
3853, 3854, 3855, 3856, 3857, 3858, 3859. 

1st Alarm: Drop Ladder 6 to fire; add Ladder 16 
to fire. 

2nd Alarm: Drop Ladder 16 to fire; add Ladder 6 
to fire. 

Order of arrival: Ladder 28, Ladder 16. 
Box: 7611. 

1st Alarm: Drop Engine 12 to Engine 16; add 
Engine 12 to Engine 20; add Engine 53 to Engine 
10. 

2nd .\larin: .\dd Engine 53 to fire; drop Engine 2 
to Engine 10: add Engine 2 to Engine 20; add 
Engine 55 to Engine 16. 

Box: 8224, .Mutual .\id Milton. 

Add Engine 53 to fire. 

-\dd Engine 43 to Engine 16. 

2nd Alarm: .\dd Engine 24 to Engine 16. 

3rd Alarm: Add Engine 26 to Engine 16. 
A.D.T. 

156, drop Engine 19; add Engine 16. 
734. drop Ladder 6; add Engine 48 and Ladder 
28. 

3451, drop Engine 19, add Engine 16. 

Automatic, 
llal, add Engine 16; drop Engine 19. 

1758, add Engine 16; drop Engine 19. 

1759, add Engine 16; drop Engine 19. 
Calls, 238, drop Engine 19; add Engine 16. 
Engine companies assigned to cover h.ngine 19 

on multiple alaims from all boxes 2562 through 
3595 shall respond to fires on the alarm that 
presently calls for them to cover Engine 19, 

On all 5th alarm responses of Engine 19 Fire 
Alarm will fill in. 

B\' order of Fire Commissioner Fr.\xcis X. 
Cotter, 

Leo C. Driscoll, 
Chief ol Department, 



6 



CITY RECORD 



DEPARTMENT CHANGES 

The Director of Acliiiiiii>tr.iti\ c Serv- 
ices lia.s approxed tlie followiiin person- 
nel diaiiKcs : 

Hospital Dkpaktmknt. 
Main Division. 
The services of the followinn ern- 
ployros liave been lenuinaled on or iirior 
to December 8: 

Permanent.— Margaret MorRan. medi- 
cal social work siii)ervisor, $88.25 a 
week. 

Teni|)orary. — Joim MeClinley, Evange- 
line Hine.s. hospital medical workers. 
$47.75 a week. 

The services of the following em- 
|)loyees have been terminated on or jirior 
to Dec(>mber 9: 

Permanent. — Ida Albert, .senior clerk 
and stenographer, $72.75 a week; Leonard 
Collins, hos|iital medical worker. S60.25 
:i week; Mary J. Kranss, floor nnr.se. 
S75.25 a week; Catherine O'Brien, hospi- 
tal medical worker, $47.75 a week. 

Tenti)orary. — Kli Jacobsen. floor nurse. 
S62.75 a week. 

The services of the following em- 
ployee.? have been terminated on or pvior 
to December 9: 

Permanent. — Margaret Crowley, hosiii- 
tal medical worker, $60.25 a week; 
Margaret L. Kelly, medical .social worker. 
S81.25 a week; John Josei)h Smith, hospi- 
tal medical worker, S57.75 a week. 

The following special nurses were ap- 
lioinled for the number of days in- 
dicated: 

.Janice Arena, 1; Claire Bach, 7; Ksther 
Bandlow, 5; Olive Barnard, 6; Pri.^illa 
Beckwith, 5; Margaret Booth, 1; Claire 
Breedan, 5; Mary Broderick, Rita 
Busher, Elizabeth (\\nty, 2; Ann 
Cavallo, 1; Dorothy Chai.sson. 2; Ruby 
Childs, 4; Dorothy Clung. 5; I-aura Coe, 
7; Noreen Cohane. 6; Rose Conlon, 1; 
Martha Co.stello, Joan Cronin. 6; Iris 
Crowley, 2; Marion Cummings, 6; Helen 
Curreri, 3; Adele Daly, 8; Evelyn Davis, 
Norma Dean, 6; Marjorie Devine. Lor- 
raine Dibble, 2; Delores Diggs. 3; 
Margaret Dillon, 1 ; Madeline Dobhyn, 
6; Leona Doherty, 1; Hannah Donahue. 
2; Patricia Doucette, 7; Marv Dowlev. 
Eleanor Dullley. 2; Mary Ivhvards, 6; 
Florence Egan, 1; Marilyn Eng.skov, 5; 
.\nna Ferrara,7; Mary Fetlierst on, Chris- 
tine Finn, 3; Elinor Foley, 1; Emma 
Foster. 7; Xlargaret Francis, 5; Mary 
Fra.ser. 2; Theresa Frazier, 5; Mary 
Frozetti, 1; Eleanor Furiga, Carolyn 
fiarney, 2; Clarice Ciarney. 4; Lois 
(iatie. 2; Shirley Ciaudreau. 6; Ann 
Ciger. 2; Doris Oilman. 1; Roberta 
Giordano. 4; Ethel (Jlennon. 5; Barbara 
Cioodwin, Louise Oracle. 4; Diana 
Ouinta. 3; Veronica Hamel, 6; Virginia 
Hamilton, J lino Hiirdiiorr', 2; IVIurio 
Haner. 3; Mar>- B. Healy. 6; Hope Hol- 



iiiis. 3; .Maigan i Hool.y, 2; Cailu rin. 
Houton. 3; Marv Howard. Dolores Hovt, 
1; Claire Hume. 4; Muriel Clark, 2; 
Dorothy Jewkes. 5; Ruth John.son, 
Catherine Kane, 7; Catherine Keith, 
Helen Kordis. 6; Maria Kotte, 7; 
.Marion Larson. 3; Elizabeth Lembo. 6; 
Jean Linder. 1; Mary Long. 5; Dorothy 
Lydon. Loretta Lynch. Mary Mahan. 4; 
Ada Malhe.son. 5; Ann Maughn. 7; 
Claire McCue, 3; Lorraine McDougall. 
1; Ma.xine McFarland. 5; Jo.\nn Mc- 
Ooniagle. 4; M.in- McLeod. 2; Marion 
Miller. 3; Sara Miller. 1; Catherine 
Moody. Ann Mooney. 6; ."^uzanne 
Morgan. 2; Lois Murphy, 7; Natalie 
Neadle, 2; Agnes O'Connor, 7; Loui.'^e 
O'Toole. 3; Mae Owens. 8; Delore.s Pal- 
ladino. 3; Mary I'iasta. 5; Vivian 
I'levack. 7; Patricia Pocpiette, 4; Alyce 
Powers. I; CJrace Powers. 2; Faith 
Prendergast. June Rahilly. 6; Audrey 
Reardon. 2; Patricia Regan. 7; Dorothy 
Ripley. .\nna Romano. Judith Ruther- 
ford. 3; Takaka Salvi. 2; Ann Savage. 3; 
Una Sinnott. 2; Mabel Smith. 1; Bernice 
Smith. 4; Verna Snow. 6; Helen Spillane, 
2; .Anna Stankard, 4; Mabel Steed. 2; 
Claire Stevenson, 5; Cathleen Sullivan, 
3; Madelyn Sullivan, 6; Margaret J. 
Sullivan. Margaret M. Sullivan. 7; 
Lsabel Sutton. 6; Carol Taramino, 3; 
Diana Thedford, 6; Claire Tompkins. 
Jocelyn Tooher, 2; Lois Tsoumas, 6; 
Jo.sephinc Tyman, 5; H. Vaillancourt, 6; 
Jacipieline Wagner. 2; Jane Wharton. 
Marcia Wharton. 1; Marv White. 7; 
Tri.sky White. 5; Kathryii Welch. 3; 
Lorraine Baker, 1; Ooldie Buchanan. 5; 
Patricia Dalton, Matireen Flynn. 1 ; 
Frances Gallagher, 2; Barbara Hoban, 1; 
Janet Hughes. 2; Anne Humbersfone. 1; 
Sally Kane, 4; Katherine Murphv. 5; 
Lorraine Robin, 3; Mary Ryan. 5; 
Maureen Corbin, Felicita "Tyrell. 3. 
Lorn/ Island Division. 

The following changes have been made 
for the week ending December 9: 

Leave of Ab.sence.— Edward F. Wagner, 
hospital laundry worker. 

Terminations.— Mary E. Kappaini, 
ho.spital house worker, emergency; Wini- 
fred Kennedy, attendant nurse. 

Cancellations.— John A. Reth. Paul F. 
Fitzgerald, attendant nur.se«; Arthur E. 
Hansen, cemeten,- laborer. 

Penal Institutions Department. 
HouRC oj Correction. 
Joseph W. Peluso. 20 Airadia park. 
Dorchester, has declined his permanent 
intermittent aii]iointmrnt as correction 
ofl^cer. 

Welfare Department. 

The following employees' .services 
have terminated: 

Mary C. Grady, permanent clerk and 
typist ; Leo O'Hearn. permanent .social 
worker; Etta Kurzman. jiermanent clerk 
and typist. 



Appointments. 
Bi iLDiNc Dep.\rtment. 
Daniel A. Cahill. 14 Everett stn et, 
DorclHsler. gasfitting in.si)ector, $72.75 a 
week. 

Carleton I. Baxter. Ill Draper street 
Dorehe.-4ter. elevator insi)ector. $72.75 a 
week. 

James W. Cosgrove. 241 Kiliredge 
street. Roslindale. building in'*peclor, 
$75.25 a week. 

Health Dep.\rtment. 
Health Divifion. 

Elizabeth Manookian. 1258 Common- 
wealth avenue. Allston. public health 
nurse. $72.75 a week. 

Ruth .\rger. 35 Peterborough street 
clerk and typist. $47.75 a week. 

Nancy Slyne. 92 Manthome road. 
West Roxbury. clerk and stenographer 
$47.75 a week. 

Jean S. Patterson. 40 Commonwealth 
avenue, junior barleriologist. $67.75 a 
week. 

Joan Buffington. 50 Peterborough 
street, public health nurse. $72.75 a week 

Patricia R. McDonough. 66 Glenellen 
ro.id. West Roxbury. public health nurse. 
$72.75 a week. 

Hospit.\l Department. 
Main Division. 

Emily Meehan. 20 Faunce road. Mat- 
taiian. clerk and tyi)ist. $47.75 a week. 

John T. Barr>-. i99 Falcon street. East 
Boston, ambulance driver. $65.25 a week. 

Patricia Mulkern. 74 Boylston street. 
Jamaica Plain, clerk and stenographer. 
S50.25 a week. 

William Kerwin. 279 .\thens street. 
South Boston, hospital house worker, 
S47.75 a week. 

P>dward A. Keenan. 49 Worthington 
street. Roxbury. hospital house worker. 
$47.75 a week. 

Frances M. McKeon. 1041 Dorchester 
avenue. Dorchester. hospital house 
worker. $47.75 a week. 

Owen J. Henne.<.sey. 693 Ma.ssachu.setts 
avenue, hospital house worker, $5525 a 
week. 

Frank A. Dubrawski. 21 Gladstone 
street. East Bo.«ton. hospital house 
worker. $50.25 a week. 

Peter M. Foley, 19 Sullivan street, 
Charlestown. ho.spital house worker, 
S50.25 a week. 

Robert R. Keil. 18 Union park, hospi- 
tal house worker. S47.75 a week. 

Francis G. Carmody. 34 South Hunt- 
ington avenue. Roxbuiy, ha^jiital house 
worker. $52.75 a week. 

James Malcolmson. 64 Hemenway 
street, hospital house worker, $52.75 a 
week. 

Richard Curran. 67 Sycamore street, 
Roslindale. clerk. $47.75 a week. 



,iax. 3 



CITY RECORD 



7 



Josephine C. Barry, 10 Wollaston ter- 
race, Dorchester, hospital medical work- 
er. S55.25 a week. 

Theresa McRae. 15 Wait street, Rox- 
biirv. hospital medical worker, $55.25 a 
week. 

Marie Joseph, 17 Horan Way, Rox- 
bury. hospital medical worker, $47.75 a 
week. 

Anna Butare, 127 Cottage street, East 
Boston, hospital medical worker, $47.75 
a week. 

Margaret M. Salter, 11 Hallam street, 
Dorchester. hos]iital medical worker, 
S47.75 a week. 

Patricia R. Quinlan, 877 East Fourth 
street. South Boston, hospital medical 
worker, S47.75 a week. 

Rose M. Sheehan, 5 Victory road, Dor- 
chester, hospital medical worker, $47.75 
a week. 

Dorothy C. Burgess, 111 Monticello 
avenue. Dorchester, hospital medical 
worker, S47.75 a week. 

Ophelia Herndon, 49 Sherman street. 
Roxbury, hospital medical worker, $47.75 
a week. 

Xora 0. Canaday. 35 Mather street, 
Dorchester, hospital medical worker, 
$47.75 a week. 

Mary M. Johnson, 124 Bclnel road, 
Mattapan, ho.spital medical worker, 
S47.75 a week. 

Barbara MacDonald, 170 Colorado 
street, Mattapan, hospital medical work- 
er, $47.75 a week. 

Catherine E. Baney, 67 Old Harbor 
street. South Boston, hospital medical 
worker, $47.75 a week. 

Charles Corvino, 13 Priesing street, 
Jamaica Plain, hospital house worker, 
850.25 a week. 

John P. Noenickx, 11 McDonough 
Wav, South Boston, hospital house work- 
er, $50.25 a week. 

Joseph Fitzpatrick. 70 Hill.side street, 
Roxbury, clerk, $47.75 a week. 

Margaret Rasmu.ssen, 9 Bullard street, 
Dorchester, clerk and typist, $47.75 a 
week. 

John Eaton, 28 Lambert street, Rox- 
bury, hospital guard, $57.75 a week. 

Robert W. Brady, 8 Burke street. 
South Boston, hospital guard, $57.75 a 
week. 

Walter Bonavita, 26 Irvin avenue, 
Roxbury, ambulance dri\er, $65.25 a 
week. 

Thomas J. Byrnes, 38 Lonsdale street, 
Dorchester, senior hospital medical work- 
er. $67.75 a week. 

Nellie Button, 157 Roxbuiy street, 
Ro.xbury, hospital medical worker, $55.25 
a week. 

Sanatorium Division. 
Mary D. Carleton, 103 King street, 
Dorchester, licen.sed attendant nurse, 
$67.75 a week. 



Long Island Division. 

Marie Brazoa, 36 Central street, 
Somorxille, licensed practical nurse, 
$57.75 :i wri'k. 

Francis H. Hazelton, 42 Fenton street, 
Dorchester, hospital house worker, $47.75 
a week. 

Joseph M. O'Hara, 58 Templeton 
street, Dorchester, attendant nurse, 
$47.75 a wc^ok. 

Timothy V. Driscoll, Jr., 8 Presley 
road, Dorchester, attendant nurse, $47.75 
a week. 

Josejih J. Collins, 314 Washington 
street, Dorchester, attendant nurse, 
$47.75 a week. 

George Quireyns, 303 Silver street, 
South Boston, hospital kitchen worker, 
$47.75 a week. 

LlCEXSIXG Bo.^RD. 
Mary M. Burke. 41 Seymour street, 
Roslindalo. clerk-typist, $47.75 a week. 

P.UiKS AM) Rk( HKATIOX DePAHTMENT. 

Lawrence P. Schoric, 103 Rowo street, 
Rc-lmdah. tree climber, 862.75 a week. 

Donald K. Holmes. 87 Howlett street, 
Ro.-;lindalc, tree climber, S62.75 a week. 

Penal Institutions Department. 
House oj Correction. 
Thomas J. Ca.-<o, 142 Bellingham ave- 
nue. Revere, correction officer, $72.75 a 
week. 

Reai, Phopkrty Department. 
Ihiihliwj.-^ Division. 
Verona Dcveiy, 114 Fenway, telephone 
oi)erator, $70.25 a week. 

RETIREAtENT BOARD. 

Evelyn A. 15;ildvi;:i. 7.S Forest Hills 
street. J;iiii:iiiM I'l un. irronnting ma- 
cliine opei jiiii-. 847.7.5 a w i ek. 

Welfare Department. 
Cvntral Office. 
Myrtle C.Ki iM , .10.5 Columbus avenue, 
clerk and ;\ pi-i, S47.75 a week. 

Patricia DiH..-aiiu. 23 Taunton ave- 
nue, Mattapan, clerk and typi-st, $47.75 a 
week. 

Esther Kalp. .56 Kinjisdale street, Dor- 
che.ster, clerk ami ivpi-i. ^[7.75 a week. 

Brendan Cunaii. .)1A Hoslin street, 
Dorchester. stati-iir;il machine operator. 
$50.25 a week. 

Dori* Allc 11. 63 Lawrence avenue, Dor- 
chester, clerk and typist, $47.75 a week. 

Nina McNair, 60 Savin street, Rox- 
bury, cook, $55.25 a week. 

SUFFOLK COrXTY. 
Supreme Judk iai. Court. 
C/r(7,-'.s Office. 
Frederick J. Quinlan. 15 Tyndale 
street, Ro.slindale, procedural technician, 
$169.11 semimonthly. 



Changes in Statm. 

Administrative Services Department. 

Purchasing Division. 
Helen R. Roth, 6 Eldora street, Rox- 
bury, from principal clerk and typist 
(temporaiy) at $72.75 a week to princi- 
pal clerk and typist (permanent) at 
$72.75 a week. 

Fire Department. 
Edward W. O'Connell, 51 Ames street, 
Dorchester, from fire alarm operator 
at $87.16 a week to senior fire alarm 
operator (temporary, 6 months) at 
$101.14 a week. 

John J. Breen, 10 Avalon road. West 
Roxbury, from district fire chief at 
$138.12 a week to deputy fire chief at 
$154.21 a week. 

Angelo M. Malverosa, 261 Hanover 
street, from working foreman sign 
painter at $72.75 a week to painter fore- 
man (temporary, 6 months) at $75.25 a 
week. 

Heaetii Department. 

Hrallh Dirision. 

Francis .K. Hi rnsaii. 129 River street, 
M:iiia]>aii. fiDiu eliH^' of Bureau of Hous- 
inii and .Sanitation at 8117.75 a week to 
chief of Bureau of Housing and Sanita- 
tion at $132 a week. 

Parks and Recreation Department. 

N'icliolas R. Aliherti, 45 Loring street, 
Hyde Park, from gardener at S75.25 a 
week to senior gardener at $77.75 a week. 

Thoma- J. Mullen, 86 Rossmore road, 
West lioxhuiy, from gardener at $75.25 
a week to .senior gardener at $77.75 a 
week. 

Jerome Sacco, 263 Ha\-rc street, East 
Boston, from senior recreation instnictor 
at $84.75 a week to rocrea'tion supervisor 
(temporary) at $88.25 a week. 

Public Whuks Department. 

// /;//) //■((// l)i rision. 

James M, Flvnn, 17 Bow street, 
Hyde Park, from cashier at .$77.75 a 
week to principal clerk and tvpist (tem- 
porary) at $81,25 a week. 

Rnriitarii Division. 
James J. Ciill. 100 Jamaica street, Ja- 
maica Plain, from motor equipment 
o]ieralor and laborer at $70.25 a week to 
lal)orer at 8677.') a week. 

Mat, r Dirisinn. 

Robert M. Tnll.\-, SO Durbeck road, 
Rockland, fioiu senior storekeeper at 
$81.25 a week to jirincipal storekeeper 
(temi)orary) at S84.75 a week. 

Patrick Brown, 20 Raven street, Dor- 
chester, from laborer at $62.75 a week 
to water .service maintenance man at 
$65.25 a week. 



8 



CITY RECORD 



Truntijers. 
Public Works Dkpahtment. 
Hohcrt V. O'Hricn, 6 Mctcalf coiiil. 
.laimiicii Plain, from Public Works De- 
part mont, HiRhway Division, as heavy 
motor (>qiiii)mcnt oprrator and laborer 
at $77.75 a wefk to Public Works De- 
jiartmont, Automoti\o Division, as 
hoavy motor equipment operator and 
laborer at $77.75 a week. 

Vetkr.ans' Services Department. 
Marjorie H. Fairhurst, 43 Crawford 
stroft. Roxbury, from Welfare Depart- 
ment as dork and typist at 86025 a week 
to Veterans' Services Department :is 
clerk Mnd tyi)ist at .S60.25 a week. 

Leaves of Absence. 

Bi ii.DiNo Department. 
James I>. Rock, 1625 Cominonwealili 
avenue. .Mlston, building in.spector, S91 .75 
a week. 

John James McNeil, 144 N .«trcot. 
South Hoston, elevator inspector, S81.25 
.1 week. 

Hospital Department. 

Main Division. 
Thomas J. Byrnes, 38 Lonsdale .street. 
Dorchester, senior hospital medical work- 
er, S67.75 a week. 

Long Island Division. 
Kdward F. Wagner, 8 Centre street. 
Roxbur>-, hospital laundry worker, S50.25 
a week. 

Pi itLir WoRK.s Department. 
Bridge Division. 
Coleman P. Flaherty, 210 O'Callaghan 
Way, South Bo.ston, assistant drawtendrr. 
S72.75 a week. 

Scwcr Division. 
Frederick G. Healey. 43 East Brook- 
line street, laborer, S57.75 a week. 

Step-Rate Increases. 

.\l)MIM.STU\TIVE SeuvICES DePAHTMENT. 

P u rrhn.-iing D i i ision . 

Helen R. Roth, principal clerk and 
typist, from $72.75 to S75.25 a week. 

-Mary Vt. Sullivan, principal clerk and 
secretary, from $91.75 to $95.25 a week. 

Fire Department. 
Paul V. Doherty, fire fighter, from 
$S7.16 to $90.22 a week. 

Health Department. 
Health Division. 
Leonard Psisciucco, accountant, from 
$88.25 to $91.75 a week. 

Leo F. Drinkwater, .«enior account 
clerk (temporan ), from $60.25 to $62.75 
a week. 

James J. Culhane, public health edu- 
' (tor. from $77.75 to $81.25 a week. 



I);iliiel ,1. Mc.\alli:ir.i, cl( rk :ind 

(on military leave), from $50^25 to $52.75 
a week. 

John P. Treunor. Jr., public health 
physician, from $117.75 to $122.jO a 
week. 

David H. Coren. public health den- 
ti.st, from $88.25 to $91.75 a week. 

Pyfhel .\. Sullivan, dental a.ssistant, 
from $57.75 to $60.25 a week. 

Kdgar W. Bidwell, environmental 
.sinitation in.spector, from $84.75 to $88.25 
a week. 

William P. Foley, environmental sani- 
tation inspector, from $84.75 to $88.25 a 
week. 

James H. McKernan, Jr., environ- 
mental .sanitation insjiector, from $75.25 
to .S77.75 a week. 

Henry Mazer, chief of Bureau of Milk 
and Chemistry, from $127.25 to $132 a 
week. 

Wiighls and Mmxurt.s Divi.fion. 
Kdward F. Green, deputy sealer of 
weights and measures, from $77.75 to 
SSI. 25 a week. 

Law Department. 

.K. Louis Ostrows. .senior legal a.ssistant, 
from SI 13 to $117.75 a week. 

Kdward F. Riley, senior clerk, from 
S70.25 to $72.75 a week. 

Penal Ln.stitutions Department. 
House of Correction. 
Bernard C. Dohertv, correction officer, 
from $75.25 to $84.75 a week. 

Pi BLic Works Deiurtment. 
// igh way-Lighting Division. 
Charles E. McCabe, senior electrical 
engineer, from $113 to $117.75 a week. 

Sanitary Divi.^ion. 

Joseph P. Sances, principal account 
clerk, from $72.75 to $75.25 a week. 

James A. Frawley, bulldozer-operator, 
from $77.75 to $81.25 a week. 

Frank J. Alberti, laborer, from S55.25 
to S57.75 a week. 



Laborers. 

Coleman Joyce, 
Robert K. Bowes, 
Thomas H. Brooks, 
Patrick J. Corbet f, 
William J. Downey, 
James P. Hooley, " 
John J. Kenney, 
Pasqiiale Lanza. 
Thomas B. McHugh. 
Thomas L. McMorrow, 
James T. O'Connor. 
Joseph G. Piazza, 
Klmer F. Sylvester, 



From 
$65.25— S 
60.25— 
65.25— 
65.25— 
60.25— 
60.25— 
65.25— 
65.2.5— 
60.2.5— 
60.25— 
62.75— 
65.25— 
6.5.2,5— 



To 



'5 

62.75 
67.75 
67.75 
62.75 
62.75 
67.75 
67.75 
62.75 
62.75 
65.25 
67.75 
67.75 



Joseph Bova. motor equipment oper- 
ator and laborer, from $60.25 to $62.75 a 
week. 



l liMi,,;.- M, iirook.-. Jr.. heavv i... 
equipment operator and laborer, u 
$75.25 to $77.75 a week. 

Anthony Cenillo. motor eqiiij)!!!. m 
operator and laborer, from $67.75 to 
%7025 a week. 

James C. (J'Reilly. motor equipment 
operator and laborer, from $57.75 to 
96025 a week. 

Louis R. .Santiano, heavy motor equiji- 
<jperat or and laborer, from $75.25 
to $77.75 a week. 

liemard C. Sulprizio. motor equipment 
operator and laborer, from $67.75 to 
$70 2.5 a week. 

William H. Watts, heavy motor equip- 
"'t'nj__op<'rator and laborer, from $75.25 
to $77.75 a week. 

Joseph G. Ahern. sign painter, from 
$70.25 to $72.75 a week. 

Francis J. Clancy, carpenter, from 
$75.25 to $77.75 a week. 

Wattr Div,.'<,on. 

Charles W. Critch. motor equipment 
operator and laborer (temporar\ ). from 
t60.25 to $62.75 a week. 

John H. Currie. Jr.. heavy motor equip- 
'"ent^^ operator and laborer, from $7525 
to $77.75 a week. 

William G. Foley, water ser\ice in- 
.spector (permanent-intermittent), from 
$81.25 to $84.75 a week. 

Retirement Iio.\RD. 

Nora C. Coleman, -senior account 
clerk, from $62.75 to $65.25 a week. 

Kdward L. Hanlon. .senior account 
clerk from $62.75 to $65.25 a week. 

Treasury Department. 
Collecting Division. 
Roy E. Capelle. deputv collector, 
from $84.75 to S88.25 a week. 

SUFFOLK COUNTY. 
Dlstrict Attorney s Office. 
Veronica Cobleigh. procedural tech- 
nician, $84.75 a week. 

Superior Court. 
Civil Business. 

Maurice J. Ahern, head clerk, from 
$95.25 to $98.75 a week. 

-Alice L. Donovan, procedural tech- 
nician, from $77-75 to $81.25 a week. 

.\nna I^. Francis, principal clerk, from 
$70.25 to $72.75 a week. 
_Mary G^_Curry, princiiial clerk, from 
$75.25 to $77.75 a week. 

Marie T. Quinn, senior clerk, from 
S60.25 to $62.75 a week. 

-Anna K. Flaherty, senior clerk, from 
$60.25 to $62.75 a week. 

Caroline P. Johnson, junior clerk, from 
$.52.75 to $55.25 a week. 

Dolores L. Russo. junior clerk, from 
$.52.75 to $55.25 a week. 

Municipal Court, City of Boston. 
Mary C. Bopp. clerk, from $47.75 to 
$.50.25 a week. 



Jax. 3 



CITY RECORD 



9 



Paul Leary, clerk, from $52.75 to $55.25 
a week. 

E.\ST Boston- District CorRT. 
Nora X. Bonincuore. principal clerk, 
from $163.67 to S169.ll semimonthly. 

OVERTIME ALLOWED 

The Mayor has approved the following 
request : 

HospiT.\L Dep.\rtmext. 
Main Divisioti. 
John Leary, working steam foreman, 
7i hours at $3 an hour; Richard Bishop, 
first-class steam fireman, 8 hours at S3 
an hour; John Kiely, second-class sta- 
tionarj' engineer, 12 hour< at S3 an hour; 
Albert Bonetti. second-class stationary 
engineer. 1 hour at S3 an hour; Florence 
Donabedian, Mary Ritchie, head clerks. 
8 hours each at S3 an liour; Rose Ab- 
berton, Julian Collins, principal clerks, 
8 hours each at S3 an hour. 



VETERANS' RETIREMENTS 

The Mayor has approved the following 
veterans' applications for retirement: 

John J. Chapman, also known as John 
H. Chapman, 11 Myles Standish road, 
West Roxbury. assessor of taxes, Assess- 
ing Department. 

Patrick M. Costello, 18 F street, South 
Boston, laborer. Sanitary Division, Pub- 
lic Works Department. 

Charles B. Crowley. 828 Parker street, 
Roxbury, junior ci\il engineer. Bridge 
Division. Public Works Department. 



CONTRACTS AWARDED 

The Mayor approved the award of the 
following contracts to the lowest eligible 
bidders: 

Admi.mstrative Services Dep.\rtme.\t. 
Purchasing Division. 
Tea and Coffee 

Furnishing tea and coflfee to the various 
citv departments from Januarv 1, 1959, 
to "March 31. 19,59. awarded as'foUows: 

Authority- was granted to award all 
items, with the exception of Item 4, to 
the lower bidders. On Item 4, the lower 
bidder did not meet specifications. 

Approximate total amounts of awards 
were as follows: 

Contract for Edmands Coffee Com- 
pany, $12,451,60, less 2 per cent discount, 
time of payment. Item 5. 

Order for Stanle^• W. Ferguson, Inc., 
$1,986.14, less 2 per cent discount, fifteen 
days, Items 1. 2, 3, and 4. 

The bids were : 

Item 1. 1,200 Pounds Black Ceylon or 
India Tea, or Blend of. Leaf, Medium 
G'ade, in Approximately 100-Pound Chests, 
As Specified, Per Pound. — Stanley W. 
Ferguson, Inc., 55.54 cents*; J. L. 
McCormick & Co., 55.70 cents. 



Item 2. 400 Pounds Black Ceylon or 
India Tei, or Blend of, Leif, Medium 

Grw'r. 1-Fi,und Packtgeh As Specified, 
P,' /'<,':„'. Stanlev W. Fer-usnii, Inc., 
5ti.,-, 1 r, ;ii. : ,1. L. McC'iji-mick & Co., 

//, /» .;. ' < r< I J!<i,i.-: irilh Tags, 

As r,' .s', ;., ',,-,/;,,/,>, /'-.',',.;,;, ' in WO's, 

l.-,n r, , Hmis tn i;,.;r.. \.; 11, ,(/„t. Per 
r<j.w . — Sta iii'v W. I'crjius lii. Inc., .§6.45*; 
J. L. Met 'Drmick iV- Co., s i. 55, 

Item -'f. 100 ( T, I Bugs, Stringless, 
Pv Spentiru-iuns. I'<irl:, 'l .',0 }-Oii,irr. 
Per ((isc.~^\:mhy W . r.i-ii-ai. Iiir,. 
S2..j5*: J. L. Mc('.)rmirk cV- < .).. s2,47. 

!;r:n .). :\S.nOO I>,u k (irou,,,' ( ofn. 
l?-(:inin I',.rt;r.(,(.<. .\ s l',r S pi c ! i'i c tlions. 
I'm ihujs To Hr I ,irn,sl;,'i to ( ':!:/ Dcpart- 
tnc^its. I n, of ( iiftrgc. Per Paikige. — 
luiniands Coffee Company, 44.47 cents*; 
Staiilcv \\ . Ferguson, Inc., 45.39 cents. 

• Contract awarded. 

Flour 

Furnishing Hour to the various city 
departments fi-.)m .la:iuai\' 1. 1959, to 
March 31. 1959, awarded to Thurman 
Cjmnany in th- amouiit of .'$3,621.20, less 
2 per cent discount, time of i)ayment. 

The bids were: 

Item 1. Appro.rimatel'i 1 .■V>0 Bags 
Flour. Br, o'. Iiio-Pooi,,' .\, ,r ( atton Bags, 
Per Bag. i{a'\v< ( 'orijoi-ation, 

$3,15, total, .ss.:il)2.3;): fhurman Com- 
pany, $5.92.* 

Item 2. Approximately 110 Bags Flour, 
Pastri!, 100-Pound New Cotton Bags, Per 
Bag. — Radio Foods Corporation, $5.80, 
total, Sa38; Thurman Company, $5.72.* 

* Contract awarded. 

Soap 

Furnishing soaj) to the various city 
departments from Januarv 1, 1959. to 
March 31, 195.1, awarded as follows: 

Contra<'ts fm- Saveni Products Com- 
\YA\\\- s:') 717, less 1 |icr cent discount, citv 
pa\ .lav. net. Illl davs: Swift & Co., 
S2.2!)S. Kl, w\. 

Orders tor Coli,iate-P;dnvi!ive Comj^anw 
SI. 323, net cash; Proct-r A- (iamMe 
Distrilniting Company, .s j:!,S.(i,S, net, 
cash: Philip M. I'rost, doing iiusiiiess as 
New England Soap Company, $148.50, 
less 2 per cent discount, time of payment. 

The bids were: 

Item 1. 125 Drums Soap Powder, 200- 
Pound Drums, Per Drum. — Savem Prod- 
ucts Company, $16, 18_per <-eiit soaj) 
powder; Swift & Co., .-i7.,.'i pi r liuniln-d- 
weight.* 

Item 2. 2,000 Pounds Hot Water Built 
So'jp, in Xew Cotton Bags, Per Pound. — 
Colgate-Palmolive Company, 11.51 cents, 
140-pound bags, Colgate, Formula 40; 
Procter & Gamble Distributing Company, 
12.25 cents. 140-pound bags, Ozonite: 
Savem Products Company. $10.60 per 
hundredweight,* 135-pound bags; Swift & 
Co., 12,17 cents. 110-pound bags. 

Item S. 4,400 Pounds Soap Chips. 110- 
Pound Xew Cotton Bags, Per Pound. — 
Colgate-Palmolive Companj-, 11.62 cents, 



100-pound cotton bags, Arctic Crystal 
Flakes; Procter & Gamble Distributing 
Company, 9.97 cents,* Concord Hakes; 
Savem Products Company, $10.47 per 
hundredweight; Swift & Co., $12.0!) per 
hundredweight. 

Item 4- 70 Cases Laundry Soap, 120 
8-Ounce Cakes, Per Case. — Procter & 
Gamble Distributing Company, $1.86, 
ordinary bar laundry soap; Savem Prod- 
ucts Company, $5.50*; Swift & Co., $5.67. 

Item -5. .^20 Cases While Floating Soap, 
Cawrappr 1 .01 in \-()inire Cakes. Per 
<'os,. ( 'oli;:i t c-l',-! Iniolive Companv, 
s\\.r,l. Col-.ii:' I'loatiim s)ap: Procter"* 
Gamble Distributing ('-)in;)aii>". 811.755, 
Ivory, 100 j-ounce cakes, uiiwiapped, 
Tvpe II; Savem Products ('onip:in\', 
$.j,75, milled.* 

Itcii i:. '.''I <oiil,;os f.ojiiiil Antiseptic 
Soup. I', ■ (oi'hoi. Nfw 1-ngland Soap 
Comi).ui\. si.:;(): .'vi\ciii Products Com- 
pany, .si. 30: Swilt & C.i.. .SI.23.* 

Item 7. It;.', (odious Lo/uoi Soap, Per 
Gallon. — New Ijifihiiid Soa|) Company, 
90 cents ; S:i\-.'iii Pioducts Compan\-, 
95 cents; >V- ( 'o.. si . p"). 

.s'. ' -/.■' < II ////( Floating Soap, 

rrnrroii/,, ', n i-Onni; Cakes, .According 
to r, ', ,,1 S/„i:ii,;itious. Per Case.— 
(■ol-,;itr-l'aliiiMlivc Conipany, S5,88, Col- 
gate Floating soap, T> p:' I*; Procter & 
(iamble Distributing C'omi)any, .$7.20, 
Tvp? II; Savem Products Companv, 
.S'i.85. Pearl. 200 3-ounce cakes. Tvpe I; 
Swift & Co., $5.89, Pearl, 200 3-ounce 
<-;ikes, Tvpe I. 



• Contract awrrded. 

Tractor Shovel 

Furnishing one tractor shovel to the 
.\utomotive Division of the Public Works 
Department, awarded to Clark-Wilcox 
Companw as follows: list price, $14,625, 
less trade-in allowance, $2,525, net de- 
livered price, $12,100. 

The bids were: 

Requisition No. G-o7o. 
One New Tractor ,Shovel, Gas. Michigan, 
Menlel 75 A. or Equal . for Highway Diri- 
.\ion. — l], J, Hleiler l^(iuipnient ('ompan\'. 
Inc., list price. Sl(i,28(), less allowance, 
85,780, total delivered price, Sl(),50!); 
Clark-Wilcox ('om|iaii\-, list price, 
814,625,* less allowance, 82,525. total de- 
livered price, .812,100; II, F, Davis Tractor 
Compain-, list price, $17,780, less allow- 
ance, .$5,000, total delivered price, $12,780; 
Hedge & Mattheis Companv, list price, 
sl4.5l),t. less allowance, 82,115. total de- 
livered pi ice, 812.1594; Sh;mahan I >(iuip- 
merit Corporation, list price, 816.591, 
less trade discount, $829,55, less allowance, 
$4,500, total delivered price, $11,261.45. 

* Contract awarded. 

Carryall 

Furnishing one Carryall to the Auto- 
motive Division of the Public Works 
Department, awarded as follows: 

The bid submitted by Luby Chevrolet, 
Inc., who was the lower bidder, was ir- 



I (I 



CITY RECORD 



Jij iiu IimI u:i> .li |..i.-iti <l ul 

till' AuilitorV olinc. Aiilhority is llicn-- 
forc r<'«)Hi'ft«-<l to aw.inl a roiilr.icl l<t llic 
•iiily titliiT l)i<l<l< r. ( 'iiinm«iiw«'al«h Chcv- 
roU't ( '<»in|>Hii\ . at the prirc i hccki-d on 
thf acriimpuiivitiK talmlatioti. 

Approxitniiti' t4)tal ainDunt of contrac t 
will !«•: list pri.f. %2.H2U.'M. tra<if 
discount. $l7(i.7.'i. less trade-in allowaiict', 
I unit. i'Mi $2,144.1"). Uss 2 per cont 
discount, time of payment. 

Dki'ahtmknt ok S< h<k)i. Hi ii.iunc.^. 
Fuel Oil Tank 

Funii>liinn and inslalliun new fuel f)il 
>l<)ra(te lank at llie South Boston Hittli 
School, awarded lo Seltzer «S: Co.. Inc.. 
in the amount of $5,990. 

The other hid was Massachusetts Heat- 
iuK ('or|)oralion. S6.747. 

Pi Bi.ic WoKKs Dki'ahtmknt. 
Sewer Contract 

Sewerage works in Weld street. West 
i{<)xl)ury: and |)rivate 1 i!id 7.') feet from 
Cirandview street to a point !)() feet south- 
w. st -rly. \\'est KoxDurv : an<i minor 
sewerage works in .Mtacrest road. Hrook- 
stone stri'ct. Hrookway road, and Florian 
Way, West Hoxbiiry. awarded to .\ . 
Hevil.ic(iua & Son. in the amount of 
s;:{.77X.2:). 

1 he other l)ids were: 

Manning Construction Company. Inc., 
S:<.>S7(i: Jo.seph Capone & Sons. Inc., 
$4.ti5(l; Mvstic Construction Companv. 
Inc.. «4.772.5(); John J. Hotti, S4,9«.2: Uos- 
lindale Construction Company, S.5.42(): 
Clover Construction Corporatiou, $11,765. 

Spotlight Poles 

The Mayor has approved the follow- 
inn: 

\>y.\H Mi{. Mavoh: 

Your approval is respectfully requested 
to the awarii of a contract for installa- 
tion of thirty spotlight )>oles at various 
locations in the City of Boston, to .lohn 
,1. Botti, 1050 .\dains .street. Dorchester. 
.Ma.ss.. the lowest eligible bidder, in the 
anioimt of $5,300. 

The following bids wore received De- 
cember 11. 1958. after publicly adveni.s- 
mg in the Cily Hvcnrd i.ssue of Novem- 
ber 29. 19.58: 

Martin T.Ca.sby. $4.2.50: .lohn .1. Botti. 
§5.300 ; Manning Construction Company. 
Inc . f6.(XX); Coughlin Construction Com- 
pany. Inc.. $7.2.50: S. ,]. Tom.isello 
Corporation. $S.400: Dooley Broth. Ms. 
Inc., $8,660: (iranite Kngineers. Inc.. 
$16,225. 

The bid submitted by Martin T. Cas- 
l>y was not re.sponsive to the publisheil 
Mivitation for bids because it failed to 
comply with certain mandatory re(|uire- 
ments of the propo.sil. and therefore 
must be rejected. Specifically, this bid- 
der .set forth his unit prices and their 
rel.ited tot.d pnci s in fig\ires onlv. and 
not l„,t|, Ul V, M,,|. ,,„| (ii:,;,, 



-Iipulaliil in the prt-iTllxci l.iiui l.,i 
proposals. 

.Mthough the failure of thi.s bidder to 
submit his proposal in words and figiirrs 
might ha\c been corrected by my re- 
(pHsting your Honor's permi-ssion to di.s- 
pen.M' with advertising, it also ha.s been 
establi.shed that the Highway Division 
engineer is not .satisfied that this bidder 
has thi- ability and experience Deces.siiry 
for the performance of thi.s particular 
kintl of work. 

The work to be done under this con- 
tract is to be contpieted December 31. 
1958. 

Rc-^jectfully .submitted. 
Robert P. Shea, 
Ciiminixsidiicr nj Public Witrks. 

Rkm. I'hoi'ektv Dei'aktmknt. 
Parking Facility Rental 

'I'he Mayor has approved the vote of 
the Real Property Board unanimously 
accepting the bid of Post (Jffice Square 
Parking. Inc.. it being the highest bid- 
der, in the amount of $4,004 i)er month, 
for the leasing of the Franklin. P<:irl. 
,ind Hartford streets. Boston. o(T-stivet 
l>.uking facility, for a term of one year, 
1)1 ginning .lanuary 1. 19.59, an<I ending 
Dicciiiber 31. 19.59. and the chairman is 
authorized to prepare and execute a 
lea.se. in behalf of the Board, with Past 
( )ttice Square Parking. Inc., in accord- 
ance with the terms of the propo.sal and 
subject to the approval of the Mayor. 

The other bids were: 

Boston Auto Parks. Inc.. $3.871 ; North 
Cambridge Motor Sales. Inc.. $2.1.50. 

CONTRACTS AWARDED 

WITHOUT ADVERTISING 

The Mayor ai)pro\od the award of a 
contract, without advertising, b.i.scd on 
the following communication: 

Pi HI.K WoKKS DkI'AKTMKNT. 

Snow Removal 

Dkak Mk. Mayor: 

On November 24, 1958. in accordance 
wiih my written request dated Novem- 
ber 19. 1958. your Honor authorized me 
lo dispen.se wilh advertising and to .ward 
contracts to nineteen contractors for 
furnishing labor and equipment, when 
necessary, during the 1958-1959 snow re- 
moval season, to supplement the regular 
forces of this department engaged in 
snow removal work. 

.\t this time. I .should like to amend 
the aforementioned letter by adding the 
nanu's of the following contractors to 
the list of contractors as recited therein. 
\ iz.. Charles Tode.sca, 98 Roslindale ave- 
nue, Roslindale. Mass.. and Ro.slindale 
Contracting Company, 34 .\verton .street. 
Roslindale, Ma.ss.. in onier that I may 
award contract.s to them for such ser\- 
ice.s. for the .same period and on the same 



I'ui.ii. I r; i-iiig will, following your 
approval of this request, be dispen.std 
with in engaging the .si'rvice.s of th<M- 
two contractors who also have the eqtup- 
ment and experience needed for the pc i- 
forman<e of snow removal operations. 
Respectfully submitted. 
Robert P. She.\. 
Cinnmiioiunur of Public Warks. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

Dccemlw r 22. 
(n III ml Ordi T So. .i.5S. 
I'nder the provisions of Cleneral Law« 
(Ter. Edit.), chapter 31. section 16A. the 
Director of Civil Service having approM .! 
the traasfer of Patrolman .lohn .1. Con- 
nolly. Division 2. to the Capitol Police 
Force, Office of the State Superintendent 
of Buildings, Commonwealth of Ma>sa- 
chii.si'tts; the .s;iid Patrolman John I 
Connolly will terminate his .ser\ices in 
the Boston Police Department at 7.1.5 
o'clock A.M., Mondav, December 2'.t. 
19.58. 

December 2^1 
anil ml Oriii T Si>. .m. 

Patrolmen Mark \. Sennett and .]<- 
seph D. Ii«lek. Division 9. are hen lr. 
commended for the performance >■ 
meritorious police duty and each i- 
granted three days' additional vacation 

.\t about 8.20 p.m. on PYidav. Novem- 
ber 28. 1958. Hilda Carpenter, of HI 
Homestead street. Roxbur>-. while walk- 
ing opposite 65 (leorgia street, in R<i\- 
bury. was knocked to the ground b\ 
youthful a-s-sjiilant and her handbag (.ji. 
taining $62 taken by him. Patrol:ii. i 
Sennett and lielek. responding to tl- 
scene in a radio car. were informed 
the fact.s and given a description of i 
youth by Hilda Carpe-nter. CnuM- . 
the area and while still on Homesti 
street, the officers detected a youiii 
answering tlu> description, who. on ob- 
.serving the officers, fled down an alley. 
The officers pursued and apprehended 
the youth, one .Steward ClarA-in, 14 year.-, 
22 Hollander street. Roxbur>-. and a.s he 
was unable to give a good account > 
liim.-elf they took him to Station 9 i 
further questioning. At first Ciar\ 
denied having any knowledge of ' 
above a.s.sault and robbery. Howe\ ■ 
Patrolmen Sennett and Belek noted il 
the subject was wearing a rcversil' 
jacket and that the inside was tan chiin. 
as described by the victim. It wa.s min- 
ing at the time, and the tan chino >i I 
of the jacket was wet. Garvin w 
questioneil further by the officers :i 
finally admitted that he was the 
sjiilanf. He named an accomplice. ^ 
Haywood Justice. 17 years, of 19 !)■ 
street. Roxbury. who was brought to iii 
station and admitted his part in .In 
crime. 

Steward Clarvin and HaywoofI Ju.<ticc 
further admitted that during the month 



Jan. 3 



CITY RECORD 



of November, 1958, either alone or in 
each other's company, they had partici- 
pated in seven similar crimes involving; 
a total loot of over S84. and in one in- 
stance the victim, a man. was also 
knocked to the ground. They also save 
the officers information regarding the 
identity cf two boys responsible for 
breaking and entering a barber shop at 
366A Blue Hill avenue. These two boys. 
Paul Bushfan, 14 years. 80 Walnut ave- 
nue, Roxbury, and Lamar Loftiis. 21 
Wakullah street. Roxbury. were ques- 
tioned and confessed to the barber shoj) 
break and to an attempted break at 
another barber shop. 

Ail of these boys were prosecuted in 
Roxbury District Court. Haywood Jus- 
t ce was held for the grand jury. Stcw.ird 
Garvin was found guilty and sentencetl 
to the Youth Service Boartl, sentence 
suspended for one year. Paul Bushfan 
and Lamar Loftus were found guilty on 
charges of breaking and entering and 
attempted breaking and entering and 
were sentenced to the Youth Service 
Board, sentences suspended for one year. 

The commissioner is pleased to recog- 
nize the devotion to duty and alertness 
of Patrolmen Sennett and Beiek in the 
arrest and thorough investigation in the 
above cases, resulting in cessation of 
criminal activities by these four >ouihs. 

December 24. 
Gtyieral Order Xa. 360. 

Sergt. Frederick W. Ramsey and Pa- 
trolmen John V. Nee and Joseph Kas- 
parian, Jr., of Division 15, are hereby 
commended for the performance of 
meritorious police duty and each is 
granted three days' additional vacation. 

On November 18. 1958. at about 3,50 
A.M., George W. Hemenway. 36 years, 
married, Wellesley. Mass.. while walking 
in Chelsea street. Charlestown, was as- 
saulted and knocked unconscious to the 
ground, robbed of his wallet containing 
$15 and his Benrus wrist watch was taken 
from his arm by the unknown assailant. 
The victim was removed from the scene 
to Massachusetts General Hospital in an 
unconscious condition, found to be .-ui- 
fering from questionable cerebral coneu.-:- 
sion and fractured right ankle and was 
held for treatment. Sergeant Ramsey 
and Patrolmen Nee and Kasparian re- 
sponded to the scene in a radio car and 
then proceeded to the hospital for the 
purpose of questioning the victim. He, 
however, was in such a dazed condition 
that the officers were unable to obtain 
from him the details of the a.ssault or 
anj- description of his assailant. 

Returning to the scene of the crime, 
the officers made inquiries of all persons 
found in the area and finally located a 
witness, a man attached to the U. S. 
Navy and temporarily stationed at the 
Charlestown Navy Yard. This man in- 
formed the officers that while he was 



seated in his automobile parked on Chel- 
sea street he saw an imknown man ap- 
proach the victim, then strike him several 
times about the fac(> and body with his 
fists, thus causing tiio victim to fall help- 
less to the sidewalk, after which the thief 
searched the \-ictinrs pockets and rc- 
inc\-ed his wrist watch. Before the thief 
left the scene, the witness walked from 
his car to within a few feet of the culprit 
and obtained a close view and good 
description of him, which he ga\'e to tlie 
officers. 

In possession of this description, the 
officers continued a careful investigation 
and after a short period of time arr;-*te(i 
at his home one Charles F. Driscoll. 46 
years, married. 41 McNulty couit. 
Cliarlestown. on svispicioii of unaini.d 
robberv. A >earch uf the lumu di- h- d 
a Benrus wrist watcli hidden l>,u..irl, 
rubbish in a kitchen waste basket. Diis- 
ccll denied owning the watch and was 
unable to account for its presence in his 
home. He was brought to the station 
where the witness positi\'ely identified 
him. George W. Hemenwa.\', the \ ictim, 
identified the Benrus watch as his prop- 
erty and the one that was taken from 
him after the assault. 

It was learned later that in .\iia:ust of 
1958. Charles F. Driscoll had coiiiiuitt.d 
a similar crime of robbery in He\ eie. f,)i- 
which he had been indicted and was out 
on bail pending trial. 

On No\ ember 19. 1958, in Charlestown 
Court, Driscoll was charged with un- 
armed robbery in the No\ember 18 case. 
Probable cause was found and he was 
held for the Suffolk County grand jury. 
He was subsequently indicted for ,his 
crime and is now awaiting trial. 

The commissioner is pleased to I'eoog- 
nize the thoroughness and sjieed with 
which Sergeant Ramsey and Patrolmen 
N(i> and Ka>palian i-Dndiirted the in- 
\-e~tii;ati(iii n\ the .i1mi\i^ ciiiiic, resulting 
in ill.- pidiiqit ain-t III the criminal. 

December 24. 
General Order Xo. -3(11. 
The following promotion and a>-iiin- 
inent is hereb>- ordered to i iki , tf. t 
Wednesday, December 24. 19.)S. ai 7.1.") 
o'clock .\.M.: 

To the Grade of Deputy Superintendent. 

Capt. Francis M. Tiernan, from Di\i- 
sion 10 to Bureau of Criminal Inxesti- 
gation. 



THE STATUS OF LAW 

No man in this country is so high that 
he is abo\-e the law. No officer of the 
law may set that law at defiance with 
impunity. .\ll the officers of the govern- 
ment, from the highest to the lowest, 
are creatures of the law. and are bound 
to obey it. 

T'nitki) St.\tks Supreme Court, 
106 U.S. 220 (1882) 



TRANSFERS OF APPROPRIA- 
TIONS 

The Mayor has approved the follow- 
ing requests for transfers of appropria- 
tions : 

City Pl.\xning Bo,\rd. 

From 21. Communications, S125, to 10, 
Permanent Employees, .$125. 

From 27. Repairs of Equipment, $25.10. 
to 10. Permanent Employees, $25.10. 

From 29, Miscellaneous Services. 
$4,163.61, to 10, Permanent Emplovees. 
$4,163.61. 

From 34. Household Supplies and Ma- 
terials, .S9.96, to 10, Permanent Em- 
]doyees. 89.96. 

From 36, Office Supplies and Materials, 
850.12, to 10, Permanent Employee-;. 
$50.12. 

From 39, Miscellaneous Supplies and 
Materials. $151.94. to 10, Permanent Em- 
ployees. 8151.94. 

From 49. Miscellaneous Ctu-rent 
Charges and Obligations, $35.40, to 10, 
Permanent Em]doyoes, S35.40. 

From 56, Office Furniture and Equip- 
ment. 8556.75, lo 10, Permanent Em- 
jiloyees, $556.75. 

From 59, Miscellaneous Equipment. 
$334.94, to 10, Permanent Employees. 
$334.94. 

Fi.NANCE Commission. 

From 10, Permanent Employees. 
83,800, to 56, Office Furnitiue and Equi)!- 
ment, $3,800. 

From 11, Temporary Employees, $500. 
to 56, Office Furniture and Equipment. 
8500. 

From 28. Travel Inside State. ,$50 to 
22, Light Heat, Power. .S50. 

From 39. General Supijlies, .$50, to 36, 
Offic'e Supplies and Materials, $50. 

From 49, Other Current Charges and 
Obligations, $1,400, to 56, Office Furni- 
ture and Equipment. $1,000, 21, Com- 
nninications. $250, 27, Re])airs and Serv- 
icing of p:(piiiiment, $150. 

Hospital Department. 

From 29. Miscellaneous Contractual 
Services. $3,000, to 27. Reiiairs and Serv- 
icing of p]quipment. -83.000. 

From 33, Heating Supiilies and Ma- 
terials, .S3,()00. lo 27, Repairs and Servic- 
ing of K(|iiiiimciiT, .$3,000. 

Loiiij Island Dirifsioii. 

From 590, Miscellaneous Equipment, 
$17,000, 700, Siiuctures and Improve- 
ments, 811,000, to 340. Houseliold Sup- 
plies, ,$4,000, 350. Medical Suiiplies 
$13,000 , 290, Mi.scellaneous Contractual 
Services, $10,000, 210, Communications. 
$700, 360, Office Supplies, $300. 

Real Property Department. 
Propertf/ Dii'i.tion . 
From 22. Heat. Light, $1,800, 26, Con- 
tractual Services, $2,600, 27, Repairs, $75 
28, Tran.sportation, $125, 29. Miscellane- 



CITY RFiCORD 



Jan. 3 



.,11- (•..iiir,..-iu:.l >, rM.. -. .S»2.j. 30. ()lii<f 
Siip|.li<':<, S240, 39. Miscflliirn'outi .Sui>- 
plus S25. 49. MiMclliinfoiis ('h:ir(j( s. 
$90. 50. .\iiio K(inii)iiiont. S.50. 70. Unil.U 
injp !«tul Imiirovcmcnis. S7.50. to 100, 
Pi rinaiicnt Ktiiployrf s, S6.1S0. 

P f B 1. K ■ W OH K .S I ) Kl' ART M K N T . 

A iitonidtivc Diimon. 

From 49. RrRistration.s and Tecs, 
S;?6.50, to 56. Offico Furniture. S36.50. 
Summr Tunmi Dii i^ioti. 

Froui 260. Rc'i)airs and Maintcnaiicr 
(.1 Huiltiings and Slruclures, $8,000 to 
120. Ovirtiiiif, $8,000. 

From 260, Repairs and Maintenance 
of Huildinns and ."structures. $4,000. to 
110. Teiiiiuirary Kniployees. $4,000. 

From 260. Repairs and Maintenance 
of Huildinss and .Structures. $12,000, to 
220. Light, Heat and Power, $12,000. 

SrFF(JLK COI NTV. 
,Iaii.. 

From 100. Permanent Kmi)loyees, S250. 
110, Temporary Kmpioyees, $170, 26, Re- 
pairs and Maintenance of HuildinRs. 
$2,200, 2S, Transfwrtation of Persons, 
.$180, 34, Houseliold Supplies and Ma- 
terials, $4.")0. 39. Other Supplies and Ma- 
terials, $400, .59, Miscellaneous Equip- 
ment, $115, to 12, Overtime, $1,100. 21. 
Communications, $200. 30. .\utomotivc 
Supplies $70, 32. Food Supplies, $2,375, 
49. Miscellaneous Current Charges, $20. 

CorKT Hoi SE Cl STODlAX. 

From 29, Mi.scellancous Contractual 
Services, $530, to 10, Permanent F^mploy- 
ees. $530. 

K.\.sT Boston Distiu:t Coi rt. 

From 10. Permanent Employees, $45, 
to 27, Repairs of Equipment, $45. 



TRAFFIC RULI.NG 

The Traffic Commi.'^sioner has voted 
as follows: 

That the Traffic Rules and Regu- 
lations of the City of Boston are 
amended as follows, cfifeclivc December 
22, 1958: 

.Vrtide VI, .Section 17 (I.«olated "Stop" 
Streets), is amended by in.serting in its 
proi)er place in the alphabetical arrange- 
ment imder the caption ' Ro-xburj-'' the 
following: 
Scaver Street. 

At Elm Hill Entrance road. 
At Mai)le .street. 
At Old Trail road. 



GAS MAIN PERMITS 

The Mayor and Pulilic Improvement 
Commission ha\e approved the follow- 
ing - 

That permi-ssion be granted to Worces- 
ter CJas Light Company to relay an 
underground structure (520 feet of ex- 
isting 2-inch steel low ))res.sure gas main 
relayed with 830 feet of 4-inc-h welded 
steel main) in Wachu.sett street. Hyde 
Park district, substantially as shown on 
a plan marked "Plan Showing Proposed 
Relay and F>xtension of 520 Feet of Ex- 
i.sting 2-Inch Steel Low Pressure Gas 
Main with 830 Feet of 4-Inch Welded 
Steel Main in Wachusett Street, Hyde 
Park, as follows: 555 Feet in Wachusett 
Street from \o. 3 Southeasterly to the 
End of the Public Way and Hardened 
Surface, then Continuing Within the 
Dirt Surface and Private Way for a Dis- 
tance .\pproximated at 275 Feet, Decem- 
ber. 1958, Worcester CJas Light Corn- 
pay. 1176 River Street. Hyde Park." and 



111! Ill tin oiiii . 1,1 ;ii. ( '.Jiiiiiussioncr 
of Public Works. 

That j)ermi.«sion be granted to Bo.ston 
(l.'ts Comj)any to lay and maintain an 
underground structure (44 feet of 4-inch 
low jjre.ssure steel main) in Valley road. 
Dorchester district, at Ruggles place, for 
the jjurpo.-^e of iastalling a new main 
connection, sul>stantially a.s sho«n on a 
plan marked "Proposed Location of 4- 
Indi Gas Main in Valley Road. Dor- 
chester, Boston Gas Company, Decem- 
ber 3, 1958," and on file in the office of 
the Conunissioner of Public Works. 



ACTING CITY AUDITOR 

The Mayor, on December 22. approvf d 
the following: 

De.\k Sir: 

I'nder the provisions of section 22 of 
chapter 3 of the Revised Ordinances. I 
.siuill. with your approval. design;itc 
Martin A. Fidton to ser\e as Acting 
City Auditor in my absence from the of- 
fice at any time during the four-week 
period beginning December 22, 1958. 

Respectfully, 

Joseph P. Lally, 

City Auditor. 

HOME. THE MAN'S CASTLE 

The jioorest man may in his cottage 
bid defiance to all the force of the 
Crown. It may be frail; its roof may 
shake, the wind may blow through it, 
the storms may enter, the rain may 
enter.— but the King of England cannot 
enter; all his forces dare not cross the 
thre.shold. . . . 

William Pitt. 1760 



BUILDING PERMITS 



The Building Department has issued the following permits for the week 



WnlkcT Huil.linK Ti 



Mr 



Mm 



U.-lt.il Tm- 

Mr. .Miclijii'l Rotenbern 

I'm rick T. CufTnev 

DoiuiM .M. Tn'iit 
.l.,.s, pl, C. M.-Kmn. y 
I'rtrr A. I). I inc 

Mrs. .I..l.n .Siilliviin 

.\lr. Lihiiian 

I.aN.'wton School of Beauty 

York Realty. Inc 

Hemard E. Roddy 

Elliot Parking Lot 



>li C. 



E. liamc lhurn and G. P. Lec. 

Henry Redaizi 

SHiiiiiel Niinstudt 

.s.i,nwl Nunstudt 

I.niiixe ami .lolin .Martin 

KrneM C..<,k 

William Hurl.an 
Marnerv I' Dalton 
.M. (;.>rlinkli- 
Cluide Lawaon 
All«-nn Wolena 
fnily BiiilclinK Trii!<t 



Location 

1 22 Boylaton st 

3 Corliss St 

. :iOi Columbus av 

. 1650 Coninionwealth av. 

12.3 D St 

158 OranRC st 

.83 Parsons st 

3'.' Ridlon rd 

.39 Roseclill st 

.92 State st 

.6;}6 Warren st 

26'.' WaahinRton st . 

10 Weeks av 

281 Treinont st 

604 WashinKton st 

. ,56 Ciimmines rd 

,306 Paris st 

. TAO .Shawmut av 

.191 Quincy st 

. 22 Vine st 

.131 Warwick st 

22 Weybosset st 

3 Ifi Beacon st 

995 Blue Hill a V 
.."la'i Columbus av . 

29.-. I) st 

, 185 Dcvonshirt- st . 



Ward 


Cost 




$100 


11 


5:J5 




1,50 


21 


1,000 


6 


760 


. 20 


795 




2.100 


18 


395 


18 


380 


3 


700 


12 


80 


3 


240 


18 


290 




150 


; 3 


200 


. 21 


400 


I 


875 




200 




200 


9 


960 


9 


75 


1? 


990 




200 


14 


250 


I 


170 


6 


500 




700 



Ow.N-EU 

William Mareella 

Cataldo Realty Co 

,lohn .1. Johnson 

W. Everett 

Dr. Robert Lasker 

Dr. M. Karp 

Portia Law School 

Portia Law School 

Edward .McManum 

Elizabeth Krauss 

William F. Comeico 

Norman Water 

92 State Street. Inc 

.lames and Stella WiUis 

Tilly Thorner 

Jordan Marsh Co 

Jules C. .Mars 

Ivouis Nichols & Sons, Agents. 



ding December II 

Location 
.59 Endi< 



tt st 

.97 Fulton st 

61 Humboldt av 

.63 Humboldt av 

.1200 H.vdc Park av . . 
. 106 Marlborough St. . . . 

.45 .Mt. Vernon st 

.47 Mt. Vernon st 

.II Xarragansclt st 

.35 Ne»hur>- st 

. 249A Northern av 

. 148 Quincv st 

.92 State st 

.184) Sumner st 

. 13I2-13I4 Treraont st . 



18.58- 

2249-2261 Washington st 



UWNKR 

E. R. Donald 

J. A .M. Corev 

Mr. W. Bandeau 

William Novcross A Co. 
N. V. N. H. H. B. A.. 



Buildings Reino\ed 



.22 Northampton st 

5 Reddv av 
.518-520 .\lbany st 

55 Hall st 



3 


1- 


3 


1. 




10(1 




100 


18 


2.50 


5 


3or 


.5 








16 




5 




6 




13 


2t>(J 




2.000 




1,495 


9 


955 


3 


600 


8 


35 


9 


7,000 



Cost 
S800 

600 
100 
1.000 
500 



Jax. 



CITY RECORD 



1 3 



GAS FITTING PERMITS 

The Building Department has issued 
the following gas fitting permits for in- 
stallation of appliances for the week end- 
ing December 26: 

Note: Wards are indicated in parentheses 
(4), (16), etc., following name of street 



Gasfitter 
S. Connolly 
S. Litman 
P. Kennedy 
R. Strum 
A. Granara 
L. Dunwai 
W. Jacobs 
S. Connolly 
P. Kennedy 
W. Jacobs 
P. Ferris 
S. Connolly 
L. Visco 
J. McGee 
A. Rusao 
P. Kennedy 
P. Kennedy 
P. Kennedy 



A. Granara 
S. Connolly 
A. Russo 
C. Bevelander 
P. Kennedy 
S. Connolly 
A. Granara 
P. Kennedy 
S. Connolly 
S. Connolly 
W. Keppler 
A. Russo 
A. Herbert 
W. Keppler 
P. Kennedy 
A. Milligan 
W. Jacobs 
S. Connolly 
P. Kennedy 
J. Dantrom 
P. Kennedy 
P. Kennedy 
P. Kennedy 
P. Kennedy 
P. Kennedy 
A. Milligan 
P. Kennedy 
S. Connolly 
S. Litman 
A. H3b2rt 
P. Kennedy 
M. Eskowitz 
F. Goldberg 
J. Palumbo 
J. Butler 
J. Butler 
J. Butler 
S. Slavine 
A. Granara 
A. Hebert 
F. Ricciardello 
F. RicciardeUo 
A. Hebert 
A. Hind 
H. Beaulieu 
A. Hind 



LOCATION- 

21 Alaska st (12) 
342 Amory st (11) 

62 Beacon st (5) 
117 Blue HiU av (8) 

11 Board AUey (3) 
403 Centre st (19) 
25 Chestnut av (10) 
47A Creighton st (10) 
Columbus av 

36 Cranston st (19) 
East Concord st (8) 

6 East Lenox st (8) 
532 East Eighth st (7) 
507 East Sixth st (6) 
79 Elmira st (22) 
48A Gloucester st (5) 

27 Greenwich pk (4) 

14 Grove st (5) 

12 Halbron st (18) 
469 Hanover st (3) 

88 Harrishof st (3) 
20 Hastings st (20) 

28 Holton st (22) 
24 Holyoke st (4) 

1 Howard pi (13) 

2 Langdon pi (3) 
438 Marlboro st (5) 
91 Minden st (10) 

51 Mt. Pleasant av (8) 
19 Neponset av (18) 
33 Orange st (20) 
76 Orient av (1) 
23 Pierce st (18) 
90 Pincknev st (5) 

15 Ravenna rd (20) 
57 Round Hill st (10) 
73 Ruggles st (9) 

159 St. Botolph st (4) 

63 Salem st (3) 

7 Smith ct (3) 

3 Snow HiU st (3) 
56 Snow HiU st (3) 
56 Snow HiU st (3) 

89 Union Park st (8) 
Vogel st (20) 



Walnu 



2486 Washington st (12 1 
3107 Washington st (10) 
3913 Washington st (19) 
84 West Brookline st (9) 
56 Catawba st (12) 

21 Centre st (9) 
169 K st (6) 

22 Melbourne st (16) 
69 Minot st (16) 
409 Neponset av (16) 
162 South st (11) 

93 Clinton st (3) 
98 Cottage st (1 ) 

23 Emerson st (6) 
19 Everett st (1) 
48 Mather st (17^ 

18 South Munroe ter (16) 
3526 Washington st (11) 
307 Washington st (17) 



CITY OF LIBERTY 

Liberty ... is best managed in a 
democratic city, and for this reason that 
is the only city in which a man of free 
spirit will care to live. 

Plato, 427-347 B.C. 



THE ROLE OF PUBLIC OPINION 

In proportion as the structure of a 
government gives force to public opinion, 
it is essential that public opinion should 
be enlightened. 

Geobce Washikgtok, 1796 



PLUMBING PERMITS 

The Building Department has issued 
the following plumbing permits for in- 
stallation of plumbing fixtures for the 
week ending December 26: 

Note: Wards are indicated in parentheses 
(4), (16), etc., following name of street. 



Cost 


Plumber 


Location- 


Cost 


W. Jacobs 


36 Cranston st (19) 


S520 


S35 


A. Russo 


79 Elmira st (22) 


1,100 


75 


J. Hannigan 


30 Groveland st (18) 


175 


15 


D. Richards 


32 Hereford st (5) 


500 


35 


W. ConneU 


7 MelviUe Lane (17) 


400 


8 


A. Russo 


33 Orange st (20) 


1,000 


50 


W. Safara 


123 Richmond st (16) 


400 


45 


W. Jacobs 


57 Round Hill st (10) 




250 


N. Powers 


841 East Third st (6) 


375 


12 


0. Joyce 


46 Manor st (16) 


950 


150 


0. Joyce 


47 Manor st (16) 


900 


1.50 


0. Joyce 


50 Manor st (16) 


1.000 




N. Rubin 


48 .\sheville rd (18) 


1,250 


250 


N. Rubin 


56 .Asheville rd (18) 


1,250 


100 


N. Rubin 


52 .Asheville rd (18) 


1,250 


300 


N. Rubin 


60 -isheviUe rd (18) 


1,250 


12 


N. Rubin 


64 AsheviUe rd (18) 


1,250 


30 


W' . McKenna 


185 Devonshire st (3) 


300 


25 


H. Honneberry 


447 Frankfort st (1) 


350 


30 


H. Baron 


3095 Washington st (11) 


350 



GAS MAIN PERMITS 

The Mayor and the Public Improve- 
ment Commission have approved the 
following: 

Baker Street 

That permission be granted to Boston 
Gas Company to lay and maintain an 
underground structure (24 feet of 4-inch 
low pressure steel main) in Baker street, 
West Roxbury district, at Ellswood 
street, for the purpose of installing a 
new main connection, substantially as 
shown on a plan marked "Proposed Lo- 
cation of 4-Inch Gas Main in Baker 
Street, West Roxbury, Boston Gas Com- 
pany, December 10, 1958," and on file in 
the office of the Commissioner of Public 
AVorks. 

Boutwell Street 

That permission be granted to Boston 
Gas Company to lay and maintain an 
underground structure (27 feet of 3-inch 
low pressure steel main) in Boutw-ell 
street, Dorchester district, at St. Clare 
road, for the purpose of installing a new 
main connection, substantially as shown 
on a plan marked "Proposed Location 
of 3-Inch Gas Main in Boutwell Street, 
Dorchester, Boston Gas Company, De- 
cember 10, 1958," and on file in the office 
of the Commissioner of Public Works. 

New Haven Street 

That permission be granted to Boston 
Gas Company to lay and maintain an 
underground structure (12 feet of 6-inch 
low pressure steel gas main) in the junc- 
tion of Xew Haven street, West Rox- 
bury district, at Joyce Kilmer road and 
Xorthdale road, for the purpose of in- 
stalling a new main connection to Xorth- 
dale road, substantially as shown on a 
plan marked "Proposed Location of 6- 
Inch Gas Main in Junction of Xew 
Haven Street, at Joyce Kilmer Road and 
Xorthdale Road, West Roxbury, Boston 



Gas Company, December 8, 1958," and 
on file in the office of the Commissioner 
of Public Works. 



Mortality Report. 

For the week ending Dec. 27, 1958. 

Population as of July, 1958, Massa- 
chusetts State Census, 822,884; popula- 
tion estimated Julj-, 1956, United States 
Census Bureau, 816,759; number of 
deaths (stillbirths excluded): Residents, 
142, nonresidents, 83, total, 225. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population 
All deaths, 14.19; nonresidents deducted, 
8.87. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: 
Last week, 16.00; corresponding week 

last year, 15.01. 

Deaths by age periods, sex, etc.: Under 

one year, 12: one year to four years, 

inclusive, 1: si.mv vears and over, 143. 

Total deaths; ^lale, 137; female, 88; 

deaths in l.u^pitals and institutions, 171. 

REPORTABLE DISEASES: 
CASES AND DEATHS.* 





|l 




Is 


31 


















3 SI 


Diseases 


Cases a 
Repor 


C 


ii 


i 

c 




Cases jDeatlis 


Cases 


Deaths 


Anterior 










Poliomyelitis. . 










Diphtheria 










Encephalitis 










Lethargica. . . . 










Influenza 










Measles 


4 




11 




Meningitis 










Epidemic 










Pneumonia 










(lobar) 








3 


Scarlet Fever . . . 


8 




11 




Tuberculosis 










(pulmonarv) . . 


2 




6 


1 


Childhood Type 










Tuberculosis. . 










Tuberculosis 










(other forms) . 


1 




1 




Typhoid Fever. . 






1 




Whooping 










Cough 


2 









Residents and nonresidents included. 



A PUBLIC OFFICIAL'S ROLE 

Government is a trust, and the officer.-; 
of government are trustees; and both 
the trust and the trustees are created 
for the benefit of the people. 

Hekrt Clay, 1829 



CITY RKCORI) 



.1 



IMPROVEMENTS VOTEO 

'I'hc Miiyor and Public Improvement 
Commission h;i\ e .ipprovod I lie follow- 
m(£: 

Drainage 

'l"\vo (Midi l)a.-.ins and connections in 
Altacrest road, at Ansonia roail. in West 
Koxbury. at an I'stimatetl cost of $7.")(). 

Mass. Ave. Repairs, Dorchester 

'I'li.it llii> (•()iiiiiii>-H)ii. liMxmc pa— ed 
ilie onii r nl notice relating to tiie public 
improvement hereinafter descnbe<l. and 
having caused a copv of said order to 
be published November 22. 25. 1958. in 
the Hoston Atnirirnn and the Boston 
III mid, two daily newspapers published 
in the City of Boston. an(i havinij piven 
the public healing, notice of which was 
given in said order, and being of the 
opinion that public necessity and con- 
venience require, does hereby order ;hat 
specific repairs be made in Massachu- 
.sotts avenue. Dorchester district, on the 
southwesterly side, from the Midland 
Division location of the New York. .Vew 
Haven it Hartford Railroad to Clapp 
street, consisting of the reduction in 
width of the existing sidewalk, as shown 
on a plan marked "City of Boston. Mas- 
.sachusetts .\venue. Dorchester. Decem- 
ber 15. 19.58. .lames W. Haley. Division 
Engineer. Survey Division. Public Works 
Department." and on lih- in thi- office of 
said depart iiicnt . 

Chelsea St. Repairs 

That this commission, having i)as.sed 
the order of notice relating to the public 
improvement hereinafter describefl. and 
having caused a copy of said order to be 
publishe<l November 8. 10, 1958. in the 
Boston Amcrirnu and the Boston 11 < raid, 
two daily new.sj)apers published in the 
City of Boston, and having given the 
jiublic hearing, notice of which was 
given in said order, and being of the 
opinion that public necessity and con- 
venience require, does hereby order that 
specific repairs be made in Chelsea 
street. Chariest own district, consisting of 
increasing the curb radius at the south- 
easterly corner of Gray street, a.s shown 
on a plan marked "City of Boston. Chel- 
sea Street. Charle.stown. December 15. 
1958. James W. Haley. Divi.sion Kngi- 
neer, Survey Division. Public Works D(>- 
jiartment." and on file in the office of 
said department. 

Traffic Island, Columbus Ave. 

That this commission, having passed 
the order of notice relating to the public 
improvement hereinafter describee!, and 
having caused a copy of said order to be 
imblished November S. 10. 19.5S. in the 
Bos-ton Aniiririni and the Bo>t<m Ihmld. 
two daily news|>;ipers published in the 
City of Boston, and having given the 
public hearing, notice of which was 
giv(>a rn said order, and being of the 



cipltlKin llial public liii(^~it\ .ilid ''iii- 
v enience recpiire. do«'s hert'by order th.it 
specific repairs b<' made in Columbus 
avenue. Koxbury district, between Tre- 
niont street an<i Centre striM't. coasisting 
of the installation of a traffic divisional 
island, as shown f)n a plan marked "City 
of B{»ston. Columbus .•Vveniie. Roxbnry. 
December 15. 19,58. .lames W. Haley. 
Division Engineer. Survey Division. Pub- 
lic Works Department." and on file in 
the office of ."aiel department. 

Commonwealth Ave. Repairs 

That this commission, having pa.s.-'ed 
the order of notice relating to the public- 
improvement hereinafter described, and 
ha\ ing cau.sed a copy of sjiid onler to b<^ 
published October 25. 28. 19.58. in the 
Bo.ston Amiricau and the Boston Hcmid, 
two <laily newspapers published in ihe 
City of Boston, and having given the 
public hearing, notice of which was given 
in said order, and being of the opinion 
that public necessity and convenience 
require, does hereby order that specific 
repairs be made in Commonwealth ave- 
nue. Brighton district, between Kelton 
street and Chestnut Hill avenue, consist- 
ing of the relocation of the exi.sting 
streetcar reservation from approximately 
100 feet northeast of Kelton street to 
approximately .500 feet .southeasterly 
thereof and the reduction in width of the 
existing streetcar reservation from W.il- 
lingford road to Chestnut Hill avenue; 
the construction of a new traffic roadway 
adjacent to the northwesterly si<le of 
this relocated streetcar reservation and 
the exi.sting streetcar reservation from 
Kelton .street to Wallingford road; the 
reduction in width of the existing traffic 
divisional island between Kelton street 
and Boulevard terrace and the construc- 
t-on of a new traffic- divisional island 
from Boulevard lerracr to Chestnut Hill 
avenue; the reduction in width of the 
existing service road adjacent to the 
northwesterly side of Commonwealth 
avenue, from Warien .street to Fidel is 
Way and from Washington street to 
Wallingford road, the widening of 'he 
existing service road fioin Fidelis Way 
to Washington street; the reduction in 
width of the existing sidewalks on the 
southeasterly side from Commonwealth 
terrace to Chestnut Hill aventie and on 
the northwesterly side from Warren 
street approximately 100 feet southwest- 
erly of Fidelis Way ; from Eu.ston road 
to Leamington road and from Walling- 
ford road to Chestnut Hill avenue -.nd 
the relocation of existing roadways, side- 
walks. re.servations. and streetcar reser- 
vations crassings at various locations, all 
as shown on a plan marked "City of 
B(K<ton. Commonwealth .\venue. Brigl;- 
t(m. December 15. 19.58. .lames W. Haley. 
Division Engineer. Survey Division. Pub- 
lic Works Department." and on file in 
the office of .s-aid depai-tinent. 



New Drainage Approved 

The Commi>si(jner of Public- Wo- 
has officially declare il his intention ; 
c-onstnirt the following: 

\ 12-inch i>ipo surface- drain in private 
land, between 75 feet .soiithv^est of 
(irandview street and 90 feet southwest- 
erly, in West Roxbur>-. at an estimated 
mated cost of $3,000. " 

.Seven catch basin.-; and connec-tions in 
Altacrest road (2). Florian Way (2). 
Brookstone street (2). and Brookway 
road (1). in West Roxbur>-, at an esti- 
matcHi cost of $3,000. 

.\ 10-inch pipe sanitary sewer and 10- 
inch pipe surfac-e drain in Weld street, 
from an existing sewer 85 feet westerly, 
in West Roxbur\-. at an estimated cost 
of $1,400. 



SEWER ABANDONED 

WiK( linrhtiry 
The Public- Improvement Comnii-i-ion 
has voted, and the Mayor has approved, 
the following: 

That due notic-e be given, that thi.s 
c-ommission is of the opinion, that, in 
said city, a public improvement should 
be made, consisting of the abandonment 
of a portion of an existing City of Bos- 
ton sewer easement in private land. West 
Roxburi- district, adjacent to Bcrtson 
avenue, substantially as shown on a plan 
in the office of this commission. 
The action is de.scribed as follows: 
Southeasterly by another portion of 
sewer easement taken July 30. 1913. eight 
and 00-100 feet; .southwe.•^ierly by land 
supposed to belong to CJrace L. Foster. 
Registered Title Certificate No. 41798, 
Book 204. i>age 198. eighty and 00-100 
feet ; northwesterly by land supposed to 
belong (o Clara E. Pinkham and Marie 
F. Rus.so. twenty-seven and 95-100 feet ; 
northeasterly by land supposed to belong 
to Henry J. and Catherine M. Domigan. 
Registered Title Certificate No. 53909. 
Book 265. page 109. eight and 02-100 
feet; .southeasterly by the .southea.«terly 
line of sewer easement as hereby aban- 
doned, nineteen and 45-100 feet; north- 
easterly by other land supposed to 
belong to Grace L. Foster, seventy-two 
and 00-100 feet, containing .seven hun- 
dred ninety-eight .square feet, more or 
less. .Said abandonment is shown on a 
plan marked "City of Boston. Plan No. 
1516B. .Sewerage Works. Bertson .\vrntie. 
West Roxbiiry. James W. Haley. Divi- 
sion Engineer. Sur>e.v Division. Public 
Works Dej>artment,',' and on file in tht 
office- of Siird dep.-irtment.-- 



Jan. 3 



CITY RECORD 



PLEASANTDALE RD. WIDENED 

West Roxhurij 

The Public Improvement Commission 
has voted, and the Mayor has approved, 
the widening, relocation, and construc- 
tion of Pleasantduie road. West Roxbury 
district, on the easterly side, approxi- 
mately 350 feet south of Stimson street. 

The project is described as follows: 

The highway named Pleasantdale road 
is hereby widened on the easterly side, 
approximately 350 feet south of Stimson 
street, and ordered constructed. 

Said highway and the land, exclusive 
of trees, shrubs, or structures standing 
upon or affixed thereto, in which an ease- 
ment for highway purposes is hereb>- 
taken, is bounded and described as fol- 
lows: 

Westerly by the easterly line of 
Pleasantdale road as laid out under an 
order of the Public Improvement Com- 
mission and Mavor dated November 27, 
1957, fifty-eight and 21-100 feet; north- 
easterly by the northeasterly line of 
Pleasantdale road as hereby widened, 
forty-four and 37-100 feet ; southeasterly 
by the southeasterly line of Pleasantdale 
road as herebv widened, forty and 05-100 
feet. 

Trees, shrubs, or structures standing 
upon or affixed to the aforedescribed 
land, shall be removed therefrom within 
thirty (30) dajs following the city's re- 
cording of this order. 

Betterments are to be assessed for the 
making of the aforesaid improvement. 

Ordered, That this commis-sion esti- 
mates that the abutting parcel of land 
situated on the easterly side of Pleasant- 
dale road will re<-eive benefit or advan- 
tage, beyond the general advantage to 
all real estate in said cit.v, from tlio 
improvement herein ordered, each of 
said parcels in the amotmt hereinafter 
respectively set against it. said parcel 
and the supposed owner thereof being 
shown on a plan hereinbefore referred 
to and on file in the office of said de- 
partment. 

Parcel. Amount. 
20. Hose M. Vincenti $48 

No damages awarded. 

CHILD ST. SEWER 

Hyde Park 

The Public Improvement Commission 
has voted and the Mayor has approved 
the following: 

That 400 linear feet of 10-inch pijio 
sewer and 400 linear feet of 12-inch pii)o 
surface drain be constructed in Child 
street, Hyde Park district, between Lin- 
wood .street and Perkins street, at an 
estimated cost of S6.000. 

That this commission estimates that 
the undermentioned parcels of land situ- 
ated on both sides of Child street as 
shown on a plan marked "City of Bos- 
ton, Plan No. 1516A. Sewerage Works, 



Child Street, Hyde Park, December 15. 
1958, James W. Haley, Division Engi- 
neer, Survey Division. Public Works De- 
partment," and on file in the office of 
said department, will roccixe benefit or 
ach aniasrc, Ik vond tin s< "i ral advan- 
tat;. iM all n al , -lair m -auI city, from 
tin i nil 111 111 11 III onli ii il. in the 

amount- In ii uiafter mentionr il. 
Parcel. Amount. 

1. Lydia A. Wragg Nothing 

2. Frank S. and Marianne Chludin- 

ski $300 

3. Richard F. Fell 300 

4. Edwin E. and Charlotte P. 

Leason 300 

3. Hueh L. and Patricia A. O'Brien, 300 

6. Maude E. Simpson 300 

7. Richard J. Rothwell 300 

8. Louise V. Scott 300 

9. Rose C. McCormick and Mary R. 

O'Brien 300 

10. Mar>' A. Brolin 300 

11. Gertrude E. Leufjircn 300 

12. Charles E. and Catherine E.Perry .Nothing 

Total $3,000 



SOVEREIGNTY 

Should things go wrong at any time, 
the people will set them to rights by 
the peaceable exercise of their elective 
rights. 

Thom.^s Jefferson, 1806 



EXTENSION OF CONTRACTS 

The Mayor has approved extension 
of the time limit on completion of the 
following contracts: 

Dep.\rtment of School Buildings. 
William N. McKenna Company, for 
plumbing work, concerning installation 
of new water ser\nce, at the Mather 
School, extended from December 10, 
1958, to January 15, 1959, due to in- 
clement weather conditions. 

New England Construction Comiunn-. 
Inc., of Boston, for niasonr>- woik at tlio 
James P. Timiltv School, extended from 
December 12. 1958, to April 30. 1959, 
due to inclement weather conditions. 

HOSPIT.AL DeP.\RTMEXT. 

An extension of time from September 
15. 1958, to November 18, 1958. has been 
granted to C. C. Temple Construction 
Company. Inc. for alterations to dining 
room, first floor. House Officers' Building. 
Boston City Hospital, due to additional 
work and delay in the delivery of ma- 
terials. 

Parks axu Recreation Department. 

Jo.-fiih P. MrCaI)e. Inc.. has been 
granted an extrusion of time until June 
1. 1959, for the coinpli rion of its contract 
for shore prot<iii,iii mil jiii|iro\"cments 
at Jamaica Pond. \\ i -i Roxhiuy. 

DeVirgilio General Contracting Com- 
pany has been granted an extension of 
time until June 1, 1959, for the comple- 
tion of its contract for grading, surfacing. 



and improvements at JefTerson Play- 
ground, Roxbuiy. 

F. C. Dolan & Sons, Inc., has been 
granted an extension of time until May 
1. 1959, for the completion of its con- 
tract for rei)airs to park benches, Boston 
Common. 

Tiaii-it Seeding, Inc., has been granted 
ail cxh n>ion of time until June 1, 1959, 
for the completion of its contract for 
loaming, grading, and sodding at Frank- 
lin Park Golf Course, West Roxbury. 

Public Works Department. 
J. A. Susi & Sons. Inc.. for bituminous 
concrete jiavement in Belnap road. 
Dodge road, Joan road, and Leighton 
road, extended from December 31, 1958. 
to June 15, 1959, due to inclement 
weather. 

Thompson & Lichtner Company, Inc.. 

for testing and inspection ser\-ices of 
asjjhaltic concrete, etc.. extended from 
December 31. 1958. to April 30. 1959. 
because the Public Works Dejiartment 
requires testing and inspection services 
from the contractor for patching material 
during the winter months and also for 
incidental testing of material for the 
incinerator and bridges. 

Renfel c»c Frost. Inc.. for furnishing 

ami in-iallinji- lieating efiuijimcnr in the 
Mo.k room at 650 Alljany streel. Sani- 
tary Dni-nm \anl. extended from No- 
veml). 1 l'.i:.s. lo December 19. 1958. 
becaii-i I inn \\ 1- u delay in the ship- 
ment of ((lUiiunent. 



LA GRANGE STREET SEWER 

West Roxbury 

The Public Improvement Commission 
has \ oted, and the Mayor has approved, 
the following: 

That 215 linear feet of 10-inch pipe 
sewer be constructed in La Grange street. 
West Roxbury district, between Furbush 
road and Brook Farm road, at an esti- 
mated cost of S2.150. 

That this commission estimates that 
the undermentioned parcels of land situ- 
ated on northea-sterly .side of La Grange 
street as shown on a plan marked "Citv 
of Boston. Plan No. 1500C. Sewerage 
Workj. La Grange Street, West Rox- 
bury. December 8. 1958. James W. Hale\-. 
Division Engineer. Survey Division. 
Public Works Department." will receive 
benefit or ad\'antage beyond the general 
ad\antage to all real estate in said city, 
from the imjirovement herein ordered, 
in the amounts hereinafter mentioned. 



Parcel. Amount. 

1. Thomas J. McGreevy $322 50 

2. Thomas J. McGreevy 322 50 

3. Thomas J. McGreevy 322 50 

4. Joseph F. Ansaldi 322 50 

5. Joseph F. Ansaldi 322 50 



Total $1,612 50 



OFFICIAL DIRECTORY 



MAYOR'S OFFICE. 

, M> 23. City Tf 1. I-A 3- 1 101). 

14. llTMU. May.,' 

A* r. McC't'AKU. Bjefutttt Sterriarv. 
u> B. Klemuiko. Chu/ Clerk. 

A»*taianl S»frfU>rw9. 



AHU B. Mclliji. Sx<ra(irc Stcrrtaru, 

Improwfment CommltUt. 
OHK A. MtniAT. DirwIor./CmwIKimi. 



K.)itori.l Office. 35 r.ly lUU. Tfl. LA 3-5100. 

TiioyA. F. O Dav. Bd.lor. 

P. NiclloUAH PrrnociLLl. Aimxialt Editor. 

CITY COUNCIL. 

Council Ch«mb.r.. 41). Floor. City H.ll. Tfl. 
LA 3-5100. 

l*ATiiirK F. .McDoNOl'OH. I'rtMtdent. 1 1 Barring- 
ton rokd. I>urvlmt«r. 
Jauix S. Corrtr. <5l McriJian Btrett. E»it 

William J. FoLcr. Jr., 15 Thomu park. South 

MMCLLA. ID McLemn 8tr«et. 

!, 213 Vi'ft Eighth llrett. 



McLacohl 
Jamuca Plain. 
Cabiiikl F. Pibmoxtk, 65 Brook Fann road. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



John P. McMo 



Madeleine L. Re 



C*ai>miiii, 227 Willow 
322 Adanil itr«et. Dor- 



1 Pmident road. We 



10 Glendalc street. Dor- 



ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES. 



Dir, 



HaU. 



ADMtNli»niATivE Division. 
AaillUN Keilh. Cir^or. 

Bt-DOET Division. 
Pickett. Svptrtttor of Budgrl: 



DONCAN T. F 



Eit. 315-316-317. 

PeRMNNEL DlVIBION. 

lU^rnwr o/ ferK 
T.1. LA 3-5100. 



61 City 

PracHASiifa Division. 
MoRAN. l*urchanruf .Agmi. 
1 City Hall. Tel. LA 3-5100. 



OffiM. 174 North strret. Tel. LA 3-63«.1. 
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES BOARD. 

William Artiicr Keillt. Dinrlor. 
John V. Moran. I'ureka»ing .iomt. 
Josehi p. Lallt. Ci(i/ .lurfuor. Bi Oficio. 

DVNCAN T. FOLE 



CotUetor-Treaturrr. Bx Omci- 
Suprrruor o/ BudftU. ' 
.4iwuor 0/ rorcs. Bl Ofirio. 



Karl R. Barnard. . 

Office. Fsncuil Ha"n. 
Nelson W. Aldrich. r>,i„rmnn. 

ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 
Office. Room 301. City Hall Annex. Trl I. .A 

A»»E««OR or Taxis. 
Earl R. Barnard. A»«t.>r n/ T,tr,. 

Board or RrviEw. 

K>RL R ilAHNARU 

Edward F. Mili in. 
JoatrH P. Lallt. Cuk .Aud>i 



BUILDINQ DEPARTMENT. 

noiLOiKO Division. 
OIBoe. SOI City Hall AniKi. Tel. LA 3-SIOO. 
Thomas J. Haanu. SuiMmv CoaiMuswMr. 

or EiAMiNEas. 



Samuel Toma 



Boas 



Thoma 



. CAairRUR. 
Public Raectt CoMMlaaioK. 
William Arthur Reillt, CKairman. 
Thomas J. Hcoher. FRANCla X. Corm. 
Dr. John H. Caolet. Timotiit ). O'Comio 

Committee on Licenses. 
Thomas J. Hcohe*. 

Francis X. Cotter. Timotkt J. 0'< 
Beacon Hill Architectural CoMMiasi 
John Codman. CViirMOR. 
Franr J. Cocohlin. Stertiar^. 

CITY CLERK DEPARTMENT. 
Room 22. City Hall. Tel LA 3-SIOO. 
Walter J. .Mallot. Cay Deri. 



Jr., r*<iir>us 



Timotht J. 
.'ossm A. 

RORERT A. MacLellan. Frederice a. Davis. 

H. Deland Chandler. .Maroaret Divver. 

Edward C. Keane. Harit J. KiarE. 

Alrert V. Coleman. CAoiVsior. 
Office, 1 108 City Hall Annes. Tel. LA 3-«iaO. 
ZONING COMMISSION 
CIVIL DEFENSE. 
Office. 115 Southampton street. Tel. HI l-30t0. 
Francis C. Cleart. Diracio'. 

ELECTION DEPARTMENT. 
Office. 1 1 1 City Hall Annex. Tel. LA 3-5100. 

Commissioners. 
David Laseer. Chatrman. Oertrdde A. PrAO. 
Joseph Rtisao. Perlie Dtar Chasr. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 
Executi\-e Headquarters. 115 Soutliampton street. 

Tel. HI 2-8000. 
Francis X. Cotter. Commusiontr. 
Leo C. Driscoll. CAte/ of Dtpartmtni. 
~ ' Fenway. Tel. 



Health I 
John H. Cadlet, .M.D.. 

Pdrlic Health Council. 
Alrert A. Horner. M.D.. CAmVsKia. 

REnisTRT Division. 
1004 City Hall Annex. Tel. LA 3-5100, 
Charles 11. Maceie. CUh RtgiMmr. 

Wriohtr and Meascres Division. 
Office. 105 City Hall Annex. Tel. LA 3-5100. 
John F. .McCartht. Seiler. 

HOSPITAL DEPARTMENT. 
Main. 818 Harriaon are. Tel. KE 6-8600. 
Richard J. Condon. Pruidtnt of Tnulw. 
Dr. John F. Conlin. Supmnlndrnt. 

Sanatorium Division. 
Dr. David S. Sherm 



LONO Island Div 
John R. McCillivi 
Tel. PR 3-1371. 

LAW DEPARTMENT. 
Room tool. l,awyers Building. 11 Beacon stre 

Tel LA 3-6200. 
William L. Baxter. Corporoium Coun»tt. 

Workmen's CoMrENSATioN Service. 
Room 709, Cily Hsll Annex. Tel. LA 3-5100. 
Thomas L. McCormack. Agent. 

LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 
Office. Library Building. Copley square. T 
Pretidrnt of Triufrea. 



KE 6-.%400. 



Office. 33 Beacon street. Tel. CA 7-6940. 
PENAL INSTITUTIONS DEPARTMENT. 
Room 805. City Hall Annex Tel LA 3-5100. 
rreclioD. Deer Island. 
POLICE DEPARTMENT. 
Headquarters. 154 Berkeley street. 

I EG J SOLLIVAN Co«».M«o«cr 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT. 

RoaEET P. 8nea. Commioo^Mur. 

Room 309. City HaU Annex Td. LA 5-5100. 



Jahri 



I... 



Rootn 511. City HaU AnBei. Tel. LA l-itOO. 

Rridor DiviaioN. 
John J. McCall. Diiuun BrvtHeer. 
Room 601. City Hail Annex. Tel. LA 3-SIDO. 

HiOMWAT Division. 
RtrmroRD J. Kellet. DinsuM jr>«iii«er. 
Hooa SOI. City Hall Annex. Tel. LA J-SIOO. 
Raom 401. Encroachment Section. 

Banitart Division. 
JORR F. Flarertt. Oiiuuni CaffiaxT. 
Room S07, City HaU Annex. Tel. LA 3-5100. 

Sbweb DiviaioN. 
Edward G. A. Powers. AXiit« Cituw* Sivtuer. 
Room 701. City HaU Annex. Tel. LA I-SIOO. 

SCRVBT Division. 
Jahbb W. Halbt. C«v./ tmimorr. 
Room 40J. City HaU AnBex. TeL LA J-SIOO. 

W'ater DiviaiOM. 
Daniel M. SrLLfVAN. I>tf<n<m ffRfinor. 
Room 607. City Hall Annex. Tel LA 3 510Q 



Au«i. Tel LA 3 5100 — 



Room •0*. Cily HaU Anoei. Tel. LA 3-SIOO. 
This depanment also includes the lollowiag: 
Committer on Fobeclosed Real Estate. 

PnorERTT Division. 

BciLDiNoa Division. 

Mabeet Division. 

RETIREMENT BOARD. BOSTON. 
Rooms 30-32. City HaU. TeL LA 3-5100. 
Walteb J. Mallot. CAa.nw... 
JosBni P. Lallt. John C. Kabac 

TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT. 
112 Southampton Blie«l. TeL HI 2-7700. 
Timotht J. O'Connob. Commiset^ner. 
Asi 

Leo J. SCLLIVAN. /'otiet C' 

Robert P. Shea. Cowtmittumrr of P 
Frame R. Kellet. CiMirman. Pari Ci 
Herman Cabp. Pml Propeny c> 

TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 
James E. Gildea. CcUretcr-Trmntrer. 
Room 10. City Hall. Tel. LA 3-5100. 
Treascbt Division— Collection Divtsior. 

SiNEiNO Fi nd CoMMisaiONERS. 
William R. Carolan. Cka.rwua. 

VETERANS- SERVICES DEPARTMENT. 
OBce. 18 CorohiU. Tel. LI 2-7S40. 
Victor C. Btnoe. CommiMoxorifr . 

FraNE T. PeoONTI. Supernoor of Vrt^ront Crapes, 
14 Bute street. Tel. LA 3-400S. 

WELFARE DEPARTMENT. 
Jahcs S. Maloop. Ckainasjt. 
Wmjjam F. Lallt. Setrttmrg. 

.43 Hawkiaa stirel. 



Tel. CA 7-8320. 
Temporary Home. 
LA 3-2337. 



47 



Tel. 



OTHER SERVICES. 

AUDITORIUM COMMISSION. 



WiLUAM D IBEIJIND. Cktxrman 

BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOL 

BUILOINOS. 
Office. 26 Norman stpeet. Tel. CA 7 .1750 
Joseph F. O'Connell. Jr.. Ckairaaa: Thomas A, 



Char 



of Co, 



BOSTON FINANCE COMMISSION. 

Office. 24 School streei. Tel LA 3-1622. 
.\irT»ONT J. VouNO. Ckairman. 

BOSTON HOUSINO AUTHORITY. 
Office, 230 Congress slreel Tel. LI 2-&4.V1. 
Frkdebick a. Cbonin, Cliairmaii. 

BOSTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY. 
73 Tremoot street. Tel. RI 2-0500. 
JoaEPH Lcnd. CKairMN. 

Kane Simonian. Dirrrtw 

LICENSING BOARD. 
Office. 24 Pro%mc« street Trl CA 7-2470. 
Clarence R Elam. r»oir»ws. 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 
OSec. J 5 B*Moa Eti»et. Tel. CA 7-iSOO 
DgRlcu C. Hairr. StipmnlndeM of SdiooU. 

L»o J. Bc«(«, Maruger. 



CITY RECORD 

Official Chronicle of Boston Muxicipal Affairs. 

Vol. 51 Saturday, January 10, 1959 No. 2 

MAYOR RENEWS PLEA FOR WIDER TAX BASE 



Mayor John B. Hyne.-^ in his annual 
address to the City Council, on January 5, 
stated as follows: 
Gextlemex: 

Today we enter upon a new miuiicipal 
year. 

It can be, and I am hopeful it will be, a 
year of substantial progress, both with respect 
to the improvement of the city government's 
financial position, and with respect to the 
improvement of the economic standing of our 
city. 

Despite a tax rate which is forbiddingly 
high because of obligations, requirements, and 
factors over which the city government can 
exert but little control, the fiscal situation of 
our municipality is not as precarious as might 
be assumed. 

On the contrary, our basic financial posi- 
tion shows improvement. In 1958, actual 
departmental and state revenues exceeded 
estimates by more than $5,000,000, and the 
surplus as of December 31, 1958, is in excess 
of $3,000,000. This surplus, while it cannot be 
used as an appropriation in 1959, is a reserve 
against uncollected taxes. 

As of December 31, 1958, we have no 
short-term debt outstanding for the first time 
in many, many years. 

The city's credit is good. We have no 
difficulty in marketing our short-term and 
long-term securities. 



Tax collections of current years' tax levy 
are approximately 90 per cent of the total 
lev}', and prior j'ears' levies are approximately 
96 per cent collected. Our tax collection 
record is good and is another indication of the 
city's basic financial soundness. 

Unquestionablr, however, a high tax rate 
bordering on the coi>fiscatory is a deterrent to 
the economic progress of the cit}', and a direct 
or indirect ljurden on the taxpayers and rent 
payers of our*cit3\ 

Almost yOxcents of every dollar the Cit}' 
of Boston raises to meet its total annual re- 
quirements comes from the real estate owner, 
the lessee, or the rent payer as the case may 
be. In any event, it is painfully apparent that 
the economy of our city will be adversely 
affected just so long as real property is forced 
to carry 70 per cent of the cost of local govern- 
ment. 

Boston's Unfair Handicap 
In other major cities of our country less 
than 50 cents comes from real property taxes. 
Consequent!}', the tax rates in these cities are 
considerably less than Boston's tax rate, and 
this condition has a definite bearing on the 
decision of private capital which carefully 
surveys the tax climate of a city before making 
a large investment in that city's future. 

Now, it might be assumed, and often is, 
that more efficient and more economical meth- 
ods or better management prevails in cities 
with a comparatively low rate. From my 
own firsthaiid knowledge of the government 
(Continued on page 19.) 



INDEX TO 
CITY HALL 

Telephone LA i 5100 

AOMIMSTKATIVK SERVICES 

5th floor 

Adminifilrative Division 

Hudftrt Divinion 

i'lTiwintK'l Diviaion 

I'lirchu^iiiK Diviitioii 

Oflicf Miichinf liepuir I'nil Hasement 



THE PRINCIPAL MUNICIPAL SERVICES 



AIDITINC 

DillK and Arroiint« 



CITY CI.KUK 

Hoal l-ircns** (Council appr.) 
lioothlackg (10 21 yrs.) 
HuBineiut Ccrliliratw 
(Vmolorv IVrmiln (Council ai>pr.) 
City OrdinnncoR 
( 'laimn 

Kixhini; and llunlinf; Licenses 
C.un Clul) IJcenM-g (Council appr.) 
Jitnev Liconws (('ouncil appr.) 
\cw!.lK)y« (10 21 yrs.) 
Shell Kinh I'crmits (Council appr.) 
Sunday S|)orts (Council appr.) 

CITY COI NCIL 4th 1 

Clerk of Committees 
Council Committees 
(HcKular Weekly Me 
2 r.M.) 



lat floor 
2nd floor 



uigH, Mondays, 
4th floor 



3rd floor 
2nd floor 
Srd floor 

2nd floor 

.A 3-1100 
2nd floor 
3rd floor 



CITY MICSSKNCiat 

City Documents 
CITY UICCOUD . 
COMI'LAINTS DIVISION 
CKKDIT I NION 

City i:mploye<'S 
MAYORS OKKICE . 

mayor's OKHCE TELEI'HO.N't: 

Public Celebrations . 
Entertainment Licenses 

Newsboys (Boston Common) 

I'HESS ROOM 3rd floor 

RI:TIH1:MI:NT HOARD . 3rd floor 

TR1:AS(1<V DIVISION 1st floor 

CITY HALL ANNEX 

Telephone . LA 3 SlOO 

ASSESSINC ... 3rd floor 
Abatement I'etitions 
Assessors Certitic4ites 
Excise Taxes 

m iLDINC ... ilth floor 
Appeals — Building Code 
Appeals — Zoning Law 
Building I'ermits & Plans 
Demolition Permits 
Electrical Installations 
I'.lcvator Operators 

(iarages, Lubritoriimis A Repair Shops 
(!as Installations 
Heating Installations 
( )pen Air Parking Spaces 
Plumbing Installations 



Public Safety (;( 
Committee on Licenses 

COLLECTINC DIVISION 
Municipal Liens 
Tax Collections 



i:i.i:CTI()N . 
X'otiiig Certificates 
X'oting Registration 



PLANNINt; BOARD 11th floor 

//oning Adjustments 
Zoning Maps 

PI BLIC WORKS 

Automotive Division 5th floor 

Bridge Division 6lh floor 

Highway Division 5th floor 

StnH't Cleaning A Repairs 

Strwt Openings 
Permit Office 4th 8oor 

iStre<'t Occupancies 

Projections over Highways 

Sidewalk Licenses 
Sanitary Division 5th floor 

Carbarge A Rubbish Collections 
Sewer Division 7th floor 

Sewer lOnlrance Permits 
StRKET Lli:llTIN<i 

Survey Division 4th floor 

Stn-et Acceptances 

Street Lines 
Water Division . 6th floor 

Meter Reading 

Public Improvement Commission 

4th floor 

RICA I, PROPERTY . 8th floor 

Foreclosed Real I'>latc 
.Markets 

OfT-Strc-et Parking 
Public Buildings 
REGISTRY DIVISION 10th floor 
Births, Deaths & Marriage 
Certificates 
WEIGHTS A MIOASLRES 1st floor 

Measuring Devices 
WORKMEN'S C().MPE\S.VTK)N 

7th fliwr 

OUTSIDE CITY HALL 

CIVIC IMPR()\ i;.mi;nt com.mittee 

14 SUte Street . LA 3-1100 

CIVIL DEFENSi: HI 2-3020 

115 Southampton Street 
DEMOLITION (C.eneral) 

14 Stale Street LA 3-1100 

FINANCE COMMISSION LA 3-1622 
24 School Street 

FIRE HI 2-8000 

115 Southampton Street 
Flammable & E.xplosive Materials 
Fuel Oil Burners & Storage 
Inspections 

Fire .Marm Headquarters 

5!> Fenway KIO 6-1100 

HEALTH . CA 7 1300 

Hay market Square 
Burial Permits (Nights, City Hospital) 
Dump Permits 
Frozen Desserts Licenses 



PI;NA1, INSTIT^•TION^ 



CITY RECORD 



Published weekly in Boston, under the direc- 
tion of the Mayor, in accordance with 
legislative act and city ordinance. 



Thomas F. O'Dav. Editor. 

P. Nicholas PrraorcLLl. Asaociat* Editor. 

EulToRlAU Orrici. Room 3S. City Hall. 

Entered as second class matter at Boston 1 



lubscription (In Advance) tS.OO per year 
inele Copies ... 15 cents 

STREET AGENCIES. 
OW South News Stand. Old South entrance 
a subway. Also News Stand. Arst floor. City 



Advertising. 
A rate of t4 per inch of 12 line, (set solid) 
a been established for such advertisements 

under the law must be printed in the City 
!cord. Advertisine and other eopy must be 

hand by 5 r.M. Wednesday of each week to 
sure its publication in the Saturday issue. 



KE C-5400 



Funeral Directors Licenses 
Gartiage Transport Permita 
Hawkers A Peddlers License* 
Health t>lucatioii Ijilioralorv 
Health Suiistii-s .Milk Licenses 
Health Cnits .Motels 
HOSPITAL 

818 Harrison Avenue KE 0-8000 

I jut Boston Relief Station 

1 4 Poru-r Street LO 7-3600 

Ixiiig IsUnd Hospital . PR 3-1371 
Sanatorium 

24'.» River Stre< l BL 8-7900 

Horsi: OF CORRECTION (X; 3 2760 

I>ecr Island 
HOUSING AI THORITV 

(leneral Office*. ZiO Congrexs Strc« t 
LI 2-6450 

Applicjil ions. 141 .Milk St. LI 2-6450 
1-AW L.^ :,-6200 

I I lieacon Slre<-1 
LIBRARY 

Copley Square 
LICENSING BOARD CA 7-2470 

24 Province Street 
Alcoholic Beverages 
Automatic .\muscment Devices 
Bowling .Alleys 
Club Licenses 
C>)mmon \'ictuallers 
Employment Agencies 
Hotels 

Ixidging Houses 
Pool Rooms 
Shooting Galleries 
MORTIARY 

818 Harrison Avenue KE 6-6707 
KE 0-6768 

NEIGHBORHOOD REHABILITA- 
TION co.\imittef:s 

14 State Street . LA 3-1100 
PARKS A RECREATION CA 7-6940 

.33 Beacon Street 
Beach and Pools 
Ometeries (City-owned) 
Golf Courses 
Parkways Occupancies 
Playgrounds 
Public Baths 
Trees 

POLICE KE 6-0700 

154 Berkeley Street 
Auctioneers Hacknevs 
Bicycles Junk Dealers 

Dogs Pawnbrokers 
Firearms I'sed Cars 

Wagon A Hand Carts 
PRINTINCi SECTION . LA 3-6:«);l 

174 North Street (Street Books) 
REDEVEIXJPMENT AITHORITY 
73 Tremont Street . RI 2-0500 
Urban Renewal 
SCHOOL BUILDINGS. 
Board of Commissioners of 
26 .Norman Street . . C.\ 7 5750 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

15 Beacon Street CA 7-5500 
Bootblacks. Ne»sl>o\ s (12-16 rears) 

45 .Myrtle Street . CA 7-5500 
TRAFFIC HI 2-7700 

1 12 Southampton Street 
Ix>ading Zones Parking Meters 
Traffic Signals Parades 

VICTERANS' GRAVf:S LA 3-4005 

14 Sute Street 
VCTERANS' SERVICI->; RI 2-4600 

18 Comhill 
WELFARE . CA ,7-8320 

43 Haw kins Street 
Aid to De[)endent Children 
Chardon Street Home 
General Relief 
DUability Assistance 
Old .\ge .Assistance 
Permits for Street Solicitations 



Jax. 10 



CITY RECORD 



Mayor's Address . . . 

(Continued from front page.) 

of other cities, I can and do state 
most emphatically that this is not 
the case. In any fair and en- 
h'ghtened comparison of municipal 
operations, Boston will not suffer. 

The reason why other large cities 
enjoy a much lower tax rate than 
that of Boston, and becau.se of that 
lower rate, enjoy a better com- 
petitive position than does Boston, 
is simply and solely because these 
other municipalities have two dis- 
! tinct advantages over our city: 
i first, they do not have the costly 
; appendages to their local govern- 
I ments, such as county costs, MDC 
! costs, and ^ITA costs, nor do most 
of our larger cities pay the full cost 
' of hospital facilities, which in Bos- 
! ton represent one tenth of our total 
; expenditures. Secondly, these other 
cities, in every instance, have sub- 
stantial sources of income, not 
available to Boston. These sources 
include revenues from utilities tax, 
occupational tax, amusement tax, 
pay roll tax, sales tax, and other 
tax sources of that nature, in addi- 
tion to the tax on real property. 
At this very moment New York 
City, in order to avoid an increase 
in the real estate tax in that city, is 
seeking to increase the city sales tax 
from 3 to 4 per cent. 

Bofton's Unfavorable Position 

I do not think I need dwell upon 
the obvious reasons why the tax 
rate in most of the local commu- 
nities of our Commonwealth are 
lower, at least, for the time being, 
than Boston's rate. Chieflj^ these 
reasons are as follows: 

Boston is a metropolitan city, the 
capital city, and as such is recjuired 
to furnish a type and \-ariety of 
services uncommon to other cities 
and towns. Boston fares poorly in 
the long-established and difficult 
to change formulae for distribution 
of State income, and assessment of 
MDC and :MTA costs. 

Boston, unlike most of our cities 
and towns, has lost rather than 
gained in taxable income. Our 



total valuations have decreased ap- 
IM-oximately $100,000,000 in the 
last ten years. 

Boston's amount of tax-exempt 
properties, which has now reached 
the point of 38 per cent, is much 
greater than most if not all our 
cities and towns. 

Boston has little \irgin territory 
for new residential or commercial 
developments. 

Be that as it may. 

Sales Tax A Solution 

Boston's financial situation can 
be immeasurably strengthened and 
improved and our tax rate lowered 
and kept within control, if it were 
to receive an 0(|uitable share in a 
state-wide sales tax which, it seems 
to me, is the one available source of 
income which can re\-er.se the climb- 
ing tax rates in our cities and towns, 
and provide some needed financial 
help to the Commonwealth itself. 

There are those who wistfull}', 
albeit sincereh', believe that there 
would be no need of a new tax, or no 
need to increase the real estate tax, 
if local government would institute 
economies in the operation of its 
affairs. 

With inflation affecting and in- 
creasing the cost of all municipal 
services and activities, and with a 
steady shrinkage in real propert}^ 
valuation, Boston is caught in the 
jaws of a relentless vise. Any 
economies sufficient to offset infla- 
tionary costs and reduced revenues 
would be, necessarily, of such 
magnitude as to cause a severe cur- 
tailment in essential municipal serv- 
ices. For humanitarian and other 
reasons, this should not happen. 
Economies of any real significance 
would not only involve the aboli- 
tion of many hundreds of municipal 
jobs, but the net result would be 
grossly inadequate services in those 
fundamental activities which a mu- 
nicipality is organized to perform. 
This does not imply, of course, that 
we should not continually strive 
to institute reasonable and sensible 
economies in our procedures and 
operations. To ignore such op- 
portunities would be in defiance of 
our sworn responsibilities. 



A "Festering Sore" 
'i'he heavy tax load on real estate 
is the festering sore of our troubles. 
It can be likened to a deep, im- 
passable pit on the roadway to 
economic progress. 

When the pit is filled and the load 
on real estate lightened, Bo.ston will 
come into an age of second flower- 
ing. 

Already it is apparent that Bos- 
ton's reconstruction era has gone 
beyond the stage of hopeful dreams 
— it has actually begun. 

\'isible proof of this can be seen 
in the completed I.B.M. building 
on Boylston street; the completed 
Boston Globe building on Morrissey 
Boulevard; the partially completed 
Libert}^ Insurance Company build- 
ing on St. James avenue; the new 
Boston Herald-Traveler building 
ari.sing within the Xew York Streets 
area; the new Chamiel .3 T\' build- 
ing on Morris.sej^ Boulevard now in 
the foundation .stage; the new Blue 
Cross-Blue Shield building being 
erected on Federal street, and the 
large-scale demolition of substand- 
ard properties in the West End 
preparatory to the construction of 
new apartment houses, in an en- 
tirely new and fresh environment, 
as designed by one of our nation's 
outstanding architectural organiza- 
tions. 

These are not all, but they are 
the most prominent visual examples 
of our entry into a period of ex- 
traordinary redevelopment and re- 
construction. 

See Tremendous Investment 
This year, initial construction 
will be started on the mugniticent 
Prudential Center, which will in- 
volve au iin'cstnient by the Pru- 
dential Insurance Company of 
America, to the extent of at least 
$100,000,000. This new center of 
startling and striking beauty and 
utility will be, in my opinion, tht^ 
milestone marking Boston's emer- 
gence from a long period of rather 
innocuous containment and con- 
tentment to a new period of \-igoi-- 
ous and vital reconstruction. The 
tremendous investment to be n^ade 
in Boston b.y the Prudential Com- 



CITY R E C O R D 



.Tan. 10 



paiiy 1^ li.iKllicadcd l)Ut clotiuciil 
lest iiiioiiy ul Ihc I'liitli that great 
coiiipaiiy has in the future of Jios- 
toii and the liostoii comiiniiiit y. 
riidoiilitedly, the Pnideiilial Center 
will he the foreniinier, the inspira- 
tion, for other significant dexelop- 
nients which will occui' in Boston 
in the near future. 

'I'o meet t lie challenge of changing 
times, Boston (hies not iiilend to he 
left in the lurch, nor does it intend 
to rely on one develcjpment no 
matter how large and hreatli-taking 
it may he. One swallow does not 
make a siimm(>r. 

Through our redevelopment pvo- 
gram we shall give impetus to 
Boston's new confidence in the 
future. We will demolish and re- 
build substandard areas within our 
city, as we are now doing in a 
f()rtv-fi\T-aere area in the West 
Knd". 

Rcfial)ilitation Program 

W\' are now ])lanning a program 
of reclamation and rehabilitation 
in that heavih'-congcsted area be- 
tween Dudley street and Franklin 
I'ark, the chief objective of which 
will be to preserve this area from 
obsolescence and to thereby make 
this fine old residential section 
accept al)le for I'JIA mortgage and 
impro\ cment loans. Once this area 
and other similar areas are cleared 
of the eyesores which have such a 
contaminating influence, and which, 
experience pro\-es, nuishroom like 
a fast-spreading cancer, iin-estment 
money will flow into the neighbor- 
hood, residential properties will be 
I'cpaired and refurbished, and living 
conditions will be greatly improve(l. 
In the furtherance of a program 
such as this, by salvaging what is 
good in a neighborhood, and clear- 
ing away what is l)ad, and providing 
new municipal facilities and im- 
])ro\ements, we shall l)e performing 
a task which will redound to the 
permanent betterment of our city, 
while at the same time we shall 
make far more tolerable the li\ ing 
conditions of many thousands of 
our people. 

We are encouraging the pres(>nt 
lively interest in the building of 



much-iiccdcd nnddlc-incoinr- hous- 
ing in our city. In the Whitney 
Street .section of Koxbury, between 
Huntington avenue and Tremont 
street, we projjose to demoli.sh and 
clear and .sell the land .so cleared to 
a prixately-financed grouj) which 
will i)roceed to the construction of 
some SOU middle-income apart- 
ments. 

This can be done with no c(wt to 
the city, and even though construc- 
tion may be.under the limited divi- 
dend plan, the taxes to be expected 
will exce(>d the tmcertain tax return 
from the dilapidated structures to 
be replaced. 

We shall encourage, and aid, 
other housing developments of thi.-- 
kind, .several of which are now in 
the exploration or initial planning 
.stage, for it is quite evident that 
Boston is still a most attract i\(! 
place in which to live, provided the 
light kind of accommodations are 
made available. 

Demolition Program 

We .shall coiitiime to demolish, 
here and there in our city, tho.se 
structures which have become dere- 
lict and which are attractive nuis- 
ances and dangerous hazards. We 
ha\-e already demolished appi-oxi- 
mately 1,.506 of this type of struc- 
ture, and the program will contiime 
unabated until all are removed. 
A\'herever i)o.ssible, the.se cleared 
sites will be a.ssembled and .sold for 
(•(jmmercial or residential purpo.ses, 
depending on the character of the 
neighborhood. 

The Government Center which, 
roughly, will be contained in that 
area running from Pemberton to 
Scollay to Adams to Dock to Hay- 
market .s(|uares, promises to be one 
()f the most history-making face 
liftings made in the downtown area 
of any large city in our country. 
With a new state office building, a 
new federal office building, a new 
city hall; with approjiriate plazas 
setting ofT a new street pattern, and 
with sufficient area made available 
within the center for private devel- 
opment, the government center will 
be truly .symbolic of the Boston of 
tomorrow. 



Line of .Atlacli 

Boston, in short, has .set its sights 
on the reconstruction of our city so 
that it will be appealing for Ixtth 
residential and business u.ses. 

To iiccomj)li.sh this we must g<» 
forward simultaneously and \igor- 
ously (jii many fronts. 

\\\' must make reasonable ar- 
rangements, fax-wi.se, with private 
capital willing to risk large .sums of 
money in new construction within 
our city. 

We mu.st he willing to cooperate 
with, and aid. developers of middle- 
income hou.sing. 

We mu.st. on whate\er .scale 
called for, go forward with despatch 
on plans for urban renewal aitd 
redevelopment. 

We must pursue without inter- 
ruption our pi'ogram of slimi clear- 
ance and demolition. 

We mu.st not lag in our neighbor- 
hood rehabilitation activities. 

We must proceed as promptl\' as 
can be in the con.struction of low- 
income housing for the growing 
mmiber of elderly in our city. 

The.se are .some of the means and 
weapons at our dispo.sal in the fight 
that must be waged to improve om- 
city. We must take the fullest 
ath antage of them. Nothing should 
be permitted to stand in the way of 
the reconstruction of oiu' city. Bo.s- 
ton must not l)e an ineffectual, 
impotent, pathetic bystander in the 
march of progress. 

Happily, the prognosis is fa\or- 
able. Among other promising por- 
tents are the potentialities along the 
route of the Fitzgerald Highway or 
Central Artery. 

The latest adornment to the 
Boston skyline is the new and 
beautiful Tra\ elers Insurance Com- 
pany building, arising on the edge of 
the Artery. It is a dramatic exam- 
ple of the kind of construction we 
may confidently expect in the 
South Station-Atlantic Avenue area 
through which the Artery nms. It 
is, I believe the harbinger of other 
.substantial structures to be built in 
the .shadow <»f the .\rtery. 



Jax. 10 



CITY RECORD 



New Construction 

Not for many years ha« there 
been as much interest and at'ti\ ity 
in construction or reconstruction as 
there has been during the past 
tweh'e months. During this period 
building permits have increased ])y 
25 per cent. There is an insistent, 
growing demand for suitable sites 
for privately-sponsored housing de- 
velopment and for commercial and 
industrial enterprises. Extraordi- 
nary interest is being displayed in 
new apartment house construction 
in the Commonwealth Aveiuie- 
Bcacon Street area, reflecting the 
desire of increasing numbers of 
people to reside in modern apart- 
ments close to the varied attrac- 
tions which can only be found 
within the city. 

With additional income to con- 
trol the upsurge of the tax rate, 
Boston's incipient or minor Iniild- 
ing boom could undoubtedh- grow 
into a reconstruction cycle, such 
as our citj' has never before ex- 
perienced. 

I appeal to the meml>ers of the 
Legislature who realize that a 
sound, healthy, progressive capital 
city is essential if we are to ha\ e a 
sound, healthy, progressi\-e Com- 
monwealth, to provide the income 
which will open the floodgates to an 
era of unprecedented I'econst ruc- 
tion and all the con.-^eciuential 
benefits Avhich will flow therefrom 
to all of the citizens of our city and 
our Commonwealth. 

A new and more prosperous Bos- 
ton is not a mirage. It is within 
reach. It will not come with a 
self-propelled, irresistible rush even 
though new reAcnues are made 
available. There must be much 
work, much effort, and much co- 
operation on many sides. Uil)an 
areas through our country, Boston 
included, could be, but do not intend 
to be passive victims of the forces 
of change and decentralization. 
We must, and we will, cut our cloth 
to the new pattern. 

Our big urban centers will, I am 
.siu-e, not merely sur\ ive this period 
of transition, but will be stronger 
and more self-reliant than ever 
before. 



Optimism Called For 
Boston will be a better city in the 
future than it has been in the past, 
but only if we aic willing to work 
diligently and assiduously to make 
it so; only if we ai'e pi'i)\-i(l(>d with 
the proper t()t)ls with w liieh to foi'ge 
our way; and only if oi)timism and 
confidence on the part of influential 
elements in our city prevail over 
lingering pessimism and doubt. 

I can assure our citizens that the 
city administ i-ati(;)i. its Mayor, its 
City Council, its ofheials, and its 
employees, will not be foinid want- 
ing. We will be proudly willing to 
take part, to cooperate, to give 
leadership in the resurgence and 
reconstruction of Boston so that 
our city may be, as it -Imuld be, the 
kind of city where business can 
flouri.sh and grow, and where our 
citizens may find ample opportti- 
nity in employment, and decent 
([uarters and surroundings in which 
to live. 

To the members of the City 
Council and School Committee, I 
extent my gi-atitude for your indi- 
A'idu;'! and collective devotion to 
duty. I appeal to each of you. 
individually and collectively, for 
your contiiuied cooperation in all 
those matters which are for the 
good of our city, and all of its 
people. 

Mvv tlic yi-.:v 1959 be recorded 
l)y tut HI r oi i;'Hs as the year of 
Boston's icbirth. 

.Ala.y the God of all be with us 
always, as he was with our fathers. 
]May He guide, protect, and inspire 
us in all our endeavors. 



V. F. W. PARKWAY SEWER 

West Roxbtiry 
The Mayor and Public Improvement 
Commission have appro\cd the follow- 
ing : 

That 500 linear feet of 10-ineh pipe 
.sewer be constructed in Veterans of 
Foreign Wais Parkway, We<t Roxbury 
district, from Gardner street approxi- 
mately 500 feet northerly, at an esti- 
mated cost of S7.500. 

That this commission estimates that 
the undermentioned parcel of land situ- 
ated on the easterly side of "Wncrans of 
Foreign ^^'al■s Parkway as shown on a 
l>lan mark( d "City of Boston. Plan Xo. 
1500B, -Sewerage "Works. A'eterans of 
Foreign Wars Parkway, West Roxbury, 



Derrmlnr 4. 195S. James W. Haley. 
Di\-ision F^nginct r, Survey Division, Pub- 
lic Works Department," and on file in 
the office of tliis department, will recoi\-e 
Ijenefit ur adxantage, bej-ond the gen- 
eral adxantagc lo all real estate in said 
eiiv, from the improvement herein 
oi(l( led. in the amount hereinafter mon- 

In.lKd. 

Parcel. Amount. 
1. Albert J. and Anna L. Steffins.... $4,916 79 



LIBERTY'S GREATEST CLAIM 

Lil)erty does not make all men perfect 
nor all society secure. But it has pro- 
\ ided more solid progress and happiness 
and decency for more people than any 
oilier i)hilosophy of government in 
history. 

Harry S. Tkum.vx, 1945 



JAYWALKERS WARNED 

Pedestrians were warned by the Den- 
ver police traffic bureau that they will be 
subject to jaywalking fines of two dollars 
for each violation. 



Mortality Report. 

For the week endins; .Jan. 2. 19.j'.'. 

Population as of Julv, 19.58. Ma- - 
Cen.sns, 822.884: poi)ulation estii 
r'nited States Census Bureau. .SI' 
deaths (stillbirtlis excluded): Ri ~, : 
residents. 94. total. 274. 

Deatli rate per 1 .000 of ijopulation: Ml deatiis. 
17.:iO; nonresidents deducted. ll..i:i. 

I^eath rate per 1.000 of populaiion: 

Last week. 14.19: cjrrespi.ndinL' week last year. 
17.81. 

Deaths by aee periods. se\, i tc: I iidi-i one year. 
20. one year to foui years. in( lu,<ne. ,,; sixty years 
and oyer, 179. Total deaths: .Male. 148. female, 
12C; deatlis in hospitals and institutions. 202. 

RKPORT.ABLE DISE.XSKS: 
C.\Si;S A.M) DliATllS.* 



Poliomyelitis. . . 

Diphtheria 

Encephalitis 

Lethargica 

Influenza 

Measles 

-Meninsitis 

Epidemic 

Pneumonia (lobar) 

Scarlet Feyer 

Tuberculosis 

(pulmonary) . . . 
Childhood 

Tuberculosis . . . 
Tuberculosis 

(other forms) . . . 
Tyrihoid Fe\-er . . , 
Whooping Cough . 



Residents and nonresidents included. 



CITY RECORD 



.Tax H 



A COMMON GROUND FOR BUSINESS AND CITY MANAGEMENT 



I'riiicipal speaker at the Mayor's 
iuiiche<ni to the TTiird ( 'oiifereiiee 
(111 Miiiiiiipal A(liuini.strati(jii held 
Xoveinher JO and J I, lU.'xS, at tiie 
I'uhlic I-ilirarv Audiloriiirn, Copley 
s(niare, was Dean I'liilii) 11. Ua^an 
of tlie Boston I'niversily College of 
liusiness Administration, who key- 
noted tlie theiu<' of the conferences. 
TTie sul)ject of Dean Ragan's talk 
was "A Conunon (Iround for Busi- 
ness and City Mana}>;enieiit." He 
sjjoke as follows: 

These conferences on municipal 
administration were initiated in 
Mlot) "for the purpose of exchanging 
ideas and formulating plans for 
more progre.ssive administration 
within our city government." The 
general interest created hy the first 
conference was sufficient to make 
the conferences an annual under- 
taking. I heartily agree with the 
statement made last year by Mr. 
Keilly, Director of Administrative 
Services. He said: "I can state 
emphatically that conferences of 
this character can only result in 
imi)i()\-ed etficieiicy in our municipal 
operation and a clearer understand- 
ing among the city officials and key 
employees of their everyday prol)- 
iems." It re(|uir(>s hut little investi- 
gation to find that a whole host of 
imi)ortant and significant improve- 
ments in techni(iues, procedures, 
and methods made hy the City of 
Boston during the past four years 
are directly attril)utable to the 
specific elTort that has been devoted 
to improvement itself as a target. 

Common Principles Apply 

T'his entin> conscious elTort to- 
waid improv(>ment is actually a 
part of the generic work of manag- 
ing, which includes certain funda- 
mental elements. Whether one is 
running th(> City of lioston, an 
organization unit thereof, a busi- 
n(>ss, a school, a hospital, an Army, 
a football team, a Ma.s.sachu.setts 
|)olitical campaign, or a Maryland 
chicken festival, the elements of 
managing are fundamentally the 
.<ame. It is these elements I would 



A complete reporl of the Third 
Conference on Mimicipal Adminis- 
tration, held \<)\emhL'r 2(( and 2!. 
lO.SH, at the Public Library Audi- 
torium, and attended b\ some 
key cit\ emplovet's, begin.s in thiy 
isfue. 

Following the introductory ad- 
dress, printed herewith, ea:h of the 
six panel discussions of the con- 
ference will be reported as a single 
installment of the entire series, 
over a period of seven weeks. 

The series will later be published 
as a document. 



like to di.scu.ss with you l)riefly 
today. 

Last year a Committee of the 
A.s.sociation of Con-sulting Manage- 
ment Kngineers (commonly known 
as Acme) made an exhaustive study 
of the common body of knowledge 
recjuired of a professional manage- 
ment con.sultant, and in September 
reported to its membership, which 
includes forty-tour leading con.sult- 
ing firms in this coiuitry. As a part 
of this report the elements or princi- 
ples of managing were detailed as 
developed by the conunittee. In 
brief, they identified the manager as 
a person at any organization level 
who, in seciu"ing results through 
the work of others, estai)li.shes ob- 
jectives, directs the attainment of 
these objectives, and mea.sures re- 
sults. 

The >\anaging Process 

Establishing objectives has four 
elements: 

1. (lather information both for- 
mally and informally. 

2. Synthesize information — 
taking the bits and pieces and 
putting them together to form as 
complete a picture as possible 
and then using this as a basis for 
managerial action. This element 
separates the men from the boys 
when it comes to matiaging. 
Some managers i)o.s.se.ss the abil- 
ity to .synthesize from incomplete 
data and .some don't. 



'i. Plan, i.r., the thinking 
through of objectives to be 
achieved: alternative courses of 
action to attain the objectives are 
developed, defined, weighed. 

1. Decide, i.r., .select the best 
possible course of action. This 
task is vastly simplified if the 
first three elements are done well. 
The well-known n»anager who 
"flies by the seat of his pants" 
makes deci.si.sons in bli.ssful igno- 
rance of the first thnH' elements, 
which in my opinion makes him 
a tinhorn gambler, not a gemiinr 
deci.sion-maker. 

Must State Objectives 
The.se first four elements deal with 
what is to be done. Even though 
the .setting of objectives is funda- 
mental to .sound managing, it is not 
a conscious or even a re.spectable 
activity in many top managements. 
Sometime ago when I was working 
as a professional management con- 
sultant, I had occasion to meet with 
the board of directors of a large 
membership corporation in the Mid- 
dle West. The president and chair- 
man of the board had included an 
item on the agenda which read: 
"What Are the Objectives of This 
Corporation?'' As soon as the 
meeting was called to order, one of 
the long-service directors in(|uired 
of the chairman, " Why do you have 
a silly item like this on the agenda? 
We know what our objectives are; 
we don't have to talk about them." 

The chairman replied, "Vou may 
very well be right, Sam, but at 
lea.st /'m not .sure what they are. 
Let's go around the table very 
(luickly and ask each man what he 
considers the objectives of this cor- 
poration to be." 

The first man called upon had 
spoken no more than two minutes 
when .several other directors jumped 
up at the same time and disagreed 
with him, and it .soon developed 
that the board of directors had no 
clear idea at all as to what the ob- 
jectives of the corporation were or 
should be. They had just been 



Jax. 10 



CITY RECORD 



23 



"flying by the seat of their pants." 
After some further discussion, they 
unanimously agreed that if an over- 
all set of corporation objecti^•es were 
developed, written, and published, 
the corporation could not help but 
do a better job in the future. A 
committee of the board was ap- 
pointed to work on a set of objec- 
tives. Within about two months, 
they were dcA-eloped by this com- 
mittee and adopted by the board. 
This incident happened several 
years ago and since then both the 
top management of the company 
and I are convinced that this con- 
scious setting of long-range objec- 
tives was one of the most significant 
tasks that this board ever under- 
took. 

Long= or Short=Range 

Objectives may be either long- 
range or .short-range. The former 
are usually general statements of 
intent and remain relatively stable 
for a number of years at least. The 
latter are deri^'ed from the former, 
are much more specific, and often 
quantitatively expressed. To clarify 
Avhat I mean by objectives in the 
context of this discussion let me 
cite some examples. Suppose an 
airline has a long-range objecti\'e 
"to become the best managed com- 
pany in the industry." This com- 
pany cannot really get at the ac- 
complishment of this objective until 
it is broken down into a numl)er of 
short-range targets that are much 
more concrete and immediate than 
a simple statement of intent. Ex- 
amples of such targets might be: 

Long= and Short-Range Targets 

1. Increase our shai-e of the avail- 
able market by 20 per cent and 
jump three places in indu.stry posi- 
tion. 

2. Reduce convair operations and 
maintenance costs to below indus- 
trj' average or to ecjual our operating 
efficiency with DCS. 

3. Reduce break e\-en subsidy 
need below $1 per j^asscMiger. 

Another example : Suppose a large 
manufacturing company sets an ob- 
jective for the long run, "to build 
good, mutually profitable relations 
with all who help make the company 



a constructive and successful enter- 
prise." When this objective is 
pulled back into the short range, it 
becomes necessary to specifically 
identify the "who." For instance: 

1. Assume the leadership in 
developing and promoting a civic 
improvement program for Mid- 
dletowu ( Branch plant location). 

2. Have each branch plant 
manager hold a get-ac(iuainted 
meeting with company stock- 
hdldcr-^ li\iiig within a 50-mile 
radiUN 111 his plant. 

3. Ivstablish a Customer Com- 
plaint Department and complete 
the processing of each complaint 
within three days after its receipt. 

4. Review the job performance 
of each frontline .supervisor; de- 
termine training needs common 
to all supervisors; and develop a 
supervisory training course to 
meet these needs. 



Council Elects 
McLaughlin 
President 

Councillor Edward F. Mc- 
Laughlin, Jr., on January 5, was 
elected president of the City 
Council for the year 1959. 

The new Council President is 
now serving his sixth year in the 
city's governing body. He re- 
sides at 6 Calvin road, Jamaica 
Plain. 

A former assistant TJ n i t e d 
States Attorney, 1950-53, former 
administrator for the Veterans' 
Adininisti'atidn, (h>al)li'd Navy 
vctei'un of AN'orld W ar II, Presi- 
dent McLaughlin graduated from 
Boston Latin School, Dartmouth 
College, and Northeastern Uni- 
versity Law School. A practicing 
attorney, he is a member of the 
federal, state, and city bar asso- 
ciations. He is 39 years of age 
and the father of four children. 

President ^McLaughlin's father, 
the late Edward F. McLaughlin, 
Sr., was formerly Fire Commis- 
sioner of Boston. 



5. Develop a set of purchasing 
policies that insures fair and equi- 
table treatment to every supplier. 

One more example. Let us as- 
sume that you and I subscribe to a 
long-run ol)j('cti\-e "to contimiously 
iniprove Boston's j^osition as a lead- 
ing American city." We would 
need to implement this worthy but 
somewhat gen(M-al statement of in- 
tent by specific targets, such as: 

1. Rel)uild slum area X. 

2. R'h1uc(> trafhr congest ion in 
the downtown area bv \ per cent. 

3. iM'ect a new city hall. 

4. Install a new telephone 
intercommunication system for 
city administration offices. 

5. Install a cost r(>duction pro- 
gram in de])artment x. 

(3. Estal)lish a management 
training j^rogram for key em- 
ployees. 

I belicA-e these illustrations will 
provide a sufficient understanding 
for our purpose here as to what is 
meant by the term "objectives." 

Directing the Achievement 

After the establishment of objec- 
tives, the next major stej) in the 
managing process is directing the 
achievement of objectives. This 
has four elements: 

1. Organize, i.e., determine the 
best method of assiuning facilities 
and peo]:)le to accom])lisli the 
established objectives. 

2. Communicate: Explain ob- 
jectives and work to be done to 
empk)yees up and down the line. 

3. Moti\ate: Pro\ifle an un- 
derstanding of the "why" of 
what is to be done. An effort is 
made to id(Mitify the success of an 
organization with the interests of 
the indi\-i(lual, and thus s])ark his 
"will to work. " 

4. Direct, guide, coun.sel, or 
teach others how the objectives 
can l)e accomplished. 

Getting the Work Done 

This second grouj) of four ele- 
ments is concerned with getting the 
work done to achie\-e objtM'tives. 

The final step in the managing 
process is to nreasure, e\-aluate, con- 



24 



CITY RECORD 



Irol to (Ictcriiiiiic tlic cncctiNcncs.^ 
with which phiiis arc hciiin carried 
out . This clement ojM'ratcs through- 
out the action phase of inauafiiufj; as 
well as after llie work has Ix'cii c(,ui- 
pleted. JiifoMuatiou <leri\-e(i from 
measurement often is used :is the 
sfartiiifi jjoint for anotlier managinp; 
cych'. 

As a smiimary <>f our chscussion 
lip to tliis i)oint, i)lease refer to 
exliil)it I. It repn sents the W(,rk (;f 

EXHIBIT I 

ELEMENTS OF MANAGING 




manaKinfi as a circular jirocess in- 
\()lvinfi- a continuous repetition of 
tlie three major stei)s with their 
nine fundamental elements. \\hn\ 
the results obtained from carryiiijz: 
out the orifiinal {)l)jecti\es * arc 
measured, a take-off jjoint is created 
for the estal)lishment of new or rc- 
\ iscd objectives. Thus, the work of 
managinfj goes on and on and is 
never completed. 

Developing People 

The Acme report defin(»s two 
otlier elements in addition to those 
just (lescril)ed that .M-rxc as cata- 
lysts throufjihout the (Mitire mana{i- 
inti process. One of the.se is "de- 
\<'l()pinfi i)eoi)le" and the other is 
"|)romotin}j; iimovation. " Ivxhibit 
I is (lesifrii(>([ to show that the iicars 
rei)r(>sentin}!; these two elements 
must be in motion for the manafiinsr 
|)r(»ce.ss it.self to be elTcctive. 

If the maiiaucr fjets results 
throush the work of others, it fol- 
lows that these others can only be 



adcfjuatc ly (|ualifi( (l and continue 
to be .so with j)roper develo|)ment. 
Duriiifr the p:tst fifteen years, con- 
siderable research Inis been carried 
on to determine just what consti- 
tutes manpower developnunt. 
There is now urowing ap;reement on 
.seven points that have r-ome out of 
this research. 

Self-Doeiopment 

First, all development is .self- 
development. It is primarily th'- 
rcsponsibilit}- of the individual who 
is to be (le\-eloped. A de.sire for 
growth, a willinsne.ss to stretch, 
must arise within the individual 
him.self and it is this that sparks any 
program of de\-elopment. 

An employer does not "develop" 
men. They dex'clop themselves, in 
the last analysis. There can be no 
inani])ulat ion from the outside, no 
pulling of puppet .strings, no moving 
of pawns by so-called experts. In 
the long run, manipulation only 
backfires. 

Second, the bo.ss must provide 
t he climate for development. There 
can be little self-development with- 
out the inunediate .superior's help 
and guidance, without the bo-s-^ 



School Committee 
Elects Regan 
Chairman 

John P. Rv^JMU. 1 President 
road, \\'est Roxbury, on January 
5. was elected chairman of the 
Boston School Committee for the 
year 1959. 

Chairman Regan, a jiracticing 
attorney, member of the state 
and city bar associations, is serv- 
ing his second year on the School 
Connnittee. He is 40 years of 
age. 

A World War II Air Corps 
l)ilot, Mr. Regan received his 
B..\. degree at Boston College in 
1942 and. after the war, received 
his law degree at Boston Univer- 
sity Law School. He is the father 
of two children, one of whom is 
a recent graduat(> of Boston Latin 
School. 



j>ro\iding the o])portimity. The 
boss camiot delegate this responsi- 
bility or pass it along to a "per- 
soimel expert." 

Third, development opportunities 
must be universal in any organiza- 
tion. The organization must be 
geared to helping everyone develoj) 
to his optimum capacity. It is in- 
rieasing the productivity of the 
total manpower that gives the 
organizatit)n significantly greater 
power and drive. 

I'ourth, all development is indi- 
\idualistic. Xo person is a carboii 
copy of any other person nor is Ik 
exactly as he him.self was yestenhiy 
Kach one is difTerent as to degn < 
and kind of ability. The so-called 
"average man" is merely a statisti- 
cal convenience. \ proliferation <>■ 
packaged programs and caimed 
coiu'.ses within an organization pos- 
sess very limited value for persoimc! 
development. 

I-ifth, most of an individual's de- 
velopment grows out of what he 
does daily on the job. Off-the-jol. 
education or training is important, 
but actual experience is needed to 
drive home one's understanding o! 
l)rinciples, concepts, and techniques 
studied in the abstract. One camiot 
learn to swim without getting wet. 

Sixth, delegation of genuine de- 
cision-making responsibility is a 
l)rime development tool. It is a 
fundamental fact that we learn In- 
st ruggling with problems and fiiul- 
ing the answers ourselves. Give a 
man a "job of work" to do and 
then let him do it. 

Seventh, the individual nui.st con- 
tinue to ask himself the (|uestion. 
"Does my greatest opportunity foi 
progress lie in being a specialist or 
in being a manager?" He must ask 
this of himself until he is sure that 
he should move in one direction or 
the other. Technical specialization 
is growing and will grow even more 
rapidly in the future; but at the 
same time, managing has emerged 
as a separate, distinct kind of work 
in its own right. Both kinds of 
work are iiece.ssarv, l)Ut they are 
difTerent . 

When the management of any or- 
ganization (>l).servcs these .se\en 



Jax. 10 



CITY RECORD 



25 



points in its development of man- 
power, it is building a solid founda- 
tion for a certain increase in produc- 
tivity. 

Promotion Innovation 

The final but perhaps most im- 
portant point is jiromoliiiu; iiiiicxa- 
tion. The maiiatier must \)v a 
steady force behind iimoxation, 
which means the intrdductiou of 
new ideas leading to improvement 
and progress. This is not easy. 
The manager must keep his existing 
activity running smoothly and in 
good order. If he does not, he will 
slow down his momentum toward 
objectives. Therefore, he must 
encourage those members of his 
staff Avho keep the ongoing march 
of operation neat and orderly. On 
the other hand, if his activity is not 
to go to dry rot, he must come u]) 
with some radically new approaches 
to meet the breakneck and often 
unpredictable pace of world change 
that always confronts him. He 
must help and ciicourau;*' his "luna- 
tic fringe" of unorthodox think(Ms, 
t)ecause out of this group of non- 
conformists he is likely to get some 
valuable new ideas often not forth- 
coming from the neat and orderly 
but uncurious mind. 

The alert manager always has 
this dilemma to meet. As Colonel 
I'rwick, the distinguished liritish 
management authority, puts it, 
"his lunatics will produce idea after 
idea, which is no flamn good. He 
has not only to drown these mis- 
shapen jnogeny at birth with as 
little (li-tuibance as possible but 
has also to comfort the bereaved 
parents. But he mtist keep them 
reproducing. One of these days they 
will turn up a winner. At the same 
time, the leader must prevent his 
administrators from mindering his 
lunatics or putting them in a 
strait jacket." 

Be that as it may, no organiza- 
tion ever stands still. It is always 
on the move. It has its origin when 
a group of people encountering a 
given set of common iM'oblems 
formulates long-term objectives to 
overcome these ])i-()l)lems and 
creates an oi^anization to achie\-e 
its objectives. By the time achieve- 



ment is realized, much of the origi- 
nal zeal has dissipated because 
many of the organizers have re- 
tired, died, resigned, or lost their 
\isi()n. 

^^'llen the organization has 
reached this ])oiiit of achievcMuent, 
it is coufroiited with an entirely new 
s(>t of ])rol)lems at a higher level. 
It is then at a fork in its road. One 
choice leads up a, liigli, craggy 
mountain to new acliie\-em('nts, a 
mountain that can only be scaled 
with the aid of inn()\ation. The 
other choice makes an easy descent 
into a mirage of success on a desert 
that leads to stagnation and even- 
tual death. The organization can- 
not pause indefinitely at the forks, 
for if it does, e\-euts will ine\ itably 
push it downhill. 

The destiny v.f an organization, a 
cit}' or civilization, or a society for 
that matter, depends u|K)n the 
development and application of new 
ideas, or the failiu'e to do so. This 
in tuiii is inseparable from the de- 
\-elopment of i)e()ple. The master 
Christian once asked a momentous 
question which fifty j'cars ago be- 
came the title of a classic novel 
"Quo \'adis?" So nuist every man- 
ager, e\'ery key emjjloyee, neyev 
cease to ask that same (luestion of 
his (irganization and of himself — 
"Whither goest thou'.'" 



James E. Gildea Heads 
1959 March of Dimes 

Mayor Hynes has appointed 
Collector-Treasurer James E. (iil- 
(!ea to head the "1959 March of 
Dime- Canij)aign" among the city 
and county officials and employees. 

Each departnietit head has ap- 
pointed a representative to handle 
the canipaign materials and funds. 
William E. Dowling, assistant 
collector-treasurer, will act as 
treasurer I'or this segment of the 
cani]);iign. 

In announcing the camjjaign, 
Mr. (lildea -^aid: 'A\'c must realize 
that in Sutfolk County tlu^ National 
Eoundation has spent $165,000 this 
pa>t year on old polio cases for 
hosi)italization, physiotherapy, or- 



thopedic appliances, clinics, check- 
ups, and other activities." 

"Polio can strike again," the 
chairman said. 



City Clerk Swears in 
New Zoning Board 

City Clerk A\'alter J. :\Iall()y, in 
the presence of the Mayor, on 
January 6, administered the oath of 
office to Boston's new zoning com- 
mission. This hoard will function 
within the City Planning lioard. 

The appointees to the zonin-j; 
commission, approved by the Citj'' 
Council on December 29, 1958, are 
as follows: 

Alfred Gross, 28 Albion street, 
Hvde Park. 

Theodore W. Paul, 133 Massa- 
chusetts avenue. 

Timothy J. Regan, Jr., 29 Hill- 
croft roa(l, Jamaica Plain. 

Arthur J. (lartland, 220 Com- 
monwealth avenue. 

William L. Hvland, 11 Beacon 
street. 

Edward I. Masterman, 58 Moss- 
dale road, .lamaica Plain. 

Stanley I'nderliill, 73 Pinckney 
street. 

Albert V. Colman, 71 Alban 
street, Dorchester. 

Robert T. Fowler, Jr., 25 IMid- 
vale road. West Roxbury. 

Charles F. Spillane, 19 Plowitt 
road. West Roxbury. 

David F. Supple, 21 Ocean 
street, Dorchester. 

The commission elected All^ert 
V. Colman its chairman and Mr. 
Hyland was elected vice-chairman. 

A meeting of the board is sched- 
uled for January 28. 



Old Harbor Village 
Now City Owned 

Old Harbor Village, Boston's 
oldest low-rent jniblic liousing proj- 
ect, has been ti'ansferred from fed- 
eral control to complete ownershij) 
of tlu' Boston Housing Autlioi'ity, 
it was annoimced January 2 in 
New York. 

Herman D. Hillman, Public 
Housing Administration regional 



2 (> 



>:ii<l llir 21-yi'ar-(>l(l pnij- 
I'ct, near Carson Bcacli, Soiitli Hos- 
t(in, clmiiKt'*! Iiaixls New Year's 
Day. 

Tlie Huston Housing Authority 
has operated tlie project under fed- 
eral h'ase since May, 1938. Under 
tlie conveyance last week, the au- 
thority must remit to the federal 
agency all net rental revenues ex- 
ceeding operating costs. 

Old llarhor Village is the last 
among federally-constructed hous- 
ing projects to he transferred lo 
local ownership. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT ORDERS 

(It Ht ml Onli r .\o. .i6:i. 

The follo\viiij{-namc<i jmt.^oiis arc hcrchv 
appointed pciuiancnt palrolinoii in this 
(Icpai tmciil and arc a.^sinncfi to the Supci- 
iiitciidcnt's Otricc, cITcctivc Wednesday, 
DcccuiIht l!l.")8, at II o'clock a.m.: 

Walter H. Khrhardt. Willnir Fevler, Jr.. 
Henry B. Karl, Hichanl T. Stanton. 
Ilcnrv J. ("ovne, Paid J. Donahue. 
Mclvin L. Hlankenshii), John F. Feeney. 

1. dward (". Lynch, Warren IL Morrissey. 
Henry T. Currie. Joseph F. Scagnoli, 
•lames M. O'Hara, Jr., William J. Cannon. 
I'rancis J. .McCarthy, Leon Reitman, 
Daniel J. Sullivan, James A. Douglas, 
.lolin F. Costello. Paul J. Bogue, Francis 
M. Connollv, Robert L. Tiernev, Francis 
II. Lakis, David (). Toler. Christy F. 
(iuerriero. Henry J. Zurka. .\nthony 1'. 
Uuzzo, Donald (!. Lehane. Robert L. 
l)a\\.M)n. Louis R. Shamalv. Joseph .\. 
Parker. Jr., Donald F. .Mc( laugh. Hender- 
son O. Parker, Dea-i H. Smith. Peter L. 
Fleming, Donahl F. Holland, lOdward H. 
Worthy. J.ames J. Dyer, William J. 
Hidge, Deiuiis F. Casey, Ral])h W. Regan, 
.l.imes W. .Jones, .john C. P.ilenno. 
John P. Mullan. 

January 2. 
Genrrtil Ortit r Stt. .{fi.i. 
Sergl. l{()ber( H. Bradley and Patrol- 
men l^lnier Keskula, Francis .\. Malone. 
and Bobert L. Kelley of Division 14 arc 
licfeby coninK'ndcd for performance of 
mcritoiious i)olice iiut.\- and each is 
gr.'inted three da\s' additional vacation. 
.\lK>ut 7.4.') P.M., Thursday December 

2. ">, nt.iS, I'alrolm;in Illmcr Keskula. while 
patrolling his route, observed smoke issu- 
ing from a front apartment of the building 
located at 201 Kelton street, .MIslon. 
The officer inunedialely sounded the lire 
.il.irm from Box ."ilS located !it Conunon- 
we.'dth :ivenue .and W.arren street. .Mlstoti, 
,ind then proceeded on fool to the building. 

Sergl. Hoberl H. Bradley with Patrol- 
men Francis .\. ^L•done and Robert L. 
Kellrv in the 14-H car immediat»'ly re- 
vpuMd<'(i In thi- .il.irin of fire and met 



CITV RECORD 



P.'ilmhii.in i\c>kiila in liuni ol ilic .ilori-- 
menlioried building, a three-story brick 
apart nn-nt dwelling. The officers entercfl 
the burning building and carrie<l from the 
.second floor front aparlnu-nl to the street 
the occupants, .Mathilda Hilstrom, K4 
years, widowed, and her son. Merlon 
Hilstrom, oO years, a paraplegic, who is 
confined to .a wh*^^ chair. Mathilda 
Hilstrom was rem«)ved from the scene to 
St. Klizabeth's Hospital in the 14 (I ear 
by Patn)linen R(»bert Hughet; and James 
Keilt v. .Merton Hilstrom wa.s remove<i to 
St. i;iiz.abeth's Hosi)ilal in the ambulanr-e 
r)f Division 14 b\ P.atrolmeii Rich.-ird 
.Ma.son and Robert ("orbett. 

Sergt. Jiradle.v and offi<-ers above men- 
tioned again entered the burning building 
and led llie occupants of the twelve apart- 
ments to safety, including .Mr. and -Mrs. 
Charles Sanders and their infant son. 

.\t St. lOlizabelh's Hospital Merton 
Hilstrom was found to be sufTering from 
extensive first and second degree burns 
about the face and body, and held for 
treatment. His luother, Mathilda Hil- 
strom, upon examination, was founfl to 
be sulTering from .second degree burns of 
the back, smoke iidialation, and was held 
for treatment. 

Merton Hilstrom stated to Sergt. 
Bradley that the fire was caused when he 
accidentally up.set a lighted candle w hile in 
the living room of his ap.irtment, this 
candle in turn igniting the Christ ma.** tree. 
The (lam;ige was set at .?4.()0<). 

The Police Commissioner is plea.sed to 
recognize the alertness and devotion to 
duty of Sergt. Bradley and Patrolmen 
Keskula. Malone, ;uid Kelle\- who, by 
their |)ronipt action, rescued an aged 
woman and her ])araplegic son from a 
binning building thereby bringing credit 
upon themselves and the Boston I'olicc 
Department. 

January 2. 

(it'urrtil Order So. 

Sergt. Francis T. Cahill .and Patrolm.-m 
James ]•;. Powers of Division 2 are hereby 
commended for the performan<e of 
meritorious police duty and each is 
gr.mted three daxs' additional vac.'ition. 

On Friday. December lit. 1!»5S, at 
about (). I.T A.M.. Sergt. Fnincis T. Cahill, 
while driving along Washington street, in 
the vicinit\- of Franklin street, en route to 
report for dut.v, he.ard a man shouting. 
■'Holdup. " lie observed two men run- 
ning up Biomfield street and went after 
them. He captured one m:m in Province 
court who had a fully-loaded n'volver in 
his hand and who later w,is identified as 
Hichard Stunkel, :{t) vears, .single, of .50 
-Millerstile road, (;uincy. 

On the way to the nearest police box, 
the prisoner suddi-nly turned on the 
sergeant and ,ittempted to seize his 
revolver. .\t this time. Patrolman James 
v.. Powers arrived :uui ji.ssisted Sergeant 
Cahill in subduing the prisoner and taking 
.away from liim a fully-loaded automatic 
pistol that he had concealed under his 



-luit ill an improvised shoulder hoi-i'i. 
a .'>-inch hiniting knife, two boxes of 
ammunition, a roll of adhesive tape, a 
roll of twine, and si-veral notes of Cau- 
tion " intended for future victims. 

Investigation disclosed that just prior 
to the jirrest. the prisoner had attempted 
to hold up a stockman on the .second floor 
of the F. \\ . Woolworth Companv store 
located at 4'.M) Washington street. Boston. 
.After being outwitted .and followed along 
Wa.shingtoM stnf-t by the victim, the 
prisoner alteinpt«»d to hold up two em- 
ploye<s of the Boston Ice Companv in a 
comiKun' truck oti Washingtrm stre«'t. 

The prisoner is being held in $20,(MKI 
bail f(»r the grand jurr on two coiuits of 
assault with a dangerous weapon, to Mil: 
a revolver, and with intent to rob, an<l on 
two counts of unlawful pos.session of fire- 
arms. Aft<'r listening to the pvidenc<' in 
this case. Chief Justice l'}lijuh .\dlow, of 
the Boston .Municipal Court «onimende<l 
Sergeant Cahill for his courage- in making 
this important arrest. 

This pri.soner has been in serious trouble 
since l!)2't when he wa.* convic-ted in New 
^ork on a robbery charg*- and sent to 
Sing Sing Prison, .\bout six and on«'- 
half years later, on .\Lirch 10, l!t:U). 
he wa.s found guilty of a similar ofTense in 
Boston and .sentenced to .State Prison for 
a term of fifteen to twenty years, eleven 
of which lie spent in Bridgewater State 
Hos[)ital. On expiration, he was returin ! 
to State Piison to serve a three-' 
sent<'n(e on a charge of armed robber-, 
which he had been convicted in Middli - 
Superior Court on .March 2:i, IKHO. 

The Poli<-e Commi.ssioner is pleased to 
recognize the excellent work of Sergeant 
Cihill and the timely and able a.«sistanc<' 
of I'atiolman Powers in capturing this 
subiect without harm to others or to 
themselves, thus ridding society for a 
tinu' of the presence of a hardened 
criminal. 

Januarx 2. 
ficrirrtil Ortlcr Sti. .ih'.'i. 
The following transfer is liereby ord«>red 
to take elTecl on .Mondav. Januarv 
I<».">;». .It 7.4,") o'clock A.M.: 

Patrolman John T. O'Connor, from 
Division 1) to Chief Clerk's Office (Haek- 
iicx ( 'iii i i.igc < )frice't. 

January 5. 
,.// Ortit r Xti. .iO(>. 

The following scheduled rates for pay- 
ing details shall become rlTcctivo Janu- 
ary 7. 1959: 

Cai>tain. S3.S5 per hour. S15.40 mini- 
mum, S30.S0. S-hour day. 

Lieutenant, S3.35 per hour. $13.40 
minimum, S26.80, 8-hour day. 

Sergeant. S3 per hour. $12 minimum, 
S24. S-hour day. 

Patrolman, S2.65 i>er hour, $10.60 mini- 
mum. .S21.20, .S-hour day. 



Jan. 10 



CITY RECORD 



\ETERANS' SERVICES DEPARTAIENT 



Expenditures for veterans' beneftts for Xovenihei 
826,497.28 in comparison with expenditures tor tlic cdi iv- 

The 1.615 eases aided fluring the month of Nox i iiil 
3,396 individuals l)enefited through the faeiUties of the \ 

There were 87 eases closed (hu int^ the month ol' 
ing employment, having l)e;-n awarded uMcnploxni' iit < 
.security and becoming inelinil'li' to ici'ci\c fiiianci d ,issi,- 
reasons. 

Expenditures for November, 

Civil Spanish Mexican World 



, 195S, show a ilecroase o 
;».ndin<;- pciiod of 19,57. 
I-, \nr,<. rr;)rr>,.)itc I ,■[ total o 
■■(■!■ S-rvi Department 
ulir; , l'),')S. Iieritus" of obtain 
'>!lll)c;!<:iti(i''. rcrcivitlg socia 
iaiic,' 'ill iiiis-rll.ineous othe 

1958 



Regular Rolls S89 00 -51,297 20 

Emergencies — — 

Bills — 634 21 

Burials — — 

Hospital — — 

Hospital — — 

Supplementary — — 



S422 00 S23,0.38 79 

— 927 .50 

— .5,7.50 ,59 

— 683 00 



53,852 60 
7.905 00 
9,133 33 



S86.870 .50 
11,381 00 
Hi,8()0 17 
1,738 61 



$89 00 S;i,931 41 .?422 00 $31,681 66 S77,473 60 S12,768 .30 S124,365 97 



Relief Expenditures Comparison 



Civil War 

Spanish 

Mexican 

World War I . . . 
World War II . 

Korean 

Emergency 

Bills 

Burials 

Hospital 

Supplementary . 



Nov., 19.58 


Oct., 19.58 


Xov., 19,57 


§89 00 


SI 32 60 


S90 20 


1,297 20 


1,221 00 


2,025 95 


422 00 


407 00 


474 00 


23,038 70 


21.889 20 


22,664 11 


53,852 60 


51.716 90 


49,893 70 


8,171 00 


8,2.54 .50 


7,975 00 


11,384 00 


15,705 30 


10,741 65 


16,860 17 


10,944 46 


29,321 41 


1,738 61 




550 00 




11,227 00 


24,680 00 


7.512 69 


5,197 58 


2,447 23 


S124,,365 97 


S126,7.55 .54 


SI. 50,863 25 



Total Cases Aided 





Nov.. 19.58 


Oct., 19.58 


Nov., 19.57 


Civil War 






4 




40 


43 


60 


Mexican 


4 






World War I 


485 


491 


519 


World War II 


916 


897 


814 




166 


1.54 


141 




1,615 


1 ,.592 


1,544 



Classification of Cases Aided 



I'ncniployed veterans. 
Employed veterans. . . 

Wives 

Widows 

Children 

Mothers 

Fathers 



Brought forward 

Made 

Granted 

Rejected 

Referred 

Investigation not completed. 



Brought forward 

Made 
(iranti-il 
Rejected 
Referifci 

Invcstigalu.ns not rnn.l.h-tr,! , 

Referred 

Investigations not completed . 



Civil 


Spanish 


Mexican 


World 


Woild 


Korean 


War 


War 


War 


War I 


War II 


War 





1 





190 


267 















19:; 


42 












12 


8 


4 


39 




254 


49 














24 










() 


11 


338 


49 











1 


33 


3 


4 


40 


4 


485 


916 


166 



Original Applications 



Reapplications 



During the month of November, 1958, the 
represents refunds b.y former beneficiaries of veterai 
drawn aid under circumstances which warranted its 



department collecleti .1295 which 
s' hene'its who were found to have 
s return to the C'it.x of Hoston. 
N'icroR C. Bv.NOE, Commissioner. 



CLAIMS APPROVED 

The Mayor, on recommendation of the 
Corporation Coun.sol, has approved the 
follnwinii' voles of the City Council Com- 

iiiii 1' I- Mil ( 'laims: 

I'Mwar.l A. Cass, 178 Hillside street, Rox- 
hmy. for reimbursement as a result of an 
accident which occurred on April 10, 1958, 
when a motor vehicle belonjjinj; to the Parks 
and Recreation Department, which he was 
operatingr, struck a parked automobile owned 
by Stephen F. Kelley, Jr., by payment of $7B. 

Margaret Sweeney, 111 Monticello avenue, 
Dorchester, for compensation for personal in- 
juries caused by a hole in the sidewalk in 
fi-ont of 357 West Broadway, South Boston, 
February 10, 1958, by payment of $485. 

John Avellino, 182 Paris street. East Boston, 
for compensation for pei-sonal injuries causerl 
by a mound of tar on the sidewalk in front of 
445 Saratoga street. East Boston, March 25, 
1956, by payment of $475. 

Catherine C. Boderiek, 17 Waldeck street, 
Dorchester, for compensation for personal in- 
juries caused by a raised slab in the concrete 
sidewalk in front of 105 Melville avenue, Dor- 
chester, April 18, 1958, by payment of $435. 

Louise Brown, 27 Westford street, Brigrhtoii, 
for compensation for personal injuries caused 
by a sunken concrete slab in the Franklin 
Street Tunnel, Allston, February 18, 1958, 
by payment of $465. 

Dorothy Feldman, 166 Seaver street, Rox- 
bury, for compensation for personal injuries 
caused by a hole in the sidewalk on Somerset 
sti-eet. adjacent to the parking lot of Fritz-Inn 
Auto Parks, April 24, 1958, by payment of 
$335. 

Oscar Nielson, 656 Massachusetts avenue. 
Boston, for compensation for personal injuries 
caused by a raised portion of the sidewalk in 
front of 134-136 West Newton street, February 
8, 1958, by payment of $343. 

Mary Bishop, 110 Monticello avenue, Dor- 
chester, for compensation for damage to auto- 
mobile caused by a hole in the highway on 
Blue Hill avenue, at the intersection of Seaver 
street, May 7, 1958, by payment of $123.96. 

Vito Santackas, 162 Quincy avenue. East 
Braintree, for compensation for personal in- 
juries and damage to property caused when 
his automobile went into a hole in the roadw.-iy 
on Mt. Vernon street, adjacent to the railroad 
tracks. May 28, 1958, by payment of $475. 

Allen E. Silver, 1451 Blue Hill avenue, 
Mattapan, for compensation for personal in- 
juries caused by a defective curbing in front 
of 66-70 Chiswick road, Brighton, October liii, 
1956, by payment of $485. 

,An(li-ew Huzyk, 152 Minot street, Dorchester. 
fi;r compensation for damage to property 
caused by a break in the water service pipe 
at the main, March 14, 1958, by payment of 
$200. 

Sharna Levine. 55 Maverick street, Chelsea, 
for compensation for personal injuries caused 
by hole in the sidewalk in front of 111 Chandler 
street, January 4, 11)58, by ))ayment of $195. 

Freda Gorfinkle, 168 Seaver street, Ro.xbury, 
for compensation for personal injuries caused 
by tree roots which protruded above the sur- 
face of the sidewalk in fnint of 168 Seaver 
street, March 2H, l:i5s. l,y i>avment of $450. 

Anna Curley, 1 (;avin Way. South Boston, 
for compensation for personal injuries caused 
by a hole in the sidewalk in front of 370 East 
Eighth street, September 3, 1957, by payment 
of $495. 



28 



CITY RE CORD 



Jan. 10 



I ) Jil' A R I M K M C H A \ ( i i:S 

riif iJiriflor of Adiiiimflrative Sei vict s 
li.i.- ;i[)pr()V((l the following ptTsonnil 

HOHI'ITAL DEI'ARTMENT. 
Main OhiHioii. 

I'lie sfr\ices of tlic followintj ciniilov- 
ics luive been tonnin.itcd on or pnav lo 
Difcmber 15: 

Permanent. — Grace Hickey. hospital medical 
worker. $55.25 a week; Jessie Lipton, floor 
mir.'ic. $1.95 an hour. 



For the week ending December 16: 
'{"lie following .special niir.*e.-i have been 
ajipointed for the number of dav.s spec- 
ified: 

Marie Allen. 5; Janice Arena. 1: Claire Uach. 
Lorraine Baker. 7: E.sther liandljw. 5; Olive 
Harnard. 6: Priscilla Beckwith. 6: Janet Ben- 
son. 2: Mar»raret Booth. 4: Nancy Bradley. 1: 
Claire Breedan. 6; Patricia Camirand. 2: Ann 
Cavalln. 4: Frances Cavannara. Dorothy Chais- 
son, 2: Ruby Childs. 1; Dorothy Chinff, 6; 
Muriel Clark. 2: Laura Coe, 6: Noreen Cohanc. 
:i; Martha Costello. 7; Joan Cronin. IS; Iris 
Crowley. 2: Marion Cummings. 7; Helen Cur- 
rcri. 2: .^dele Daly, 7: Evelyn Davis, fi; Norma 
Dean. 7: Marjorie Devine. 2: Larraine Dibble. 
4; Madel-.ne Dobbyn, 6; Leona Doherty. 2: 
Hannah Donahue, Patricia Doucpttc. 7; Mary 
Edwards, Coldie Buchanan. 5; Marilyn EnK.s- 
kov, 3; Anna, Ferrara. 7; Mary Fctherston, ;i; 
Christine Finn. 4: Maureen Flynn. 5; Elinor 
Foley. 7; Emma Foster. 2; Margaret Francis. 
7: Theresa Frazier. 4; Mary Frozetti, :i: Elea- 
nor FuriKa. 2; Carolyn Carney, Florence Car- 
field, I; Clarice Carney, 2: Lois Gatie, :}; 
Shirley CJaudreau 5: Patricia Cauehan, Ann 
CiKcr, 2: Roberta Giordano, I; Ethel Glennon, 
Barbara G.;odwin. Veronica Hamel, 7; Virginia 
Hamilton. .!: Marie Hauer, 1; Mary B. Healv. 
fi: Barbara Hoban. 1: Hope Hollins. :i: Cather- 
ine Houton, 2: Mary Howard, Dolores Hoyt. 
1: Janet Huches, 5: Mary Hyde. 4: Dorothy 
Jewkes. 2; Ruth Johnson. Catherine Kane. 4; 
Sally Kane. C; Lillian Kearney, Marjorie 
Kearney, 1: Catherine Keith, 7; Jean Kinnare, 
1: Helen Kordis. Maria Kotte, 7; Shirley La- 
Roche, 2: Elizabeth Lembo, 4; Anne Linsky. 
5: Mary Lonir. 6; Ljretta Lynch, 5; Mary 
Mahan, 4; Ada Matheson, 5: Ann Maufrhn 7- 
Claire McCue, 4: Lorraine McDouRall, :i: Max- 
me McFarland, JoAnn McGoniagle, 4; Mary 
Mclnnis, 5: Ann Mooney, .-J: Cynthia Moore, 2- 
buzanne Moriran. 4: Helen Murphy. 1; Cather- 
ine Murphy, 7: Lois Murphy, G; Natalie Needle, 
2: Phyllis NiVro, 1; Agnes O'Connor, 6; Mae 
Owens. 4: Delores Palladino. 7: Mary Piasta. 
1: Vivian Plevack, 6; Patricia Poquette, 7: 
Grace Powers. 2: June Rahilly. 7: Ethel Rahain. 
l; Audrey Reardon. Patricia Regan, Jacqueline 
Riley, 2: Dorothy Ripley. 4: Beatrice Roch. 2- 
Ann Romano. Judith Rutherford. 3: Takaka 
balvi. 2: Bcrnice Smith, Verna Snow. 7: Helen 
Spillane 2: Anna Stankard. 7: Mabel Steed. 
Claire Steven.son. Cathleen .Sullivan 1- 

Florence Sullivan, Madelyn Sullivan, Mar- 
garet J. Sullivan, Margaret M. Sullivan, I.sabel 
Sutton, 7: Carol Taramino, 4: Diana Thedf.ird, 
6; Claire T.impkins, :t: Jocolyn Tooher. 2; 
Luis Tsoumas, Josephine Tyman, G; H Vail- 
lancourt 7; Jacqueline Wagner, Kathryn 
Welch. 3: Jane Wharton, 5: Marcia Wharton, 

Wclpe, Agnes Aherne. 4: Marion Andrews, 
o: Moniqiie Crowley. 2; Imogene Gillis. 4: 
daT , Ly't'*"- Patricia O'Kior- 

The following eiiiplovee ha.^ be(>n 'ui- 
pciinted: " ' 

Jl'l""" i^'-V'' ""Tfi^-"''- hospital kitchen 
worKei. ?;4i.i.'> a week. 

The .service..* of (he following oniplov- 
ee.s have been terminate.l on or prior lo 
December 17: 



l.v.,n J. Ri.hi.i.l. senior r.sid.nt. «152 a 
month; Alice E. Sweeney, hospital mi-dicnl 
worker. J47.75 a week. 

Long liilajid OiviMion. 

The following changt s have been made 
for the week ending December 23: 

Terminations. Clinton W. Bearse, hoapital 
kitchen worker, emergency; John R. Bradford, 
attendant nurse; Ro»emai-y L. Clark, licensed 
practical nurse: George P. Marcin. hospital 
house worker, emergency; Francis X. Curley, 
steam fireman, provisional. 

Public Works Department. 
Geurge Botolinski. of the Automotive Division, 
now a permanent garage foreman, will be 
paid in accordance with the rates set forth 
in a letter of October 195S. for repairing 
and operating snow-remuval ecjuipment. 

Appointments. 

.Ad.ministrative Services Department. 
J'riiiting Section. 
George W. McnUgue. f.O Westmoreland 
street. Dorchester, cylinder pressfceder. $92.G:i 
a week. 

William Finnegan. 1451 Almont Apartments. 
Mattapan, compositor. $112 a week. 

Blildi.sc Departme.nt. 
John R. Wall, 29 Rosemont street, Dorches- 
ter, building inspector, $75.25 a week. 

City Planning Board. 

Brigitte G. Orent, 360 Harvard street, 
C;imbridKe, senior planner, $108.25 a week. 

William E. Barbour, 4 Stoughton road. 
Dedham. senior planner, $10S.25 a week. 

Seward Weber, 2 Scott street, Cambridge, 
chief planner. $151 a week. 

Richard S. Bolan. 44 Bradford avenue. 
Sharon, chief planning analyst. $151 a week. 

Cynthia W. Hullinger. 48 Boylston street. 
Cambridge, planning a.ssistant, $77.75 a week. 

William Leonard Kaplan. 225 Commonwealth 
avenue, junior planner, $91.75 a week. 

Lewis Sanger. 11 Royce road, Allston, junior 
planning analyst, $91.75 a week. 

Health Department. 
HeaHIt Division. 
Mary E. Breen, 36 Pleasant street, Dor- 
chester, clerk and typist, $55.25 a week. 

Mary ,\. Hennessey. 107 King street. Dor- 
chester, public health nurse. $72.75 a week. 

Helen A. Sullivan. 2326 Centre street. West 
Ro.xbury. clerk and typist. $47.75 a week. 

Hospital Department. 
Main Diii.tion. 
Bridget O'Loughlin. 31 Myrtlebank avenue. 
Dorchester, hospital medical worker. $50.25 a 
week. 

Rosetta Wilkins. 38 Holyoke street, hospital 
medical worker. $52.75 a week. 

Anna M. Harkins. 14 Michigan avenue. Dor- 
chester, hospital medical worker. $50.25 a week. 

Alfred T. Bibby. Jr.. 34 Buswell street, 
ambulance and medical aid man. $60.25 a week. 

C. Anne Kinnamon. 66 Fenway, laboratory 
assistant. $50.25 a week. 

Blanche A. Morrissey. 24 Batchelder .street. 
Roxbury. hospital house worker. $55.25 a week. 

John H. Kelly. 24 West Broadway, South 
Boston, second-class stationary engineer, $77.75 
a week. 

Veronica Laird. G8 West Concord street, 
hospiul medical worker, $60.25 a week. 

Lee W. Williams, Gl Myrtle street, occupa- 
ti nal therapist, $62.75 a week. 

Claire Leonard, 199 Falcon street. East Bos- 
ton, clerk and stenographer, $47.75 a week. 

Frances Sessoms, 103 Townsend street, Rox- 
bury, clerk and stenographer. $47.75 a week. 

Louis Frank. 10 East Brookline street, hos- 
pital house worker. .'550.25 a week. 

Americo Capone. 43 Norman street, hospital 
hou.se worker, $50.25 a week. 

Laura C. Breen. 22 Beechland street. Ros- 
lindalo, hospital medical worker. $50.25 a week. 



lU-rtha .M. Dt-Paoli, :{5 Forest street. IJ..N- 
\mry. h.spital medical worker. $50.25 a week. 

Mary J. Kelly, 734 East Second street. South 
BuHton, hospital medical worker, $50.25 a 
week. 

Ruth Grant, 796 Saratoga street. East Bos- 
ton, clerk and typist, $47.75 a week. 

Jennie A. Palano, 7 East Cottage street, 
Dorchester, hospital medical worker, $52.75 
a week. 

Dorothy Marden. 28 Newbern street, Ja- 
maica Plain, hospital medical worker. $52.75 
a week. 

Mary T. Gutcliffe, 158 Eustis street. Rox- 
bury, hospital medical worker, $52.75 a week. 

Treasi'ry Department. 
Collecting Uivinion. 
Phyllis Marsilia, 201 Havre street. East 
Boston, statistical machine operator, $50.25 a 
week. 

Joan SUrkweather, 124 Spring street. West 
Roxbur>-. statistical machine operator, $50.25 a 
week. 

Barbara Caine. 17 Wilcox road, Dorchester, 
statistical machine operator, $50.25 a weel;. 

SUFFOLK COUNTY. 
MiNiciPAL Court of Boston. 
Phyllis Cooke Walker, 44 Pierce avenue. 
Everett, probation officer. $4,800 a year. 



Reinstatements. 



Hospital Department. 
.Wain [Jirigion. 
Jane Kelley, 208 Huntington avenue, senior 
hospital house worker, $70.25 a week. 

Changes in Status. 

AlLMINISTRATrVE SERVICES DEPART.MKNT. 
.1 dm iiiintra I ivc IHvition. 
John J. Scully. 11 Speedwell street, Dor- 
chester, from senior clerk and typist (tempo- 
rary) at $62.75 a week to senior clerk .nnd 
typist (permanent) at $62.75 a week. 

Printing Section. 
MaiT Grant, 562 East Fifth street. South 
Boston, from copyholder at $77.75 a week t.. 
priKjf reader (temporary. 3 months) at $112 :i 
week. 

Hospital Department. 
Main Division, 

Lucille R. Murphy, 49 Elmwood place, Rox- 
bury, from senior hospital house worker (tem- 
pcrar> ) at $62.75 a week to .senior hosj.ital 
house worker (permanent) at $62.75 a week. 

Thomas Quigg. 104A Dorchester street. South 
Boston, from hospital laundry worker at $52.75 
a week to senior hospital laundry worker at 
$62.75 a week. 

Mary Donahue. 450 East Sixth street. South 
Bostcn. from hospiul house worker at $60.25 
a week to senior hospital house worker at 
$62.75 a week. 

Dorothy S. Callahan. 56 East Springfield 
street, from clerk and stenographer at $55.2.i 
a week to senior clerk and typist (temporary. 
6 months) at .?60.25 a week. 

Sarah Loonie. 5 Pleasant Street court. 
Charlestown. from senior clerk and typist at 
$72.75 a week to principal clerk (temporary. 
6 months) at $75.25 a week. 

Josephine Mankevech. 9 West Bellflowi 
street. Dorchester, from hospital medical work- 
er at $60.25 a week to hospital house work. : 
at $60.25 a week. 

Audrey Manthorne. 20 Wrentham street 
Dorchester, from floor nurse at $77.75 a wool; 
to head nurse at $81.25 a week. 

.^niiAforinm Division. 
Thomas N. Dunn. 121 Magazine street. Ron- 
bury. from hospital house worker at $55.2' 
a week to watchman (temporary. 3 months i 
at $57.75 a week. 

Law Department. 
William D. Quigley. 50 Houghton strc.-, 
Dorchester, from assistant corporation counsel 



Jan. 10 



CITY RE CORD 



29 



at $104.52 a week to assistant corporation 
counsel at S123.67 a week. 

William McDermott, 79 Sydney street, Dor- 
chester, from assistant corporation counsel at 
$129.45 a week to assistant corporation counsel 
at $148.60 a week. 

Hector Ciechetti, 342 Hanover street, from 
assistant corporation counsel at $114.11 a 
week to assistant corporation counsel at 
$133.26 a week. 

J. Edward Keefe, Jr.. 251 Pond street, 
Jamaica Plain, from assistant corporation 
counsel at $129.45 a week to assistant corpo- 
ration counsel at $148.60 a week. 

Eugene F. Murphy, 55 King street. Dorches- 
ter, from assistant corporation counsel at 
$104.52 a week to assistant corporation counsel 
at $123.67 a week. 

P.ARKs AND Recreation Department. 
Francis J. Kennedy, 74 West street, Hyde 
Park, from recreation supervisor (temporani') 
at $88.25 a week to recreation supervisor (per- 
manent) at S88.25 a week. 

George M. O'Neil, 21 Mallet street, Dorches- 
ter, from senior civil engineer at $132 a week 
to principal civil engineer (temporary) at 
$136.75 a week. 

Robert F. Cusick, 29 Alarie street. West 
Roxbury, from deputy director of recreation 
at $108.25 a week to first deputy director of 
recreation (temporary) at $113 a week. 

Treasury Department. 
Collecting Division. 
Ellen M. Collins, 28 Druid street, Mattapan, 
from senior clerk (temporary) at $65_.25_ a 
week to senior clerk (permanent) at $65.25 a 
week. 

Welfare Department. 
Central Office. 
Austin O'Malley, 84 Chittick road, Hyde 
Park, from principal social work supervisor 
at $98.75 a week to senior legal assistant 
(temporary transfer, 6 months) at $103.50 a 
week. 

Leo J. Larkin, 248 Fuller street, Dorchester, 
from principal social work supervisor at $98.75 
a week to senior legal assistant (temporary 
transfer, 6 months) at $103.50 a week. 



Promotions. 

Veterans' Services Department. 
James J. Barr>'. 34 Hill Top street. Dorches- 
ter, from principal veterans' services super- 
visor at $95.25 a week to principal veterans' 
services supervisor at $95.25 a week. 



Leaves oj Absence. 

Hospital Department. 
Main Division. 
Elizabeth Scribner, 38 Mayhew street, Dor- 
chester, hospital house worker, $60.25 a week. 

John Francis O'Brien, 21 West Dedharn 
street, hospital medical worker, $60.25 a week. 
Long Island Division. 
James R. Harris, 459 Old Colony avenue. 
South Boston, senior hospital laundi-y worker. 



Step-Rate Increases. 

Hospital Depart-MENt. 
Main Division. 

Kathryn M. Calderbank, hospital medical 
worker, from $57.75 to $60.25 a week. 

Ro32 Parriseau, floor nurse, from $1.95 to 
$2.05 an hour. 

Margaret Talieri, floor nui-se, from $1.9.3 
to $2.10 an hour. 

Anne Nolica, floor nurse, from $1.95 to 
$2.05 an hour. 

Anne Keefe, floor nurse, from $1.95 to $2.10 
an hour. 

Mary Manchester, floor nurse, from $1.95 
to $2.10 an hour. 



.Anna Stevenson, floor nurse, from $2.05 
to S2.10 an hour. 

Katherine Shellmer, floor nurse, from $1.95 
to $2.05 an hour. 

Floor Nurses. 

From To 

Gladys McCarthy, $1.95— $2.05 

Mary Miller, 1.95— 2.10 

Alice Trayers. 1-95 — 2.10 

Anna Stevenson. 1.95— 2.05 

Marie DiNatale. 1.95— 2.10 

Josephine Dunbar, 1.95— 2.0o 

Anna Rowe, 1.95— 2.05 

Rose Morris, 1-90— 2.10 

Tally Cummings, 1.75— 2.10 

Gloria Smith, 1.95— 2.10 

Parks and Recreation Department. 

Joseph Belange. laborer, from $60.25 to 
$62.75 a week. 

William F. Breen, bath custodian, from 
$72.75 to $75.25 a week. 

Thomas P. Connelly, bath attendant and 
laborer, from $65.25 to $67.75 a week. 

Albert O. Matarazzo, laborer, from $65.25 
to $67.75 a week. 

Public Works Department. 

Bridm- Division. 
Francis J. Pineau. first assistant drawtender. 
from $72.75 to $75.25 a week. 

Sumner Tunnel Division. 
William J. Fitzgeiakl. heavy motor equip- 
ment oper;itur and laborer, from $75.25 to 
$77.75 a week. 

Anthony J. Giadcne. tollman-guard, from 
$70.25 to $72.75 a week. 

Traffic Department. 

Joseph Galeota. chief traffic engineer, from 
$151 to .S155.75 a week. 

Evelyn Sullivan, head administrative clerk, 
from $95.25 to $98.75 a week. 

SUFFOLK COUNTY. 
Courthouse. 

James P. Cronin. elevator operator, from 
$62.75 to $65.25 a week. 

Alfred Gustavson, mechanic, from $75.25 
to $77.75 a week. 

Thomas Morgan, steam fireman, from $70.25 
to $72.75 a week. 

Joseph Walsh, janitor, from $60.25 to $62.75 
a week. 

Municipal Court of Boston. 
For Civil Business. 
Ruth .A. Hoy, procedural technician, from 
$91.75 to $95.25 a week. 



Aiira Jordan, principal medical stenogra- 
pher, 4 hours at $3 an hour; Arthur Atwood. 
supervisor of ambulance service. 7 hours at 
$3 an hour; Richard Bishop, first-class steam 
fireman, 12 hours at $3 an hour; Arthur 
Pearce, second-class stationary engineer, 8 
hours at $3 an hour; Daniel Sullivan, boiler 
maintenance man, 8 hours at $3 an hour. 

Charles Lynch, third-class stationary engi- 
neer, 6 hours at $3 an hour; Albert Bonetti, 
second-class stationary engineer, 8 hours at 
$3 an hour; Duncan Thomson, third-class sta- 
tionary engineer. 16 hours at $3 an hour; 
Richard Bishop, first-class steam fireman, 12 
hours at S3 an hour; Arthur Pearse, second- 
class stationary engineer, 4 hours at $3 an 
hour; John Leary, working foreman steam- 
fitter. Hi hours at $3 an hour; Cornelius 
Cooper, assistant chef, 8 hours at $3 an hour. 

Kathleen M. Moylan, head clerk. 8 hours at 
$3 an hour; Mary Smallcomb, principal clerk, 
8 hours at $3 an hour; Mary Murray, principal 
clerk. 5 hours at $3 an hour; Katherine 
O'Rourke. senior clerk and typist, 4 hours at 
$3 an hour: Gertrude Folan, executive secre- 
tary, 7 hours at $3 an hour; George Regan, 
principal clerk, 1 hour at $3 an hour. 

Mary Smallcomb, principal clerk. 16 hours 
at $3 an hour; Kathleen Moylan. head clerk, 
16 hours at $3 an hour; Mary Murray princi- 
pal clerk, 5 hours at $3 an hour; Katherine 
O'Rourke. senior clerk and typist, 4 hours 
at $3 an hour; Rita Lavin. head technician, 
24i hours at $3 an hour; Bessie Dantos, tech- 
nician, 12 hours at $3 an hour; Linda Flaherty, 
technician, 4 hours at $3 an hour; Arthur 
Atwood, supervisor of ambulance service, 13 
hours at $3 an hour. 

Victoria Christie, principal medical stenog- 
rapher, 7 hours at $3 an hour; Margaret 
Willis, principal medical stenographer, 4 hours 
at $3 an hour; Charles Lynch, third-class 
stationary engineer. 8 hours at $3 an hour; 
Jiihn Leaiy. working foreman steamfitter, 4 
hours at .$3 an hour; .Albert Bonetti, John 
Kelly, second-class stationary engineers, 8 



OVERTIME ALLOWED 

The Mayor has approved the following re- 
quest: 

Fire Department. 
Working Foreman Steamfitter William J. 
Lonergan, 4j hours at $3 an hour. 

Health Depart.ment. 
Daniel G. Milano, chief Bureau of Food. 10 
hours: Louis Brackman. environmental sanita- 
tion inspector, 2 hours. 

Hospital Department. 
John Leary, working foreman steamfitter, 
7'. hours at $3 an hour; Mary Ritchie, head 
cferk, S hours at $3 an hour; Julia Collins, 
principal clerk. 8 hours at $3 an hour; Rose 
Abberton. principal clerk. 4 hours at $3 an 
hour- Florence Donabedian. head clerk, 8 hours 
at S3 an hour; Alice Rahilly, senior clerk and 
typist. 4 hours at S3 an hour; Gertrude Folan, 
executive secretary. 14 hours at S3 an hour; 
Helen Quirk, Elizabeth Flynn, principal clerks, 
8 hours each at $3 an hour; Helen Gaffey, 
head account clerk. 4 houi-s at $3 an hour; 
Sally Loonie, principal clerk. 4 hours at $3 an 



$3 



hou 



Parks and Recreation Department. 
Approval has been granted that the follow- 
ing-named employees be compensated at the 
rate of .'?2.30 an hour and S3.45 an h.-.ur 
overtime from 5 P.M. to 8 A.M., for the period 
between December 3, 1958, and April 30, 1953, 
when operating, during the winter season, the 
heavy-duty equipment assigned to sanding, 
snowplowing. and snow removal work, con- 
sisting of Walter snow fighters, four-wheel 
drive trucks, bulldozers, 12-tcn Sanders and 
12-ton cranes. 

Daniel C. Callahan, Edward A. Cass, John 
J. Cavaoaugh, Robert I. Clark, Robert F. 
Cclley. James J. DeLuca, John F. Dillon, John 
J. Dillon, William J. Dowd, William Dunne. 
Wendelvn Dujsik, Michael W. Farrell. Robert 
Finn. Richard Fitzgerald, Raymond Flaherty. 
George F. Flanagan. Rocco R. Fosco, Leroy 
F. Gorham. Ccleman J. Griffin, Erwin L. 
Hainline, Francis E. Harkins. Jack Kool, Ed- 
ward L. Judge. Joseph F. Lydon, William A. 
Lynch. Herbert A. Mathis. Richard J. Mc- 
Donough. William A. Meaney. William Mc- 
Sweeney. John F. Murphy. John F. O'Brien. 
Nicclo Pace, Leonard F. Reardon. Richard J. 
Shiuhan, Wallace Siteman, Joseph W. Sulli- 
van, Jr., Philip A. Trovato. Thomas Wall. 

The following rates of pay to personnel 
working on snow are the same rates of pay 
that the Public Works Department has recom- 
mended: 

Heavy motoi- equipment operator. S2.30 an 
hour straiirht time; $3.45 an hour overtime. 
^ Grade il.5, regular pay straight time; $5 an 

Grades 21 to 34. inclusive, regular pay 

straight time; S4 an hour overtime. 

Giades 15 to 20. inclusive. re.gular pay 

straight time; .SH.75 an hour overtime. 

Grades 12 to 14. inclusive, regular pay 

straight time; S2.80 an hour overtime. 



C n Y R l£ C R D 



Jan. 10 



(iradi-s h li> 12, ini-|uhi\e, r<vulur iia\' 
^I'uitfht tinit-; $2.70 an hour civiTtime. 

Kxcept I'mployopH operatinK or rrpniririK 
hcnvy-iluly Hnuw o<|uipmcnt. 



VETERANS RETIREMENT 

Tlic .M.ixor approved the follow iiin 
M'l(Tai>'.>; application for retircini'iit : 

.lo.K'pli A. .\lbcrli. 27 Compton strpd. water 
iiii-lcr n'p:iirtimii. Wjilcr Division. I'ulilic Work 
l)i-piirtmi HI. 



CONTRACTS AWARDF:!) WITHOUT 
ADVERTISIiNO 

The Mmvoi .ipj.rovcl llic award ol 
citiilracls. without adxcrti.siiiK, hascd on 
the follow iiie comtniiiiicatioii.x: 

AllMIXISTIlATU K SkKVICK-* H KI'A RTM K\T. 

I'urrhasinu Diriniim. 

Automotive Equipment 

I)KM( Mr. Mavoh: 

TIiIh ollipc is in rcci'ipt of rci|iii»ili<)iis from tlii' 
Aiiloniotivi' Division of the I'lihlic Works Dcpart- 
iiiont anil tlir I'irc Dcparlnicnt fur tli<' ininicdiaK- 
• Iciivrry of onr (II I-<MK) I'or.l. on.' (II I--7.50 
I'onl. six ((i) (i-rylindPr Slandurcl I'ord 2-door 
sedans, and one (II fi-rylinder Kordoniatic trans- 
nii.ssion Kordor Kurd sedan. 

Ina.mitirli as time is of the essence, written 
(piotations were solicited from several Ford dealers. 
Bids were received from tiirce companies. The 
lowest bidders were as follows: 

Bowers Motor Sales, Inc.: Six (6) new 1959 
I'ord 2-door seilans, as per specifications, SI3.620. 
loss trade-in allowance on eight (8) vehicles. $S(K). 
makinK a net amount of J12.820: one (1| new 19.59 
I'ord F-750 dump truck, as per specifications. 
S7,.'{80. less trade-in allowance on one (1) used 
unit. $I0[). makinc a net amount of S3.98C. 

Eliot .Motor Company. Inc.: One (1) new 19.59 
I'-liOO chassis, as jtvr specifications, S3.918. le.ss 
lrai|p-in alliiwunce on one (1) vehicle, $200, mak- 
ing a net amount of $5,718. 

Bowers Motor Sales. Inc.: One (I) new 19.59 
I'ord I'ordor sedan, as per specifications, $2,(>,'i(), 
l"ss trade-in allowance on one (I) used vehicle, 
SI.5;j, makine a net amount of S2.48;5. 

In order to insure immediate delivery, authority 
is recpiested to dispense with publicly advertisinc 
for prices and award contracts, without public 
advertisement, to the lowest bidders on written 
<|Uotations, as outlined above. Total amounts of 
<'ontraets will be: Bowers Motor Sales, Inc., 
S22.289. net; Eliot Motor Company, Inc., $'{,71«. 
net. 

Hespectfully yours, 

El-OKKK K. Wklsii, 
Arlhw J'lirchaiiinf/ Agrnt. 

Automobile 

Dkvh Mn. Mavoh: 

This ollic-c is in receipt of a reipiisitiun for one (1 1 
yyi .,1,,.,, to be delivert'd im- 

■ • i (' I 1 11. lie « \ ■ III. Ic' IS to replace a Buick 
' I it W 7'' I- pr.si'iitly out of ser\'ice. 

Iric M 1. il,. mIihIi iir(ie"nlly nee<|ed and 
-iiu'- III. I. I-. iiisuMiiiciii time before the end of 
195S to advertise for bids anil receive delivery 
before .lanuaiy 1. 19.59. written quotations were 
solicited from several Buick dealers. Bids were 
rereiveil from two dealers. 

.\utliorily is ri i|uested to dispense with publicly 
advertisiiii; for bids and award a contract, without 
public aiherlisemt-nt. to Dickson Buick. Inc.. the 
lower of two bi.lders, for one (11 19.59 Le.Sabn' 
Buick 2-door sedan, to !>:■ ei|iiippcd with auto- 
matic transniisRion, heater and defroster, radio, 
dual S|>eei| windshield ui|K-rs, safely steerinc 
wliccl. wheel discs, safety uroup, foam cushioiis. 

Vi i 1 iViiu.itc total HMiount of contract will be 
^ ; ;7 . ■ I tradi'-in allowancr- on 19.5f) Buick 
>!• 1 1 1! -mI iii. as IS. $975. .5:t. makinR a net total 

..( sj. l!i;i. 

Ucspcctfiilly yours. 

.loii.s V. MORA.V, 
I'urrhaninij Agrnt. 



EXTH.NSION OF CO.NTRACTS 

'J'lic Mayor li:i.s ajijiroved oxtcDMon of 
I 111' time limit on completion of the 
followiiiK contract.-;: 

Dkfaktmrnt op School Buildings. 

M. S. Kcllihcr Campany. for the construc- 
tion of an elementary school in the Rice- 
Kranklin District, extended from December 
24, UI5H, to February 20, 1959. due to strikes 
durinK the construction period. 

PcBLic Works Department. 
Charles Todcsca, for artificial stone side- 
walks in Augustus avenue, Cornell street. Holl- 



PLUMBING PERMITS 

The Hiiilding Department has. i,ssiie;J 
the followinK ])liimbing permits for in- 
stallation of plumbint? fi.xtiire.s for the 
week endinn ,Jaiiuai'v 2: 

Note: Wards arc indicated in parentheses 
(4), (16), etc., following name of street. 



1'lumiikk Location Cost 

A. Milliean 95 C st (7) $2,100 

K. I'ann lOlClenway st (14) 1.000 

R. KiuK 1 i:i8 .\dams St (17) 1.50 

.\. Rubin (18 Ashevillc rd (IS) 1,2.50 

N. Rubin 7i:{ Beech .si (18) 1.250 

\. Rubin 717 Beech st (18) 1.2.50 

I). WeinberK 17 Monson st (17) .500 

,1. Ferullo 905 Beacon st (21) 200 

P.Adams ( '.ibbs ct (2) 4.50 

E. Ilealy f)8 Cranite av (16) 100 

S. CoKos 2;{ .Moreland st (12) .55 

(i. Zeolla 224 Tremont st CJ) 000 

S. Adams 7.55 Adams st (10) 22C 

II.MeMahon 1 -Asheville id (18) 1.025 

E. Oulette 9t) 102 Atlantic av CI) 4.900 
A. Kellem AM Beacon st (5) 4.000 
D. Dudyas 20 Bearse av (17) 80fi 
D.Greenwood :n8 Beech st (20) 1,.500 
H. I'rsworth 111 Commercial st (3) t"0 

F. Sullivan Deer Island ( I ) 5.000 
S.Adams 2:{ Everton st ( 15) 4.50 
S. .Adams 205 Hamilton st ( 15) 2.50 
D. Yeh 35 Ililburn st (18) 2,000 
II. .Mc.Mahon 495 IIuntinKton av (18) 1.150 
H. McMahon 9.57 River st ( 18) 1.1.50 
D. Veil I9(i Stimson st (20) 2.000 
II.MeMahon 23 Valencia rd ( 18) 1.0.50 
R. I-accntni 10 Willard st (3) 75 



OAS FITTING PERMITS 

The Biiilding Department has issued 
the following g;is fitting permits for in- 
stallation of appliances for the week end- 
ing .J.-muary 2: 

Note: Wards are indicated in parentheses 
(4), (16), etc., foilowinK name of street. 



CasI ITTKU 


Location 


Co.sT 


W. Connell 


780 Albany st (8^ 


$7(10 


N". Rubin 


r>8 Asheville id (18) 




N. Rubin 


713 Beech st (18) 


I (t 


N. Rubin 


717 Beech st (18) 


i;() 


I.. Vi.sco 


527 BenninKton st (1) 


1.50 


W. Connell 


79 Bird st (15) 


51 


II. Beaulieii 


17 Boynton st (11) 


10() 


W. Connell 


7 Columbia rd (7) 




II. Ril)eck 


:iti5 Dorchester av (7) 


250 


C. Kav 


7 Doiiiclas st (7) 


800 


F. Odenweller 


ICO East S<>venlli st (7) 


.50 


S. Simon 


819 East Sixth st (0) 


21 




1.53 Frankfort .st ( 1 ) 


.50 


W. Connell 


12 I.erov st (15) 


.50 


I,. Viseo 


273 lA-xiniiton st ( I ) 


40 


1.. \'i_sco 


175 London st 1 1 ) 


.50 


W. Koeen 


12 Newbern st 1 19) 


4.50 


.1. .McKinnon 


8 I'arklawn rd (20) 


UXI 


W. Connell 


23 Shafter .st (14) 


30 


W . Saw.ver 


24 SprinK Bark av (19) 






35 I ptim st (3) 


1.50 


B. Cnrlin 


3999A Washinitton st ( 19) 


4(K) 




111 West Newton st i4) 


,50 



injr-worth street, and KusswoimI street, i\- 
teniled from December 31. 195H. to June :'.i'. 
1959, due to inclement weather. 

James Scimone. for removinn abandoned eas 
lampposts in various streets of the City of 
UoRton. extended from December 31, 19.'i». 
to May 30. 1959. due to inclement weather. 

Baker & Ca., Inc., for makinK minor side- 
walk and roadway repairs, consistini; of sheet 
asphalt sidewalks and/or artificial stone side- 
walks: resettinif edircstones: and incidental 
sheet asphalt pavement in designated locations 
on nineteen streets in Ward 3. and two streets 
in Ward 5, from December 31. 1958. to June 
30, 1959, due to inclement weather. 



c; »HiiTTi-ii 






D. fJuiffe 


18.5 Amory st (11) 


SlKfl 


I. Xorlhey 
J. I'enilfKi 


73 Barnes av (1) 


IINI 


905 lieacon st (21) 


20(1 


.A. Onesaimo 


740 Blue ilill av (14) 




E. .Secatore 


0:t Condor st ( 1 ) 


.Vl 


E. Secatore 


117 Cottaw st (I) 


- '" 


F. Faritar 


3G Falmouth at (4) 


70() 


1'. KlISSU 


02 Garfield st (18) 




E. Mealy 


08 Granite av (IK) 


.VI 


\. (iranara 


232 Hanover at (3) 


2(1 


It. Ilohmer 


3.52 K st (7) 


IfMl 


\. Ilalbard 


2180 .Massachusetts av (7) 


20 


1'. Russ<j 


18 .Mildred av (18) 


2(1 


S. (ioKOS 


23 .Moreland st (12) 


.55 


B. Simon 


155 .\ 81 (7) 


TA\ 


D. Kargar 


Rear 1.523 River st (5) 


1(1 


D. Carey 


5 .Somerset at (3) 




M. Kealla 


224 Tremont st (3) 


.'((Xl 


J. Thoms 


240 Westville st (15) 


175 


W. Jacobs 


180 Chestnut av (19) 


8.5 


C. .MehcKan 


95 (i st (7) 


:!(KI 


E. MoKel 


135 Hudson st (3) 




A. .Milliean 


47 I^asell st (20) 


.Vj 


E. Moucl 


44 St. Germain st (4) 


45 


I. Silvcrstein 


470 Tremont st (5) 


.50 


P. Janis 


229 Adams st (to) 


40 


D. Blaney 


•143 .Adams st (Ifi) 




J. Principato 


.33 .Anderson st (5) 


15 


P. Culesian 


91 Arliniiton st (18) 


2(K) 


F. Diift 


2r> Bearse av ( 17) 


.5(1 


D. Cn-enwood 


318 Beech st (20) 


00(1 


II. Mc.Mahon 


21 Business st (18) 


12.5 


W. Foster 


13 Cleveland st (18) 


25 


C. Sillari 


845 Commonwealth av (21) 


90 


D. Blanev 


28 Draper st (15) 


30 


D. Blanev 


15 Dumas st (14) 


15 


A. Hebert 


051 ICast Fourth st (0) 


.((Kt 


D. Blanoy 


19 Elder st (7) 


115 


S. Kushmir 


8.5 Essex st (21) 


75 


S. .Adams 


23 Everton st (15) 


000 


P. Ciilesian 


9 Greenwood av (18) 


KKI 








P. (iulesian 


02 (ireenwood sq (18) 


L5(l 


S. .\danis 


205 Hamilton st (15) 




II. .McMahon 


490 IIuntinKton av (18) 




W. Foster 


953 Hyde Park av (18) 


'T5 


R. (iarriey 


1:525 Hvde Park av (18) 


KKI 


D. Blaney 


1200 Niorlon st (17) 


M) 


P. Ciile.sian 


(10 NeiKmspt av (18) 


KHI 


P. (iulesian 


7(1 Nepon.set av (18) 




J. Principato 


(il Prince st (3) 


15 


1*. (iulesian 


8 Reddv av (18) 


:!0(l 


\. (ininaia 


115 Richmond st (3) 




P. (iulesian 


(-.91 River st (18) 


2.50 


I', (iulesian 


818 River st ( 18) 


:{(KI 


II. .Mc.Mahon 


9.57 River st (18) 


l().'l 


H. .McMahon 


905 River st (18) 


KMI 


II. Mc.Mahon 


1000 River .st (18) 




II. .McMahon 


1 142 River st (18) 




II. .McMahon 


1.58.5 Rivei st (18) 


300 


II. .McMahon 


92 Roanoke rtl (18) 




D. Blaney 


«3 Rosseter st (14) 


'.50 




873 Second st (fi) 




D.BIanev 


34 Shepton st (10) 


:i5 


D. Blaney 


91 .Saw.ver av (13) 


10 


P. (iulesian 


19 Summit st (18) 


2(KI 


P. (iulesian 


119 Summit st (18) 


20(1 


A. Ileheit 


2a3 Temple st (20) 




D. Blaney 


34 Torrey st (17) 




P. (iulesian 


12 Walter st (18) 




I', (iulesian 


28 Webster st (18) 




F. Odenweller 


310 West Thiid st (0) 




B. Weiner 


12 Windsor st (9) 




P. (iulesian 


12 Winter st (18) 




P. (iulesian 


155 Wood av (18) 




P. (iulesian 


3(« Wood av (18) 




1). Blaii.-v 


15 Wvob pi (14) 





Jan. 10 



CITY RECORD 



John F. Shea Company. Inc.. for replace- 
ment of artificial stone sidewalks, where ex- 
cavations have been made by the Water Divi- 
sion of the Public Works Department in any 
location in the city, from December 31. 1958, 
to July 15. 1959. due to inclement weather. 



Baker & Co.. Inc.. for bituminous concrete 
pavement in Buchanan road, etc., extended 
from December 31. 1958, to June 30, 1959, 
due to inclement weather. 



Mystic Construction Company, Inc., for lay- 
inn and relaying water pipes in Savin Hill 
avenue. Ward 13; RuKjrles place. Ward 17: 
Highfield terrace. Ward 18; Martinwood road. 
Ward 19; Meyer street. Ward 19; Baker street. 
Ward 20: and such additional locations, if any, 
in Wards 13. 17, 18, 19, and 20. as may be 
designated by the Commissioner of Public 
Works, extended from December 31, 1958, to 
May 30, 1959, due to inclement weather. 

Manning Construction Company. Inc., for 
bituminous concrete pavement in Business, etc., 
streets, extended from December 31. 1958. to 
July 31, 1959, due to inclement weather. 



Manning Construction Company, Inc., for 
bituminous concrete pavement in Ascent, etc., 
streets, extended from December 31, 1958, to 
July 31, 1959, due to inclement weather. 

S. J. Tomasello Corporation, for corner 
cutbacks in Brewer, etc., streets; roadway 
widenings in Rosselerin road, etc.. and traffic 
islands in Centre, etc.. streets, extended from 
December 31. 1958, to May 30, 1959, due to 
inclement weather. 



C. Russo, Inc.. for sewerage works in St. 
Clare road, from Boutwell street, to end, Dor- 
chester extended from December 15, 1958, to 
May 30, 1959. Although the work is completed, 
the restoration of the paving cannot be done 
until the spring. 

Camp, Dresser & McKee, for services of 
engineer on construction of inverted siphon 
across the Prudential Life Insurance Com- 
pany's premises, from January 1, 1959, to 
March 1, 1959, because the contractor was 
delayed, due to unavoidable delays in the 
gathering of the necessary information re- 
quired to design and prepare the working 
drawings, and because of the amount of time 
required to analyze such information. 

Charles Todesca, for bituminous concrete 
pavement in East Newton, etc., streets, ex- 
tended from December 31, 1958, to June 30, 
1959, due to inclement weather. 



Roslindale Contracting Company, for sewer- 
age works in Bradlee street, between Safford 
street and Tacoma street; and Tacoma street, 
from Bradlee street, 100 feet northeasterly, 
Hyde Park, extended from December 15, 1958. 
to February 15. 1959. due to weather condi- 
tions. 



TRANSFERS OF APPROPRIATIONS 

The Mayor has appro\-ed the following 
requests for transfers of appropriations: 
Administrative Services Department. 
Printing Section. 
From 1-01-46-36, Office Supplies Account, 
$1,230. to 1-01-45-10, Miscellaneous Contractual 
Services, $1,230. 

Building Department. 

From 29, Other Contractual Services, $1,600, 
to 10. Permanent Employees, $1,600. 

From 29. Other Contractual Services. $1,500. 
to 28, Transportation of Persons, $1,500. 



Health Dkpaktme.nt. 
U'nV//''-^- .l/'OKHrcf Dii.-isioii. 

From 10. Pi-inKintnt Employees. $85. to 
49,_ Rents. T:i\os. ami Licenses, $35, 27, Re- 

HOSPITAL Depaut.ment. 
Sunatorium Division. 
From :!2, Food and Ice, ?10,non, 33. Hontinjr 
Supplies and Materials, $10,0«(), 35. Meili.-al. 
Dental, Hospital Supplies ami Materials. 
$12,000, 39. Miscellaneous Supplies and Ma- 
terials, $2,000. 26, Repairs and Maintenance 
of BuildinKs and Stiucturcs. $10,000, to 10, 
Permanent Employees, $44,000. 

PvHLic WoKK.s Department. 
Central Office. 
From 290, Other Contractual Services, $660, 
to 100, Permanent Employees, $660. 

Sumiicr Tunnel Divlxioii. 
From 260, Repairs and Maintenance of 
Buildings and Structures. $1,500, to 340, House- 
hold Supplies and Materials, $1,500. 

SUFFOLK COUNTY. 
Municipal Court. Charlestown District. 
From 21. Telephone Service. $60. to 11, Tem- 
porary Employees, $60. 

RETIREMENTS 

December 30, 1958. 

To the Auditor: 

At meotinfis of tlie Boston Retirement 
Board held on December 12 and Decem- 
ber 30. 19o8, the following rctiremenis 
were voted, to become effective at the 
close of business on DeciMuber 31, 1958: 
Fire Department. 

Paul J. DeRosa, fire fighter. 

John T. Donlan, fire fighter. 

Hospital Department. 
Mary Gittins. medical worker. 
Iris M. Clarke, clerk-typist. 
Josephine M. Blake, medical worker. 

Library Department. 
Albert L. Carpenter, investigator. 
Sidney Weinberg, assistant. 
Pearl V. Brian, matron. 

Parks and Recreation Department. 
Stephen Bagdonas, laborer. 
William L. Greene, laborer. 
Daniel J. Linnehan, foreman. 

Police Department. 
Henry Brogan. patrolman. 

Public Buildings. 
Marjorie Harkins. matron. 

Public Works Department. 
Edward J. Murphy, laborer. 
Charles Cardillo, laborer. 
Constanza Vecchio, welder. 
Samuel J. Hunt, chauffeur. 

School Department. 
Pauline Vanderhoop, teacher. 
Edward E. Hunkins, master. 
Helen H. WoUhan. teacher. 
Joseph F. Burke, teacher. 
Mary J. Deegan, teacher. 

SUFFOLK COUNTY. 
Jail. 

.\nn V. Remmes, matron. 
Municipal Court, Dorchester District. 
Jennie S. Thurlow, clerk. 
Attest: 

Paul L. Carty, 

Secretary. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT ORDERS 

December 30. 
Gcicral Order No. Sf. 



I. Fire Alarm Boxes Installed. 



The 


followinu- 


fir 


■ alarm box. which was 


eslabl 


shed in ( 




■al Ord.T. No. 42, dated 


Septc 


iber I 




has been installed and 




ted in cii 




No. 50: 




51. B.isti.n 


M 


dical Laboratory, 19 Bay 


Slate' 


road. (Cir 




50.) 


The 


following 


Hr 


• alarm box, which was 


cstahl 


shed in ( 




■al Order, No. 60. dated 


N.iven 


iibcr M. 1 




has been installed and 



c mntcted in circuit No. 71: 

2S29, Weld street and Manthorne road. 
(Circuit 71.) 

The following fire alarm box, which was 
established in (ieneral Order, No. 44. dated 
September 23, 1958. has been installed and 
crnnected in circuit No. 81: 

12-3816, public school, Gordon avenue. (Cir- 
cuit 81.) 

The following fire alarm box, which was 
established in General Order, No. 48, dated 
October 15, 1958, has been installed and con- 
nected in circuit No. 26: 

12- 1541. public school, 90 Warren avenue. 
(Ciicuit 26.) 

The following fire alarm box, which was 
established in General Order, No. 42, dated 
September 9, 1958. has been installed and con- 
nected in circuit No. 45: 

13- 5374. St. John's Seminary, Bishop Peter- 
son Hall, Lake street. (Circuit 45.) 

The following fire alarm boxes, which were 
established in General Order, No. 22, dated 
May 6, 1958, have been installed and con- 
nected in circuits indicated: 

5291, North Beacon street, opposite Arthur 
street. (Circuit 14.) 

5293, North Beacon and Etna streets. (Cir- 
cuit 45.) 

Company commanders will add the above 
boxes to circuit cards indicated. 

II. Change in A.D.T. Signal Address. 

Company commanders shall make the follow- 
ing change in address for Signal 145 on the 
American District Telegraph Company run- 
ning cards in this department: 

From: 115-131 Tudor Street, South Boston, 
Mass. 

To: Tudor and Seventh Streets (Building 
E), South Boston. Mass. 

HI. Fire Alarm Box Established. 
In the near future, the following fire alarm 
bjx will be installed: 

12- 3815. Joseph V. Kennedy, Jr., Memorial 
School, Hale street and Gordon avenue. 

Company commanders will add the above 
box to assignment card for Box 3815. 

The circuit number for this box will be 
announced when the box is installed. 

IV. Fire Alarm Box Discontinued. 
The following fire alarm box has been re- 
moved from service and discontinued perma- 
nently: 

13- 1677. Home for Aged Men, 133 West 
Springfield street. 

Company commanders will delete the above 
box from assignment card for Box 1677 and 
also from circuit card No. 36. 

V. Change in Circuit Number. 
The following fire alarm box has been re- 
moved from circuit No. 64 and connected in 
circuit No. 46: 

5292, North Beacon and Dustin streets. 
Company commanders will delete Box 5292 

from circuit card No. 64 and add this box 
to circuit card No. 46. 

VI. Commendations. 
Fire Fighters William A. Cunningham of 
Engine Company 28. Bernard L. O'Connor 
of Ladder Company 10. and Rodney W. Strat- 
ton of Engine Company 50 are hereby com- 
mended for responding to and working at 
fire. Box 2411, second alarm, on December 19, 
1958, while off duty. 



.\ 2 



CITY RECORD 



■Us. 10 



BUILDING PERMITS 



The Building I)c|)artinent has issued the following permits for the week inding Jiuiuary 2. 

Alterations Owxkk I^cation- w.( 



l,uk<-'.t Cimvulcsn III lloiui- 

mas I. Diut 

|ih H..riili 

, I jiuhiiid Baptist Hospital. 

I. SlM i,;inl Co 



Illation of America. 



. I I'.l Koxbiii y »t 

.:ii4 Beacon 8t 

.{24 East Einlitli st . . . . 
.01-109 Parker Hill av. . 

.rM -72 School Bt 

. raar Main St 

107 Milk St 

.2.i Alpine st 

.07 ArlinKton st 

. 10 Beacon st 



I (JO Commercial sf 

494 Commonwealth av. 

147 Dover st 

l.')l Dover st 

008 East Broadway. . . . 

702 East Fifth st 

60-72 Eliot st 

50 Eiitaw st 

1 10 t-ederal st 

233 Friend st . 



Am liimy Kusao 

.losfpli .Miukunis 

Motui Mart Ciarage 

Cariiiella Natale 

II. N. Corin & Leeder.. . . 
.Mass. Cas '& Electric Co. 

Ricliard Erlandson 252 Huntington av 

.lolm Shannon 31 Linnet st 

Martiarpt Diigas 

Hrockway-.Smith 

Dor-Mattapan Hebrew School 

(lilinan .lacks 

K. M. Bradley & Co., Inc 

.1 (■ CniMi;:!!! Co., Inc 



Cold Storage. 



Rosenborg Pliarniacy 
National (lunite Co.. 
.loseph IVrrt-po 

II. S, li"in;m, , . 



23 Mansfield st 

46.5 Mcdford st 

800 Morton st 

20 Myrtle st 

8 Newbury st 

4 1 Norwood st 

32 Savin st 

34 Savin st 

15 School st 

Rear 15 School st 

370 Simmer st 

20 T Wharf 

I'nist 18 Tremont st 

Huptist Mission 88 Tremont st 

/isi 482 Tremont st 

nl Oil Co 1405 V.F.W. Parkway. 

I ;ift 12 Walnut st 

innisian 321!> Washington st. . . . 

4272 Washington st 

4541 Washington st. . . . 
101 West Dedham st. . 

134 Willow st 

12.") Beacon st 

(■).") I Beacon st 

::8.A Belgrade av 

I . .71. l.-,78 Blue Hill av 

L'li Cliestnut st 

I.) Chesterfield st 

55 Colonial av 

9-11 Commercial st 

15 Henshaw st 

33 North st 

238 West Selden st . . . . 
1283 River st . 



Street . 



<;. .>c .M. [{(■•■ilty (•( 
S'cdiui Bank Stat.- 

X. Li.iiibardi 

1'. J. Martin 

N. Norris 

Estate of T. Fuller 

Lvnne Realty Co Rear 55 Amory st . . . 

Megel 14 Barna rd 

Technical Delta Upsilon Assoc . . . 526 Beacon st 

Delta Chi Trust 528 Beacon st 

A. Dominico 79 Bickford st 

•M. Vasilioii 1422 Blue Hill av. . . . 

(ieorge Robert Wliitc Fund 190 Boylston st 

J. Classer 141 Brighton av 

.1. Murphy 34 Browning av 

S. I . L'L'i tt Trustee 57 Corning st 

I 11 ' I' ino.s .39 DeSotord 

1 ' I n 18 Fairland st 

I ; W u 45 Forest st 

A ( ..11;,,^ 22 Freeman av 

<;. CiLsalili 415 Geneva av 

J. Fcnillo 3 Harvard av 

.). Arigo 3 Henshaw st 

D. CIrifliths 21 Homes av 

P. Eacobacci 30 Howell st 

Governor .Apartments 201 Kelton st 

S. McC;rail 61 Kilmarnock st . . . . 

V. Spang 72A Eandseer st 

W. Ryan 12 Lyne rd 

\ elerana' .Adiuinistration 14 Melbourne st 

White Citv .\partments, Inc .534 Newbury st 

A. Wycke 212 Norwell st 

E. Desmond 5 Poiie's Hill st 

Try Realty 23 Rosedale st 

Real ProiK-rtv Board 159 Salem st 

W. CJrondell .39 South Munroe ter 

.1. M. Trigirs 9 Summer st 



\'\ltl 






SI, 175 










10 


2!I8!(KK) 




lO.(XK) 




2. 100 


3 


4 .(KK) 


}t 








3 


.50 


22 


2.(KX) 


18 


3.800 




1.50 


5 


375 


3 


050 




275 




1 .200 




1 ,395 




450 




475 


•} 


75 




100 


18 


350 


20 


320 


22 


1 ,8.50 


- 


2.50 




300 




300 
400 


10 


2.50 




75 


12 


75 


17 


100 


17 


150 


1 


15 


3 


490 


3 


C75 


3 


075 




400 


20 


200 


5 


.575 


1 1 


999 


19 


250 


20 


1.000 


<l 


780 


20 


800 




450 


5 


475 


20 


1 .000 


18 


700 


5 


10(1 


18 


990 


17 


4.50 


3 


4.50 


22 


1,600 


18 


98.5 


18 


400 


18 


175 


1 1 


950 


10 


95 




400 


5 


400 


10 


100 


18 


100 


2? 


I .OIKI 






14 
3 


1.70(1 


20 


.300 
125 


8 


500 


8 


490 


20 


900 


15 


1,715 


14 


425 


22 


250 


15 


100 


7 


570 


21 


3.50 




250 


20 


700 


21 


490 


10 


4.50 


5 


500 


17 


90 


10 


960 


17 


210 


3 


484 


10 


875 


18 


410 



.-^ledfaM RuM^ rCo 

t'-^. l\. Lurtseiiia 

B. .Murphy 

Thomas J. Diab 

R. Pecaro 

Mr. and Mrs. .Murphy. 

.Ml. Al Mader 

Ma Adler 

Ivilward J. Sullivan . 

.Morgan .Memorial 

BoHton Pro|>ertips, Inc 
l iancis .1. .\lorella, et als 

II. Rigth 

\. i:. Tel. i Ti l. Co 

New England Ijnd Co 

I'nity Building Tiust 

J. -Achilie Bcaupne 

First Church of Christ Scientist . 

Chamber of Commerce 

.-Vbialiani SImroff 

Wong Wun Sim Assoc 

.Arnold Realty Trust 

Mr. Shapiro 

Mr. Boaton Distiller. Inc 

tirogan Realty Trust Co 

Met Transit .Author 

Babson Really Trust 

,\ias.s. CJeneral Hospital 

Biirnap Free Home for Women. . 

Mass. .Memoiial Hospital 

Carmelo Pettnizzelli 

.Jack Grcenlwrg 

Shebros Corp 

^^arrenton Realty 

Double • S" Realty Co., Inc ... . 

Temple Ohaboi .Shalom 

Modem Realty Trust 

Mary McNamara 



8 Topalian st . 
97 Walwiirlh ft . 
.52 Waller »l 

10 W est Rl 

2:i Wfsl Eagle st 

1.5 U. si .Milton Bl 



Newton i 



IJK i:;0 West Si-venth st 


c 


1 .(MKI 


; W. ■.ivillc tcr 


15 




27 UlKc lerst 




Till 


.5'.! Hhv Stale rd 




IC.OtMl 


335 H 81 


Ij 




Rear 290 Beacon st 




1 .(KK) 


41 Bi lviden- si 


4 


10.31(1 


I 1 17 f'oiUt Rl| 


3 


20.00(J 


18.5 Devonshire st 


3 


30.0(MI 


12!) Eastwood Circuit 


20 


.5(;< 1 


75-105 Falmouth st 


4 


9.80.1 


80 1-i'deral «I 


3 


tO.UXi 


7.5 Harrison av 


3 




10 Hudson st 


3 


3. 1 7.-. 


10 .Magnolia st 

228 .Market si 


13 

22 


12.00(1 
KX) 
2,3(K) 


1000 lOIO Massachusetts av. 


8 




10 


17.5 




21 

3 


28,.5(k; 
2.2.5(1 


11-13 .Mvitle .st 


17 North .Anderson st . 


3 


750 


38 Pleasant st 




6,001' 


.33 45 Sharon st 


8 




13 South Margin st 


3 




70 80 Talbot av 


14 


100.000 


11 15 Wallham st 




2.(KK1 


76 Warrt'nton st 




I ..5(K) 


70;t 715 Wni. .Morrissev Blvd 


10 


75.0(HI 


1.58 Woidsworth st 


1 


1.100 


44 Cliambers st 


3 


10 \"inson st 


10 


49 



Buildings Removed 



Ow: 



Dudley Trading Corp ()3l> Columbia rd 

.1. Connolly 000 Dorchester a v 

.lane Lesser 1277 2181 Dorchester a' 

White Fuel Co 712 7(IS K:i.*i First st . . 

White Fuel Co Sim i : T --i st 

\\hitp Fuel Co Mm I - 1 , ■ -t 

White Fuel Co N n | i , . m 

White Fuel Co 8(»ii l.a>i I u. t st 

White Fuel Co 800 Easi First st 

W hite Fuel Co 800 East First st 

While Fuel Co 800 East First st 

Robert H. Eliich 741-745 Washington St. 

Citv of Boston 362 North st 

City of Boston 364 North st 

City of Boston 366 North st 

Trustees of Parkway Realty Rear 262 Baker st 

Mr.s. T. Doherty 330 West Fourth St.. . . 

Mrs. T. Doherty 332 West Fourth st. . . . 

Bethany Baptist Church .50 West Cottage st 

f larendon Development Corp. . . .99 Commonwealth a v. . 



New Buildings 



WAf 



E. & L. .Tohnson 12 Brinuuer st 5 

.lames B. McKinnon 2197 Centre st 20 

William Merola. Inc 17-19 Grossman st 18 

Charles .1. O'Malley 85 Gould st 20 

Boston City Hospital 818 Harrison av 8 

Bertha Cohen 58 Hemenway st 4 

Wong Wun Sun .Associates 8 Hudson st 3 

Boston l.yinc-In Hospital 221 Longwood av 4 

G. iVr II, Cdiupan.v .53 Moreland st 20 

Siuion .lohnsoii 9 Mossdale id 19 

.lolin Basilo Co 31 Mossdale rd 19 

Charles .1. O'Malley 110 Northdale rd 20 



3(KI 
0.000 
3,00(1 

2(MI 
3.();t(l 
2.00(1 
3,000 
3,00<l 
7,0(¥l 



Charles .1. O'.Malley 119 Northdale rd 20 

Charles .1. O'Malley 123 Northdale id 20 

Charles .F. O'Malley 127 Northd.-.le rd 20 

Charles J. O'Malley 131 Northdale rd 20 

Charles J. O'Malley 135 .Northdale rd 20 

Ravmond's, Inc Rear 300 Washington st 3 

.Iosoi)li F. An.saldi 2490 Centre st 20 

Keniuorc Realty rrust 017 Commonwealth av 5 I, .500 



9,(K)!) 
10,0(M) 

8.000 
16.000 

3.5(: 

3.175 
774,000 
9..500 
15,000 
16.000 
8,000 
8.000 
8,000 
8.000 
8.000 
8.000 
050 
8.000 



Jan. 10 



CITY RECORD 



33 



CLAIMS APPROVED 

The Mayor, on recommendation of the 
Corporation Counsel has approved the 
following votes of the City Council Com- 
mittee on Claims: 

Anna Santackas. 1G2 Qiiincy avenue. East 

juries caused when an automobile operated 
by Vito Santackas. in which she was a pas- 
senger, went into a hole on Mt. Vernon street, 
Dorchester, adjacent to the railroad tracks, 
May 28, 1958, by payment of $340. 

Marj' Aghjanian, 8 Peacevale road. Dor- 
chester, for compensation for personal in- 
juries caused by a hole in the sidewalk on 
Oakwood street, corner of Norfolk street, Dor- 
chester, January 11, 1958, by payment of $475. 

Agnes Gray, 18 Preston road. West Roxbury, 
for compensation for personal injuries caused 
by a hole in the sidewalk in front of 20 
Preston road, March 21, 1957. by payment of 
$448. 

James D. Gilfeather, 97 Austin street, Hyde 
Park, for compensation for damage to property 
caused by a change in grade during the re- 
construction of Austin street, by the Public 
Works Department in the spring of 1956, by 
payment of $28. 

Dorothy L. Cotty, 1172 Morton street, Dor- 
chester, for compensation for expense in- 
curred in excavating on her property to locate 
a water leak which later was found to be on 
city property. May 26, 1958, by payment of 
$75.60. 

Louise Scott, 90 Tv'yman, street, Jamaica 
Plain, for compensation for personal injuries 
caused by a hole in the sidewalk in front of 
48 Wyman street, March 25, 1957, by payment 
of $400. 

John R. Sablock, 70 Winthrop street, 
Charlestown, for compensation for damage to 
automobile caused by a hole in the highway 
in Brookline avenue, near Kenmore square, 
January 28, 1958, by payment of $16. 

Saul B. Sharaf, 15 Stow road, Dorchester, 
for compensation for damage to automobile 
caused by a hole in the highway in Appleton 
street, corner of Clarendon street, March 22, 
1958, by payment of $147. 



CITY Of BOSTON. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



Pkofosals for Uniform Cloth. 
The Police Department of the City of Boston 
invites proposals for furnishing and delivering 
14-ounce serge cloth; 16-ounce trouser cloth; 
20-ounce dresscoat cloth, and 30-ounce 
overcoat cloth. The bidder must use the 
form of proposal to be obtained, at the 
office of the Property Clerk, 154 Berkeley 
street, Boston, and deposit with his bid, at 
the office of the Police Commissioner, a 
properly certified check for $1,000, payable 
to and to become the property of the Police 
Commissioner for the City of Boston if the 
proposal is not carried out. Proposals will 
be publicly opened and read on Friday, Janu- 
ary 16. 1959. at twelve o'clock noon, at the 
office of the Police Commissioner, 154 Berkeley 
street, Boston, Mass. The Police Commissioner 
reserves the right to accept or reject any or 
all proposals or any part of a proposal, and 
to award the contract as he deems for the 
best interests of the Police Department of the 
City of Boston. Surety bond will be required 
of the successful bidder, in an amount equiva- 
lent to 50 per cent of the estimated amount 
of the contract. 

Leo J. Sullivan, 
(Jan. 10) Police Commissioner. 



Theresa A. Baker. 10 Havre street. East 
Boston, for compensation for personal injuries 
cause'l by the broken curbstone in front of 
2ST-2I)1 Washington street, near School street, 
March 5. 195S, bv payment of 1282. 



Mary Glen, 28 Sidlaw road, Brighton, for 
compensation for persona! injuries caused by 
a hole in the sidewalk in front of 1962 Beacon 
street. Brighton. January 29, 1958, by payment 
of $375. 

Mary Heft, 148 L street. South Boston, for 
compensation for personal injuries caused by 
a hole in the roadway opposite 568 East 
Broadway, South Boston, November 30, 1957, 
by payment of $485. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 

BOSTON TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT. 

Propo.sals for Furnishing and Installing 
Traffic Control Signals at Ten (10) 
Intersections in the City op Boston, 
Mass. 

The City of Boston, acting by the Traffic 
Commissioner, hereinafter referred to as the 
Commissioner, with offices at 112 Southampton 
street, invites proposals from citizens of the 
United States and corporations or other legal 
associations wherein the controlling interest 
to the extent of at least over one half thereof 
is owned by a citizen or citizens of the United 
States, for furnishing and installing traffic 
control signals at ten (10) intersections in 
the Citv of Boston, Mass. A performance bond 
and also a payment bond, each of a surety 
company satisfactory to the Commissioner and 
each in the sum of 100 per cent of the con- 
tract price will be required of the successful 
contractor. Forms of proposals may be ob- 
tained at 112 Southampton street. Each pro- 
posal should be filled out, signed, enclosed 
in an envelope, sealed, marked "Proposal for 
Furnishing and Installing Traffic Control 
Signals at Ten (10) Intersections in the City 
of Boston. Mass.." one copy of which is to be 
left at 112 Southampton street before 12 M. 
(Eastern Standard Time), on Thursday, 
January 29. 1959. with a certified check for 
five hundred (500) dollars, payable to and 
to become the property of the city if the 
proposal after acceptance is not carried out. 
The proposals will then and there be publicly 
opened and read. 

Proposals must be made in duplicate, the 
scaled duplicate, without check, to be deposited 
by the bidder with the City Auditor previous 
to the time named for opening the bids. If 
the lump sum price of any item appears to 
the Commissioner to be abnormally high or 
low, or the bidder neglects to bid on each and 
every item, it may lead to the rejection of 
the proposal. The rate per hour of the wages 
to be paid to mechanics, teamsters, chauffeur:: 
and laborers in the work to be performed 
under the contract shall not be less than the 
rate of wages in the schedule determined by 
the Commissioner of Labor and Industries of 
the Commonwealth, a copy of which is an- 
nexed to the form of contract referred to 
herein. Copies of said schedule may be ob- 
tained, without cost, upon application there- 
for at the office of the Commissioner. Before 
commencing performance of this contract, the 
Contractor shall provide by insurance for the 
payment of compensation and the furnishing 
of" other benefits under chapter 152 of the 
General Laws (the Workmen's Compensation 
Law so called) to all persons to be employed 
under this contract, and shall continue such 
insurance in full force and effect during the 
term of this contract. The undersigned re- 
serves the right to reject any or all proposals 
or to accept any proposal or any part of a 
proposal .should he deem it to be for the best 
interest of the city so to do. 

City of Boston, 

Timothy J. O'Connor, 

(Jan. 10.) Traffic Commissioner. 



John J. O'Neill, 115 Brookway road, Roslin- 
dale, for reimbursement as a result of an 
accident which occurred on February 20, 1958. 
when a motor vehicle belonging to the Parks 
and Recreation Department, which he was 
operating, collided with an automobile owned 
by William T. Appleyard, causing personal 
injuries to William Driscoll, a passenger, and 
damage to the automobile, by payment of $225. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



DEPARTMENT OF SCHOOL BUILDINGS. 



Invitation for General Bids for Repairs and 
Flameproofing of Stage and Window 
Drapes, Curtains and Other Fabrics, 
and Repairs to Operating Mech.anisms in 
Various Schools. 
The City of Boston, acting by the Superin- 
tendent of Construction of the Department of 
School Buildings, Boston, Mass., hereinafter 
referred to as the Awarding Authority, invites 
sealed general bids for repairs and flameproof- 
ing of stage and window drapes, curtains and 
other fabrics,^ and repairs to operating rnech- 

General bids will be received up until 12 
o'clock noon. Monday, Januai-y 26. 1959, at 
the office of the Awarding Authority, fourth 
door, 26 Norman street, Boston, Mass., at 
which time and place they will be publicly 
opened and read. 

General bids must be submitted in duplicate 
on forms obtained from the Awarding Au- 
thority. Each copy of the general bid shall 
be completely filled in, signed, inclosed in an 
envelope, sealed, and plainly marked with the 
description of the work to be done. One copy 
of the general bid shall be filed with the 
.'^warding Authority, at the office designated 
above, accompanied by a bid deposit in the 
form of cash or a certified check on, or a 
treasurer's or cashier's check issued by, a re- 
sponsible bank or trust company, payable to 
the City of Boston, in the sum of $300. The 
other copy of the general bid shall be filed at 
the office of the City Auditor, City Hall. Bos- 
ton, Mass. Both copies shall be filed before 
the time stated above for the opening of 
general bids. 

No bidder may withdraw his bid within 
thirty days (Saturdays, Sundays, and legal 
holidays excluded) after the actual date of the 
ojioning of general bids. 

The rate per hour of the wages to be paid to 
mechanics, teamsters, chauffeurs and laborers 
in the work to be performed shall not be loss 
than the rate of wages determined for this 
work by the Commissioner of Labor and In- 
dustries of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
under the provisions of General Laws (Ter. 
Ed.), chapter 149, sections 26-27D, inclusive, 
as amended, a schedule of which appears in 
the specifications. 

The successful bidder will be required to 
provide by insurance for the payment of com- 
pensation and the furnishing of other benefits 
under the Workmen's Compensation Law, 
General Laws (Ter. Ed.), chapter 152, to all 
persons to be employed under the contract, 
and sufficient proof of compliance with the 
foregoing stipulation will be required before 
commencing performance of this contract. 

Specifications and other contract documents 
may be obtained at the office of the Awarding 
Authority. 

A performance bond and also a labor and 
materials or payment bond, each of a surety 
company qualified to do business under the 
laws of the Commonwealth and satisfactory to 
the Awarding Authority and each in the sum 
of 100 per cent of the contract price will be 
required of the successful general bidder. 

The Awarding Authority reserves the right 
to waive any informalities. The Awarding 
Authority also reserves the right to reject any 
or all general bids if it be in the public interest 
so to do. in accordance with section 44D of 
chapter 149 of the General Laws as amended. 

City of Boston, 
Charles A. Callanan, 

(Jan. 10.) Superintendent of Construction. 



.?4 



CI I Y R K C R I) 



Jan. 10 



CITY OI' liOSTON. 



) or KXAMINKKS OF CAS UTTKKS. 
KoiiM 901. CITY Hall Annkx. 



I'Kdl'ciSAI.S FlIH Kl HMSIIINC Al TOMOHII.K TiKKS 
AND Tl'BKS foil ClTV DKI-AKTMKNT.s. 
I'i'oposHls may be ubtuintKl at Hoom 53, City 
Hall. At this room the bids will be opened 
arul re:id Thursday. January 22. 1!I5!1. at 12 M. 
The bidder must leave his proposal with a 
.•.rliriptl check for $100. payable to and to 
become the property of the City of Boston 
if the proposal is not carried out. A dupli- 
cate bid. without check, must be left with the 
Auditor prior to the time for openine bids. 
Knvelopes containing bids to be sealed and 
marked "I'ro|)nsal for Automobile Tires and 
Tubes." The successful bidder must furnish a 
faithful performance bond for one halt the 
total estimated amount of the contract with 
a surety company authorized to do business 
in Ma.ssachu.-!etls. The Purchasine AKcnt re- 
serves the riKht ti> accept or reject any and 
all bids, or any part of a bid. and to award the 
ontracl as he deems for the best interests of 
the city. 

John V. Moran, 
(Jan. 10.) I'uTchaaing Agent. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



Pkoposals for Envelopes. 
The Police Department of the City of Boston 
invites proposals for furnishinir special en- 
veloi)e.-i. The bidder must use the form of 
I)ropi)sal to be obtained at the office of the 
Property Clerk, of the Boston Police Depart- 
ment. Room 105, 154 Berkeley street. Boston, 
and deposit with his bid at the office of the 
Police Cummissioner. a properly certified cheek 
in the amount of $100. payable to and to 
bcceme the property of the Police Commis- 
sioner for the City of Boston if the proposal 
is not carried out. Proposals will be publicly 
opened and read on Friday. January 16. li)5S>. 
at twelve o'clock noon, at the office of the 
Police Commissioner, 154 Berkeley street. Bos- 
ton. Mass. The Police Commissioner reserves 
the riKht to accept or reject any or all pro- 
posals, or any part of a proposal, and to 
award the contract as he deems for the best 
interests of the Police Department of the City 
of Boston. Surety bonil will be re<iuired from 
the successful bidder in an amount equivalent 
to .")() per cent of the estimated amount of the 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Puoro.sAL.s FOR P'l'RNisHiNr, Gasoline for 
City Departments. 

Proposals may be obtained at Room 5S. City 
Hall. At this room the bids will be opened 
and read Friday. January 2S, 1959, at 12 M. 
The bidder must leave his proposal with 
a certified check for $200, payable to and to 
become the property of the City of Boston 
if the proposal is not carried out. A dupli- 
cate bid. without check, must be left with the 
Auditor prior to the time for opening bids. 
Envelopes contnininsr bids to be sealed and 
marked "Proposal for Gasoline." The suc- 
cessful bidder must furnish a faithful per- 
formance bond for one half the total estimated 
amount of the contract with a surety company 
authorized to do business in Massachusetts. 
The Purchasing Agent reserves the right to 
accept or reject any and all bids, or any part 
of a bid, and to award the contract as he deems 
for the best interests of the city. 

John V. Moran, 

(Jan. 10.) I'nrehaaing Agent. 



Notice ok f:xamination for Gas Fitters' 

LIi'EN.SF.H. 

An examination of applicantu for Master 
or Journeyman Ga« Fitters Licenue will be 
held on Friday. January Ifi. 1959, at 1.30 P.M., 
in Room 901. City Hall Annex. 

City of Boston Gas Fining ReKulatiunit. 
established consistent with the proWsions of 
chapter 479. Acts of 19:»S, as amended, are 
obtainable in pamphlet form at the office of 
the Building Commissioner. Price is 50 cents. 

Thomas J. Hughes. 

Chairman. 
John H. Cailey, M.D.. 
Health Commiagioncr. 
James M. McCksker. 
(Jan. 10.) Matter Gas Fitter. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Notice. 

In compliance with provisions of section 41, 
chapter 98. of the General Laws of Ma.ssachu- 
setts. as amended by chapter 32. of the Acts of 
1923. I hereby give notice to all inhabitants or 
persons having usual places of business in 
Boston using weighing or measuring devices 
for the purpose of buying or selling goods, 
wares, or merchandise, for public weighing or 
for hire or reward, to bring in such weighing 
and measuring devices to be tested, adjusted, 
and sealed. I shall be at the office of Sealer 
of Weights and Measurts every day during 
regular business hours to attend to this duty. 

John F. McCarthy. 
Sealer of Weights and Meaauren. 

Office hours. 9 a.m. to 5 p M.. Mondays to 
Fridays, inclusive. 

(Jan. 10.) 



Proposals for Cleansing, Sterilizing, and 
Reconditioning Football Eqi'ipment anp 
Football Shoes for Boston Public 
Schools. 

The School Committee of the City of Boston 
invites bids for cleansing, sterilizing, and re- 
conditioning football equipment and football 
shoes for the Boston public schools. Pi-oposal 
forms are obtainable at the office of the Busi- 
ness Manager of the School Committee, tenth 
fliior. 15 Beacon street. Envelopes containing 
proposals must be sealed and plainly marked 
"Proposal fur Cleansing. Sterilizing, and Re- 
conditioning ?'ootball Equipment and Football 
Shoes." The bid must be in duplicate. One copy, 
signed by the bidder, and accompanie<l by a 
certified check, payable to the City of Boston, 
in the amount of two hundred dollars ($200). 
must be left at the office of the Business Man- 
ager on or before twelve o'clock noon on 
Monday, January 19, 1959. Copies filed with 
the Business Manager will be publicly opened 
and read at twelve o'clock noon of the dav 
stated. The other copy, also signed by the 
bidder, must be filed with the City Auditor, 
City Hall, Boston, Mass., previous to the time 
named fcr opening of bids. The School Com- 
mittee reserves the right to reject any or all 
bids, and to accept the bid which it deems 
best for the interests of the city. The bidder 
awarded the contract must furnish a suitable 
bond or deposit of money or other security for 
the faithful performance of the contract in 
the amcunt of not less than 50 per cent thcre.Tf. 
Leo J. Burke, 
Huaiiieaa Manager of the Seliool Committee. 
(Jan. 10) 



CITY Ol BU.SION. 

ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 

AssF^.soR.s' Notice to Taxpayers. 

Cm- Hall Annex. 
Boston, January 1. 1959. 
RETi rns Mi'.st Be Maiie On or Before 

January 31. 1959. 
Particular attention is called to the As- 
sessors' notice posted upon City Hall and 
various other places throughout the city rel- 
ative to making returns on personal property 
subject to taxation. 

Earle R. Barnard, 

Aaaeaaor. 

(Jan. 10. 17,24,31.) 



Proposals for FfRNisHiNG Paper, Blank- 
books. Notebooks, and Envkix)Pes for 
Boston Public School."--. 

The School Committee of the City of Boston 
invites bids for furnishing and delivering at 
the Supply Room. 440 Brookline avenue. Bos- 
ton, paper, blankbooks, notebooks, and en- 
velopes as per schedule. Pr..posal forms .i 
obtainable at the office of the Business M 
ager of the School Cjmmittee. tenth floti: . 
Beacon street. Envelopes containing proii 
must be sealed and plainly marked "Prop.p 
for Paper. Blankbooks, Notebooks, and Kn- 
velopes." The bid must be in duplicate. One 
copy, signed by the bidder, and accompanied 
by a certified check in the amount of two 
hundred dollar? (S200), payable to the City 
cf Boston, must be left at the office of the 
Business Manager on or before twelve o'clock 
noon on Monday. Januarj- 2fi. 1959. Copies 
filed with the Business Manager will be pub- 
licly opene<i and read at twelve o'clock noon 
of the day stated. The other copy also signed 
by the bidder, must be filed with the City 
Auditor. City Hall. Boston. Mass.. previous 
to the time named for the opening of the bids. 
The SchotI Committee reser\-es the right to 
reject any or all bids and to accept such bid 
or part of bid as it deems best for the inter- 
ests of the city. The bidder awarded the 
contract must furnish a suitable bond or de- 
posit of money or other security for the faith- 
ful performance of the contract in the amou:it 
ef not less than 50 per cent thereof. 
Leo J. Burke, 

liuaineaa Manager of the School Committee. 
(Jan. 10) 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proposals may be obtained at Room 53, City 
Hall. At this room the bids will be opened 
and read Monday. January 26, 1959, at 12 M. 
The bidder must leave his proposal with 
a certified check for $100 payable to and to 
become the property of the City of Boston if 
the proposal is not carried out. A duplicate 
bid, without check, must be left with the 
Auditor prior to the time for opening bids. 
Envelopes containing bids to be sealed and 
marked "Proposal for Automobile Batteries." 
The successful bidder must furnish a faithful 
performance bond for one half the total esti- 
mated amount of the contract with a surety 
company authorized to do business in Massa- 
chusetts. The Purchasing Agent reserves the 
right to accept or reject any and all bids, or 
any part of a bid. and to award the contract 
as he deems for the best interests of the city. 



John V. Moran, 
Purehnaing /Xgenl 



Jan. 10 



CITY RECORD 



35 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES DEPART- 
MENT, PURCHASING DIVISION. 



Proposals for Furnishing Bituminous 
Patching Mix. 
Proposals may be obtained at Room 53, City 
Hall. At this room the bids will be opened 
and read Friday. January 16, 1959. at 12 M. 
The bidder must leave his proposal with a 
certified check for $500, payable to and to 
become the property of the City of Boston 
if the proposal is not carried out. A dupli- 
cate bid. without check, must be left with the 
Auditor prior to the time for opening bids. 
Envelopes containing bids to be sealed and 
marked "Proposal for Bituminous Patching 
Mix." The successful bidder must furnish a 
faithful performance bond for one half the 
total estimated amount of the contract with 
a surety company authorized to do business 
in Massachusetts. The Purchasing Agent re- 
serves the right to accept or reject any and 
all bids, or any part of a bid. and to award 
the contract as he deems for the best interests 
of the city. 

John V. Moran, 
(Jan. 10.) Purchasing Agent. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES DEPART- 
MENT, PURCHASING DIVISION. 



Proposals for Furnishing Spark Plugs for 
City Departments. 

Proposals may be obtained at Room 53, City 
Hall. At this room the bids will be opened 
and read Thursday. January 22. 1959, at 12 M. 
The bidder must leave his proposal with a 
certified check for $100, payable to and to 
become the property of the City of Boston 
if the proposal is not carried out. A dupli- 
cate bid, without check, must be left with 
the Auditor prior to the time for opening 
bids. Envelopes containing bids to be sealed 
and marked "Proposal for Spark Plugs." The 
successful bidder must furnish a faithful 
performance bond for one half the total esti- 
mated amount of the contract with a surety 
company authorized to do business in Massa- 
chusetts. The Purchasing Agent reserves the 
right to accept or reject any and all bids, or 
any part of a bid, and to award the contract 
as he deems for the best interests of the city. 

John V. Moran, 

(Jan. 10.) Purchasing Agent. 



No. 3. 

CITY OF BOSTON. 



ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES DEPART- 
MENT, PURCHASING DIVISION. 



Proposals for Furnishing Automobile Motor 
Oil for City Departments. 

Proposals may be obtained at Room 53, City 
Hall. At this room the bids will be opened 
and read Friday, January 23. 1959, at 12 M. 
The bidder must leave his proposal with 
a certified check for $100, payable to and to 
become the property of the City of Boston 
if the proposal is not carried out. A dupli- 
cate bid, without check, must be left with the 
Auditor prior to the time for opening bids. 
Envelopes containing bids to be sealed and 
marked "Proposal for Automobile Motor Oil." 
The successful bidder must furnish a faithful 
performance bond for one half the total esti- 
mated amount of the contract with a surety 
company authorized to do business in Massa- 
chusetts. The Purchasing Agent reserves the 
right to accept or reject any and all bids, or 
any part of a bid, and to award the contract 
as he deems for the best interests of the city. 

John V. Moran, 

(Jan. 10.) Purchasing Agent. 



RIGHTS OF FREE MEN 

No freeman shall be taken or im- 
prisoned, or disseised, or outlawed, or 
banished, or any waj's destroyed, nor 
will we pass upon him, nor will we send 
upon him, unless by the lawful judgment 
of his peers, or by the law of the land. 

The M.\Gy.\ C.^rt.a, 1215 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



BOSTON TRAFFIC COMMISSION. 
Changes in Traffic Rules and Regulations. 



Voted. That the Traffic Rules and Regula- 
tions of the City of Boston are amended as 
follows, effective January 13, 1959: 

Article IV. Section 3, Part 2 (Prohibition of 
Parking), is amended by striking out the 
following : 

Poplar Street, West Roxbury. 

West side, from Washington street to 
Sycamore street, 8 A.M. to 6 P.M. 
Article IV. Section 3, Part 2 (Prohibition of 
Parking), is amended by inserting in its prop- 
er place in the alphabetical arrangement under 
the caption "Dorchester" the following: 
Ronald Street. 

Northeast side, from the northwest prop- 
erty line of the Christopher Gibson 
School to the dead end. 8 A.M. to 6 P.M. 
.i^rticle IV. Section 3, Part 2 (Prohibition of 
Parking), is amended by inserting in the 
proper place in the alphabetical arrangement 
under the caption "Roxbury" the following: 
Cunard Street. 

Northeast side, from Columbus avenue to 
a point eighty (80) feet southeast of 
Columbus avenue, 8 a.m. to 6 P.M. 
Article IV, Section 3, Part 2 (Prohibition 
of Parking), is amended by inserting in its 
proper place in the alphabetical arrangement 
under the caption "West Roxbury" each of the 
following: 

Greenough Avenue. 

North side, from Alveston street to Elm 
street, 8 A.M. to 6 p.m. 
Poplar Street. 

West side, from Washington street to 
Sycamore street, 24 hours. 
Article IV. Section 5, Part 3 (Restrictions 
in Five Cent Parking Meter Zones), is amended 
by adding the following: 

MUNICIPAL OFF-STREET PARKING AREAS. 

Under the Fitzgerald Expressway, Boston 
Proper. 

From Traverse street to Haymarket square, 
9.30 A.M. to 6 P.m. 
Under the Fitzgerald Expressway, Boston 
Proper. 

8 A.M. to 6 P.M. 
From Haymarket square to North street. 
Article IV, Section 6, Part 3 (Restrictions 
in Cent and Five Cent Parking Meter Zones), 
is amended by striking out the following: 
Commonwealth Avenue, Brighton. 

South (local) roadway, north side, at 
reservation cutbacks, from opposite Lin- 
den street to Griggs street, 8 A..\i. to 6 

P.M. 

South (local) roadway, south side, at 
sidewalk cutbacks from Brighton avenue 
to Bedford street, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
.Article IV, Section 6 Part 3 (Restrictions in 
Cent and Five Cent Parking Meter Zones), 
is amended by inserting in its proper place 
in the alphabetical arrangement under the 
caption "Brighton" the following: 
Commonwealth Avenue. 

South (local) roaiway, north side, at 
reservation cutbacks, from opposite 
Fordham road to Griggs street, 8 .\.M. 
to 6 P.M. 

South (local) roadway, south side, at 
sidewalk cutbacks, from Brighton ave- 
nue to Scottfield road, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
.i^iticle IV, Secticn 6, Part 3 (Restrictions 
in Cent and Five Cent Parking Meter Zones), 
is amended by adding the following: 



Municipal Off-Street Parking Areas. 
Mattapan Square, Dorchester. 

At River street and Blue Hill avenue. 
Article V, Section 1 (One- Way Streets), is 
amended by striking out the following: 
Auburn Street, Boston Proper. 

From Poplar street to Leverett street. 
Oliver Street, Boston Proper. 

From the southeast roadway of High 
street to Purchase street. 
Article V, Section 1 (One- Way Streets), 
is amended by inserting in its proper place 
in the alphabetical arrangement under the 
caption "Boston Proper" each of the follow- 
ing: 

Auburn Street. 

From Poplar street to Chambers street. 
From Leverett street to Chambers street. 
Lincoln Street. 

From John F. Fitzgerald Expressway to 

Kneeland street. 
From John F. Fitzgerald Expressway to 
Summer street. 
Article V, Section 1 (One-Way Streets), is 
amended by inserting in its proper place in 
the alphabetical arrangement under the cap- 
tion "Charlestown" the following: 
Polk Street. 

From Bunker Hill street to Medford street. 
Article V, Section 1 (One-Way Streets), is 
amended by inserting in its proper place in 
the alphabetical arrangement under the cap- 
tion "Dorchester" each of the following: 
Morse Street. 

From Washington street to Ronald street. 
Ronald Street. 

From Morse street to Brinsley street. 
Article V, Section 1 (One-Way Streets), is 
amended by inserting in its proper place in 
the alphabetical arrangement under the cap- 
tion "Roxbury" the following: 
Tetlow Street. 

From Worthington street to Evans Way. 
Article VI, Section 10 (Left Turns Pro- 
hibited), is amended by striking out the fol- 
lowing: 

Commonwealth Avenue, Boston Proper. 
Into Amory street, southerly, 7.30 A.M. to 
10 A.M. and 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. 
Article VI, Section 10 (Left Turns Pro- 
hibited), is amended by inserting in its proper 
place in the alphabetical arrangement under 
the caption "Boston Proper" the following: 
Commonwealth Avenue. 

Into Amory street, southerly. 
Article VI, Section 11 (Only Right Turn 
Movements Permitted), is amended by in- 
serting in its proper place in the alphabetical 
arrangement under the caption "Boston 
Proper" the following: 
Oliver Street. 

Into High street, southeast roadway, 
northeasterly. 
Article VI, Section 14 (U Turns Prohibited), 
is amended by striking out the following: 
Commonwealth Avenue. Westerly, Boston 
Proper. 

To Commonwealth avenue, easterly, at 
Amory street. 7.30 A.M. to 10 A.M. and 
4 P.M. to e P.M. 
Article VI, Section 14 (U Turns Prohibited), 
is amended by inserting in its proper place 
in the alphabetical arrangement under the 
caption "Boston Proper" the following: 
Commonwealth Avenue, Westerly. 

To Commonwealth avenue, easterly, at 
Amory street. 

Voted. That the Traffic Rules and Regula- 
tions of the City of Boston are amended as 
follows, effective Januai-y 13, 1959: 

Article VI, Section 17 (Isolated "Stop" 
Streets), is amended by inserting in its proper 
place in the alphabetical arrangement under 
the caption "Hyde Park" the following: 

Blake Street. 

At Taunton avenue. 

A true excerpt from the minutes rf the 
December 12, 1958, meeting of the Boston 
Traffic Commission. 
Attest: 

W. T. Doyle, 
Deputy Commissioner and Secretary 
(Tor, in \ " 



OFFICIAL DIRECTORY 



MAYOR S OFFICE. 

Room » 23. ( ily 11^1. Tel. I.A 3 1100. 
John II. lliKU. Motor. 
Thoma* 1". Mcfl'mn. Ktontli- Hfrrtton 
ll«>OLD n. Klmuino. C*w/n<T». 



l.DINO DrPARTMENT. 

IICIU.l'.O DlH.IOK. 

y Hall Admi. TfI. I.A 3-! 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPABTMCNT. 

m JOB. cIl" H»lrABlIiT"T»l. LA S-SIOO. 



JoMa J. McC> 



I'aul H. II 

l>HILir KlUHU. I^t 

toHH D. Buoitx. Oi 



r»u/. /.ifoo 

4i.«Mol .4<*n 



Kxtcuhte Sirrfian/, Tin 



rUAT. Dtttttor 0/ Drmdtlion. 
Uaxiu. J. AanrrTA. .4uitf<i>il Dirntor. 

Mitori.l Offiw. 3S Cily lUll. TrI. I.A 3 5100. 

' '"'"'""city'cWncil. 

( ouncil C'luinben. 4tli Hoot. City lUll. T.I. 

t'rttidtnt, 1 1 Barrinx- 
451 Mcridiaa •ti»«t, K«»t 
k luTlA™ J. FoLlT, in.. 15 Tliomu puk. South 
MtLLA, 10 McUu •ll«t. 
213 WmI Eiihth •li»»t. 



Dorchratrr. 



End. 



JoiiH K. Kr 

South Boston. „ . " 

PtT«« F. HlHU. 7 BelUire road. WmI Roibury. 

Kdwaiid F. KIcLavoiilik, J... 6 Clvm romd. 

Cabribl F. Pie>io!«t«. 6.5 Brook Farm n>ad, 

Wwl Roibury. _ . . „. . 

JoacPH C-. WTillTl. 12 Riuk.n itiwt. Wnl 
Roibury. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

not. ¥. lllHLtv. Chairman. 227 Willow 
wt. \\>»t Koibury. 

I P. Mc.Moaaow. 322 Adami slrMt. Dor- 
I IV Rboan, I Pn-sident road. West 
^elki'nc L. Rcillt, 19 Commonwealth avc- 
i''j^ir«!eaT, Jb., 10 Glondale Itreel, Dor- 



ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES. 

ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 
DEPARTMENT. 
William Aanifa UtiLLV. OirrrMr. 
Office, 50 City Hall. Tel. LA 3-5100. 



John G, PicltnT, Supfrrivtr oj Budgfit 

CoMPLAiirni OivmoN. 
WllxlAU AimiCIl RalLLr. Direeior, 
Sahcil R. Goodwin, Suprrruor. 
Office. 25 City Hall, Tel, LA 3-5100 



Divi 



Eit. 315 316-317. 
""i'fonn,!. 



-5100. 



Dl NCAN T. FOLIT. Stiixn 
Office. 51 City Hall. Tel, 

PtmciiAaiNO DnimoN. 
John V, Mo«an, I'urchiuKio 
Office. M City llaU, Tel. LA 3-5100, 

PlilNTiNr Section, 
Jauu J, l>t'rrT, ,1rfininijfrafiF^ Auittanl. 
Office, 17< North aliret, Tel, LA S-6363. 

ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES BOARD, 
William AltTHfa Riillt, Dirtrlor. 
John V, Mohan, I'urfKaaing .Agent. 
JoarrH P, Lallv, Cilii ,4iiWii<.r, Ez Ofirw. 

Dl'NCAN T, FoLtT, Suprrrnnr of /■rraonnW. 
jAMn E. ChLOKA, Co/l.rtor-rrnnurrr, Bl O.DSn'a 

John G, Piritrrr, SuperntoT o/ BudgH: 
Karl R. Barvakd, Autuor of T<utt, St Ofirit. 

Office, Faneull italT, °' 
Nelson W. ALoaicn, r*ainwaa, 

ASSESSINO DEPARTMENT. 

Office, Room ,101, City Hall ,Annei. Tel. I.A 3 510 

Amiuuior or Taika, 
Karl R. HAaNAKD. Aumor o/ Tata. 



AUDITING DEPARTMENT. 

Room 11. City Hall Tel. LA 3 .1100. 
JoaiPM P. I.allt. City .AuH^ior. 



William Abtnl-i Riillt. Clt«ira>aa. 
Tmoma* J. llt-oHn. FaAMcta X. Corm. 
I>ft. John H. Cavlit. Timotwt J. O'Connob. 

COHHITTII ON LiCBNBBa. 

Thomas J. Hdombb. 

fBAMCIB X. CotTIB. TiMOTHT 1. O'CONKOB. 

John Codman. CAotrsMia, 

FbaxB J. <'otIOIILIN. S^rHary. 

CITY CLERK DEPARTMENT. 

Room 22. City Hall. Tel I.A 3 MOO. 

WaLTCB J. MaLLOT. City CItrk 

CITY PLANNING BOARD. 

Room 1101. City Hall Anaei. Tel. LA 3-SIOO. 
TiMoniT J. Rboan ■ 

JoaSPH A. MlTCHE 

Robert A. MacLe 

II. Delano Chandlcb. .Mabqabbt Ditvcb. 
Kdwabo C. Keane, Habbt J, Kebee. 

Board of Zonino ADjomiENT, 
Alribt V. Coleman, rxoirauii. 
Office, 1 108 City Hall Annei, Tel. LA 3-5100. 
ZONING COMMISSION 
CIVIL DEFENSE. 
Office, 115 .>5outliaiii|.lon ptteet. Tel. Ill J 30J 

FBANCM C. CluRT. OlfWlOr. 

ELECTION DEPARTMENT. 

t)ffice, 1 1 1 Ciiy Hall Annei, Tel, LA 3 5100. 

David Laseer, C*oir1Ili'""'GERTBDDi A, Pfac 
Joseph Russo, Peblie Dtab Chai 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Kieeuti«*e Headnuarters, 115 Soutlianiptoo strei 

Tel, HI 2-8000. 
Francis X, Cotter. ro»i»ii«»«oinr. 
Leo C. Driacoll. CKu/ o] DfpaHmtnt. 
Fin- AUrm Head<|iiarleni. 59 Fenway, T 
KE 6-1100. 

HEALTH DEPARTMEN1. 
Office. Haymarket square. Tel. CA 7-1300. 

Health Division. 
John II, Cadlet, M,D,, Co»i»iis«.»er, 

Public Health Codncil, 
Albert A. Horner, M,D„ Ckairmuii. 

Reoistbt Division. 
1004 City Hall Annei. Tel. LA 3-5100, 
Charles II, .Maceie, Cilv ffsinMror, 

Office, 105 City Hall Annei. Tel. LA 3-5100. 
John F. McCart.it. Se.ler. 



Db. John 
Dr. Dav 



HOSPITAL DEPARTMENT. 
18 Harriaon ave. Tel. KE 6-8600. 

:. Pruidm o/ rnuless. 



Sanatobicm Division. 



Tel. BL 8-7900. 

311 N R. Mcg1li°iv'b". 
IVl. PR 3-1371. 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 
1003. l,awver> Buiklinf, II Bei 

LA 3-6206 



L. .McCoBMACi. Agnl. 
LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 

Kbw 

Milton K. Lord, Dtraetor. 

Parks and recreation department. 

Office, 33 Beacon street. Tel. CA 7-6940. 
Frane R. Kellet, Cciamuncaer, 

Pare. Pi-OLic Gbocnos. Bath, 
Recbeation Divisions. 
Pine Bank Bld«., Jamaicaway, Tel. JA 4-6400. 

Office, 33 Beacon Tjr'cA'7-6940. 
PENAL INSTITUTIONS DEPARTMENT. 

Room 805. City Hall Annei. Tel. LA 3-5100. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT, 
llssdauarurs, 154 Berkeley street. 

Tel. KE 6 6700. 

Lbo J. StTLLiVAN. Cnwsiunsaer. 
Fbancis J. Hennesst, 5iiper<alra<ini(, 



401. EBCr< 



JOMN F. FLAMEarTT. Ouuxm Sacutere. 

Roooi 507. City Hall Aanei. Tel. LA 3-5100. 

Seweb Diriatov. 
Eowabb G. A- Powers. Aaing DtwtttMk Et^n'" 
Roots 701, City Hall Anoei. Tel. LA J-SlOli 
BtBvrr Division. 
"" Ckx./ 



Halt 



Tel LA 3- 



Div 



Daniel M. ScLi.rvA« 
Roofn 607. City HaU Anaai. TeL LA 3 510Q 
PcBuc Improvemejtt CoMMiaaioN. 

Robebt P Shea and Timotut J. O'ComtoB. 
CsasAUnoaert 

Room 403, City BaU AuKi, TeL LA J-SlOO — 
Eit, S< 

REAL PROPERTY DEPARTMENT. 



Room 8011, City HaU Annei. Tel LA 3-5100. 
Ttus department also includes the followiBf: 

COMHirTES ON FOBBCtXMED ReaL EsTATE. 

Pbopebtt Division. 



Offic*. Quincy Msrk 
William J. Galvin. 



Msrket. Tel. CA 7-J382. 



Joseph P. Lallt John C Kara 

TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT. 

MJ Southampton street.^ Tel. HI 2-7700. 



Fban 



. C»ai. 



. Pork Co. 



N Carp. ff«>l /Vopertj Comm 
TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 
Jambs E. Gildba. CallrHor-Trmw^. 
Room 10, City HaU. Tel. LA 3-5100. 

Tbeabubt Dttibion — Cou-BcnoN DiVIBON, 
SlNEINO Fcnd CoHMiaaioNEBa, 
William B. Cabolan, CkairsMa. 

VETERANS- SERVICES DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 18 ComhilL Tel. LI 2-7940. 
VicTOB C. Binoe. C«»«u.um»r. 
Fbane T. Peoonti. Swpernaor of Vi^erana' Crssea 
14 SUtc street. Tel. La 3-4005. 

WELFARE DEPARTMENT. 
James S. Maloop. CKil.rman. 
William F Lallt. Se<T.l»r» 

Office. Adminiatrauon Buildinf, 43 Hawkins lliect 

Tel. CA 7-(O20 
Temporary Honie. 47 Chardoa street. TeL 

I.A 3 2337. 

OTHER SERVICES. 

AUDITORIUM COMMISSION. 



BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOL 
BUILDINGS. 

Office. 28 Norman street. Tel. CA 7-5750. 
Joseph F. O'Conneix. Jb.. CKainman; Thomas A. 



' OP School BciLOiiroa. 
itreeL^Tel. CJW-57S0. 



BOSTON FINANCE COMMISSION. 

re. 24 School itreei Tel. LA 3-1622. 
moNT J. Y»i NO CAoi-swa. 

BOSTON HOUSING AUTHORITY, 
je. 230 Concress street. Tel. LI 2-645a 



.nerrwA street. i el. 1 
Cronin. rVlirsua. 



BOSTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY. 
73 Tiemont street. Tel. RI 2-0500. 
JoaEPH LrND. ChairsMn. 
Kane Simonian. [hrrclor. 

LICENSING BOARD. 
Office. 24 Province .treet Tel. CA 7 2170. 

t^LABENCE R. ElaM. diaiMMn. 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 
Office. IS Beacon street. TeL CA 7-5JO0 
Dennis C. Halei 
Leo J. BcBEE. Bunn,.. , 



CiTV OP Boston 
Administrative Sbbvicbs Drtabt 
Pbintinc 4^9^ Sbction 



CITY RECORD 

Official Chronicle of Boston Municipal Affairs. 

Vol.51 Saturday, January 17, 1959 No. 3 

BUILDING IN BOSTON TOPS SIX-YEAR PEAK 

The total amount of new construction, structural alterations, and building additions 
within the Cit}' of Boston, for which permits were issued during the calendar year of 1958, ex- 
ceeds the total of any one year since 1952, according to a summary released this week by the 
Building Department. (See complete analysis of building operations for 1958 elsewhere in this 
issue.) 

Permits Were Issued During 1958 for the Following Buildings, the Cost of Which Exceeded $100,000. 

Nature Purpose Location Owner Cost 

New Offices 30 St. .James Ave Liberty Mutual Insurance Company. . . ..¥7,000,000 

Alterations Manufacturing 600 ( 'lu lsci St U. S. Gypsum 125,000 

New Store 400 W ("st.ni .Vve Western Avenue Properties, Inc 225,000 

Alter Storage-Office 44(i 1.30 Albany St 460 Albany Street Trust 169,000 

Alter School 787 Commonwealth Ave Boston University 450,000 

Alter Mercantile 109^153 Lincoln St York Rcaltx- 100,000 

New Public Building 315 Cummins Hwy C\W of Bost(jn 340,000 

New Club 470 W:isliinu,ic)n St Boston YMCA 135,000 

Alter Hospital 2i) iihu kl m St Children's Hospital 190,000 

New Hotel 26 U) s St Hotel Loganaire, Inc 200,000 

New Garage 30 Clinton St City of Boston 1,450,000 

New Youth Center 60 Ashlev St R. C. Archbishop of Boston 238,000 

New Office 133 Federal St Mass. Medical and Hospital Service 4,110,000 

Alter Office and Apartment 34 J Beacon St Family Service Association 1 17,000 

Alter Hospital 194 Pilgrim lid New England Deaconess Hospital 255,600 

New Garage 30 Kilbv St City of Boston 1,640,000 

Alter Church 206 Clarendon St Trinity Church 144,000 

New School 380 Huntington Ave Xorthea.^tern University 800,000 

New Office 161 Huntington Ave New IviglaiKl Home foi- Little ^Vanderers 300,000 

New Convent 85 Brown Ave R. C. Catholic Archbishop of Boston .... 200,000 

Alter Bank 135 Devonshire St New I'lngland Trust 100,000 

New Fire Station 700 Tremont St Citv of Boston 334,000 

Alter Office-Manufacturing 854-912 River St Tih stdii-IlolUngsworth 130,000 

Alter Ho.spital 818 Harrison Ave V\\\ of Bcjston 515,000 

Alter Hospital 55 Fruit St .Massachusetts ( icneral Hospital 175,000 

New Nursing Home 43 1 Pond St Vnnenian W omen's As.sociation 300,000 

New Convalescent Home 113 Central Ave llvde Park Convalescent Home 197,000 

New School 235 leaker St Christian Brothers of Ireland 1,400,000 

New Telephone Exchange 23 27 Belvidere St New England Tel. and Tel. Co 300,000 

Alter School 302 Walnut Ave City of Boston 450,000 

Alter Manufacturing 10 Newmarket Sq Fulton Packing Company 1 18,000 

New Warehouse 100 Colchester St Stop & Shop 3,000,000 

New Library 4246 Washington St Cit\' of Boston 288,700 

New Offices 50 Wm. Morrissev Blvd \\'ol.uni Realt^• 500,000 

New Chapel Long Island Hospital R. C. ("athulic Archbishop 145,000 

Alter Warehouse 455-465 Medford St Men lumts Tei ininal 300,000 

New Hospital 221 Longwood Ave Boston Lving-in Hospital 774,000 

Alter Hospital 91-109 Parker Hill St New England Baptist Hospital. 298,000 

New Apartment House 99 Commonwealth Ave Clarendon Development Corporation. . . 2,200,000 

New Motel 1271-1273 Bovlston St Fenwav Motors, Inc 400,000 

New Manufacturing 425 Medford St \mcric:m Sugar 2,155,300 

New Telephone Exchange 50 Harvard Ave New ilunlaud Tel. & Tel. Co 150,000 

New Dormitory 33 Gainsborough St New lOiif^land Conservatory 1,283,000 

New Home for Aged 1215 Centre St Roxburv Home for Aged Women 200,000 

Alter Dormitory 50 St. Paul St R. C. Archbishop of Boston 270,000 

Alter School 76 Dunbar Ave City of Boston . . . , 400,000 

Seventy-three per cent of all this construction becomes taxable real < 



INDEX TO 
CITY HALL 

Telephone . . LA i-5100 

AUMIMSTUATIVK SERVICES 

5th floor 

AdminiKtralive Divimori 

liudK^l Divinion 

I't-monnrl Diviaion 

I'urrlwuiiiif; Diviaion 

Oflicc Miirhine Repair Unit Kaiicment 

lilt floor 
2nd floor 



THE PRINCIPAL MUNICIPAL SERVICES 



ACniTINC 

HillM and Accounts 



CITY CLERK 

Houl Lirrnms (('ouncil appr.) 

Hootlilucks (111 21 yrs.) 

Hufimtw Crrliliciitiw 

Ccnu'lrrv I'mnils (CJouncil appr.) 

{'ily Ordinanrcx 

Claims 

KiKhin^ and Hunting Licenses 
Cun Clul) LirenKos (Council appr.) 
Jitney Licenocs (Council appr.) 
.Ne\v.sl)oy» (10 21 yrs.) 
Shell Ki.ih IVrmita (Council appr.) 
Kun<lay S|>orts (Council appr.) 

CITY COUNCIL . . . 4th floor 
(;ierk of Committees 
('ouncil Committees 
(Regular Weekly Meetings, Mondays, 
2 I'.M.) 

CITY MlvSSENGER . 4th floor 

City Documents 
CITY RECORD ... 3rd floor 
COMPLAINTS DIVISION 2nd floor 
CHKDIT UNION 3rd floor 

City i:m|>l<)yces 

.MAYOR S OKKICI-; . 2nd floor 

.mayor's ofI'Ice telephone la 3-11(X) 
Public Celebrations 2nd floor 

laitt-rtuinment Licenses 3rd floor 

Newsboys (Hoston Common) 

riU;SS ROOM 3rd floor 

RETIREMENT HOARD . 3rd floor 

TREASURY DIVISION . 1st floor 

CITY HALL ANNEX 

Telephone LA 3 SlOO 

ASSESSING ... 3rd floor 

Abatement Petitions 

Assessors Certificates 

i;.\cise Ta.xes 

IJUILDINC. . . mh floor 

Appeuls — Building Cmie 
.Xppcals - Zoning Law 
Hiiililing l'i rniil.< <t Plans 
IVniMhtioM l-.'imits 
I'.lertri.al Installation.^ 
I '.levator Operators 

("larages, Lubriloriums iV Repair Shops 
( );is Installations 
Mealing Installations 
(>p<-n .\ir Parking Spaces 
I'Umiliing Installations 



Pubiic Safety Co 
Comniittcf on Licenses 

COLLECTING DIVISION 
Municipal Liens 
Tax Collections 

ELICtTION 

Voting Certificates 
\ iiling Rcgistrition 

PI:NAL INSTITUTIONS 



PLANNING BOARD 11th floor 

Zoning Adjustmentj 
Zoning Maps 

PUBLIC WORKS 

Automotive Division . 5th floor 

Bridge Division 6th floor 

Highway Division 5th floor 

Street Cleaning 4 Repairs 

Stre<-t Op<-nings 
Permit Office .4th floor 

Street ( >ceupanciea 

Projections over Highways 

Sidewalk Licenses 
Sanitary Division 5th floor 

(iarbarge & Rubbish Collections 
Sewer Division 7th floor 

Sewer Ivntrance Permits 
Stkeet Lichtinc; 

Survey Division . 4th floor 

Street Acceptances 

Stre«-t Linc-s 
Water Division ... 6th floor 

Meter Reading 

Public Improvement C'ommission 

4th floor 

R1:AL PROPICRTY . Sth floor 

Foreclosed Real I'jttate 
Markets 

Off-Street Parking 
Public Buildings 
RIXJISTRY DIVISION lOth floor 

Births. Deaths A Marriage 
('ertificates 

WEIC;HTS A MEASURICS let floor 

Measuring Devices 
WORKMEN'S C;o.MPENS.\TION 

7th floor 

OUTSIDE CITY HALL 

CIVIC imi'K()Vi:.\ii:nt com.mittee 

14 SUtte StrtH't . LA 3 1 100 

CIVIL DEFENSE . . HI 2-3020 

115 Southampton Street 
DEMOLITION (General) 

14 State Street . LA 3-1100 

FINANCE COMMISSION LA 3-1622 
24 School Street 

FIRE HI 2-8000 

1 15 Southampton Street 
Flammable A Explosive Materials 
Fuel Oil Burners A Storage 
Ins|>ections 

Fin- Alarm Headciuarters 

5!) Fenway . KE 6-1100 

HEALTH , CA 7-1300 

Ilaymarket Square 
Burial Permits (Nights, City Hospital) 
Dump Permits 
Frozen Desserts Licenses 



CITY RECORD 



Published wFckly in Boston, under the direc- 
tion of the Mayor, in accordance with 
leiristative act and city ordinance. 

Thomas F. O'Day, Editor. 

P. Nicholas PrrsocELLi, Auociate Editor. 

EomMIAL Omct. Room 35. City Hall. 



lutocription (In Advance) 15.00 per year 
•inirle Copies ... 15 centa 

STREET AGENCIES. 
Old South Newi Stand. Old South entrance 
subway. Also News Stand, ftrvt floor. City 



Advertisinc. 
A rate of 14 per inch of 12 lines (set solid) 
has been established for such ••dvertisemenU 
as under the law must be printed in the City 
Record. Advertisinr and other copy must be 
in hand by 5 r.M. Wednesday of each weeli to 
In the Saturday issue. 



Funeral Dir«-< Ujr» Licenses 
( iarl>ag<- Transport Permits 
Hawkers A Peddlers Licenses 
Health Ivlucatioii I-al)oralorj- 
Health Statistirs .Milk IJcensea 
Health UniU .Motels 
HOSPITAL 

818 Harrison Avenue KE &-8600 

I Cast lioston Relief Sution 

1 4 Porter Street LO 7-3GO0 

Ixjng IsUnd Ilospiul PR 3-1371 
Sanatorium 

24!» River Street . BL 8-7900 
HOUSE OF CORRIXTION OC 3-2700 

De<'r Island 
HOUSING AUTHORITY 

General Oflices. ZU) Congress Street 
LI 2^i4.'>0 

Applications, 141 .Milk St. LI 2-C450 
LAW LA 3-6200 

I I Beacon Stre<'t 

LIBRARY KE C-5400 

Copley S<|uare 
LICENSING BOARD CA 7-2470 

24 Province- Street 

Alcoholic Beverages 

Automatic .\muscment Devices 

Bowling Alleys 

Club Licenses 

Common Victuallers 

Emplo>nient .\gencics 

Hotels 

I/xlging Houses 
Pool RtHjnis 
Shooting Galleries 
.MORTUARY 

818 llarri.son .Avenue KE 6-C707 
KE G-67G8 

NEKWIBORHOOD REHABILITA- 
TION COM.MITTEI-:S 

14 State Street . LA 3-1100 
PARKS A RECREATION CA 7-C940 

Xi Beacon Street 
Beach and Pools 
Cemeteries (City -owned) 
(Jolf Courses 
Parkways Occupancies 
Playgrounds 
Public Baths 
Trees 

POLICE KE 6-C7(K) 

154 Berkeley Street 
Auctioneers Hackneys 
Bicycles Junk Dealers 

Dogs Pawnbrokers 
Firearms Used Cars 

Wagon A Hand Carts 
PRINTING SECTION LA 3-0.30:1 
174 North Street (Street liooks) 

redi:vi;l()pment authority 

73 Tremont Street RI 2-0500 

Urban Renewal 

SCHOOL BUILDINCJS, 
Board of Commissioners of 
26 .Norman Street . . C.\ 7-5750 
SCHOOL CO.MMITTEE 

15 Beacon Street CA 7-5.500 
Bootblacks. Newslwvs (12-16 vears) 

45 .Myrtle Street . . C.\ 7-5500 
traffic: . HI 2-7700 

1 12 Southampton Street 
Ix>ading Zones Parking Meters 
Traffic Signals Panides 

VETERANS' GRAVICS LA 3-4005 

1 4 State Street 

VITERANS' SERVICh:S RI 2-40C0 

18 Comhill 

W |;LFARE . CA 7-8.320 

43 Haw kins Street 



Genend Relief 

Dis:ibility .Assistance 

Old .Age .Assistance 

Pcnnits for Street Solicitations 



I Jax. 17 



CITY RECORD 



FIN. COM. REPORTS ON SCHOOL FIRE SAFETY IN BOSTON 




BOSTON'S NEWEST FIRE STATION, located at !) Gidlivan Boulevard. Dorchester, was dedicated on Thur.-Jday. January 15, 
1959. This station is the new ()uarters of Engine Company 16 and Ladder Company 6, and also of the district fire 
chief of District 8. The structure was completed December' 18. 1958. at a total cost of S326.753. This new station is 
part of the Fire Department's consolidation plan whereby the number of firehou.<es will be cut and. at the same time, 
new ones strategically located for the most efficient operation of the department. 



January 8, 1959. 
To the Honorable the Mayor. 

The recent controversy on the 
subject of School Fire Safety in 
Boston has generated many charges 
and reports. In such a confused 
atmosphere, it is difficult for the 
public to get a clear picture of the 
city's Fire Safety Program in the 
schools. The Finance Commission 
in this report undertakes to clarify 
the atmosphere with respect to 
administrative procedures of Fire 
Safety Programs of the several de- 
partments involved. 

The -Statute which establishes the 
Finance Commi.s-sinn authorizes the 
latter to investigate matters relat- 
ing to "methods of administration 
affecting the City of Boston." 

In the current discussion of 
School Fire Safety, the "methods 
of administration'' of three depart- 
ments appear to be involved : 



1. The School Buildings Depart- 
ment is concerned with the .safety 
of the school building as a structure. 

2. The School Committee and 
its agents (ma.sters and custodians) 
are concerned with the u.-^c and 
operation of the building. 

3. The Fire Department is prop- 
erly concerned with the promotion 
of a Fire Prevention Program in the 
schools. 

The following statement outlines 
and analyzes those administrative 
procediu'es which affect school fire 
safety : 

The School Building Structure 

School fire protection l)egins with 
the building structure and its ec(uip- 
ment. This is the special province 
of the Boston School Buildings De- 
partment and the Mas.sachusetts 
Department of Public Safety. 

The latter i.s.sues a certificate 
which indicates that the building 



conforms with the reciuirements of 
chapter 143, General Laws, that the 
means of egress are deemed suffi- 
cient, corridors are wide enough, 
exit doors are of sufficient size and 
open in the proper direction — all to 
provide for efficient evacuation of 
the building in case of emergency. 
The Ma.ssachusetts Department of 
Public Safety also establishes the 
number of persons permitted on 
each floor of a building, in auditoria, 
gymnasia, and cafeterias. These 
certificates are posted in conspicu- 
ous places in the various school 
buildings. 

Since all plans for structiu-al 
changes in the schools must he ap- 
proved by the Mas.sachusetts De- 
partment of Public Safety liefore 
the Bo.ston Building Department 
will consider them, this fact insiu-es 
that any change which might aft'ect 
the validity of the certificate of 
safetv would be brought to the 



40 



CITY RECORD 



Jax. r 



notice of the M:i.s>acliu.-ct t s De- 
part inoiit of Puldic Safety. 

To moot the re(niireiueiits of 
chapter 1 13, whicli Ijecaino ofToetive 
ill 1!)4S, the eitv has spent approxi- 
mately .«.-), ()()(),()fH) for tlie installa- 
lioii of (loulile-cKress from all rooms 
in use, fire doors, (iro escapes, rt al. 
All essential work was completed hv 
October 10, ]^m. The city has 
f!;ono beyond this legal minimum by 
providing emergency lighting in 
areas not re(|uired by law, a second- 
ary source of power for exit lights 
in high schools, and fire escapes to 
pro\ ide direct egress to the open 
air for kindergartens. 

Additional Considerations 

All eleven new .school buildings 
in Boston constructed within the 
past five years are equipped with 
automatic sprinklers in storerooms, 
boiler rooms, and shops. These are 
all buildings of fireproof, first-class 
construction. 

It is the general opinion of fire 
protection engineers that automatic 
.sprinkler in.stallations should be 
more widely made in schools. A 
representative of the National Fire 
Protection Association recommends 
that a survo}' of the older school 
buildings be made with the view of 
installing .sprinklers in the older 
buildings in such potential hazard 
spots as storerooms, .shops, labora- 
tories, kitchens, stairwells, and cor- 
ridors, if indicated; all .such in- 
stallations would be tied to the 
fire alarm .sj-stem of the .school. A 
l)ublication of the National Fire 
Protection A.ssociation on the sub- 
ject of school fires reads: "Ex- 
jjerience shows that automatic 
sprinklers, properly installed and 
maintained, are the most effective 
of any of the various safeguards 
again.st loss of life by fire." 

The School Buildings Department 

Two flivisions of this department 
are i)art icularly concerned with 
school building fire hazards, viz., 
the ]]lectrical Division and the 
Heating and \'entilating Division. 

Electrical Division 
The lOlectrical Division is charged 
with the installation of electrical 



>ystems in the schools. 'i"he po- 
tentiality for fire hazards of .school 
electrical .service .sy.stems is well 
known. A publication of the Na- 
tional Fire Protection A.s.sociation 
states that electrical cau.scs ac- 
counted for approximately 34 per 
cent of the hundreds of fires in 
public schools which have been 
analyzed. The breakdown by spe- 
cific causes was: 

Wiring, overloaded or short eircuit..29.1''^ 

.\l)plianee.s, defective 

^Iolors, defective 1.5' 'r 

To combat this potential hazard, 
particularly because wiring is a 
concealed factor, the School Build- 
ings Department has been engaged 
in a systematic program of rewiring 
old buildings. In 1957, rewiring 
was done in seventeen schools; 
eight being completely rewired at 
a cost of S30,000. There are 
twelve to fifteen old school buildings 
containing electric wiring which has 
been in use for man}^ years, and 
which still remain to be rewired hy 
modern methods. 

Another 830,000 was spent on 
fire alarm S3'stems in old buildings 
in 1957, and S10,000 on fire alarm 
boxes. In addition, this division 
employs two men to inspect fire 
alarm .systems in .school buildings. 

The Heating Division 

The Heating Division controls 
the installation and maintenance of 
heating and ventilating .systems in 
the schools. 

The National Fire Protection 
A.s.sociation Bulletin referred to 
above states that approximately 
18 per cent of .school fires are caused 
by heating and cooking equipment: 
central heating systems being re- 
sponsible for about 10 per cent of 
the fires. 

Boiler safety in Boston public 
schools is covered by certificates 
i.«sued by insurance company in- 
spectors after te.sts; the.se men are 
authorized by the Mas.sachu.setts 
Department of Public Safety to 
i.s.sue ."^uch certificates. According 
to the School Buildings Depart- 
ment's heating engineer, all boilers 
in u.se in every school building in 
Boston were covered -by such cer- 



tificates of .-safety, as of Decembei 
1 1 , 1958. livery year the State I )e- 
partment makes a spring in.spectioi 
of .school boilers to determine needec 
repairs which are carried out liy tlu 
School Buildings Department. 

Operation of School Buildings 
The School Buildings Depart 
ment through its officials and em- 
ployees (Superintendent of Schools 
and A.ssistants, Masters, Custo 
dians d al) Ls responsible for lh< 
operation and use of school build 
ings. Obviously, it is not enougl 
that .school buildings Ije con.structeo 
and maintained according to ac 
ceptcd .standards of .safety; the} 
must be operated with due regaro 
to fire safety, by masters, custo- 
dians, and others involved. 

There must be present an aware- 
ness of the importance of fire safetv 
in schools, an ability to recogniz< 
fire hazards, and a school plan: 
management program, to insure ai: 
effective and sustained fire safety 
program. 

To carry out the.se points, the 
Superintendent of Schools has i.s- 
sued a .series of directives, prepared 
by the Supervisor of Safety, to all 
principals, in recent years. 

1. A directive, dated May 3, 
1956. contained a set of precautions 
and regulations for fire prevention, 
with special in.stnictions in the fol- 
lowing areas: Custodial, Industrial 
Arts, Home Economics, Fine Arts, 
Chemistrv and Science, Pln-sical 
Education, Cafeterias. 

2. A report, returnable not later 
than January 28, 1957, was sent to 
principals on December 17, 1956, 
which, when filled out, would con- 
tain data on the fire .safety condi- 
tions of all areas in the school, plus 
a plan of fire drill procedure for each 
.school. 

3. In March. 1957, a new Man- 
ual of Fire Drill Practice to replace 
the 1950 manual was prepared and 
distributed. 

4. A directive, dated Septem- 
ber 11, 1958, calling attention to 
special sources of hazard was dis- 
tril)uted. 

5. A directive, dated Septem- 
ber 12, 1958, calling for names of 



Jax. 17 



CITY RECORD 



41 



:lie Safety Counselor, Fire Coim- 
ielor, Safety Patrol Supervisor, 
First Aider, and Civil Defense 
I^ounselor in each school, was 
Jistributed. 

The responsibility of the school 
'ustodian and his relation to fire 
>afety are spelled out in a publica- 
ion entitled: "Rules, Regulations 
ukI Instinctions to Custodians," 
irinted in July, 1958. 

]<]very school has a fire counselor 
md safety counselor, appointed by 
he master from the faculty, who 
ire expected to observe safety con- 
litions in the building and report 
o the master any hazards noted. 

The authority over the individual 
•u.stodians and the enforcement of 
ules and regulations are vested in a 
■hief schoolhouse custodian and his 
assistants who are required to re- 
)ort to the School Committee cases 
)f negligence and inefficiency. These 
egulations and instructions cover a 
nultiplicity of factors affecting 
ire safet}'. These include the pre- 
-ention of accumulation of rubbish, 
'ontinuous inspection of fire es- 
•apes. exit doors, panic bolts, con- 
lition of building equipment, fire 
^ongs. fire doors, and many other 
•onsiderations. Custodians are re- 
luired to be present at all times 
\-hen the steam plant is in opera- 
ion; in a word, the custodian is 
•harged with a very special concern 
,vith all those factors in the opera- 
ion of the building which affect the 
ire safety. 

A ^lanual of Fire Drill Procedure 
printed in 1957 states that : "Within 
;he school the responsibility for the 
safety of the pupils rests with the 
■school Principal."' This manual 
[hen proceeds to spell out instruc- 
tions on the manner in which the 
principal must conduct monthly 
fire drills; the.se drills organize the 
:orces of principals, teachers, cus- 
todians and safetj- counselors, and 
spell out the responsibility of each. 

In a word, the responsibility of 
Bvery one concerned with the pro- 
-am of fire safety in the operation 
3f the schools has been spelled out. 
The next step is to determine how 
vvell these regulations are enforced. 



The Fire Department 

A check by an outside agency on 
the effectiveness of the fire safety 
program is pro\'ided by a regular 
inspection of school buildings by 
district fire personnel; a captain or 
lieutenant handles this assignment. 

The standard procedure is a 
quarterly inspection made jointly 
by the Fire Department official, the 
schoolmaster and the custodian. 
A check list is used, which is a form 
prepared hy the National Board 
of Fire Underwriters; two copies of 
the i-eport are sent to School Head- 
([uarters and one copy remains in 
the local .school. 

There is a lack of uniformit\' in 
this situation. In case of some 
schools, no forms were used or 
available at the school, although 
they were available at School Head- 
quarters. As a result, there is no 
cjuarterly report of such inspections 
forwarded to School Headquarters 
hy these schools. This means that 
no complete record of the cjuarterly 
inspection has been forwarded or on 
file at School Headquarters for 
those schools, although a quarterly 
inspection has been made of all 
schools. 

The Fire Department official 
does not retain a copy, l)Ut, in 
case a safety hazard is discovered, 
he fills out a 1 iie Department Form 
5 or 12, submits this to his district 
chief and then this report processes 
up the chain of command to Fne 
Headquarters and ultimately to the 
Fire Prevention Division. 

Comment on Check List 

One example will illustrate the 
pitfalls of this check list. One 
question on the list asks whether a 
certain oil burner shut-off mecha- 
nism is provided, but does not ask 
whether it is in operating condition. 
In the case of one school, this ques- 
tion was answered correctly with 
the word "yes"; however, this 
answer did not disclose the impor- 
tant fact that the mechaiiisni was 
not in proper operating condition. 

A new check list is currentl}- in 
preparation hy the school authori- 
ties which should correct an}' short- 
comings in the in.spection lists 



previou.sly used. Supplementing 
source material for the purpose of a 
check list may be found in "School 
Fire Safety" (Office of Education, 
Federal Security Agency) and Na- 
tional I'ire Protection Association 
publications. 

Uniformity in Practice 
There appears to be a lack of 
luiiformity in inspection frequency, 
in actual practice. In District 5, 
school authorities at the Dearborn 
and Boston Clerical Schools state 
there are no monthly inspections; 
in the Prince School, it is reported 
that in.spections are made at least 
monthly; McKinley School lias at 
least monthly inspections; school 
officials at the Edi.son School in 
Brighton .state that this school is 
inspected more frequently than 
(juarterly. 

The Follow=Up After Inspection 

Rule .339 of the Rules and Regula- 
tions of the Fire Department pro- 
vides that; "When report is for- 
warded regarding such conditions 
as may be a fire menace, a reinspec- 
tion of the premises shall be made 
within seven da\s (and shall be 
made within forty-eight hours if 
the conditions are of a serious na- 
ture), and a report forwarded as to 
the action taken by the owner or 
occupant." 

Schools have heretofore been ex- 
cepted, in practice, from this re- 
inspection rule, the Fire Depart- 
ment relying on the concern cf 
school authorities wixh fire safety to 
correct the defect. This excepting 
of schools is open to question; it 
.seems that follow-up should be 
made in all cases, public or private. 
This situation is being corrected by 
adoption of the abatement proce- 
dure, to apply to school inspections. 
Under tliis new procedure the local 
Fire District officer who makes the 
inspection will make a follow-up 
inspection in case of a condition 
which in his judgment should be 
corrected. 

Results of Fire Inspection of Schools 

Whereas the records of the Fire 
Prevention Di\ ision show that only 
four cases of safety defects reached 



CITY RECORD 



thai (lixision (Itiiiiijj; llic year a> a 
icsult of the (luartcrly inspection, 
I lie concerted inspection drive in 
Dcceinhcr prodMc('<l some fifty- 
se\-cn cases of scliools, which, in th<' 
judgment of the inspectors, con- 
tained defects wliich called for cor- 
rect ion. 

It is true that in many of these 
cases reported the matter involved 
a (|uestion of judf!;ment as to its 
necessity. Many were not ac- 
knowleclsed to he clear-cut cases of 
safety violations. But others were. 
I'here are enough ca.ses, liowever, to 
indicate that the December drive 
was ha.sed on a stricter set of stand- 
ards than was apparently followed 
(lurinfj; the ((uarterly in.spections. 

In many ca.ses conditions were 
found which should have been pre- 
\ented by tho.se in charj^e of the 
operation of the school, if the regu- 
lations, rules, and directives had 
l)een complied with. 

Fire Prevention Division 
.V major point of emphasis should 
be the importance of the Fire Pre- 
\-ention Division of the Fire De- 
])artment in this picture. This divi- 
sion, at long last, was given status 
and recognition in the recent I'ire 
Dejiartment reorganization. It was 
gi\(Mi ('([ual functional status with 
I'ire I'igiiting and Ti'aining, by the 
appointment of an assistant chief 
in each of the.se three functional 
areas. This recognized the I'ire 
Prevention Di\-ision as the coordi- 
nating agency of fire prev(>ntion 
actixities throughout the depart- 
ment. 

It points also to the need of 
further staffing of the division. 
Since the reorganization of the l'"ire 
Department, and its attendant re- 
duction in number of companies, a 
reservoir of officer manpower should 
be a\ailable for this purpose. The 
appointment of a trained fire pro- 
tection engineer to serve as consul- 
tant and instructor is also indicated. 

Th(> problem of training in fire 
l)re\ention work is recognized by 
the division but a program is not 
yet fully implemented. 

With lespect to school saf(>ty, a 
slrengthen(>(i I'ire Prevention Divi- 
sion should scr\-e sev(>ral purpo.ses; 



1. Pro\ ide .•special training to 
district Fire Department personnel 
who make the (juarterly inspections 
of school buildings in the technical 
aspects of (ire .safety, to in.sure a 
uniform and higli level competency 
in appraising safety conditions in 
school buildings. 

2. Serve as a clearing-house 
through which all school l)uilding 
inspection reports should channel, 
with a direct reporting to the Super- 
intendent of Schools. 

3. A f(jllow-up of all reported fire 
.safety violations l)y this divi.sion to 
in.sure inmiediate correction. 

4. Training all .school operating 
personnel in fire .sifety inspection 
practice. 

Sum mar_\ 

1. The School Buildings l)ei)art- 
ment has met and gone beyond the 
statutory minimum for fire .safety 
reciuirenients in .school l)uilding 
provisions. 

2. An additional consideration to 
be ofTered in the matter of "built- 
in'' fire .safety provisions is the 
advi.sal)ility of installing automatic 
sprinklers in those buildings which, 
after a survey, appear to recpiire 
such treatment. 

3. There is a need for reconciling 
the viewpoint of the I'ire Depart- 
ment with present scliool building 
standards. The School Buildings 
Dei)artment should weigh carefully 
certain recommendations of the 
Fire DepartnuMit which are not now 
reciuiretl l)v tli(> Massachusetts De- 
partment of Public Safety. The.se 
include: 

A. I' ire doors on staircases lead- 
ing from basement to first floor. 

B. r.se of wire-glass on win- 
dows opening on fire escapes. 

C. Elimination of screens and 
grills on windows. 

4. A school safety program under 
the Sifperintendent has been in 
operation for many years and has 
been stepped up in recent years. 
I'ire Department ins|)ection acts as 
an outside check on the effective- 
ness of the School Department's in- 
ternal .safety program through fjuar- 
terly inspections. A I'ire Depart- 
ment inspection dri\e in December 



>ln)\ved that some item.- in the p 
gram had not been complied wi' 
."). Several shortcomings of i 
vious methods are now in proce- 
change: 

A. A new, comprehen- 
check list for inspection jjurp' 
is needed. It is in preparatK i 

B. All .schools should be fur- 
ni.shed fornjs to l)e u.'^ed for (piar- 
terly inspections and principals 
be instructed to use such forms 
and forward copies to School 
Headc|uarters. 

('. A follow-up by I'ire Preven- 
tion Division personnel, to ascer- 
tain whether a reported fin 
.safety violation has been cor- 
rected, has been adopted. 
(). There is a need for bringing 
the Fire Prevention Divi.sion mon- 
prominently into the .school .safety 
picture; of training custodians and 
.school personnel in the .subject ol 
fire .safety: of insuring a high, 
uniform ([uality and frecjuency of 
inspection by all pensons charged 
with this responsiliility. 

H espec t f u 1 ly su bm i 1 1 ed , 

A.NTHONV J. '\'()r.\G, 

(hninimn, 
RoGKU J. AniZAiD, M.I)., 

II. W. DwiGHT Kl DD, 

Maxwkll B. (Jho.s.sm.w, 
The Finance Connnifsiou. 

Tho.MA.S J. Ml RPHV, 

Exendive Serrctarij. 



CLAIMS APPROVED 

The Mayor, on recommendation of ilio 
C'oriioralion Counsel, has approved tlie 
following \ ote.< of the City Council Cimi- 
niittce on Claims: 

John J. Mclntyre. 7 Virjril road. West Ro\- 
bury, for reimbursement as a result of an ac- 
cident which occurred on September 24. I;».j8. 
when a motor truck belonirini; to the Sanitary 
Division. Public Works Department, which he 
was operatinK, struck a parked truck owned 
by the Clearwater Laundrj-. by payment of 
$98. 

Paul H. DeOssie. 40 Brookway road. Roslin- 
dale. for reimbursement as a result of an 
accident which occurred on May 19. 1958. when 
a motor vehicle belonRinir to the Water Divi- 
sion. Public Works Department, collided with 
an automobile owned by Domenic A. Mambuca, 
damaRinK .same and causinir personal injuries 
to Mr. Mambuca, by payment of $490. 

Dora Kurlander. 63 WashinKton street. Dor- 
chester, for compensation for personal injuries 
caused by a depression around a coal hole 
cover in the sidewalk in front of 144-148 
Camden street. Roxbur>', May 1, 1957, bjr 
payment of $385. 



Jax. 17 



CITY RECORD 



43 



BOSTON'S 1958 HEALTH REPORT BEST IN CITY'S HISTORY 



Dr. John H. Cauley, Boston's 
Health Commissioner, on Deoem- 
l)er 30, 1958, issued the following 
report on the public health of the 
city stating that Boston enjoyed the 
t)c~T vear of its entire history. He 

I he city's vital statistics which 
with births, deaths, and inci- 

1. lire of disease, reveal the high 
lights occurring during the year. 
There were 5,650 marriages in 
' Boston and, in addition, there were 
2,100 marriages of Boston residents 
outside of the city. Twenty-three 
[thousand six hundred babies were 
[born in Boston of whom 15,155 
were born to residents of the city. 
During the last several years, Bos- 
•ton may be rightfully proud of the 
exceptionally fine record in the care 
jof new mothers. In 1958 there 
were only three maternal deaths 
among Boston residents, one of 
I which occurred outside of the city. 
[A careful study of these cases indi- 
[cates that the deaths were not pre- 
ventable by any type of care or 
treatment. Search of the records 
of large cities of the world proves 
that Boston over the last five years 
has maintained the lowe~<t ax crage 
for maternal deaths of any city ox er 
500,000 population. 

"The total number of deaths hi 
Bo.ston remains approximately the 
same as in previous years. As has 
been the case in recent \'ears, the 
same leading causes of death are 
recorded: heart disease, cancer, dis- 
eases of the central nervous system, 
accidents, and diseases of the 
arteries. There were no deaths 
during the year from poliomyelitis, 
diphtheria, measles, scarlet fe\er, 
typhoid fever, whooping cough, or 
other common diseases of childhood. 
Pulmonary tuberculosis, however, 
continues to be responsible for many 
deaths which may be prevented In- 
early recognition and persistent 
treatment. 

"Fortunately, the incidence of 

new cases of tuberculosis decieased 
(5^ per cent from the previous year 

and the number of deaths from 



NUMBER OF DEATHS IN BOSTON FROM 
PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS, 1949- 1958 




105 



Kil '50 'St '£2 '53 'Si '55 '56 '57 1953 
YEAR 

tuberculosis in 1958 is the smallest 
lumiber of deaths from this cause 
ever to occur in Boston in any year 
since records Avere first maintained. 
The accompanying graphic picture 
of the decline of tuberculosis shows 
the results of the intensive detection 
and treatment program conducted 
by the Boston Health Department 
and by other official and voluntary 
agencies interested in this problem. 
The City of Boston sp(>iuls from tax 
funds approximately $3,000,000 an- 
nually combatting this disease. 
There is, however, still an immense 
amount of effort which must be ex- 
pended by voluntary agencies and 
the general public in order that cases 
of tuberculosis may be recognized 
early and provided with effective 
treatment. Also, more general edu- 
cation is needed so that the public 
will be aware of the fact that tuber- 
culosis is curable. The newer meth- 
ods of treatment with chemicals, 
surgery, and early hospitalization 
combined with detection of cases 
of newly-developed tuberculosis 
make it possible to predict that 
tuberculosis shall be eliminated as 



a major cause of death in the fore- 
seeable future. Boston's accom- 
plishments during the last ten years 
in the recognition and ticatment of 
tuberculosis is responsible for Bo.s- 
ton now having a tuberculosis death 
rate for 1958 of 12.7 which compares 
wry fax'orably with most cities in 
the nation having a population over 
500,000. 

Health Program 

"In all activities of the Health 
Department, Boston may well be 
proud of what has been accom- 
plished. Thcn^ still icmain, how- 
ever, many actixitics in the field of 
public health which constitute a 
new challenge to health depart- 
ments throughout the nation. Bos- 
ton has accepted the challenge and, 
during 1958, took on seveial new 
projects. One program prox ides for 
dental treatment of schocjl children 
within the schools themsehcs result- 
ing in a sa\'ing of time and prox'iding 
for treatment foi' inoi-e children. 
Another program is ])r()\'idiiig the 
Flealth Department staff with a 
thorough indoctrination in mental 
health and ways of incorpoiating a 
preventix'c ])i()gram into routine 
activities. By careful admiiiisti-a- 
tive policies, it has l)eeii pos.sihle for 
the Boston Health D(>partment to 
maintain all its acti\ities without 
exceeding its budget allocations for 
the year. 

Weights and Measures 

"The Division of Weights and 
Measures of the Health Department 
has carried on its inspectional pro- 
gram and all those who ha\'e busi- 
ness in the City of Boston may be 
confident that wherever they have 
occasion to purchase any material 
by weight or by measure, they arc 
getting full measure for their ex- 
penditui'e. 

"The Registry Division of the 
Health Department contiiuies to 
maintain meticulous records per- 
taining to births, deaths, and mar- 
riages." 



44 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 17 



\ ital Statistics in Boston 1954 I9.SS 
BIRTHS. DEATHS. AND BIRTH AND DEATH RATES 







Number of 




Number of 




Yeaii 


Population 


Births 


Birth Rate 


Deaths 


Death Rate 


I9S8 


825.048 


1.x l.V. 


18 4 


9.216 


11.2 


I9S7 


822,884 


1.5..-i.->.3 


18 it 


9..33."» 


114 


1956 


819.822 


1-I.7J7 


19 2 


9.199 


112 


19SS 


816,759 


16.2.5.'5 


19.5 


9,421 


115 


I9S4 


813,696 


14.226 


17.5 


8.998 


11.1 



MATERNAL DEATHS AND RATES 



Year 


Number of 
Maternal Deathfi 


Maternal 
Death Rate 


1958 


3 


2 


1957 










3 


2 




3 


2 




10 


0.7 





DEATHS OF BOSTON RESIDENTS DUE TO REPORTABLE DISEASES 





1958 


1957 


1956 


1955 


1954 




S 


S 


1 


32 


1 


Diphtheria 






1 


1 


1 


Pulmonary Tuberculosis 


105 


146 


141 




l'J.5 


Typhoid Kever 











""o 





















.'^rarlet Fever 




























3 






* All figures allocated — Boston Residents only. 

Infant Deaths in 1958 

"The infant deaths occurring in 
the City of Boston have been of 
particular concern to the Boston 
Health Department for a period of 
many years. l*'inal return.s for the 
year 1958 pertaining to total l)irth.'^ 
and death.s of infants in the city 
are not now available, and will not 
he for a matter of ten days or two 
weeks. 

"From the data already avail- 
able, it is evident that more than 
two thirds of the deaths which 
occur during the first year of life 
occur during the first week of life, 
and an analysis of these early 
deaths reveals that more than one 
half of such deaths occur before 
the child has completed his first 
day of life. 

"It is (juite evident that ir- 
respective of any precautions which 
might have been used or any care 
which luight have been rendered 
to these infants with our present 
knowledge it would have had no 
influence on the lives of these 
children. 



"However, research is constantly 
being carried on in our maternity 
hospitals and by our pediatricians 
in an effort to determine what may 
be done to prevent .such deaths 
ill the future. 



Council Deliberates Plan 
for Privately Financed 
Project for 800- 
Dwelling Unit in 
Roxbury Section 

The Mayor, on .lanuary 12, sent 
the following communication to the 
City Council: 

Enclosed herewith for considera- 
tion b\; your Honorable Body is 
the land assembly and redevelop- 
ment plan, including summary of 
project costs and financial plan, 
for the Whitney Redevelopment 
Project prepared by the Boston 
l^'devclopment Authority. 

If the redevelopment plan meetvS 
with your ajiproval. a loan order 



to pntvide funds to carry out 
project and a cooperation ag; 
niciit to authorize a transfei 
funds to the Redevelopment > 
thority will be submitted for 
proval. 

Your Honorable Body is familiar 
with the magnitude of the n'<le' 
velopment and renewal problem in 
our city, ami also the imperative 
necfl for providing middle-income 
housing, often referred to as a for- 
gotten group, because of the fad 
that their incomes are above tin 
)((|uirements for public housiim 
while at the same time not suHi- 
cient to afford new privately-con- 
structed housing. 

The sponsors of this project, tlit 
Beacon Redevelopment Corpora- 
tion, are a grouj) of outstanfliim 
citizens of the community with 
more than adequate financial re- 
sources, who have organized this 
corporation to develop run-down 
areas for middle-income liou-ing 
throughout the city. The Whitney 
Street area is the pilot project of 
this group. The cooperation of the 
city in providing funds to clear tiie 
areas and the cooperation of the 
Redevelopment Authority for the 
exerci.st' of the powers of eminent 
domain are necessary in orrler to 
implement the objectives and ac- 
tivities of the Beactm Redeveloji- 
ment Corporation. I believe tins 
is an unusual opportunity for the 
( "ity of Boston and I am wry luucii 
heartened that prominent people 
in the community with resources at 
their command have enough faith 
.and confidence in the future of the 
city and the city government to 
undertake this most worth-wliilc 
objective. 

Your favorable action on this 
proposal is sincerely and urgently 
requested. Enclosed please find a 
copy of a transmitttal from the 
Boston Redevelopment Authority 
in connection with the project. 

Respectfully. 

.1. B. Hvm:s. 

^^(^!/nr. 



Jan. 17 



CITY RECORD 



45 



OLD PROBLEMS AIRED; NEW APPROACHES SUGGESTED 



''Old Problems — New Approju-h- 
es" titled the first of six panels 
which comprised the Tliird Annual 
Conference on Municipal Adminis- 
tration held Xoveniber 20 and 21. 
1958, at the Boston Public Library 
Auditorium, Copley square. Tlie 
conferences were attended by sonic 
350 key city employees. 

Moderator for this panel was 
Gregory B. Wolfe, director of re- 
search. Clreater Boston Economic 
Study Committee. 

The panelists were as follows: 

William J. Bird, executive vice- 
president of the Greater Boston 
Chamber of Commerce, who talked 
on the city's transportation prob- 
lems. 

Oliver "\^^ Park, resident con- 
sultant, ReeA'es & Co.. who dis- 
cussed the city's ecjualization sur- 
vey. 

Donald W. Ciraham, planning 
administrator for the City of Bos- 
ton, whose topic dealt with the 
neighborhood improvement pro- 
grams. 

Fred Smith, vice-president. Pru- 
dential Insurance Company of 
America, who dwelt on Boston's 
outlook for the future. 

EQUALIZATION SURVEY 
By Oliver W. Park 

By prearrangement, the previous 
speaker has incorporated in his 
remarks enough laughs for the two 
of us. So, you will hear no humor 
in this, the first public report oh the 
Efiualization Survey. Those of us 
who live intimately with the assess- 
ing situation in Boston are con- 
stantly reminded that equalization 
in Boston is no laughing matter, and 
I do not wish in any way to divert 
your attention from the seriousness 
of the situation facing us. 

Since taxes are an old and 
everpresent problem, and e(iuali- 
zation is a relatively new approach 
to help .solve the problem, it is 
most fitting that we discuss it on 
this panel. The Equalization Sur- 



This is the second installment 
of the complete report of the 
Thi.-d Annual Conference on 
Municipal Administration which 
will run consecutively in each 
issue of the "City Record" 
through February 14. 



\ey group, which has been studying 
assessments for the past two years, 
has also discovered that it is a 
formidable problem to endeavor 
to set fair and eciuitable values on 
commercial property in Boston. 

]\Iany of you may have assumed 
that all properties are assessed ac- 
cording to a standard formula, at 
their fair market value. But such 
is not the case, in Boston or in 
many other cities and towns in 
every state in the nation. How- 
ever, it may not be as noticeable in 
ether cities where they have addi- 
tional sources of revenue, which 
tend to keep their real estate taxes 
in balance. But I assure you that 
if other cities were obliged to de- 
pend upon a real estate tax as their 
main source of revenue, as does the 
city of Boston, j^our tax rate might 
not suffer so by comparison, and, it 
would not be enjoying its present 
nation-wide notoriety. 

Matter of Fairness 

With the increase in the real 
estate levy, more and more cities 
are turning to equalization to 
insure that the tax burden is shared 
more eciuitably. That is the pri- 
mary purpo.se of eciualization: to 
determine the fair, e((uitable value 
of each property for assessment 
purposes, and to distribute the tax 
burden equitably. 

Also a Tax Stabilizer 

But, man\- civic leaders see 
another useful and more positive 
end. If we can equalize assess- 
ments, and stabilize the tax rate, it 
may lead to renewed confidence in 
Boston's assessments and values; 
this may, in turn, generate in- 



creased investment in real e.state; 
new construction ; modernization ; 
increased business activity, and 
this positive chain of events may 
thereby help ease the tax burden, 
and be of benefit to all. 

Recognizing the need for such a 
pi-ogram, your ]\Iayor and City 
Council inaugurated the Equaliza- 
tion Suivey in the latter part of 
1956. At that time his Honor the 
Mayor set up a Pvcalty Advi-sory 
Committee to pro\'ide top-level 
polic}' guidance for the program. 
This group is comprised of rep- 
i-('s(Mitat i\i's of a number of civic 
gii)up>, iiirhiding the Boston Citi- 
zens Council, the Municipal Re- 
seaich Bureau, the Greater Boston 
Chamber of Commerce, the Retail 
Trade Board, and the Boston Real 
Estate Board. 

The City's Program 

This group has a most important 
role in the successful conduct of 
the sur\'cy and its iniplenieutatiou. 
The men serving on ihis conuuittee 
are not just figureheads. From the 
very beginning they ha\'e taken an 
active part in formulating the pro- 
gram. Now they meet frequently, 
at least once each month, some- 
times more often. They plan and 
follow up the progress of the survey 
very clo.sely; study and discuss mat- 
ters as intensely as iloc- any IWc- 
wire board, and, in a->iuniiig this 
active role, they are rendering a 
real public service. Because they 
are willing to actively participate, 
to function as a working board of 
advisors, we are able to utilize an 
approach which will go far beyond 
"equalization," important as that 
is. But, in acldition, we are provid- 
ing a base for improved assessment 
administration now, and in the 
future. Let me elaborate on this. 

There are two fundamentally dif- 
ferent ways in which a job of this 
kind can be done. First, j'ou ma}' 
bring in an outside technical group 
to perform all of the work in\-olved 
in the eciualization, then turn the 
results over to the assessor and his 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 17 



>i;ilT to iinplciuciit . Or you may 
use your local assessors, under the 
close niouitorship of an outside 
consultant, to do the work of etpial- 
ization and to install the results 
upon completion. There are prcs 
and cons to both approache.s. 
Reeves, over the past thirty years, 
has done the job both ways, but, 
the u.«e of local a.ssessinp; persoimel 
is favored wherever possible, be- 
cau.se there is no better training for 
a.s.se.s.sors than to participate in an 
e(|ualization program, to utilize 
sy.stematic procedures in collecting 
and processing valuation data, to 
employ con.si.stent .standards in ob- 
jectively arriving at e(iuitable a.s- 
ses.sed value.s. Once such values 
have l)een put into effect, the pros- 
pect of keeping them current, is 
much improved if the assessing staff 
has participated in the original task 
of determining ecjualized values. 

Outside Experts 

In Boston, Ave are utilizing the 
ser\ ices of your local assessors, to- 
gether with local office and tech- 
nical staff, all under the direction 
of the Reeves organization. By 
the time our .survey is completed 
your own asse.ssing personnel will 
already be using the systematic 
techniciues and procedures which 
are the very heart of progressive 
assessment administration. This 
apjiroach promises to save you 
valual)le time, time which we all 
recognize is priceless. 

But, let us remember, an ambi- 
tious program of this twofold na- 
ture could not be attempted or 
carried on without the active parti- 
cipation of a group of civic leaders 
capable of serving in cooperation 
with city officials as a working 
board of directors. 

The survey got down to business 
at the end of 1950. At that time, 
the late John Breen, father of the 
survey, ."^elected John Kane, whom 
you all know, to organize and co- 
ordinate the program. 

Oin- first efforts in 1957 were de- 
voted to making .some preliminary 
surveys regarding property classifi- 
cations, valuations, and exemptions. 
We discovered that as!5es.sed value 



was shrinking at an aiarnnng rate. 
In fact, in any city, it is always 
alarming if a.s.se.s.sed value just re- 
mains steady. I'or throughout the 
nation expenditures for city admin- 
istration are increasing and the 
value ba.se must also increa.se to 
off.set the increa.sed expen.ses. 

We also ffisco\ered that exempt 
property was increasing, which 
again is a .serious matter, since the 
costs of .ser\-ices for exempt prop- 
erty must be borne by the taxed 
property. At present, almost 40 
per cent of Boston's real property 
is exempt from taxation. 

Land Values 

We then began the study of land 
values })y conducting an intensive 
rental .survey in the downtown 
area. Because of the changing 
character of downtown Boston, the 
changes which are occurring in land 
u.se and rental rates, it was nece.s- 
sary to accumulate the maximum 
amount of factual rental informa- 
tion po.ssible. This rental data was 
proces.sed through into repre.senta- 
tive rentals, and a pattern of land 
values established, .street by street, 
block by block, for the retail core 
and surrounding areas. This street 
pricing was then applied to each 
parcel, after taking into con.sidera- 
tion such factors as corner influ- 
ence, .side streets, alleys, plottage, 
shape, etc. 

The cornerstone of orderly and 
ecjuitable a.s.sessment administra- 
tion is an accurate description and 
assessment history for each prop- 
erty. This de.scription should be in 
terms of physical data, income and 
expen.se, and .sales information 
where awiilable. 

I'or each property, we are pre- 
paring a Property Record Card, 
such as this, on which we record de- 
tailed information. At the top of 
page 1 1here is a plot plan and an 
outline of the building. At the bot- 
tom, income and expen.se data 
which is u.sed to arrive at an esti- 
mate of the capitalized value of the 
property, (^n page 2, physical data 
regarding the structure are re- 
corded, ba.sed on building records 
and inspection in the field. On 



p:igc ;:! the building i> priced, ilic 
land is priced, and we arrive at an 
estimate of the summarize<l value 
of the whole property. Any compa- 
rable sales data are noted here, also. 
And as a final step in the apprai.sal 
prore.ss, we here correlate the sev- 
eral e.stimates of value into our 
recommended as.ses.sed value. On 
page 4, there will later be entered 
a hi.storv of the actual a.s.sessments. 
Supplementing this })a.sic card is an 
Income .Vnalysis Form, whereon a 
more comprehensive income-ex- 
pen.se analysis is made for complex, 
high-valued propert ies. 

Target for 1958 

Our target for 19.38 is to complete 
this proce.ss for mo.st of the eligible 
parcels in Wards 3, 4, 5, 0, and 21, 
where the bulk of your value is 
concentrated. 

I would like to u.se the few min- 
utes remaining to discuss some of 
the technical problems which we 
are encountering in this, the first 
comprehensive ma.ss apprai.sal of 
real property by uniform stand- 
ards in Bo.ston's .300-year hi.storv. 

Many of these technical problem-; 
have their genesis in that very 
history. For instance, one of our 
more difficult tasks has been in 
.setting eciuitable land values for 
individual parcels in an old city 
which is uni(iue for its crooked, nar- 
row streets, numerous alle\'s, small 
and oddly .shaped lots, and its 
heterogeneous land u.se; lots in most 
ca.ses being improved for encum- 
bered) with obsolescent structures 
which can hardly be replaced in the 
present tax and economic climate, 
i)ut which may operate to depre.ss 
your land values in many areas. 

Because of this and the para- 
doxical phenomenon that, in this 
.situation, it would appear that 
many of the.se older structures may 
represent the highest and best u.se 
of many parcels for an inde- 
terminable future period, the com- 
putation of depreciation is a knotty 
problem. 

Determining Values 

In appraising or a.sse.ssing there 
are three conniionly accepted ways 



Jan. 17 



CITY RECORD 



47 



of determining the value of a prop- 
erty. The first is the cost. What 
did it "cost" to buy the land 
and to build the building? Usually, 
with a newer building, the depreci- 
ated replacement cost is a solid 
indication of value; except that 
since World War II, as you know, 
buildings have been depreciating in 
value, which makes it tough on the 
appraiser or assessor. In Boston 
we are still doing business in build- 
ings erected oO or 100 or 150 years 
ago. Depreciation becomes a big 
(luestion mark under the circum- 
stances, and the cost approach is 
not so reliable a guide to value as in 
other cities, where buildings are 
much more modern, and you have a 
more normal "mix"' of structures 
with respect to age. 

The second approach is the com- 
parative or sales approach. What 
did this property sell for? Or what 
would it sell for, in comparison 
with other comparable properties 
which have sold recently? This is 
a good guide to value with residen- 
tial property, where you have many, 
many sales for comparables. 

Factors Involved 
With commercial-industrial prop- 
erty, the use of sales information is 
not ciuite so simple. First, sales 
are not so frequent ; nor, .second, are 
they so comparable. One office 
building is usually tjuite different 
from other office buildings which 
may have sold recent I3'. Care 
mu.st be exercised in researching 
the financing involved, the relation- 
.ship between the parties to the sale, 
the reasons for the sale, and the 
reasons for the purchase. Then, 
too, in Boston, we must consider 
the a.ssessment and interpret its 
effect on the sale price. This is a 
study in itself, which I shall not be 
able to go into this morning, except 
to mention just one po.ssibilit\' : 
the sale price may be lower than the 
market value because the assess- 
ment is above the market value; 
when the assessment is adjusted 
downward, the property may then 
be worth more than it sold for. 
This is just one of a number of 
such possibilities which we must 



consider here in Boston in evaluat- 
ing sales data. 

Our last approach, I might almost 
say our last hope, is the income 
approach. What rent will this 
property earn? What are the ex- 
penses of operation and ownership? 
What net income will it produce? 
How long will this income continue? 
How stable is the income? How 
stable are the operating expenses? 
How stable are the tax expenses? 
How stable is the net income? What 
capitalization rate is fair and ecjui- 
table for this type of property? How 
does the sale of comparable prop- 
erties relate to the net income? Do 
they sell for five times the net, or 
five and one-half, or six times the 
net income? 

There are lots of ciuestions we 
must ask about the income-expense 
approach; many comparisons we 
must make. But rents are more 
universal than sales and we do have 
either an actual or an economic rent 
for every income property, even 
when we do not have a sale to guide 
us. Therefore, we must rely heavily 
on the capitalization of income 
approach to value, regardless of the 
work invoh-ed. We correlate this 
estimate with the other evidences of 



Boston Has 
142,1S5 Buildings 

The Building Department es- 
timates tliat there is a total of 
142.185 separate buildings with- 
in the city of Boston, as of 
January 1. 1959. 

Of that number, 46.001 build- 
ings are of brick or of other fire 
resistive construction. A total of 
154 buildings of this type of con- 
struction were erected during 
1958, and 456 of the same type 
of buildings were torn down. 

As of Januarj^ 1, there were 
96.185 wooden buildings in the 
city. A total of 454 of these 
buildings were erected during 
1958. During the same year 381 
wooden buildings were torn 
down. 



value to arrive at an e(|ualized value 
of the property. 

Not an Exact Science 
One of the most serious current 
assessing difficulties was pointed 
out in a letter to the editor of a 
Boston newspaper a few weeks ago. 
This writer stated what every 
as-es5or knows only too well: that 
assessing is not an exact science. 
The most we can say is that, 
ideally, it is the .systematic applica- 
tion of comnioii sens:^, using uni- 
form standai'ds, wlici.'ver possible, 
to assurr i'uii,-:-t ■m treatment of 
all properties. In the past, when 
tax rates were lower and assess- 
ments were at only a small fraction 
of full market value, a difference of 
opinion as to the assessed value did 
not have nearly so great a dollar 
impact as it does today. As this 
writer stated it: "When the tax 
rates went into orbit and began to 
compete with Sputnick, the dollar 
differences in assessments moved 
up geometrically, and the fight 
began. " 

Xo other city in America at- 
tempts to raise so much of its 
revenue from a tax on real estate. 
To attempt to do so is to put a very 
great burden on the assessor and 
perhaps to jeopardize the entire 
assessing process. 

Another related difficulty stems 
from the lack of any formal griev- 
ance period in Massachusetts, as is 
common in most assessing jurisdic- 
tions, before the tax roll is finalized. 
The pro\ ision of such a period, dur- 
ing which time the assistant as- 
sessors might discuss proposed 
assessments with the taxpaj^er, and 
receive from the taxpayer such ad- 
ditional information as he might be 
moved to suhiuit, would lead to 
greater accuracy in the assessments 
placed on the roll, and fewer re- 
quests for abatements or ATB 
hearings. 

In closing, I am happy to report 
to you that your city officials and 
bus ness and civic leaders recognize 
that eciualization in Bo.ston is a 
serious, paradoxically diflficult and 
complex series of problems, the 
resolution of which will require the 



48 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. i: 



help and the tcaiiiwoik of many 
Hi()ni)s and individuals. 

Team Work Involved 
That is why I am confident that 
uc arc well on the way to working; 
out a solution to Boston's assessing 
difficulties. At last, there is pul)lic 
recognition of the interrelatedness 
of our se\('ral prol)lems, and I 
helieve that the team efTort I have 
described to you this morning — 
the cooperative working rolation- 
sliip of city officials, assessors, and 
business leaders — is a concrete 
demonstration of a new kind of 
team efTort which is already under 
way. I believe that this, and thi; 
many other promising develop- 
ments which we are considering 
here today, forecast an era of con- 
limiing teamwork at the action 
level which will enable all of us to 
build a Ik'tter Boston. 

THE NEIGHBORHOOD 
IMPROVEMENT PROGRAMS 
B.\ Donald M. Graham 

My sul)ject on this panel, 
"Xeigliborhood Improvement I'ro- 
firams," is one part of urban re- 
newal — a single link in a chain. 

Urban renewal in its broadest 
sense is city rebuilding. It oft'ers 
us the opportunity of making the 
Boston of tomorrow the kind of 
city we want it to be. It involves 
the elimination of buildings an<l 
conditions within the city that 
have become detriments to our 
health, safety, and welfare, that are 
making Boston a i)oorer place, 
rather than a better place in which 
\o live. I'rban renewal involves 
also the correction of decadent con- 
ditions that are correctable, the 
restoration of structures and neigh- 
borluHMls to acceptable standards 
of livability wherever this is pos- 
sible. I'rban renewal means, too. 
the protection and preservation by 
positive action of the many things 
in Boston which are as useful today 
as the day they were built and of 
which we can still l)e .iustly proud. 



Two Important i unctions 

To Use the terms which we hear 
so frc(|Uently t(Mlay. a total urban 
clearance, the reiiabilitation of de- 
clining areas, and the conservation 
of stable areas. 

Or looking at it another way. a 
complete lenewal program for 
Boston must serve two important 
functions. First, urban renewal 
nmst be used to maintain the health 
and vigor of Boston as the central 
city of a metropolitan area and as 
the nerve (enter of New England. 
This renewal of Boston as a re- 
gional center recjuires the elimina- 
tion of obsolete structures, uses and 
conditions; the reversal of obsoles- 
cence through rehabilitation and 
modernization; and the protection 
and conservation of those many 
buildings, activities and amenities 
which have made Boston such a 
favorite city the world around, and 
which are still so vital and so im- 
portant to the city. To serve Bos- 
ton as a place to work and do busi- 
jiess. urban renewal tools must be 
used to improve Boston as a dy- 
namic center for offices, retailing, 
transportation, recreational and 
cultural activities, government, 
edvication and meriicine. 

Although this job is never done 
we are all aware of some encourag- 
ing progress in this directitm. The 
several new office buildings, the 
Prudential Center, the (Jovernment 
Center, the Central Artery and 
Southeast Expressway, the parking 
garages, the New York Streets proj- 
ect, the downtown merchants' ex- 
periments with shopping malls are 
all steps in (he right direction. 

Problem City 

But in our very real concern for 
the future' of downtown Boston, we 
must not overlook the rest of the 
city, for Boston is also a city of 
homes. No renewal ))rogram for 
Boston would be complete, no mat- 
ter how dramatic or exciting some 
of the downtown projects might be. 
unless it provides for the improved 
livability of our neighborhoods. 



A> a place to live, lioston no-, 
ranges from very bad to excellent. 
We have five grades of residential 
renewal program inclu«les shun 
neighborhoods and difTerent re- 
newal treatment is recjuircil for 
each of them. 

At the bt)ttom of the pile we have 
residential areas that are now in 
poor ((mdition and which should 
not remain in residential u.>^e. They 
are areas in whi<h the connnunity 
interest can best be served by de- 
voting that land to other uses ap- 
propriate for Boston — perha|)s 
commercial, perhaps intlustrial. 
perhaps institutional. These areas 
cannot be maintained adefjuately 
a> residential neighborhoods be- 
cause of geographical or other 
physical relationships. It may be 
difficult to provide them with 
schools and other community fa- 
cilities or to remove hazardous 
tlirough-traffic from the streets, or 
to avoid the blighting influences of 
nearby land uses that are not goo<l 
neighi)ors for homes. On the other 
hand, the veiy features that ren- 
der them bad for housing may 
make them particularly well suited 
I'or some other use. The New York 
Streets project is an ex:nn!)le. 

West End Example 

Secondly, we have residential 
neghborhoods that, although they 
are in as ])oor condition as the first 
group, are so situated that they 
can and should remain residential. 
The existing housing in such areas 
is so deteriorated as to re(|uire 
tiemolition and urban renewal to be 
used to provide for new housing 
to replace it. The West End i.s 
but one example of such an area. 

In these worst areas of Bo-ston, 
shun clearance is rcfjuired. Soon- 
er or later, most, if not all, of the 
properties in the.se areas must be 
accniired by the Boston Redevelop- 
ment Authority, the families relo- 
cated, the building.s demolished, 
the site pre|)ared and resold for 
new housing construction or new 
nonresidential investment as the 
case may be. 



JAX. 17 



CITY RECORD 



49 



At tlie other end of the scale or 
(•(indition of residential neighbor- 
IkkkIs in Boston is the stable area, 
the area in which people still like 
to live or to which people would 
like to move if given the opportu- 
nity. ^^'est Roxbury is our best 
( xample. Although such a neigh- 
borhood, like any other, needs pro- 
tection, the problems aren't nearly 
as severe. Drastic governmental 
action is not required and it falls 
largely to the residents themselves 
to watch for the danger signals of 
decline. 

This reference to residents and 
the important part they must play 
in neighborhood protection intro- 
duces a new dimension into tu'ban 
renewal: the part of the private citi- 
zen, the tenant, the property owner. 
In any area in which existing prop- 
erties are to remain in present 
ownership, the owners and occti- 
pants become important partners 
in urban renewal if a project is to 
succeed. 

In the middle range of condition, 
between neighborhoods recjuiring 
extensive clearance on the one hand 
and stable areas on the other, we 
have two more grades of neighbor- 
hoods, each reciuiring different re- 
newal treatment. But in each the 
residents and property owners are 
important partners. 

Marginal Areas 

Just better in condition than the 
areas calling for extensi\'e clearance 
and redevelopment, a third type of 
residential district in Boston is that 
which, although it cannot be con- 
sidered completely deteriorated, is 
slipping badly, and rapidly. These 
are the areas that startle us because 
although they are not sliuiis we 
know they will be if we don't take 
action. Urban renewal in these 
areas must be designed to save as 
much of the existing housing as 
possible, before it becomes slums, 
and to check the spread of blight. 
Central Roxbury is an example. 

In an area which is slipping 
badly, we must still look to the 
Boston Redevelopment Authority, 
not to acciuire and tear down all 
the buildings, but to clean out the 



pockets of slums that have devel- 
oped, to weed out the bad and give 
the good room to breathe. But 
most of the existing properties 
would remain and, hopefully, be 
impro\-ed by their present owners. 
This we call a rehabilitation area. 

The fourth group of residential 
neighborhoods are those still in 
good condition but over which 
looms the specter of blight. They 
are usually on the edge of blighted 
areas and must be oin- first line of 
defense in a stop-tho-hlight move- 
ment. These are the aicas in which 
home owners are growing restless. 
They are beginning to wonder 
whether it is worth the fight; per- 
haps they had better move to the 
suburbs. These are the areas in 
which tenants, cjuite pleased with 
their apartments not too long ago, 
are beginning to think they ought 
to move to a "better neighborhood." 
This kind of neighborhood is just 
beginning to "change." The houses 
are showing their age. Mainte- 
nance is beginning to slip. Over- 
crowding and conversions are be- 
ginning to take place. Its residents 
are beginning to be luieasy about 
its future, even though it certainly 
is not slum, nor even blighted. In 
short it is still a good area; it can 
remain a good place to live for a 
long time to come if we are tough 
enough and smart enough to pre- 
vent blight from getting a foothold. 

The objective in such an area is 
to prevent blight, not ehminate it. 
It is this kind of area for which the 
Neighborhood Impro\-ement Pro- 
gram is designed. It probably isn't 
the oldest area in the city, but it is 
at least middle-aged. It was exten- 
sively built up before we had a 
modern building code or before 
zoning even existed. Many of the 
existing buildings do not meet the 
standards of health, safety, con- 
venience and amenities that we are 
growing accustomed to under to- 
day's conditions of rising standards 
of living. The design of the houses; 
the size of the lots; the condition of 
the streets, schools, and parks; the 
condition of the shopping areas; 
and the amenities of the neighbor- 
hood are substandard according to 



today's desires. Most of these so- 
called substandard conditions are 
not illegal, they just lender the 
neighborhood less desirable than the 
newer siihuilis. They serve to 
accelerate a person's decision to 
move to the newer suburbs. 

But some of these conditions are 
illegal. They became illegal with 
the enactment of the housing code 
in 195(j. The housing code is one 
of the basic tools in our lu-ban re- 
newal kit, for even under the most 
ambitious renewal program we 
couldn't possibly replace all of our 
housing by atti'active modern 
homes, desirable though this might 
be. If we camiot replace our exist- 
ing hotises then we have the choice 
of sitting by and watching them 
deteriorate into skims, or of re(iuir- 
ing them — all existing houses— to 
meet a reasonable minimum stand- 
ard of maintenance, facilities and 
occupancy. If we must live with 
our present housing for a long time 
to come, we must make sin-e, as a 
community, that the people li\-ing 
in this housing will be protected at 
least in minimum fashion against 
detrimental and substandard condi- 
tions, and as a community, we must 
take positive slum prevention steps 
today to avoid perhaps less humane, 
certainly more costly, slum clear- 
ance tomorrow. 

Three=Part Program 

It shapes up then that a Neigh- 
borhood Impro\'ement Program has 
three parts: two parts initiated by 
the city, one part by private citi- 
zens. These three parts are the 
provision of the necessary public 
improvements, the enfoicement of 
codes and ordinances, and the \ ol- 
untary improvement of private 
property by its owners. 

In a middle-aged neighborhood 
most of the streets, utilities, schools, 
parks and playgrounds, the libraiy 
and the fire station may have been 
provided some time ago. Like the 
private properties within the area 
these, too, need rehabilitation, ex- 
pansion, or replacement. This part 
of a Neighborhood Impro^-ement 
Program is therefore the city's re- 
sponsibility: the development and 



CITY RE-CORD 



.Ian 17 



(■;irryiiiji oiil ol ;i >|)ci-ific ])rotii;)in 
of capital impr()V('m('iit.>- (l(■.<i}^ll('<l 
(() make the luvn more attract ixc 
tomorrow than it i.s today. 

Socoiuily. ill ail older ii('inhl)<)r- 
liood we know that \iolntioii.s ot" 
city ordiiiaiicos havo a toiidoiicy to 
creep in. and we know that viola- 
ti()ii.« of the hou.'-ii'p; code, some 
major, mostly minor, exist in many 
of the buildings within .such an 
area. The second element of an 
lmpro\-ement Program is also the 
city's responsibility: the systematic 
enforcement of codes and ordi- 
nances. If the objective is a more 
lival)le, blight-free neighborhood, 
then every owner, every tenant, 
must l)e asked to observe the stand- 
ards, and the enforcement of the 
standards must be done on a door- 
to-door, hou.se-to-house, l)lock-bv- 
l)l()ck basis. 

But what about the most impor- 
tant element of all: the perfectly 
legal but still less than fully satis- 
factory, less than fully attractive 
condition of some of the private 
properties in such an area? Here 
the city has no authority. Here 
only private investment, neighbor- 
h()<)d pride, public opinion, can be 
effective. Here it is up to the resi- 
dents themselves. 

Apathy Is Fatal 

We hear frefjuently that the aver- 
age city dweller is noted for his 
apathy, his lack of interest in his 
neighborhood, his lack of willing- 
ness to cooperate with his neighbors, 
and liecause of this any effort to 
ui)gra(le an old central city neigh- 
borhood is doomed to failure. 
Frankly, wh(>re the property owners 
aiul tenants do remain apathetic, 
uninterested and uncooperative, a 
neighborhood improvement pro- 
gram is doomed to failure. 

But in these neighborhoods for 
which impr()\cment jjiograms are 
appropriate there are many positive 
values. Many residents through 
tlieir church associations, their chil- 
dren in school, their neighborhood 
friendships, the convenience of tlu>ir 
homes to their ])lace of work, or 
for other reasons have a real interest 
in tlie n(«ighl)<)rhoo(l. Many jirop- 



(•rl>- o\\n( r> with hundred.- ol ilicir 
hard-earned dollars invested in their 
property are concerned with the 
stability of their investment. There 
are many churches, with heavy iii- 
ve.stmeiits in physical plant, dedi- 
cated to .serving the people in these 
areas. There are tradesmen and 
bankers who.H- very busine.ss future 
is linked with the future of these 
neighborhoods. Although it may 
not be readily apparent there is a 
great reservoir of interest and con- 
cern on the part of the residents of 
the neighborhood in its welfare and 
in its future. The greatest challenge 
in a neighborhood improvement pro- 
gram is to draw upon this great 
re.>^er\ ()ir and put it to con.structi\ e 
u.se. 

Dorchester Program 

Boston'.s Pilot Neighborhood Im- 
provement Program is now under- 
way in the Mt. Bowdoin-C'odman 
section of Dorchester. Under the 
spon.sor.ship of the city's Urban Re- 
newal Coordinating Committee the 
Planning Board is supervising the 
program. The Public Works and 
Park Departments are scheduling 
their improvements for the area. 
The Health, Building, and Fire 
Departments have their systematic 
enforcement operations underway 
now in the area. The Mayor's 
Dorchester Rehabilitation and Con- 
servation Committee initiated the 
first meetings for residents of the 
area and are sponsoring an advisory 
committee. A steering committee 
of an area citizens' group has been 
functioning since summer and the 
local press has been most coopera- 
tive. 

So far progress has lieen marked 
more by the formation of com- 
mittees than by results, but we are 
learning by doing. If the city 
agencies and the area residents can 
continue to work together and 
learn together in the niterests of 
better neighborhoods, and if other 
sections of the city slated for 
neighborhood improvement can 
profit by the mistakes and knowl- 
edge gained in Mt. Bowdoin-Cod- 
man, the present and future resi- 
dents of the middle-aged neighbor- 
hoods of Boston can be proud of 



llicii addrc,-.- {tii many long year- 
come. 

"EFFORTS TO SOLVE THE 
TRANSPORTATION DILEMMA" 
By William J. Bird 

The problem of metropolitan 
transportation is simply a reflec- 
tion of the commuter's needs and 
desires. 

Whvn there is a head-on collision 
between his apparent needs and 
his apparent desires progress is 
slow and expensive. 

This is the problem that faces 
us today. The experts say that 
the commuter should u.se public 
transit. The commuter wants to 
drive to work. 

Since the commuter is king, let's 
take a look at what he has been 
doing and thinking over the jiast 
century. 

One liundrefl years ago the com- 
muter lived as close a-s possible to 
his place of employment. 

Today he lives as far away as 
])ossil)le, and he expects the state 
to connect his home and work- 
bench by six-lane expressways 
and/or rapid transit lines. 

At the present time in the Bos- 
ton area a six-lane exjiressway will 
cost between S3 and S30 million 
jier mile. The Boston Central 
Artery will cost over SlOO mil- 
lion and was expected to handle 
traffic adequately for the next 
twenty-five years. But already the 
exjierts tell us the artery is pres- 
ently serving traffic volumes above 
its peak cajiacity. 

One hundred years ago the com- 
muter walked to work. Twenty- 
five years ago he walked to tlie 
nearest streetcar stop. Now he 
never walks. He complains that 
train fares are too high at 4 cents 
jier mile so he commutes by car at 
7 cents per mile plus SI. 25 for 
parking. This means he is spend- 
ing over S300 more per year com- 
muting by car rather than by train. 

He knows that the small auto- 
mobile is more practical for com- 
muting and more economical, so 
he purchases a small car — for his 
wile. And you can see large num- 



Jan. 17 



CITY RECORD 



bers of these tiny vehicles out on 
the wide suburban liighways but 
when you come downtown you find 
the commuter driving the longest, 
lowest, and widest available ear 
requiring the widest and most ex- 
pensive expressways. 

Great Need For Auto Space 

At the end of the expressway the 
city must provide a parking space 
which costs as much as the car 
did in the first place. 

Downtown parking spaces fre- 
quently cost as much as $2,500 
per space and the cost is rising. 
Parking fees are rising, too. Some 
of the more desirable spaces down- 
town now cost as much as $2.50 
per day. 

In the summertime the commu- 
ter feels that public transportation 
is not necessary but when the snow 
is on the ground he believes that 
we should have more public trans- 
portation. 

If all those who used pul^lic 
transportation during the winter 
snows used it daily, the ;MTA defi- 
cit would be insignificant and the 
railroads would not be trying to 
get out of the commuter business. 

AVhen the commuter reads that 
a $60 million highway is being 
built, he accepts this as a sign of 
progress, but when he reads that 
a $20 million transit line has been 
proposed, or a $900,000 subsidy is 
being studied, he complains of the 
public extravagance. 

He regards the transit deficit at 
$8 per capita as a l)ackln-eaking 
tax, but he never complains about 
the $15 average highway cost. 

If the commuter continues to 
move further from the city, and 
if we accommodate him with more 
and wider highways to the city, 
and if we build more garages down- 
town, eventually we will destroy 
(a) the downtown area; ib) the 
commuter's place of employment; 
and (c) the commuter. 

Already about half of the down- 
town area is devoted to roads, 
streets, and parking spaces. 

If all the persons who come 
downtown daily by mass transpor- 



tation were to drive, they Avould 
bring an additional 245,000 cars 
into the city, requiring an addition- 
al 49 million square feet of park- 
ing space. Since the total down- 
town area is only 27.8 million 
square feet, one can see that there 
wt)uld be very little left downtown 
except multi-storied i)arking facili- 
ties. Actually, these additional 
cars couldn't get downtown since 
no coml)ination of existing or j^ro- 
posed highways would he remotely 
adequate to transport them. 

Novel Ideas Advanced 

And so the experts warn that the 
commuter must return to transit 
and throughout the nation a num- 
ber of remarkable ideas are being 
considered to cither jolt or compel 
or attract the commuter to pul)lic 
transj-jortation. 

For example: Monorail is a jiro- 
]iosc(i transit system which is sonie- 
tliing of a cross between streetcars 
and guided missiles. A steel beam 
is strung throughout the city like a 
telephone wire and bullet-shaped 
cars proi)elled along tlie beam at 
60 to 80 miles per hour. So far 
there is no monorail operating in 
the country. 

In small cities parking is banned 
from the downtown streets, usually 
with successful results. In Boston 
no radical move has been made, 
but properly so the number of 
street spaces is being .steadily re- 
duced. 

Beyond that is the possible ban 
of all traffic from the downtown 
area. Cars would be parked on 
the fringe and ]ioople would travel 
to tlie downtown civic centers by 
bus or moving sidewalks. 

The city of Fort AVorth has a 
l)lan for such a system. 

Another proposal is to ring the 
city with toll gates to finance 
transportation facilities and to con- 
vert the l)udget-minded commuter 
to public transit. 

Already, traffic from north of 
Boston pays tolls at the bridge and 
the tunnel. If the turnpike is ex- 
tended, traffic from the Avest will 
also be charged tolls. And so this 



conc.ci)t of i)aying a fee to drive 
into the central city is gaining 
ground in Boston. 

Transportation Prospects 

Fortunately, Boston is in a good 
jumping off point for transporta- 
tion improvements. We have al- 
ready constructed one of the best 
transportation systems in the na- 
tion. 

The city is served by three rail- 
road lines and a rapid transit which 
has a total of 250 miles of rail 
serving commuters. 

The yiTX and the three rail- 
roads combined carry over 950,000 
riders ])er day in the Greater Bos- 
ton area. 

Only three cities — New York, 
Chicago, and Philadelphia — have 
more rail facilities. And each of 
these is a much larger city. 

Suppoi'ting the transit system is 
a master highway system calling 
for 152 miles of six- and eight-lane 
exi)ressways. Almost half of the 
system has been completed to date. 
This includes Route 128 and the 
Central Artery, both of which are 
models of good expressways. 

These highways were primarily 
designed to relieve traffic conges- 
tion. A very healthy and unfore- 
seen side eft'ect of these arteries is 
their im]iact on the location of new 
industrial and commercial con- 
struction. Route 128 has become 
a national cxamjile of the economic 
development which can result from 
the construction of new arteries: 
150 new plants; 10,000 new jobs. 

Since AA'orld A\ ar II Boston has 
built 6,000 parking sjiaces with an- 
other 1,790 under construction to- 
day. 

Desjiito these ach-ances we con- 
tinue to lir ]il;mui'd by traffic con- 
gestion caused by an increasing 
population, changes in living hab- 
its, changes in technology, and, as 
I i)ointcfl out before, the difficulty 
of reconciling the apparent desires 
and the apparent needs of the com- 
muter and translating these needs 
and desires into firm iiublic policy. 
Recommended Policies 

In order to continue our record 
of transportation progress for the 



CITY RECORD 



.Ian 17 



iii(tr()|)nlitaii area tlic CliaiiilHT 
iccdiniiicnds tlii'sc policies: 

1. Tlic iinpnivfiiicnt (if the resi- 
dential neitfhl>(irli<t<i<ls in Boston 
tlirouuli tlie process of urban re- 
newal in order to retain the middle- 
class population and thus reduce 
the enormous amoiuit of time and 
money recpiired for connnutation. 

2. Tlie recognition that all of 
us are part of a metropolitan com- 
munity to which we have definite 
responsihilities. Hifjhways and 
transit lines travel through a num- 
ber of connnunities. It is not 
sible to construct the optinuun fa- 
cilities unless the conumniities can 
afjree on the systems they need 
and are willin<!: to support. 

ill) Acce])tance of metropolitan 
responsibilities is indicated by the 
formation of the Area Advisory 
("oimcil of 17 Chambers of Com- 
merce from the different cities and 
towns which are now working to- 
gether on transportation matters. 

{b\ This year 38 connnunities 
from Boston to Cape Cod formed 
a transportation district to begin 
partial financing of and i)lanning of 
conunuter facilities south of the 
city. 

(ri Our most pressing need in 
this field is the establishment of a 
metropolitan planning council com- 
prising the governmental leaders 
in this area. 

3. We nuist determine what 
role, if any. tlie railroads can play 
in connnutation. If the railroads 
are to continue to serve us. new 
e(|uipment. new schedules, and ])os- 
sibly public subsidies would be re- 
r|uire(i. 

4. The rapid transit system to- 
ilay l)egins downtown but does not 
extend far enough out to reach the 
mass conmiuter market. Exten- 
sions such as the Highland Brancli 
exti-nsion to Route 128 are neces- 
sary. 

'). Transit finances must be 
stal)ilized through the extension of 
service and the increase of income 
and the modification of regulations. 

Ui\ StudeiU fares. 

(6t Number of guards. 

(rl Allocation of deficit. 



(). To (oiiiiilctc our highway 
system we nee(| an iimer belt route 
encircling the downtown Boston 
area. Tliis is now a primary issue. 

7. The parking jjrogram must 
be continued and extended. 

8. KfTective traffic controls must 
be accepted by the public, and I 
refer specifically to the towing law. 
to the need of higher traffic fines, 
and jtedestrian control measures. 

Education Needed 

To advance this ))rogram we 
need a continuous ])rocess of com- 
muter education. The Chamber 
and other civic organizations must 
assume responsibility for educating 
the conunuter of today anfl by edu- 
cating tomorrow's comnuiter — 
not only to the point of .supporting 
sound i)olicy on transportation, 
but also to the general responsibili- 
ties to the metropolitan conunu- 
nity. and to the new role of crea- 
tive citizenship in a dynamic met- 
ro|)olitan community. 

NEW APPROACHES 
By Fred Smith 

I like to think I am here today as 
a sort of friend of the family, and 
what I ha\ o to .«ay i.s for discus.sion 
purpo.ses and not in the nature of 
criticism. The fact is that we have 
had more complication.s and more 
hurdles in comiection with our Bos- 
ton project than we ever dreamed 
could exist in any one area. How- 
ever, we ha\ e ha(l more cooperation, 
more shoulders to the wheel, than 
we have e\er found, in any area, 
before. 

A new and more prosperous Bos- 
ton is ahead, but it is not coming 
about .--wiftly or ea.sily. It will be a 
long uphill struggle against old and 
well-established odds, as well as all 
the new problems that face every 
iwban area. The oidy really dan- 
gerous i)otential is that you will let 
the.se hurdles ,so color your outlook 
that you yourself will lo.se patience 
and gi\-e up. In the past we have 
all .seen reported in publications 
that .some of your civic leaders be- 
li(>\-e Boston is done, finished, 
washed uj). I haven't ."•een any of 
that lately. 



.M;iiiy iih'.iniing cluirges ;ire ni; '; 
against this area; for example, tl 
Ma.s.si«chu.setts' industrial growtl. 
not keeping pace with the nati. 
that employment is growing i. 
rapidly in Ma.s.sachu.setts than 
the nation; that higher tax(- 
which add to the cost of doing bii 
ne.s-^ — are causing Ma.s.s;>cliusett.-,' 
ndustries to look el.-ewhere for 
ixpansion; and that the Massachu- 
setts Legislature has nm up one of 
the highest state debts in the nation. 
The.se are facts. It would app< 
that any one of them would b< 
good rea.son for building Brudeni 
Center, or anything like it. son 
where out.side of Boston or M 
.sachu.setts. 

Yet we have faced all the.se {v.< 
and Prudential Center, at thi- 
writing, is still in Boston. I mu.st 
admit that the ice gets a little thin 
at times, but .somehow it never 
(|uite breaks. 

Prudential Problem* 

These are general problems. But 
for anyone bringing a new. income- 
producing enterpris<> to Boston, 
there are many other problems. A 
gomi part of Bo.ston is filled land, 
and this re(|uires all .sorts of expen- 
sive engineering projects. We found 
we had to go down nearly 2(K) feet 
in places to reach rock and when 
we fovmd it, it was more or le.ss 
standing on end, so I don't know 
what kind of a footing it will allow. 
There are strange and wonderful 
restrictions in deeds that were put 
there about the time of the Boston 
Tea Party and are still there. 
Building code.s are hopelessly out- 
dated in many ways, but binding 
nou!? the less. For example, we have 
to build much the same kind of a 
fire wall l)etween the unburnable 
outer skirt of our buildings and the 
inner fireproof walls as was re- 
(juired when we had hoi-secars in the 
streets and cow.-? on the Common. 
What is even more perplexing is 
that the old c(Kle re(|uires no fire 
wall backing up a gla.ss window; but 
if the gla.ss is cpacpie instead of 
transparent, you need the fire wall. 
Since the entire skin of our main 
building will Ise a combination of 



■Jan. 17 



CITY RECORD 



opaque and transparent glass, we 
are caught sfiuarely in the middle, 
and we will have fifty-two stories of 
the most punctured and purposeless 
fire wall in history. And even 
the most progressive administration 
can't waive some of these outlandish 
restrictions because Boston, mere 
than most other cities, is se\'erel,v 
circumscribed by the Legislature in 
many building regulations and other 
normal city responsibilities. I have 
heard it said that onl}' Washington, 
D. C. has less autonomy. 

Boston Effort Evident 

So what we have is a state that is 
publicized as going downhill, and 
a cit.y that is old; its structures 
obsolescent, inefficient, and diffi- 
cult to replace; its taxes terrible; its 
streets too narrow; its traffic im- 
possible. Most older cities are 
similarly cursed, but at least 3'ou 
have plans, and people willing and 
capable of carrying them out, and 
a mayor and an administration that 
goes far beyond the normal call of 
dut}^ to encourage people like the 
Prudential to conquer the hurdles. 

As long as Boston is able to con- 
quer defeatism, almost anything is 
possible in time; and one way to 
protect against defeatism is to 
refuse to succumb to statistics. 
You're a dead duck if you listen to 
the numbers and don't do a hard- 
headed job of interpretation. 

On any statistical basis, for 
example, industrial and economic 
growth in these parts seems hope- 
less. The figures look terrible: 
manufacturing is up 500 per cent 
in the South, 700 per cent in the 
West; personal income is up 411 
per cent in the South, 450 per cent 
in the West, while in this area, 
almost all the figures seem ridicu- 
lously small in comparison. But 
the comparison is colored by the 
fact that the South and the West 
started with virtually nothing in 
the way of industry, so develop- 
ment there appears to be even 
greater than it is. 

Moreover, when a textile mill 
moves south from Massachusetts 
and, say, takes 5,000 jobs with it, 
we have an alarming statistic. But 



how much potential leaves Massa- 
chusetts with that industry? Any- 
one who is making a substantial 
investment in any section of the 
country must consider potential, not 
just what is happening there at the 
moment. During recent years, some 
older and well-established indus- 
tries, big as they are, have not been 
noteworthy for their (-ipacity to 
expand and create wealth and de- 
ve\op new jobs. Some of them, like 
Boston itself, have been so long in 
one place that obsolescence and 
traditional practices ha\-e grown up 
around them and are sapping their 
strength. Moving, and thus being 
forced to create modern, efficient sur- 
i-oundings, may be the best thing 
that ever happened to them. When 
you lose one of these industries, 3'ou 
do indeed lose an asset of some 
dimensions and a statistic of sub- 
stantial proportion-s — but the new 
and younger industries you are 
getting will prove to be e\-en more 
of an asset. 

New Replaces Old 

Apparently it is primarily the 
older businesses that have moved 
away. Chemical, electronics, and 
research businesses are moving in. 
Certainly, they don't fill the statis- 
tical gap, they don't always bring 
5,000 jobs with them, nor do they 
always have the financial assets of 
an old-established mill with millions 
in\-ested in concrete, mortar, and 
machinery. But these new busi- 
nesses, even the smaller ones in all 
probability, bring with them a 
small slice of the future. These are 
businesses with their whole lives 
ahead of them, businesses that will 
play a key part in the developing 
pattern of our civilization. 

The fact that employment is 
growing less rapidly in Massa- 
chusetts than in the nation may 
be simply another facet of the 
changing picture. In some cases, 
you replace 5,000 workers with 
"fewer salaried (>mployees who have 
high per capita earning capacity 
— with the result That vvew though 
there are fewer employees, over- 
all personal income figures are 
not suffering in proportion to em- 



ployment statistics. Where this is 
the case, mass employment is cer- 
tainly not the index of a sound 
economy. It is conceivable that 
many older industries, employing 
thousands of people, could mo\'e 
out of Massachusetts and if re- 
placed by certain other industries, 
employing far fewer, but perhaps 
more highly skilled, people, Massa- 
chusetts would be economically 
sounder for it in the end. This is 
not to imply that less skilled people 
are necessarily poorer citizens than 
the more highly skilled; but rather 
that modern industries have a tend- 
ency to lift the skills of their em- 
ployees by eliminating the drudgery 
jobs, and this makes a better 
economy. 

Let's not, however, on this basis 
invite all heavy employers to mo\-e 
on, and make way for new growth 
industries. The point is that when 
these large employers move, the 
effect on employment statistics (so 
long as large serious unemployment 
doesn't result) and any statistical 
dip in industrial assets, may prove 
to appear a great deal worse, in the 
long run. than the actual disloca- 
tion of the economy, so long as new 
and growing businesses with a 
higher percentage of more skilled 
employees keep coming to Boston 
and to ]\Iassachusetts. There is 
certainly nothing wrong with im- 
porting brains and improving skills. 

Everything we can find indicates 
that these businesses are continuing 
to come to Boston and to Massa- 
chusetts. It may take a lot of time 
for these businesses to create a 
sizeable statistic, but we don't be- 
lieve it will take too many years for 
them and their persoimel to create 
an important future for Boston. 
Boston's High Taxes 

Boston's high taxes can't be 
laughed off. However, it doesn't 
make sense simply to charge this 
up to inefficient city administra- 
tion or even to faulty tax collecting, 
which seems to be the tendency. 
One reason for high taxes is the 
obsolescence of so much of the city, 
and nothing is so expensi^•e as 
obsolescence. It is iiulicated, tor 
example, that your projected new 



CITY RECORD 



.T\x. 17 



('lt\- IImII will soiiictlilliK like 

si;{").0()() :i ypar in charges now 
arisiiiM; out of ohsolescciicc and in- 
efficiency ill this one structure 
Another reason for hi^h taxes is 
tliat the very people who are being 
hurch-ned l)y llieni are calling for 
and even voting into existence new 
appropriations that will directly 
and indirectly increase taxes. No 
n»att(>r how justifiable or necessary 
these appropriations may be, no- 
body can pay the bill but the tax- 
l)ayer who votes for them. This 
situation, of course, is not peculiar 
to iio.ston. With federal taxes the 
highest they have ever been, and 
tax complaints more profuse than 
at any time in history, public pre.s- 
svues "encouraged the last se.ssion of 
Congress to appropriate far more 
monev for far more jirojects than 
ever "before. In Washington, as 
well as in Boston, it is customary to 
compel the government to spend 
money; then blame the officials for 
doing it . Mdmund Burke once said : 
"All that is necessary for the forces 
of evil to win the world is for 
enough good men to do nothing."' 
We might paraphrase that by .say- 
ing: "All that is necessary for the 
count rv to go l)ankrupt is for 
enough voters to blame the wrong 
IK'ople for the j^light they bring on 
themselves. " 

Still another reason for high 
taxes is that Boston has more 
n()ntaxal)le educational institutions 
than any other city in the country, 
and because they are so successful 
these nontaxable organizations have 
a great and growing need for addi- 
tional r(>al estate. Some day. that 
situation is going to have to In- 
faced .s(|uarely. Boston has every 
right to be proud of its educational 
institutions, but this pride is grow- 
ing exceedingly exiK'iisive. 'Fhe 
contribution that the.-<e institutions 
make is recogni/.(>d tluoughout the 
nation, and throughout the world 
for that matter, l)ut Boston pays 
an out sized .>*hare of the bill. 

Of course, this is not a total loss 
(o Boston. Some of the finest, 
most progre.ssive and ablest old 
liostonians I have met are men who 
galloped in from places like Toca- 



tello. Idaho, attended Har\anl. or 
.M.I.T. or Boston University, and 
never went home. The considerable 
value of liaving .sueh people stay in 
Bostr)!! is difficult to a.s.«ess; but 
nevertheless, the financial problem 
of ha\ ing .so large a part of Boston 
tax-free is a neat one that has no 
ready e(|uitable .solution. Certainly 
you can't levy taxes against non- 
profit educational institutions, they 
iiave a hard enough time as it is. Is 
it po.ssible that .some day the federal 
government might help subsidize 
the tax rolls of cities to compensate 
for .such worthy tax-free institu- 
tions, which .serve the nation as 
well as the local community? 

Special Tax ArranKcmcnts 
Finally, on the subject of taxes. 
I would like to mention our own 
tax arrangement with the city. 
This, as you know, was negotiated 
on the front pages of the newspapers 
and with the affirmation of your 
leading cix ic groups. An effort was 
made in designing this arrangement 
to make it grow, from the stand- 
point of income to the eity, as the 
project approached profitability. To 
be sure, it is a different arrange- 
ment from one which u.ses brick and 
mortar co.sts as a base — but on the 
other hand it i.sn't as different as it 
looks. N'aluation should be a 
mea.sure or indication of market 
\alue rather than construction cost 
on any newly-built project, and on 
this basis our project will have very 
little value for many years to come; 
but the construction cost will be 
enormous. On the other hand, 
when it has had a chance to become 
profitable, and accordingly does 
liave a market value, ta.xes will 
reflect this changed situation. I 
want to point this out here becau.se 
— as I have said— the real enemy of 
])rogre.ss in Boston is obsolescence. 
It would be difficult or inijjossible to 
asse.ss the waste in busines.ses, in- 
dustries, retail e.stabli.shments, and 
the city itself that comes as a result 
of ob.'^olete and inefficient buildings 
and facilities. Nobody knows how 
many businesses would move to 
Boston if there were efficient 
places to h()u.<e them, because Bo.s- 



ton i.^ Irom many jxtiiits of \iew a 
strategic and gratifying place to lie. 
But never forget this: without a tax 
arrangement that is geared to the 
financial stability of this project, 
rather than construction costs or 
some other fixed ba.-^e. Prudential 
Center simply could not lie built in 
Boston, nor can the other worth- 
wliile projects sf) badly needed. 
Competition Among Cities 

So the problem is clear: Boston 
must ha\ (' new buildings, new con- 
st ruction, new enterprises. To get 
them will retpiire a method of taxa- 
tion that will encourage the inve.-.t- 
ment of funds for new projects, and 
thi.s is not at all unu.sual — Boston's 
competitor cities have been doing it 
for years. After that, comes deter- 
mination on the part of community 
leaders, and that is well in hand. 
You need a start — and you have 
that — with Prudential, with other 
new buildings, with the determina- 
tion of real estate people to give you 
.some good apartment hou.ses. and 
with the city's own construction 
plan.s. Another recjuirement is im- 
proving aece.«s to and from the 
urban area, and this .^eerns to be 
well on the way. You need facili- 
ties to attract people, and place.s 
to put people after they get here, 
and you will take a long step toward 
that with the Convention Hall and 
the projected new hotel. You need 
an acti\e and effective Chaml)er of 
Commerce, and you have that. 

But most of all you need civic 
leadership, working hand-in-hand 
with the city government, in a 
.sound, energetic and determined 
effort to get things done. If you 
have that — and to the extent that 
you have it — you can count upon 
finding new .solutions to any prol>- 
lem, new or old, that comes along. 
Boston's problems now are prob- 
lems of transition; rebuilding it.^^elf 
and learning to operate more effi- 
ciently, and finding ways to keep a 
respectable .set of books while doing 
it. This can't l)e done with mirrors. 
It can only be done with work and 
dedication and ingenuity. They 
are the only "new" solutions I can 
think of. and they are the oldest in 
the world. 



Jan. 17 



CITY RECORD 



POLICE DEPARTMENT ORDERS 

Jaimary 7. 
General Order Xo. 367. 
The following-named persons are here- 
by reinstated in this department and are 
assigned to divisions stated, etfective 
Wednesday. January 7, 1959, at 7.45 
o'clock A.M.: 
Edward F. Donahue. Division 1". 
John F. Petitti, Jr., Division 17. 

January 7. 
General Order Xo. -iOS. 

Acting under provisions of chapter 32. 
section 7. as amen(l( d (State-Boston Re- 
tirement Sv,~rtiii). ih. Boston Retire- 
ment Boani ha- ;i]iprii\ , d for retirement 
the following-naiiii d ixjlice officer, effec- 
tive as of Wednes(hiy. December 31. 
1958. at the close of bii>iness. 

In view of this operation of law. after 
December 31, 1958. the said police officer 
shall no longer be an acti\-e member of 
this department, and it is hereby ordered 
that its records be so amended. 

Patrolman Henry F. Brogan, Bureau 
of Criminal In\estigation. 

January 7. 
General Order Xo. 369. 

The following transfers are hereby 
ordered to take effect on Thursday, Jan- 
uary 8, 1959, at 7.45 o'clock .\.m.: 

Capt. John J. Cunniffe, from Division 
9 to Division 10. 

Capt. Dennis F. Dalton, from Division 
15 to Division 9. 

Capt. William D. Donovan, from 
Bureau of Criminal Investigation to Di- 
vision 15. 

January 7. 
General Order Xo. 370. 

Patrolman Thomas J. Kelly, Jr.. of the 
Crime Prevention Bureau, detailed to 
Division 11, and Patrolmen Samuel M. 
Range and Richard J. O'Meara of the 
Crime Prevention Bureau, detailed to 
Division 10, are hereby commended for 
the performance of meritorious police 
duty and each is granted three days' ad- 
ditional vacation. 

During the month of May, 1958. as a 
result of coming in contact with juve- 
niles in the Dorchester area who had in 
their posso-ion obscene photograph^, 
the ju\"eniie ofHccrs of the Crime Pre- 
vention Bureau instituted an intensive 
investigation to determine the source of 
supply in an effort to protect the school 
children of Boston from this influence. 
Juvenile Officer Thomas J. Kelly con- 
tinued the investigation throughout the 
.summer months in cooperation with 
other juvenile officers which culminated 
in the month of December, 1958, with 
the knowledge that these obscene photo- 
graphs were being sold to school children 
throughout the city and were originating 
in the Roxbury area. 



On December 17. 1958, Ju\ ciiile (Jthcers 
Thomas .1. Kelh', 8aiiiurl M. H;in}ri', and 
Richard J. O'Meara, as a result of fhe 
in\'estigation. went to the Minil Man 
Car Wash, No. 1234 Tremont street, 
Roxbury, v.-here they arrested an em- 
ployee. Robert F. Lynch, 25 years, mar- 
ried. No. 656 Himtington a\-enue, Rox- 
bmy. for the illegal sale of obscene 
photographs. At the saim time tlie nt- 
ficers searched his locki r :it th. li.,-- oi 
business and found humln'l- 'ii (.li-i-cne 
photogiaphs plus obscene Ini iatun which 
they seized for e\'idence. The officers then 
went to the home of Lynch at No. 656 
Htintington a\'enue, Roxbury, whereupon 
searching the premises, they found and 
seized a camera, printing eciuiimient, 
hundreds of obscene photographs and 
also ncgati\"es of obscine pictures. At 
the time of interrogation, L>ncli admit- 
ted that he had sold the pictures lo 
minors using the car wash as a base of 
operations. 

As a result of information obtained from 
Lynch as to his source of supply, the 
abo\ e officers went to Cambridge, where, 
witfi the assistance of the Cambridge 
police, they went to the home of one 
George B. Saford, 53 years, married. No. 
13 Acorn street, Cambridge, where, armed 
with a search warrant, the officers seized 
a large number of negatives of obscene 
pictures plus a large amount of obscene 
photographs. Due to the fact that Saford 
was not at home at the time, no arrest 
was maile. 

Furthering the in\'estigations, the of- 
ficers arrested for the offense of selling 
obscene pictures to childi'en, Eilward 
William.-, 31 years. No. 76 Hollander 
street, Roxbury, another employee of the 
Minit ^\lan Car Wash, and after a 
search of his home, seized hundreds of 
so-called "strip tease" photographs of a 
Japanese girl which he had been selling 
to school children for $1 a set. 

The officers, again upon further inves- 
tigation, arrested for the offense of hav- 
ing in his possession with intent to ex- 
hibit obscene pictures, Rus.sell B. Worley, 
53 years, single, Emerson Hotel, Colum- 
bus a\enue, Roxburv. 

On December 18, 1958, George Saford, 
53 years, married. No. 13 Acorn street, 
Cambridge, surrendered to the abo\-e 
officers at the station and upon arraign- 
ment in the Roxbury District Court, he, 
witli the other three defendants, had 
tfieir cases continued until January 2, 
1959, at which time Robert F. Lynch 
was found guilty of printing obscene 
pictures, indefinite term to Concord, 
suspended; selling obscene photogi'aphs, 
$500 fine; contributing to the delinquen- 
cy of a juvenile, placed on file and, due 
to the fact that at the time of his ar- 
rest a warrant was outstanding for a 
violation of the terms of his parole on an 
unarmed robbery charge, he was then 
surrendered to the Concord Reformatory. 

Edward Williams was found guilty of 
selling obscene photographs to minors 



and reci'i\rcl one >i'ar in the House of 
('(trKcfion, suspended, placed on proba- 
tion lOi- t\\(j \i'ais. 

Russell B. Worley was found guilty of 
possession of obscene photogi':i]ilis with 
intent to exhibit and received six mom lis 
in the House of Correction, su.-pend(d. 
and placed on probation for one year. 

George Saford was found guilty f)f 
printing obscene photographs with intent 
to exhibit them and rec(.'i\-e(l one year 
in the House of Correction, suspended, 
and placed on probation for two years. 

The Police Commissioner is pleased tu 
recognize the (le\-otion to duty and the 
efficient ])olice work performed by tfiese 
officers wlio, by fh(>ir alertness and keen 
obser\-ation, together with their intelli- 
gent and successful in\-est igation, brought 
about the ai'rest of these four nefarious 
criminals. 

January 7. 
General Order No. 371. 

Patrolman Josejih M. Connolly of 
Di\-ision 13, on detail to Di\-ision 17, is 
hereby commended for the jierformance 
of meritorious jiolice duty and is grantetl 
three days' atiditional vacation. 

On Friday, January 2, 1959, at about 
2.30 .'^.M., while making examination of 
the buildings on his route, the attention 
of Patrolman Jo.seph M. Connolly was 
drawn to an open window about 8 feet 
from the ground on a side entrance 
leading from an alleyway off Washington 
street, at the Municipal Building, 6 
Cummins Highway, Roslindale. Beam- 
mg his flashlight, the officer made careful 
inspection and ob.served that the window 
apparently had been forced by means of 
a tool. Without hesitation. Patrolman 
Connolly entered the building by balanc- 
ing himself on a 3-foot ledge and raising 
himself up and through the ojien win- 
dow. On hearing a metal noise emanat- 
ing from a basement floor, the officer, 
with ,ser\-ice re\-oh-er drawn, quietly and 
cautiously made his way to the front 
section of the building, descended a 
flight of stairs and surprised and appre- 
hended two men endea\-oring to pry 
open a metal container with a crowbar. 

These subjects, John J. Ward, Jr., 34 
years, married, 214 West Fifth street, 
and Frederick R. Knapp, 25 years, single, 
750 East Broadway, both of South Bos- 
ton, were ordered by the officer to face 
a wall with both hands upward on the 
wall and both legs spread. After search- 
mg his ]3risoners. Patrolman Connolly 
marched them out the front door to a 
police signal box, summoned a.^sistance 
and delivered both criminals to Station 

Patrolman Connolly returned to the 
building and found and seized a large 
a.ssortment of burglarious tools, includ- 
ing an electric drill with two bits, a pinch 
bar, large wrecking bar, a chisel, and the 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 17 



cmwhar Ix inn n^' il l>>' 'ii<' wlieu 
iiliprchondod. 

t^ucslioniiiK of tlic prisonors di-^-loscd 
tliat, liavintj in mind that tlio Registry 
of Motor Vfliiclcs liad rfcontly opened 
a liraiicli oflice in llie Ko--linilale Miinici- 
(lal HuildinK, they anticipated tliat a large 
sum of money was doublles.s reeeivod 
an<l i)()ssil)ly held there, after aeeom- 
modaling the flow of registration ai)pli- 
( Ml ions for the new year. 

Investigation revealed that both pris- 
oners had criminal records dating bat'k 
to ju\('nile days, one of them having 
served a term in the Federal Penitentiary 
at Chillicothe, Ohio, for armed robbery; 
I lie other, two .sentences for breiiking 
and entering. 

On Saturday, January 3, 1959, Ward 
and Knapp were arraigned in West Rox- 
biiry District Court on charges of break- 
ing and entering in the nighttime the 
above building, and i)ossession of burglar- 
ious tools. A sum of money taken in 
the building and found on one of the 
|)risoners was used as evidence. Judge 
Daniel Ca.s(>y after a hearing ordered 
botii held in $5,000 double surety for the 
grand juiy. 

The Police Commissioner is plea.sed 
to recognize the courageous disiilay of 
initiative on the part of Patrolman Con- 
nolly who, in the face of grave personal 
danger, sought out the.se subjects and 
singlehandedly elTected their arre.st. The 
manner in which lie performed his duty 
in this case is in the highest tradition 
of fine i>olice work. 

January 9. 
General Order .Vo. Sli. 

Patrolmen Thomas P. Kineavy and 
.lolm T. McCdinehey, Division IS. are 
hen'by commc-nded for the performance 
of meritorious police duty, and each is 
granted three davs' additional vacation. 

On Sunday, December 28, 1958, at 
about 7 P.M., Patrolmen Kineavy and 
Mc(ilinehey, a.ssigned to radio patrol car 
dutv, heard the sound of breaking gla<s 
from the rear of Malina's Market, 1290 
Hyde Park avenue. Hyde Park. Th.- 
otficei-s immediately investigated and ob- 
served two boys jumping from the roof 
of the building to the ground, where a 
third boy was waiting. The three boys 
then Hed and after a chase of about two 
blocks the oHiceis apprehended Ravmond 
Hart let t, 16 years, of 164 Hyde Park ave- 
nue, and Jo.seph C^uartarone, 1,") veai-s. of 
SO Williams avenue. Hyde Park. The 
third bov. William Richards, 1,1 years, of 
1.-) Ml. Pleasant .-treet, Hyde Park, es- 
caped over a fence but was later brought 
to Station 18 by his father. 

Upon (luestioning, the boys confessed 
to breaking and entering the above store 
bv icmoving a pane of gia.ss from the 
.-k>light. and removing s(>ven six-can 
c.irlons of beer, three half pints of wine, 



four carioU' of cigan lit ami $7 in c.i^li. 
all of which was recovered by Patrolmen 
Kineavy and McCilinchey. .\ffer further 
questioning and investigation. Hartlett. 
a parolei' of the Lyman School, admitted 
implication in eleven other breaks re- 
cently taking place on Division 18. 

In the We.st Roxbury District Court 
on January 2, 1959. before Judge Daniel 
Casey, Richards and Quartarone were 
charged with the above breaking and en- 
tering and larceny committed on Decem- 
ber 28, 19.58, were found (U linquent and 
given suspended sentences to the Youth 
Service Hoard. Raymond Hartlett was 
charged with the above crime; breaking 
and entering six store.s on River street, 
near Maltapan square, Mattapan, on De- 
cember 13, 1958; and breaking and enter- 
ing five stores on Ri\er street, near 
Wood avenue, Hyde Park, on December 
15, 1958; found (lelinquent on all twelve 
counts and .sentenced to the Youth Serv- 
ice Hoard. 

The commissioner is plea.sed to recog- 
nize the alertness of Patrolmen Kineavy 
and McCilinchey in their apprehension 
of the.se three juveniles in the act of 
burglarizing a store and in their subse- 
quent invesigation which resulteii in the 
sohing of eleven other such crimes in 
that district. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT ORDERS 

January 13. 
CeiHral Order .Vo. /. 
I. Retirement. 
The following retirement, in accord- 
ance with section 7, chapter 32 of the 
Cieneral Laws, which became etTective as 
of 8 .A.M., October 22, 1958. is hereby an- 
nounced : 

Fire Fighter Paul J. DeRosa. Engine 
Company 28. 

Fire Fighter DeRosa was appointed to 
the department on September- 26, 1945. 
and he leaves the department with the 
best wishes of his associates. 

n. TllANSFEKS. 

The following transfers, which will be- 
come effective at 8 .\.M., Wednesday, 
January 14. 19.59. are hereby announced: 

Fire Fighter Thomas E. Donlan, from 
Engine Company 43 to Engine Company 
16. 

Fire Fighter John P. McLaughlin, from 
Fire Prevention Division to Ladder Com- 
pany 6. 

Fire Fighter Jcseph P. Murray, from 
Fire Prevention Division to Engine 
Company 32. 

Fire Fighter Gerald L. Murphy. I'roni 
Ladder Company 10 to Ladder Com- 
pan>- 11. 

Fire Fighter Joseph P. T. McNeil, 
from Engine Company 22 to Engine 
Stiuad n. 



HI. FlHK .Xl.AK.M lio.\t.S DiStONTIMl 

The following fire alarm box has b. 
removed from .service and discontinu 
permanently : 

12-1563. Mechanics Building. Huntii _ 
ton aypnue. 

Company commanders will delete i 
above box from a.s.signment cards i- 
from circuit card No. 7. 

IV. Ch.axge in Assignment. 

Company conuiianders shall make th(> 
following change in a.ssignment cards to 
become effective at 8 .a.m., Wednestlav, 
January 14. 1959: 

Hox 221: 

1st Alarm, add Engine 37 to fire. 
2nd Alarm, add Engine 41 to Engine 
37. 

3rd Alarm, drop Engine 37 to fire; add 
Engine 41 to fire. 

3rd Alarm, drop Engine 41 to F^ngine 
37. 

4th Alarm, add Engine 55 to fire. 

V. Change in Boston Aitomatic 
Assignment. 

Company commanders shall make the 
following change in assignment on Bos- 
ton Automatic Fire Alarm Division run- 
ning cards in this department: 

Signal 1649. drop Engine 16; a<ld En- 
gine IS. 

W. HosTfiN Al TO.M.ATir A.sskjnment. 
Company commanders shall add the 
lollowing signal numbers to running 
cards of the Boston Automatic Fire 
.\larm Division in this department : 

1784. 56 Ashley street, St. Lazarus' 
Youth Center, ba.sement. 

1785, 56 Ashley street. St. Lazarus' 
Youth Center, first floor. 

Apparatus to respond: Engine 56, Lad- 
der 21. Di.strict Chief 1. Nearest box 
6242. 

^TI. C.ANrELL.ATION OF A. D. T. SiGN.ALS. 

Letters have been received from the 
American District Telegraph Company 
for cancellation of the following signals: 

727. Arthur Blank Company, Inc.. 38 
Cau.sewav street. Boston. 

824, Boston Wharf Company, .")! 
Melcher street. Boston. 

VIII. 1959 March of Dimes. 

His Honor, Mayor John B. Hynes, has 
appointed City Collector-Treasurer James 
E. Gildea Chairman of the City Employ- 
ees' Drive for the 19.59 March of Dimes 
C^uupaign. 

This appeal is part of a nation-wide 
effort to fight polio and other yiru.<es. 
arthritis, birth defects, and disorders of 
the central nervous .system. 

During 19.58. the national foimdation 
spent $165,000 in Suffolk County on ohi 
polio ca.ses for hospitalization, physio- 
therapy, orthopedic appliances, dinicil 
checkups, etc. .Since tlie 19.55 epidemic. 



Jax. 17 



CITY RECORD 



57 



during which families of #c\cial Boston 
fire fighters were aideil by this founda- 
tion, tliere have been 952 new cases caus- 
ing an expenditure of approximately 
$1,000,000. 

Polio can still strike as it did in De- 
troit's recent epidemic when over 650 
persons were stricken. It is therefore 
evidently urgent to build tlic deiileted 
polio fimd to an amount equal to the 
need of any future emergency that we 
may have to meet. 

Voluntary contributions are being 
solicited. Company commanders and 
heads of branches are asked to interview 
all members of their commands and ac- 
cept an}- contributions they may be 
offered. 

Members contributing should fill in 
their names and addresses on the stub 
end of the pledge card and also the 
amount contributed. The company com- 
mander, or other person collecting the 
money, shall give the large portion of 
the card to the person contributing as 
his or her receipt. 

Please place the company munber on 
the upper right-hand corner of the stubs 
which are to be returned with the money 
to Miss Alice T. Lyons in the Head- 
quarters Division. Contributions and 
stubs will be received in the Headquart- 
ers Division from 9 a.m. to 12 noon on 
each weekday, except Saturday, and all 
contributions should be delivered on or 
before January 30, 1959. 

(The last General Order in the 1958 
series was No. 58.) 



Mayor's Ofbce Negotiates 
For New Plant Here 

International Shoe Machine Cor- 
jjoration has signed an agreement 
to buy from the Metropolitan 
Bottling Company the real estate 
situated on Soldiers Field road in 
Brighton, it was announced last 
week by Mayor John B. Hynes. 

Representing the Mayor in en- 
couraging the company to locate in 
Boston was Col. Paul Hines, the 
Mayor's Industrial Advisor and 
Coordinator of his Rehabilitation 
and Conservation Program. 

After extensive alterations to the 
existing structure and the initial 
addition of a 10,000-foot modern 
executive and administrative office 
l.'uilding facing Soldiers Field 
road, the premises will be occupied 
by International Shoe ^lachine 
Corporation as its home office and 
New England manufacturing plant. 



It is expected that the premises 
will be available for ()ccu|)ancy in 
the late summer. The company 
will employ more than 200 people. 

Mayor in Chicago 
to Discuss U.S. 
Railroad Crisis 

Mayor Hyncs, on .lanuary 13, 
attended a meeting in Chicago held 
for the purpose of discussing legis- 
lation, national in scope, to encour- 
age the railroads of the United 
States to stay in operation. 

"The situation," INIayor Hynes 
said, "is so critical that there is 
grave danger of cessation of pas- 
senger service on many main lines 
throughout the country." 

Legislation to avert this situation 
has been proposed in \ ai ious forms, 
including a straight govcrmnental 
subsidy, and including the forma- 
tion of a federal agency which 
would purchase new eciuipment and 
rent such equipment to the rail- 
roads. 

Several railroad presidents at- 
tended the meeting along with the 
mayors of many of the nation's 
largest cities. 

Mayor Hynes was accompanied 
by Henry ^l. Leen, the ^layor's 
ap])ointee to the Old Colony Area 
Transportation Commission. 

CLAIMS APPROVED 

The Mayor, on recommendation of the 
Corporation Counsel, has approved the 
following votes of the City Council Com- 
mittee on Claims: 

Vincent J. Provenzano. 597 East Third 
street, South Boston, for reimbursement as a 
result of an accident which occurred on Febru- 
ary 24. 1958. when a motor vehicle belonging 
to the Sanitary Division, Public Works De- 
partment, which he was operating, collided 
with an automobile owned by Margaret M. 
Kenney, causing personal injuries to Mrs. 
Kenney and her minor child, Leona A. Kenney, 
and damage to the automobile, by payment of 
$370. 

Martin J. Powers, 1106i Bennington street, 
East Boston, for reimbursement as a result 
of an accident which occurred on January 8, 
1957, when a motor vehicle belonging to the 
Fire Department, which he was operating, 
struck a parked automobile owned by Raymond 
Pizzano, by payment of $15. 

Helen A. Aleksieizuk, 15 Milford street, Bos- 
ton, for compensation for personal injuries 
caused by a protruding cement slab in the 
sidewalk in front of 15 Berkeley street, 
March 12, 1958. by payment of $365. 



John J. O'Neill, 115 Brookway road, Roslin- 
dale. for reimbursement as a result of an 
accident which occurred on February 20, 1958. 
when a motor vehicle belonging to the Parks 
and Recreation Department, which he was 
operating, collided with an automobile owned 
by William T. Appleyard. causing personal 
injuries to Chester Bielaw.ski, a passenger, by 
Payment of $185. 

John J. O'Neill, 115 Brookway road, Roslin- 
dale. for reimbursement as a result of an 
accident which occurred on February 20, 1958, 
when a motor vehicle belonging to the Parks 
and Recreation Department, which he was 
operating, collided with an automobile owned 
by William T. Appleyard, causing personal 
injuries to Arthur Whalen, a passenger, by 
payment of $185. 

Joseph V. McBrine, 125 Beech street, Roslin- 
dale. for reimbursement as a result of an ac- 
cident which occurred on May 7, 1958, when a 
bullet which he fired at a robbery suspect 
struck the window of the Tudor Coffee Shop, 
shattering same, by payment of $52. 



Henry H. Huling, 341 K street, South Bos- 
ton, for reimbursement as a result of an 
accident which occurred on July II, 1958, 
when a motor vehicle belonging to the Police 
Department, which he was operating, collided 
with an automobile owned by Leo J. Halpin, 
causing personal injuries to Mr. Halpin and 
damage to the automobile, by payment of $485. 



Mortality Report. 

For the week ending Jan. 10, 1959. 

Population as of Julv, 19.58, Massachusetts State 
Censvis, 822,884; population estimated July, 195R, 
United States Census Bureau, 816,759; number of 
deaths fstillbirths excluded); Residents, 177, non- 
residents, 101, total, 278. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: AH deaths, 
20.14; nonresidents deducted, 12.59. 

Death rate per 1. 000 of population: 

Last week, 17.30; corresponding week last year, 
10.03. 

Deaths by age periods, sex, etc.: Under one year, 
15; one year to four years, inclusive, 4; sixty years 
and over, 190. Total deaths: Male, 174; female, 
103; deaths in hospitals and institutions, 202. 

REPORTABLE DISEASES: 
CASES AND DEATHS.* 



Dl.SE.\SES 


Cases and Deaths 
Reported Week 
Ended 
Jan. 10, 1959 


Cases and Deaths 
Reported Week 
Ended 
Jan. 11, 1958 


Cases 


Deaths 


Cases 


Deaths 


Anterior 










Poliomyelitis. . . 




















Encephalitis 










Lethargica 






















11 




26 




Meningitis 










Epidemic 






2 




Pneumonia (lobar) 




1 




3 


Scarlet Fever 


19 




10 




Tuberculosis 










(pulmonary) . . . 






8 




Childhood Type 










Tuberculosis . . . 










Tuberculosis 










(other forms). . . 




1 






Typhoid Fever . . . 










Whooping Cough . 


1 




8 





* Residents and nonresidents included. 



CITV RECORD 



.Ian. 17 



Tlic lt»ll(»v\ iiiK is a stiitciiicMil showing tlic iiuiiilxr <»l new l»uil(iiiin> for imrpoM-s cjl 
li.'iliilation. toKt-tlicr with the iiiiiiiIxT ^>^ fiimily acconitnoiiations |>r()vir|<!(l thcrcl)y, for 
the iTt'ctioii of wliicli appliiatioiis wen- fiicil with tl-c HiiildiiiK Dcpartnu-rit of the 
City of Hostoii (luriii;,' the 

Month of December and Twelve-Month Period. 1957 and 1958. 





Dbcbmbkr 


Twelve-Month Period 


Nl'MRER OF 

l-AMitr L'nits 
IN Each 


I9M 


1957 


1958 


1957 


Bl-ILOINO 


BuildinKs 


Families 


Buildings 


Kamilies 


Buildings 


Familiej 


Buildings 


Families 


1 


29 
3 


29 


23 


23 


429 


429 


365 


365 




G 






9 


18 


5 


10 














8 
















1 


148 


4 


20 
















Tottl 


32 


35 


23 


23 


441 


603 


374 


395 


Estimated Cost.... 


$2«5.000 


S222.C03 


W.39 


I/jOO 


13. 


599.70 J 



SUMMARY OF HOUSING CONSTRUCTION, 1958 



Nl-HRKR OP 


December 


Year 1958 


New habitations erected 

Accoinniodations provided by new construrtion 

Aeeominodations provided by altering anv remodeling 

Accoinniodations eliminated by altering and remodeling 


32 
35 
19 
2 
.50 
132 
— 18 
—80 


441 

fi03 

381 
97 

799 
2.2.39 
—358 
- 1.352 


Accommodations eliminated by demolition 

Net change in number of habitations 

Net cliangc in number of family accommodations 


Habitations Razed and Family Accommodations Eliminated, 
December, 19.58 


Buildings 


Accommo- 
dations 


1 - family 

2- family 

.t-family 


12 
12 
19 

2 
5 


12 
24 
58 
8 
20 








.50 


132 





MO.N-TM Of 

Decembr 


1958 


1957 


Number 


Cost 


Number 


Cost 


Tyi« IV 

Tyi* y 

TyiJC VI 


40 
7 
73 
34 
454 


$26,863,700 
2,193,200 
2.334,600 
328.800 
4.421,400 


28 

101 
40 

3!>7 


$16,086,100 
2.5I8.8(KI 
4,4.59,800 
2r3.i500 
3,577,200 


Total new const met ion 

.Mterations, additions, etc 


608 
6,668 


$36,141,700 
12,678,900 


574 
4,827, 


$26,935,400 
14,756,465 


Total structural construction 


6,276 
—875 

.075'>r 

11,713 


$18,820,600 
♦7,128,635 
.078'-, 
9,462.000 


5,401 
11,213 


$41.691.8':5 
9,910,730 


Clrand toUl all work 

Increase or derrcase 


17,989 
*1375 
.03% 


$.58,282,100 
•8.679,5ft5 

.063';;, 


16,614 


$51,602,595 



Denotes increase 



DEPARTME.NT CHANGES 

The Director of Adiiiinii-trative Services 
lia:- apfiroved the following personnel 
changes : 

Hospital Department. 
Main OiriaioH. 

For the week ending December 9. 1958: 

The following weekly nurses have been 
appointed : 

Permanent. — Cornelia A. Sullivan, slafT 
nurse, $70.25 a week. 

Temporar)-. — Patricia Gaughan, Imogene 
(Jillis, Anna McHenry, Patricia Moran. floor 
nurses. $1.75 an hour. 

For the week ending December 16, 
1958: 

Tile following weekly nurses have l»< en 
appointed: 

Permanent. — Gloria Smith, Anna Ste\-enson, 
floor nurses. $58.50 a week. 

Temporary. — Noreen Cohane, Pauline Poirier. 
Carole Sullivan, floor nurses, $1.75 an hour. 

For the week ending December 23, 
1958: 

The following weekly nurses have b. en 
appointed : 

Permanent. — Joan Bresnahan, floor nurse. 
$77.75 a week: Tally Cummings, floor nurse, 
$2.10 an hour: Virginia Nikas, Catherine 
O'Brien, floor nurses. $S4.75 a week; Catherine 
O'Donnell. floor nurse, $72.75 a week; Helen 
Wood, nurse. $G2.75 a week; Helen Sheehan, 
floor nurse. $84.75 a week; Mary J. Young, 
floor nurse, $77.75 a week. 

Temporary. — Claire Preedan, Elizabeth 
Pitcher, floor nurses, $1.75 an hour. 

The following employee has been ap- 
pointed : 

Charles H. Morse, hospital medical worker, 
$1.20 an hour. 

The services of the following employ- 
ees ha\e been terminated on or prior to 
December 30, 1958: 

Permanent.— Claire Breedan, floor nurse, 
$1.75 an hour. 

Temporary. — Jeraldine Clear>-, floor nurse. 
$70.25 a week: Dominga Perr>-. hospital med- 
ical worker, $47.75 a week; Irene Kemp, lab- 
oratory technician, $62.75 a week; Joanne 
Thomas, clerk-typist, $47.75 a week. 

The .-^erx ices of the following employ- 
ees have been terminated on or prior to 
December 22. 19.58: 

Permanent. — Anna Martinet, hospital kitchen 
worker. $55.25 a week. 

Temporar>'. — John J. Thomas, laboratory 
technician. $62.75 a week; Dorothy Anne 
Withers, floor nurse. $1.75 an hour. 

The .<ervices of the following emplux - 
ees have been terminated on or prior in 
December 23. 1958: 

Permanent. — Marie O'Neil. floor nurse. $70.23 
a week; Gertrude Sullivan, floor nurse. $1.95 
an hour. 

Temporar>'. — R. Virginia Womble. floor 
nurse, $1.75 an hour; Richard M. Wortman, 
hospital medical worker, $47.75 a week. 

For the week ending December 23, 
1958: 

The following speci:tl nurses have been 
appointed for the number of days in- 
dicated : 

Marie Allen. 6; Claire Bach. 2: Lorraine 
Baker. 3: Esther Bandlow. Olive Barnard, 6; 
Priscilla Beckwitb. 4; Janet Benson, 2; Mar- 
garet Booth. 1; Nancy Bradley. 7: Claire 
Breedan. 4; Goldie Buchanan, 5; Patricia 
Camirand. :t; Ann Cavallo. I; Frances Cavan- 
nara, 2; Ruby Childs. 4; Dorothy Ching, 6: 



Jan. 17 



CITY RECORD 



59 



Laura Coe. 1: Marion Cummings, 4; Helen 
Curieii, Adele Daly, 2; Evelyn Davis, 4; Nor- 
ma Dean, 6: Carole Delorey. Lorraine Dibble, 
2; Madeline Dobbyn, 3: Hannah Donahue, Pa- 
tricia Doucette. 5; Mai-y Edwards, 2; Florence 
Egan, 1; Anna Ferrara, 3: Christine Finn, 7; 
Emma Fester, 4; Margaret Francis, 6: 
Theresa Frazier. 5; MaiT Frozetti, 4: Carolyn 
Garney, 2: Florence Garfield, 1; Clarice Garney, 
3: Lois Gatie, 6; Shirley Gaudreau, 5; Ann 
Giger, 2: Doris Gilman. Roberta Giordano, 1; 
Ethel Glennon, 6; Barbara Goodwin, 2; Louise 
Gracie. 5; Diana Guinta, 1; Veronica Hamel, 3; 
Katherine Hannigan, 1: Marie Hauer. 2; Mary 
B. Healy, 3: Barbara Hoban, 1; Mary Howard, 
Janet Hughes, 4: Mary Hyde, Dorothy Jewkes, 
2: Ruth Johnson, 4; Catherine Kane, 6; Lillian 
Kearney. 1; Francis Kiluk, 3; Helen Kordis, 5; 
Maria Kotte, 4; Shirley LaRoche, 2; Elizabeth 
Lembo, 7; Rena Levesque, Anne Linsky, 1; 
Loretta Lynch, 5; Mary Mahan, 2; Ann 
Maughn. 7; Claire McCue, 5: Mary Long, 6; 
Jean McAuliffe. 2; Virginia Hamilton, 1; 
Marion Holland. Kathryn McDonough, 3; Lor- 
raine McDougall, 4; Maxine McFarland. 3; 
Mary Mclnnis, 4; Catherine Moody, Ann 
Mooney, 3: Cynthia Moore, 4; Suzanne Morgan. 
2; Cecilia Mullen, 3; Catherine Murphy, 5; 
Lois Murphy, 3. 

Natalie Needle. 1; Phyllis Nigro, 3; Agnes 
O'Connor, Mae Owens, 4; Delores Palladino, 
Mary Piasta, 2: Patricia Poquette, June Ra- 
hilly, 5; Ethel Rahaim, 6; Catherine Reynolds, 
1; Dorothy Ripley, Anna Romano, 4; Judith 
Rutherford. 3 days: Shirley Ryan. 4; Takaka 
Salvi, Bernice Smith, 2; Verna Snow, 3; Anna 
Stankard, 1: Mabel Steed. 3: Claire Stevenson. 
2; Cathleen Sullivan, Florence Sullivan, 3; 
Margaret M. Sullivan, 7; Isabel Sutton. 6; 
Carol Taramino. 7; Diana Thedford. Claire 
Tompkins, 2; Jocelyn Tooher, 3; Lois Tsoumas. 
5; Josephine Tyman, 6; H. Vaillancourt, 5; 
Jacqueline Wagner, 1; Kathryn Welch, 5; 
Jane Wharton, 6; Mary White. 4; Trisky 
White. 7: Elizabeth Wolpe. 2; Patricia Durkin. 
5: Catherine O'Leary, Theresa Splaine. Agnes 
Aherne, 1; Marion Andrews. 3: Monique Crow- 
ley, 1; Imogene Gillis, 4; Rose Joyce. 1; Ellen 
Leary, 3; Margaret O'Connor, Edith Wells, 2. 



For the week ending December 30, 
1958: 

The following special nurses have been 
appointed for the number of days in- 
dicated : 

Esther Bandlow, 3; Olive Barnard, 0; Pris- 
cilla Beckwith, 3; Janet Benson, Lillian Black- 
burn. Margaret Booth. 1; Claire Breedan, 3; 
Mary Broderick 2; Goldie Buchanan, 5; Pa- 
tricia Camirand, 2; Frances Cavannara, 3; 
Dorothy Chjng. 7; Muriel Clark, 1; Noreen 
Cohane, Maureen Concannon, 3; Donna (Jon- 
don, 1: Marion Cummings, 4: Norma Dean, 2: 
Carole Delorey, 5; Leona Doherty, Patricia 
Doucette, 2: Mary Dowley. 1; Marv Edwards, 
4; Jean Farrell. 5; Christine Finn. 4; Emma 
Foster, 5; Margaret Francis, 6: Theresa 
Frazier, Eleanor Furiga, 1: Carolyn Garney, 
6; Florence Garfield, 1: Clarice Garney, 2: 
Lois Gatie, 5: Shirley Gaudreau. 4: Doris Gil- 
man, 2; Roberta Giordano. 1: Barbara Good- 
win. 7: Louise Gracie Virginia Hamilton, 1; 
Katherine Hannigan, 6: Marie Hauer. 1; 
Catherine Houton, 4; Dolores Hoyt, 1; Janet 
Hughes, 2: Anne Humberstone, 1; Claire Hume. 
5; Dorothy Jewkes. 4; Ruth Johnson, 5: Cath- 
erine Kane, 4; Stella Kiluk. Francis Liluk, 1; 
Eileen Leeburn, 4: Elizabeth Lembo, 3; Mary 
Long, 2; Loretta Lynch, 4; Mary Mahan, 1; 
Ada Matheson, 4; Ann Maughn, 5; Claire 
McCue. Kathryn McDonough, 1; Lorraine Mc- 
Dougall, 2; Mary Mclnnis. 5; Nancy Miller, 
Catherine Moody, 1; Anne Mooney, 2: Suzanne 
Morgan, Eleanor Morris, Cecilia Mullen, 4; 
Catherine Murphy, 5; Natalie Needle, 2: Vir- 
ginia Nesbitt, Phyllis Nigro, 1; Agnes O'Con- 
nor, 6; Delores Palladino, 2; June Rahilly, 4; 
Ethel Rahaim, Patricia Regan, 3; Catherine 
Reynolds, 1; Dorothy Ripley. 2; Beatrice Roch, 
5; Anna Romano. 1; Judith Rutherford, 2; 
Shirley Ryan, Takaka Salvi, Verna Snow, 3; 
Lois Stacy, Gei-trude Sullivan, 1; Margaret 
Sullivan, 7; Carol Taramino, 2; Claire Tomp- 



kins, 1: Lois Tsoumas, 2; H. Vaillancourt, 1; 
Jacqueline Wagner, 2: Jane Wharton, 3; Mary 
White. 1; Trisky White, 6; Lorraine Kilty, 
Ellen Leary, 1; Patricia Mann. 2; Agnes 
O'Leary, Theresa Splaine, 1; Ilene Todd, 2. 

The following weekly nurses have been 
appointed ; 

Permanent.— Nellie Blaisdell, floor nurse, 
$84.75 a week; Tally Cummings, Angelina 
Hirst, floor nurses. $1.95 a week; Ann Mollica, 
floor nurse. $77.75 a week; Agnes Soper, floor 
nurse, $81.25 a week; Merton Ward, floor 
nurse. $75.25 a week. 

Temporary. — Carole Delory, Dorothea Kush- 
ner, Elizabeth Leary, Paula Minehan, Lois 
Powers, floor nurses, $1.75 an hour; Eleanor 
Shea, Kathleen Treanor, nurses, $1 an hour. 

The following doctors ha^'e been ap- 
pointed : 

Adrian V. Blake, intern. Medical V and VI, 
$112 a month; Vincent L. Hughes, Medical V 
and VI. $112 a month; Mai-y A. Lloyd, Medical 
V and VI. $112 a month; Milton R. Okun, junior 
assistant resident, Dermatology, $132 a month; 
Joan V. Kelsch, junior assistant resident. Pedi- 
atrics, $132 a month; Yong Whee Bahk, senior 
assistant resident, Radiology, $152 a month; 
Joan V. Kelsch, junior assistant resident. 
Pediatrics, $132 a month; Yong Whee Bahk, 
senior eissistant resident, $152 a month; 
Raymond Bernier, senior assistant resident, 
Radiology, $152 a month; Bernard D. Grant, 
senior assistant resident. Orthopedic, $152 a 
month; Felix N. Martinez, senior assistant 
resident. Orthopedic, $152 a month; Edward 
Spindell, senior assistant resident. Orthopedic, 
$152 a month; Levon K. Topouzian, senior 
assistant resident. Orthopedic, $152 a month; 
Elie Turgeon, senior assistant resident. Radi- 
ology, $152 a month; Herbert White, senior 
assistant resident. Dermatology, $152 a month; 
Bernard A. Gouchoe, senior assistant resident. 
Pediatric. $152 a month; Leroy D. Aaronson, 
resident. Dermatology, $182 a month; Raymond 
Boucher, resident. Radiology, $182 a month; 
Susan R. Bough, resident. Anesthesia, $182 
a month; Arrie Charoenphong, resident. Oph- 
thalmology, $182 a month; Francis V. Creeden, 
resident. Orthopedic, $182 a month; Antonio 
J. DiRienzo, resident. Radiology, $182 a month; 
Harry P. Engel, resident. Neurosurgery, $182 
a month; Remedios A. Guillermo, resident, 
Anesthesia, $182 a month; Rudolph Muto, 
resident. Thoracic Surgery, $182 a month; 
Don E. Poulson. resident. Orthopedic, $182 
a month; Nathan H. Fearer, resident. Pedi- 
atric, $182 a month; Saeed Ahari, resident. 
Surgical III, $182 a month; Ernest M. 
Barsamian, resident. Surgical V, $182 a 
month; Anthony G. Capobianco. resident, 
Surgical III, $182 a month; Seymour A. Di- 
Mare, resident. Surgical III, $182 a month; 
Dale B. Fliekinger, resident. Surgical V, $182 
a month; Gianfranco Frittelli, resident. Pedi- 
atric Surgery. $182 a month; George A. Glines, 
resident, Pediatric, $182 a month; Benjamin 
J. Kripke. resident. Anesthesia. $182 a month; 
Thomas S. Morse, resident. Surgical I, $182 
a month; Dimitrios Nicolaidis, resident. Radio- 
logy. $182 a month; Joseph F. Ruscio, resident. 
Anesthesia, $182 a month; John I. Sanders, 
resident. Thoracic Surgei-y, $182 a month; 
Kenzoh Yada, resident. Neurosurgery, $182 a 
month. 

The ser\-ices of the following employ- 
ees ha\-e been terminated on or prior to 
December 30. 1958: 

Permanent. — Marjorie Buckley, floor nurse, 
$70.25 a week. 

Temporary. — Helen N. Riley, laboratory 
technician, $62.75 a week. 

South Division. 

For the week ending December 30, 
1958 : 

The service of the following employee 
has been terminateil: 

Temporary. — Ronald S. Rubin, hospital 
medioal worker, $47.75 a week. 



Long Islattd Division. 

The following changes have been made 
for the week ending December .30, 1958: 

Terminations.— Edward T. Crisp, hospital 
house worker, provisional; Marie B. Brazao, 
student practical nurse; Colin W. Daniels, at- 
tendant nurse; Kenneth J. Houlihan, hospital 
kitchen worker, emergency. 

Appointments. 

Administrative Services Department. 
Printing Section. 
Ernest W. Connors. 26 Percival street, Dor- 
chester, laborer, $55.25 a week. 

Building Department. 
Gayle Nave, 658 East Seventh street. South 
Boston, clerk and typist, $47.75 a week. 

Health Department. 
Hmlth Division. 

Anna C. Garrity. 40 Julian street, Dor- 
chester, clerk and typist, $47.75 a week. 

Anna M. Baranowski, 18 Preble street, 
South Boston, clerk and typist, $47.75 a week. 

Joan D. Kukla, 342 Commonwealth avenue, 
public health nurse, $72.75 a week. 

Elizabeth J. Hughes, 82 Bennett street, 
Brighton, public health nurse, $72.75 a week. 

Wciglits and Measures Division. 
Thomas F. Manning, 1211 Dorchester avenue, 
Dorchester, deputy sealer of weights and meas- 
ures, $75.25 a week. 

Hospital Department. 
Main Division. 
James E. O'Connor, 2A Pope's Hill street, 
Dorchester, hospital kitchen worker, $47.75 a 

Ronald F. O'Brien, 14 Dunlap street, Dor- 
chester, hospital kitchen worker. $47.75 a week. 

John Maltese, 40 Ballou avenue, Dorchester, 
hospital kitchen worker, $47.75 a week. 

Ellsworth H. Carter. 19 Monsignor Reynolds 
Way, hospital medical worker, $52.75 a week. 

James H. McCluskey, 2 Dunmore street, 
Roxbury, hospital medical worker, $50.25 a 

Ariene Rosefeld. 126 Warren street, Brighton, 
laboratory technician, $62.75 a week. 

Gerald J. Skeflington, 10 Vallaro road, Hyde 
Park, elevator operator, $55.25 a week. 

Barbara Kerwin, 115 Peterborough street, 
dietitian, $81.25 a week. 

Francis Thompson, 39 Wyoming street, Rox- 
bury, laboratory technician, $62.75 a week. 

Timothy Teehan, 85 Whitfield street, Dor- 
chester, clerk, $47.75 a week. 

Joanna Thomas. 15 Drayton avenue. Dor- 
chester, clerk and typist, $47.75 a week. 

Paul Murphy, 14 Bellaire road. West Rox- 
bury, laboratory assistant, $50.25 a week. 

Robert M. Hollister. M.D., 15 Weldon road, 
Newton Corner, executive physician, $75.25 

Richard Lennihan, Jr., M.D., 34 Fairfax 
street. West Newton, associate director, first 
surgical, $686.67 a month. 

Donald C. Nabseth, M.D., 1180 Beacon street, 
Brookline director, first surgical, $1,270 a 
month. 

Marilyn I. Fitzgerald, 12 Stafford street, 
Ruxbury. laboratory technician, $62.75 a week. 

Janet A. Thayer, 160 Summit street, Hyde 
Park. laboratory assistant. $50.25 a week. 

Roslyn K. Shore, 1630 Commonwealth ave- 
nue, Brighton, laboratory technician, $62.75 
a week. 

Phyllis R. Bornstein, 728 Morton street 
Mattapan, laboratory technician, $62.75 a 
week. 

Claire F. Conley, 82 Central avenue, Hyde 
Park, laboratory assistant, $50.25 a week. 

Janis L. Rose, 157 N street. South Boston, 
laboratory assistant, $50.25 a week. 

Miriam Cohane, 20 St. Brendan road. Dor- 
chester laboratory assistant, $50.25 a week. 

William T. Bogue, 25 Patterson Way, South 
Boston, hospital guard, $57.75 a week. 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 17 



IJ. Nancy Smith. :t(lll C'i)mmunwi;ilth hm tiu. . 
laburatory a»»iHtanl. $50.25 a week. 

Saul N. Meyer. M.U., Boston City HoHpital. 
H1K Harrison avenue, executive physician. 
$75.25 a week. 

Manraret E. McKleney. 52 bailey street. 
Uorcheater. laboratory technician, $62.75 a 
week. 

Phyllis C. McDonnell. 29 Coodway road. 
Jamaica Plain, uorial worker. $70.25 a week. 

Mnry E. Slaney. G Cenacle road, Hriirhton. 
laboratory assistant, $50.25 a week. 

William C. Burnett, 'Jl Croen street, Charles- 
town hospital medical worker, $57.75 a week. 

Sheila E. Moran, 198A Hamilton street, 
Dorchester, laboratory as.sistant. $50.25 a week. 

Thomas J. Smith. 37 Logran Way, South 
Boston, hospital medical worker, $47.75 a 
week. 

Allan T. Doherty. K7I Harrison avenue, 
hospital medical worker, $47.75 a week. 

Carroll Gajtnon, 69 Tower street, Jamaica 
Plain hospital medical worker, $55.25 a week. 

Leo F. Farrell. ;i5 Grew Hill road. Roslin- 
dale. hospital medical worker, $47.75 a week. 

Norman W. Brown. 39 Worcester square, 
hospital medical worker, $47.75 a week. 

Cleveland A. Pitters. 612 Columbus avenue, 
hospital medical worker, $47.75 a week. 

Edward D. McAllister, 2 Jess street, Ja- 
maica Plain, hospital medical worker, $47.75 
a week. 

Joseph R. Saunders, 335 Shawmut avenue, 
hospital medical worker, $47.75 a week. 

Patricia A. Foss. 11 East Newton street, 
laboratory assisUnt, part time, $39 a week. 

Kalhryn C. Dunn, 93 Fenwood road, labora- 
tory a.ssisUnt, part time. $39 a week. 

Patricia McCarthy, 7 Babson street, Matta- 
pan, laboratory assistant, part time, $39 a 
week. 

Matthew Beechinor, 920 East Fourth street. 
South Boston, hospital kitchen worker, $52.75 
a week. 

John Daniel Lynch, 33 Locust street. Dor- 
chester, hospital kitchen worker, $52.75 a 
week. 

Lorraine Champa, 106 Bremen street, Ea.st 
Boston, laboratory technician, $62.75 a week. 
Sanatorium Division. 

John Galvin, 82 Wheatland avenue, Dor- 
chester, hospital medical worker, $47.75 a 
week. 

Dr. William Gaire, 3 Fidelis Way, BriRhlon, 
rotatinK resident surgeon, $182 a month. 
Long Island Division. 

Josephine A. GosseKn, 284 Copeland street, 
Quincy, licensed practical nurse, $57.75 a 
week. 

Penal Institutions Department. 
House of Correction. 
Henr>' J. Dobbyn, Jr., 303 Kiver street, 
Mattapan, institutions school teacher, $37.58 
a week. 

Joseph R. Sullivan. 129 Chiswick road. 
Briithton. correction officer. $77.75 a week. 

PiTBLU- Works Department. 
Sru-er Division. 
Br>'ce A. Milroy. 24 Montpelier road. Dor- 
chester, steam fireman, $65.25 a week. 

Treasirv Department. 
Treasury Division. 
Helen Smith. 79 Myrtle street, clork and 
typist, $55.25 a week. 

Collecting Division. 

Paul F. Fitzirerald, 7 Parkton road. Ja- 
maica Plain, clerk. $52.75 a week. 

Leo D. McNiff, 169 Bunker Hill street, 
Charlcstown, clerk, $47.75 a week. 

Welfare Department. 
Central Office. 
Irene M. Lynch. 22 Frazer street. Hyde 
Park, clerk and typist, $47.73 a week. 



Reinstatements. 

Ari)iTiN<; Department. 
David P. Berriiran. 28 Tremletl street. Dor- 
chester, senior account clerk. $60.25 a week. 

City Planning Board. 
Salvatore John Salipante, 92 Rojters avenae, 
Somerville. planninK assistant. $77.75 a week. 

FiKE Department. 
John C. Kabachus. 841 La GranKc r.trcct. 
West Roxbury, fire lieutenant. $105.17 a week. 

Hospital Department. 
Main Iti vision. 
Michael DiGiovanni. 492 Commercial street, 
elevator operator. $55.25 a week. 

Mildred Cloff. 105 Brookway road. Roslindale, 
hospital kitchen worker, $60.25 a week. 

Annie M. Kelly, 58 Cliff street, Roxbur>'. 
hospital house worker. $60.25 a week. 

Long Island Division. 
Alfred F. McCarthy, 157 Woodrow avenue, 
Dorchester, attendant nurse, $52.75 a week. 

Parks and Recreation Department. 
Joseph E. Campagna. 23 Dartmouth street, 
third-class stationary enjrineer. $81.25 a week. 

Welfare Department. 
Centra/ Office. 
Josephine Petrillo, 498 Bennington street. 
East Boston, clerk and typist, $60.25 a week. 

Annie V. Holder, 16 Wardman road, Rox- 
bury. social worker. $84.75 a week. 



Changes in Statm. 

Administrative Services Department. 
Printing Section. 
Martha V. Ryan. 77 Waldeck street. Dor- 
chester, from buyer at $95.25 a week to head 
clerk (temporary, 6 months) at $103.50 a week. 

Auditing Department. 
Joseph A. Re, 582 South street, Roslindale. 
from principal account examiner (temporarj-, 
6 months) at $84.75 a week to principal ac- 
count examiner (permanent) at $84.75 a week. 

Fire Department. 
James J. Murphy. 675 Adams street. Dor- 
chester, from fire captain at $118.19 a week 
to district fire chief at $138.12 a week. 

Health Department. 
Health Division. 

Joseph Sweet. 63 G street. South Boston, 
from junior building custodian (temporary) 
at $67.75 a week to media man (permanent) 
at $67.75 a week. 

Registry Division. 

Eleanor R. Kiederis. 31 Nottingham street, 
Dorchester, from senior clerk and typist (tem- 
porary) at $60.25 a week to senior clerk and 
typist (permanent) at $60.25 a week. 

Charles H. Mackie, Jr., 79 Glenville avenue, 
AUston. from clerk and typist at $55.25 a 
week to senior clerk and typist (permanent) 
at $60.25 a week. 

Hospital Department. 
Main Division. 

Vera SeKei-ste<lt. 71 Old Harbor street. South 
Boston, from hospital medical worker (perma- 
nent) at $55.25 a week to laboratory assistant 
(temporary) at $57.75 a week. 

Sarah Saunders, 526 Norfolk street, Dor- 
chester, from laboratory a.ssistant (permanent) 
at $62.75 a week to laboratory technician 
(temporary) at $75.25 a week. 

Robert D. Leonard, 73 Mercer street. South 
Boston, from principal hospital medical work- 
er (permanent) at $77.75 a week to assistant 
mortuary supervisor (temporary) at $81.25 a 
week. 

Ralph Quigley, 49 Burton street. Brighton, 
from car|>enter foreman (permanent) at $88.25 



a w iM-k to clerk of the works (temporary) ji'. 
$151 a week. 

Esther Prendenrast. 27 Parker Hill avenue, 
Ri..<bury. from clerk and typist, part time 
(permanent I. at $51.50 a week to clerk and 
typist, full time (permanent), at $.»7.75 a 
week. 

Anne M. Guahue. 11 East Newton strce*. 
from clerk and typist ( permanent ) at $55.25 
a week to laboratory assistant (temporary) ut 
$57.75 a week. 

Theodore R. Adams. 1 Briggs place, from 
hospiul medical worker at $55.25 a week to 
eltvatcr operator at $55.25 a week. 

Morris Priier. M.D., 745 Massachusetts ave- 
nue, from physician. South Department, at 
$98.75 a week living out to senior executive 
physician at $95.25 a week living in. 

Sanatorium Division. 

Mary C. Flynn, 249 River street, Mattapan, 
from head nurse at $98.75 a week to night 
supervisor of nurses at $103.50 a week. 

Florence May John.son, 88 Emmett avenue. 
Dedham, from licensed practical nurse at 
$75.25 a week to licensed practical nurse at 
$72.75 a week. 

James J. Dio. 56 Linden street, Dorchester, 
from clerk (temporary) at $47.75 a week to 
clerk (permanent) at $47.75 a week. 

Katherine E. Gray, 104 Pierce street, Hyde 
Park, from clerk and typist at $55.25 a week 
to senior clerk pnd stenographer (temporary, 
6 months) at $60.25 a week. 

Parks and Recreation Department. 

Adam B. DiOrio, 19 Arberfield road, Roslin- 
dale, from maintenance mechanic sign painter 
at $77.75 a week to sign painter and letterer 
at $81.25 a week. 

Charles G. Norton, 567 Ashmont street, Dor- 
chester, from tree maintenance inspector at 
$84.75 a week to tree maintenance foreman 
(temporary, 6 months) at $91.75 a week. 

Penal Institutions Department. 
House of Correction. 

Edward F. Frederick, 161 Fuller street. Dor- 
chester, from correction officer at $84.75 a 
week to correction officer and carpenter (tem- 
pcrary, 6 months) at $88.25 a week. 

Thomas Nee. 131 Willis avenue. Medford. 
from correction officer at $84.75 a week to 
correction officer and locksmith (temporary 
6 months) at $88.25 a week. 

Public Works Department. 
Highuav Division. 
John J. Campbell. 7 Winborough street. 
Hyde Park, from senior engineering aid at 
$77.75 a week to junior civil engineer (tempo- 
rary) at $84.75 a week. 

Treasury Department. 
Collecting Division. 

Judith A. Croake. 731 Washington street. 
Dorchester, from senior statistical machine 
operator (temporary) at $60.25 a week to 
senior statistical machine operator (perma- 
nent) at $60.25 a week. 

Nancy E. Murphy. 1615 Dorchester avenue. 
Dorchester, from senior sutistical machine op- 
erator (temporary) at $60.25 a week to senior 
sutistical machine operator (permanent) ct 
$60.25 a week. 

Transfer. 

Public Works Department. 
Alice T. McCarthy. 32 O street. South Bos- 
ti n, from Hospital Department, Long Island 
Division, a.s senior clerk and typist at $67.75 
a week to Public Works Department. Highway 
Division, as senior clerk and typist at $67.75 
a week. 

Leaves of Absence. 

Fire Department. 

John C. Kabachus. 841 La Grange street. 
West Roxbury. fire lieutenant. $105.17 a week. 

Richard A. Walsh, 276 Geneva avenue, Dor- 
chester, fire fighter, $105.36 a week. 



Jan. 17 



CITY RECORD 



Charles J. Parenteau. 121 Old Hai-bor street. 
South Boston, fire figrhter. $105.36 a week. 

Arthur C. Ryley, 9 Bailey street, Dorchester, 
fire figrhter, $105.36 a week. 

Health Department. 
Health Division. 
Charles J. Hamilton, 4 Heela street, Dor- 
chester, environmental sanitation inspector, 
$84.75 a week. 

Hospital Department. 
Main Division. 
Gerald Skeffington. 10 Vallavo road, Hyde 
Park, elevator operator, $55.25 a week. 

Edna R. Brown. 531 A Columbus avenue, 
hospital medical worker, $55.25 a week. 

Catherine Tobin, 3 Holden street, Dorchester, 
hospital laundry worker, $60.25 a week. 

Law Department. 
Abraham H. Kahalas. 22 Hosmer street, 
Dorchester, legal assistant, $95.25 a week. 

Public Works Department. 
Water Division. 
Thomas F. Manning. 115 Woodbole avenue, 
Dorchester, water meter reader, $75.25 a week. 



Step-Rate Increases. 

.\[)MINISTRATIVE SERVICES DEPARTMENT. 
Printing Section. 
Joyce A. Reardon, senior clerk and typist, 
from $62.75 to $65.25 a week. 

Assessing Department. 

Philip E. Conroy, deputy assessor, from 
$141.50 to $165.25 a week. 

George F. Cronin, deputy assessor, from 
$141.50 to $lo5.25 a week. 

Frank McFarland. deputy assessor, from 
$141.50 to $165.25 a week. 

John J. O'Connor, deputy assessor, from 
$141.50 to $165.25 a week. 

Paul J. Oswald, deputy assessor, from $141.50 
to $165.25 a week. 

Fire Department. 

Margaret M. Jacobson, clerk and typist, 
from $52.75 to $55.25 a week. 

Arthur H. Schwarz, clerk and stenographer, 
from $50.25 to $52.75 a week. 

Harold G. Washington, fire apparatus re- 
pairman, from $75.25 to $77.75 a week. 

Health Department. 
Kealth Division. 
H. Marie Duffy, clerk and typist, from $47.75 
to $50.25 a week. 

Registry Division. 
Genevieve E. McCarthy, senior clerk and 
typist, from $70.25 to $72.75 a week. 

Hospital Department. 
Main Division. 
Gloria Forrest, head nurse, from $88.25 to 

Anne E. DeLorey, head nurse, from $88.25 
to $91.75 a week. 

Martha Doyle, floor nurse, from $75.25 to 
$77.75 a week. 

Kathleen Powell, floor nurse, from $81.25 to 
$84.75 a week. 

John J. Connell. hospital laundry worker, 
from $47.75 to $50.25 a week. 

Sanotorium Division. 

Mary Chapin, intermittent relief telephone 
operator, from $62.75 to $65.25 a week. 

Martin McDonnell, steam fireman, from 
$70.25 to $72.75 a week. 

Helen Madden, hospital house worker, from 
$55.25 to $57.75 a week. 

Catherine McGrail, hospital house worker, 
from $57.75 to $60.25 a week. 

Edward Pollard, hospital house worker, from 
$50.25 to $52.75 a week. 

Rose Carroll, hospital kitchen worker, from 
$57.75 to $60.25 a week. 



William MacArthur, senior hospital kitchen 
worker, from $67.75 to $70.25 a week. 

Helen Stewart, hospital kitchen worker, from 
$57.75 to $60.25 a week. 

Elizabeth Jones, hospital medical worker, 
from $55.25 to $57.75 a week. 

Michaael O'Malley, hospital medical worker, 
from $50.25 to $52.75 a week. 

Mabel Palermo, hospital medical worker, 
from $50.25 to $52.75 a week. 

Frederick Wells, hospital medical worker, 
from $50.25 to $52.75 a week. 

Ernest Lavalee, head nurse, from $91.75 to 
$95.25 a week. 

Long Island Division. 

John F. Carney, Jr., hospital kitchen worker, 
from $52.75 to $55.25 a week. 

Gloria F. Bogle, graduate registered nurse, 
from $81.25 to $84.75 a week. 

Michael J. Duran. principal account clerk, 
from $81.25 to $84.75 a week. 

Alice T. McCarthy, senior clerk-typist, from 
.$65.25 to $67.75 a week. 

Mary E. Mulhall, principal clerk-stenogra- 
pher, from $72.75 to $75.25 a week. 

Leo J. Ronan, social worker, from $77.75 to 
$81.25 a week. 

.Alberta G. Albrecht, attendant nurse, from 
$52.75 to $55.25 a week. 

Catherine M. Barry, attendant nurse, from 
$55.25 to $57.75 a week. 



Julia A. Costello, attendant nurse, from 
$50.25 to S52.T5 a week. 

Edmund J. Foley, hospital kitchen worker, 
from $57.75 to $60.25 a week. 

Amelia Gaffey, attendant nurse, from $57.75 
to $60.25 a week. 

Ann R. Latford, attendant nurse, from 
$47.75 to $50.25 a week. 

Peter J. Mullin, attendant nurse, from $50.25 
to $52.75 a week. 

Mary M. Nelson, attendant nurse (now 
working as telephone operator and clerk, tem- 
poraiT), from $57.75 to $60.25 a week. 

George R. Stoddard, attendant nurse, from 
$50.25 to $52.75 a week. 

William F. Donnelly, second-class stationary 
engineer, from $81.25 to $84.75 a week. 

Parks and Recreation Department. 
Mario Marotta, grave digger, from $65.25 
to $67.75 a week. 

Cemetery Division. 
Loreto Tempesta, laborer, from $62.75 to 
$65.25 a week. 

Penal Institutions Department. 
House of Correction. 
Paul Conroy, correction officer, from $72.75 
to $75.25 a week. 

Rcnald Galgani, correction officer, from 
$72.75 to $75.25 a week. 



TYPE OF BUILDINGS CONSTRUCTED, 1958 



Th(> following; is a statement showing? bv matcrial.s, iiii;n'>er and e-timate:l cost 
the erection and the alterations of huilding.s and struetnie- lur whid, applicati.m- 
were filed with the Building Department, City of Boston, loi the year I'.l.oS: 



Material 


New Buildings 


Alterations 












Number 


Cost 


Number 


Cost 


Brick 


72 


S2,044,600 


2,004 


$6,554,100 


Stone . 






25 


279,800 




42 


28,978,700 


36.5 


3,201,000 


Steel frame 


33 


323,800 


45 


316,000 


Concrete block, hollow tile and terra cotta. . 


7 


372,200 


31 


133,200 


Other fire resisting 










Total fire resistive buildings 


1.54 


$31,720,300 


2,470 


$10,486,100 


Wood 


4.54 


4,421,400 




2,192,800 


Total all construction 


608 


$36,141,700 


5,675 


$48,820,600 



BUILDING OPERATIONS DURING MONTH OF DECEMBER 



Month of December 


1958 


I9S7 












Number 


Cost 


Number 


Cost 


Type I 


3 


$174,500 




$4,000 


Type II 




1,283,000 


1 


84.000 


Type IV 


7 


264,200 


3 


89,100 


Type V 




5,600 


2 


1,000 


Type VI 


32 


293,000 


26 


225.600 




45 


$2,022,300 


36 


$403,700 




282 


1,299,400 


331 


709,800 


Total structural construction 


327 


$3,321,700 


367 


$1,113,300 




—40 








—4.8% 


*7.5% 






Installations, etc 


997 


1,066,700 


1.016 


827.400 




1,324 


$4,388,400 


1,383 


$1,940,900 




—59 


*2,447,300 








—2.3% 


69% 







— Denotes decrease * Denotes increase 



6 2 



CITY RECORD 



.Ian. 



Public Wokks Department. 
IHoliiruy Pivinion. 
He-nry J. Ciiync, laborer, frum $57.75 to 
$f.(t.J5 a wii.k. 

TllAPKIC UKI'AKT.MKNT. 
Cracc Culliiian, principal clerk and ste- 
niiKrapher, from $77.75 to $K1.25 a week. 

Vktekans' Skkvu-rs Department. 
SiiHan M. Flaherty, veterans' «cr\'ice8 investi- 
itat'jr, from $77.75 to $H1.25 a week. 

SUFFOLK COUNTY. 

Sl'PEKKIK COI'RT. 
Ann Turner, from $50.25 to $52.75 a week. 
MEniCAL Examiner Service, Northern 
Division. 



OVMkllAUi ALLOWED 

Tlif Mayor ha.-; approval the followinn 
ri'(iiic.»l.»: 

Health Department. 
Lester J. Sheehan, environmental sanitation 
innpector, 11 hours; David F. Kiley, environ- 
mental sanitation inspector, 14 hours. 

Ho.spital Department. 
Hessic DantoB. technician, HI hours at fi 
an hour: Kita Lavin, head technician, 36 hours 
at $3 an hour; Linda Flaherty, assistant elec- 
trocardioicraph technician, 9 hours at $3 an 
hour. 



Licensing Board. 
Charles L. Malley, principal account clerk, 
15 hours; Kita A. White, principal clerk and 
typi.st. 25 hours. 



I'AllKS AM) KECUKATION DEPARTMENT. 

Cemetery Division. 
Director of Administrative Services Willi 
Arthur Reilly has approved the following c. 



Dear Sir: 

Your approval is requested to 
increase in the mrtilar rate per hour of . • 
ployees in this department who operate, dur: 
the winter season, the heavy-duty equipni< 
assiitnd to sandinic. snowplowing, and m. 
removal work. 

I respectfully request your approval in this 
matter and recommend that the foll'winit- 
named employees be compensated at the rate 
of $2.30 per h:;ur, when performintt the above 
stated duties, and $3.45 per hour overtime, 
from 5 P.M.. to 8 A.M.. for the period between 
December 3, 1968, and April 30. 1959: 



BUILDING PERMITS 



The Building Dcp.artinciit has issued tlie following |)erinit8 for the week tiiding January !). 



Alteration!! 



•ATII 



.1. Ciipone unil W. .\Iiicci .')8 Barnes av 

I'irst National Bank 161 Devonshire 8t. . . . 

New KnKland Medical Center. . .26 Hollia st 

Ilyiiian Epstein 9 lola st 

\rlin 1.51 MassachuBetta av. 

X. \\ . I'ci rv. Inc 123 Summer st 

1 irsi K. i.li.v Co 18 Tremont st 

Itosc K. Kahatzinick 96 Windsor st 

■I r:.\ Hr.-li v 14A .•\shford st 

' I I 292 Beacon st 

Hoinenico 79 Bickford st 

I 1 Haws of Harvard 17-2.5 Blackfanst. . . . 

\ Kc t fe 304 Blue Hill av 

' 1 1 1 2.56-258 Boylston st. . 

I 1 I < allierino McHoweI1..65J-67 Day st 

h . I . rminal Co 465 Medford st 

I I ' Inc 100-110 Norfolk av.. . 

M w I S. Inc 88 Pearl st 

88 Robinwood av 

I I ■ li.iuskas .S5 Spencer st 

i I'l l Liii 3,5 I'pton st 

I 1 ^\ ll iriiey 69 Bowen st 

I ! ' 1 ' Uiri. TO 242 Bunker Hill st,. . . 

I 1 I I. o-.VIara 29 Clare a v 

I \ u 63 Dorchesterst 

1^ I; liy SICilenwoods 

- ' - l\r^iT,i. . . 16 Hancock st 

M I N ,572 Hyde Park av. . . 

I '1 ^' - r:irL:r.li . . 1 Monmouth sf| 

l'...-i I, .V Mmiim- UK 364 Rutherford av 

i;n..( h \\.M„ll,;niscr 3.57 W.ilnut av 

I'r.vnan 77 Waln.n pk 

C. :ui,l l\ Vinc. ll,,. I J() W. Kstpr st 

1.. an.l 1.. Wolf. !I7 West SiirinRfield St. 

(1(1 West .'^prinKfield St. 
10 I J Wcstville ter . . 

H-'L' 1'Imc Hill av 

.5:{(i Centre- st 

512 Beacon st 

1.575 Blue Hill av 

9 Prinsley st 

22 Diehton st 

f..5<) Oi.dloy st 

2IJ lliintincton av . . 



I.. DiCarln 
I. Hook.sirin 
W. Iluscl.i.in 
NonlMooni Corp 
.Muttapan Cooperali 

V. Cirira 

Mr. Calioon 



IJI-' \U 



I'ark av 



.■^t. l.iiki- s ( Onvulesrcnl Home 149 Roxburv st . . . . 

.1. (ilasser 89 State st." 

F.state of J. B. Thomas 779 Treniont st. . . . 

I'. -1. Hill 3349 Waahin«tU>n st. 

Hoslindnlc Tnvem. 4272 WashinRtoD st . 

.1 V. O Hrien 31 We8t«low st 

.M. rodltli * Cn w, Inr 100 Boylston st . 

A. I- nink .575 Columbus av. . . 

\. .><tevcs.. 105 Forest Hills st.. 

.1. 1!. Brown (i Crcennich ct 

S. Cohen 8 Harrison av 

J. l ecney 9 Kenton rd 



Wahi. 


Cost 




¥800 


3 


900 


.•J 


7.50 


14 


1.50 




200 


3 


1.50 


3 


son 


9 


650 


21 


.500 




3.000 


10 


2,300 


4 


9,000 


14 






2..>od 


lb 


20.800 




300.000 


8 


2.440 


3 


32.000 


19 


300 


17 


800 


3 


0.50 




9.50 




160 


18 


990 


6 


4.50 


12 


100 




240 


18 


1.4.50 




325 




6..500 


11 


233 




460 




325 


9 


510 


9 


448 


15 


700 






19 


100 




200 


18 


65 


14 


998 




300 


1.3 


485 


4 


8.50 


4 


300 


18 


200 


18 


990 


9 


800 




480 
100 


I'l' 


300 




900 


ih 






950 




750 


II 


400 


9 


390 


3 


2.50 




485 



Ow.VER Locatio.n 

Fellsway Wreckinc Cor]) 4.5-47-49 I^inartine st 

T. A. Morris Realty 63 Portland st 

V. i. Connors 32 Rill st 

C. X. Smith 4 Yarmouth st 

J, & S. Hadee 362 Treniont st 

W. C. Nor. ross Co .5201 Albany st . . 

N. E. Deaconess Hospital 2 .\ntumn st 

f lark & Malioney 2.54 Pennington st 

Sear.s Roebuck * Co 1834 Centm st 

L. Jiidah 21 Clare av 

W. Zelinski 22.53 Dorchester av. . . . 

A. DiManno 245 E st 

A. DiManno 247 E st 

R. Mock I Coodway rd 

Mr. Johns 40 (Jref-nouRli av 

Calumet Trust 734 Huntington av . . . . 

F. Reynolds 908 910 HuntinKton av 

Mr. Early 00 .lohnsw.HKl rd 

Mr. Leonar.-l .50 Lorraine st 

Joseph Pates 35 Manning st 

.Mr. Maciolsk .592 Poplar st 

Mr. Marrana 615 Poplar st 

L. C. Carr 17 Riverside s<i 

Crc-en Bros. Realty Trust 806 Shawmut av 

Ralph Pill 85 Staniford st 

J. Aheam 100 Summer st. 

Mr. Maple 329 331 Treniont st 

Mr. Jarobino 1 Weok.s av. 

.\. Poschetto. Sr I'l'l Wi..«tl)i)iimi ~' 



New Buildings 

Location 
41 Asheville rd. 



Owner 
Morview, Inc 
.Morview, Inc 713 Beech st.. 

Morview. Inc 722 Peech st. 

Morview. Inc 726 Beech st. 

.Morview. Inc 7.30 Beech st. 

.Morview . Inc 734 Beech st. 

Morview, Inr 743 Beech st. 

Puildinc Construction Co 120 Praintrp<- st 

Cuerino D. Maacio 11 ClenclilT rd. 

Morview. Inc 62 LcKleeliill r,i. 

.Morview. Inr 70 LodKcliill r.l. 

Morview, Inc 74 Lodeeliill rd. 

Morview . Inr 78 IxKigehill rd. 

Moiview. Inc 82 Lodeeliill rd. 

.\meriran Sugar Re6nine Co 425 Me<iford St. 



Buildings Removed 



OWXKH 

V W. Burrow 
<la 



Dorchester Car|>el Cleaning Co. 

Ceorge H. Riishton. 

Albert Kurke. Trustw 

D. Robertson and .M. Brown. 

Mass. C&s & Electric Co 

Mass. Cias & Electric Co 



2<.t Field st 

52 East Cottage st 
. 165 Granite av. . . . 
24 Rollins st 
20 Rutland st. 
235 SliawniMl av 
208 210 Friend st 
20 Traverse st . . . . 



Jan. 17 



CITY RECORD 



63 



Domenic A. Antonelli, John R. Cataldo. 
motor equipment operators: James F. Connolly. 
Augustine V. Dalia. Mario Gilberti, heavy 
motor equipment operators; Andrew A. Gin- 
noohio. Domenick Guerriere, motor equipment 
operators: Richard J. Hornbrook, heavy motor 
equipment operator; Samuel F. Litto, Robert 
T. McHugh, motor equipment operators; Peter 
J. Neo, maintenance mechanic machinist. 

Also the following rates of pay to personnel 
workinK on snow. These are the same rates 
of pay that the Public Works Department 
have recommended: 

Heavy equipment operator, $2.:?0 an hour 
straight time, $.3.45 an hour overtime; Grade 
:i.>. regular pay straight time, $5 an hour over- 
time: Grades 21 to 34, inclusive, regular pay 
-tiaight time, $4 an hour overtime; *Grades 15 
! ) 20. inclusive, regular pay straight time, 
s '.T'i an hour overtime; 'Grades 12 to 14, in- 
rlusive. regular pay straight time, $2.80 an 
hour overtime; Grades 8 to 12. inclusive, reg- 
ular pay straight time, $2.70 an hour overtime. 

* E.xcept employees operating or repairing 
hcHvy-duty snow equipment. 

Penal Institutions Department. 
' Corbett, C. Cotter, C. Dennehy. C. De- 

. P. Madison, J. Marenghi. F. O'Connor. 
1 ry, correction officers, 8 hours each at 
an hour: T. Conroy, correction officer 
a:i I a-sistant herdsman, 8 hours at $2.11 an 
h. ui : J. Corbett, correction officer and clothing 
cutter, 8 hours at $2.11 an hour; J. Daley, 
J. Dee, J. Frawley. G. Gannon, R. Hoffman. 
R. Hollaman, W. Lind, correction officers, 8 
hours each at $2.11 an hour; J. Manion, cor- 
rection officer. 20 hours at $2.11 an hour; 
R. .Mullaly, C. Murphy, T. McGuinness, F. 
Riley, M. Schomberg, H. Sidman, G. Stevens. 
R. Walsh, correction officers, 8 hours at $2.11 
an hour: J. Bonito, correction officer and shoe 
instructor, 8 hours at $2.20 an hour; T. Bruno, 
T. Coughlin, correction officers, 8 hours each 
,-it S2.20 an hour; E. Craig, steam fireman and 
ii^^]<tant engineer. 32 hours at $2.20 an hour; 
A. Duty, correction officer. S hours at $2.20 an 
h : J. Gannon, correction officer and baker, 

iirs at .$2.20 an hour; F. Ledford. correc- 
. fficer and cook. 151 hours at $2.20 an 

: T. Nee, correction officer and carpenter, 

liuurs at $2.20 an hour; L. Pitts, correction 
8 hours at $2.20 an hour; F. Sclafani, 
collection officer and motor vehicle repair- 
man. S hours at $2.20 an hour; U. Flynn. 
ccriection officer and assistant poultry man, 
^ hours at $2.29 an hour: J. Gallivan, correc- 
tion officer and electrician, 20 hours at $2.29 
an hour; E. Crowley, assistant deputy master, 
> houi-s at $2.38 an hour: R. Flvnn, hospital 
supervisor, 8 hours at $2.38 an hour; W. Gan- 
non, hospital supervisor, 8 hours at $2.38 an 
hour: A. Puzzo. correction officer and receiver, 
^ hours at $2.38 an hour; G. O'Halloran, J. 
Sullivan, assistant deputy masters, 8 hours at 
$2.58 an hour; J. Hoban, E. Shepard, deputy 
masters, 8 hours at $2.82i an hour. 



Public Works Department. 
Automotive Division. 
Daniel J. Cronin, principal storekeeper, 8 
hours; William P. Pacitto, senior storekeeper, 
8 hours: James C. Strong, head clerk 5 hours. 



Traffic Department. 
William Ahern, acting traffic signal super- 
visor, 8 hours straight time, 12 hours time 
and a half; Thomas Condon, working foreman 
traffic sign repairman, 8 hours, straight time; 
Frank Huddleston, traffic signal inspector, 7 
hours, straight time. 1 hour, time and a half; 
Frank Solari, traffic signal inspector. 7 hours, 
straight time, 1 hour, time and a half; Leonard 
Van Gemert, traffic signal supervisor, 8 hours, 
straight time, 8 hours, time and a half. 



Welfare Department. 
Anthony Bushlow, supervisor of supplies, 3 
hours; Joseph Todisco, supervisor of statis- 
tical machines, 3 hours. 



SUFFOLK COUNTY. 
Sheriff'.s Office. 
Edward F. Bowers. 8 hours, $1G.25; Frank 
A. Broderick, 8 hours. $17.65: Charles C. Bus- 
well, 8 hours, $16.25: Mary D. Carr, 8 hours, 
$17.65; Ernest L. Ciampa, 4 hours. $8.48; 
Thomas F. Coffey, 8 hours, $18.35; Abraham 
S. Cohen, 8 hours, $16.25; John J. Donovan, 
8 hours, $20.70: Francis A. Doyle, Richard C. 
Fannon, 8 hours each, $17.65; Joseph Ferrera, 
8 hours. $16.95; John H. Flanagan, 8 hours, 
$17.65; William H. Francis, 8 hours, $16.95: 
Edward V. Handwork, 8 hours, $17.65: Brain- 
erd Hughes. 8 hours, $20.70; Martin E. Hynes, 
8 hours, $16.25; Edward W. Kenney. 8 hours, 
$20.70; Joseph P. Long, 8 hours, $17.65: 
Francis Mangiacotti. 8 hours. $16.95; John 
McCarey, 8 hours. $16.25: William J. Mc- 
Donald. S hours. $16.95; Donald M. McKellar. 
John P. McTomney, 8 hours each, $16.25; John 
R. Murphy, 8 hours, $20.70; Salvatore Pettian- 
toe, 8 hours, $17.65; Frederick Randall, 8 
hours, $16.25; Peter Sarnie, 8 hours, $17.65: 
Christopher Smith, 16 hours, $35.30: Ernest H. 
Smith, Jerome Tracy, 8 hours each, $16.25. 



CONTRACTS AWARDED 

The Mayor api>ro\ ed the award of tlic 
following contracts to the lowest eligible 
bidders : 

-Admixistrativf: .'^krvices Department. 
I'urchasnw Division. 
Copper Tubing 
Furnishing ((iiipcr tiihinsr to the Water Service 
of the Puhlir W.iiks n. ,.aitinent from .lanuarv 1, 
19.59. to .Mairk awanled to Clranite 

Phunbing .^u|i|.lv I oini.ain , Inc.. in the amount of 
S3.410.IO. les> |.r, (lilt discount for payment 
within 20 days from date of delivery. 
The bids were; 

Rrquisition No. .',0.5. 




total. S.-,.:',7:, (tins I, 111 1.11 ■„,.• MiiL'lr .1,1,1- 

ment of 9,00(1 fcr-t ,,f i ,|.|„a ml, mil' at lui- tinn' 

openin-). 



* Contract awarded. 



WITHOUT ADVERTISING 

Tiio I\Ia>-()r appro\-cd the award of 
contracts, without advertising, based on 
the following coininiinications : 

Administrative Services Department. 
Purrh using Division. 
Street Cleaning Equipment 
Dear Mr. Mayor: 

This office is in receipt of a requisition from 
the Automotive Division of the Public Works 
Department for one (1) mounted Tarco 
"Gutter-Vac." The "Gutter-Vac" is available 
from the Tarrant Manufacturing Company 
only. In order that the proper installation be 
made on the Jeep, it is advisable to have the 
company furnish the Jeep also. Inasmuch as 
the Tarco unit is available only from the 
Tarrant Manufacturing Company, it is re- 
quested that permission be granted to dispense 
with advertising publicly for bids and award a 
contract, without public advertisement, to the 
Tarrant Manufacturing Company, for one (1), 
only, Tarco "Gutter-Vac" mounted on Model 
FC.-150 Willys Jeep and as per specifications 
to be included in the contract. Total amount 
of contract will be as follows: 

Tarco "Gutter-Vac." as per specifications, 
$2,400. 

Model FC-150 Willys Jeep with extra trans- 
parent door panels $2,700. (Jeep price in- 



cludes $150 excise tax, deductible on receipt of 

Installation of right-hand controls: steering, 
brake, clutch, and throttle. $350; installation 
and mounting on Jeep, $100; delivery to Boston 
by factory trained instructor, $200. 
Net total, $5,750. 

Respectfully yours, 

Eugene K. Welsh, 
.\KsiHt(uit I'urcliusiny Agent. 

Buii.iii.sc Dki'Aictment. 
Church Demolition 
Dear Mr. Mayor: 

There was a serious fire early this morning 
in the Bethany Baptist Church. 60 West Cot- 
tage street, corner of Judson street, Roxbury. 

The condition of the building is such that 
immediate steps must be taken to raze the 
structure to the foundation and more especially 
to raze the chimney which seriously menaces 
the adjoining property. 

Since the condition admitted of no delay, I 
authorized Dennis J. Keohane, Head of Con- 
struction and Safety Inspections Division of 
this department who was on the site with a 
force of inspectors to solicit bids from not less 
than three concerns engaged in building wreck- 
ing business and thoroughly familiar with the 
hazard involved. I instructed Mr. Keohane 
further to receive the bids at the premises and 
open them in the presence of witnesses. He 
has done so. The figures are: 

F e 1 1 s w a y Building Wrecking Company, 
$6,000. 

Mystic Building Wrecking Company. $5,425. 
Bay State Building Wrecking Company, 
$4,750. 

The public interest so requiring, I have au- 
thorized the Bay State Building Wrecking 
Company to proceed at once to raze the dan- 
gerous portion of the building and to complete 
the task as rapidly as posssible. Accordingly, 
I ask your Honor's permission to award the 
contract, without advertising as required in 
the City Charter, to the Bay State Building 
Wrecking Company in the sum of $4,750. 
Very truly yours, 

Thomas J. Hughes, 
H u tiding Com m isaiov er. 

Election Department. 
Transportation of Machines 

Dear Mr. Mayor: 

The contract for the transportation of voting 
machines between the City of Boston, Board of 
Election Commissioners, and P. A. Milan, Inc., 
expires on December 31, 1958. 

P. A. Milan, Inc., has performed this service 
for approximately eight years in a satisfactory 
manner, having supplied first-class equipment 
and men capable of performing the duties re- 
quired in the transportation of these machines. 
The men employed by the contractor are ex- 
perienced men, and all operations are in strict 
accordance with the rules and regulations of 
both the Interstate Commerce Commission and 
the Massachusetts Department of Public 
Utilities. 

P. A. Milan. Inc., in addition to having a 
large fleet of trucks has the specialized equip- 
ment with which to handle these machines, 
including the padding for the machines, covers 
for the machines, winch trucks with hoists, 
and special blocks and hand trucks, in order 
to give more efficient and proper sei-vice in the 
delivery of the voting machines, so that they 
can be used for each election function. 

In 1955, P. A. Milan, Inc., was the successful 
bidder for the transportation of voting ma- 
chines at the price of $17.85 for the moving 
of each machine. In subsequent years, despite 
labor increases, the Milan Company absorbed 
these additional increases and continued the 
transportation of voting machines for this 
Board at the same contract rate, $17.85 for 
each voting machine. 

We have been advised that the year 1958 
saw the completion of negotiations for a new 
contract with Local 25 Teamsters Union for a 
period of three years. This means an increase 
in the rate per hour, the formation of a pen- 
sion fund, and a health and v^elfare fund. In 
addition to these increases insurance rates and 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 17 



other coslH have steadily increased. All <.f 
these factors have made it ncci-ssury for I'. A. 
Milan. Inc.. to ask this year for $19.75 for the 
movine of each votinir machine. 

In view of the fact that the services of 
1'. A. Milan, Inc., has been satisfactoi-y in the 
past, and that it possesses the necessary etjuip- 
menl to handle the transportation of niiichines 
properly. I respectfully recommend that the 
contract for the moving of votinK machines 
for the year 1959 be awarded to P. A. Milan. 
Inc.. 202 State street. Boston, without the 
usual advertisinK- 

Respectfully yours, 
Hdaki) op Elrction Commissioners, 

David Laskek, C/ifiirnKin. 

ri Bi.ii- WORK.S Department. 
Architectural Services 
Dkah Mk. Mayor: 

It was decided last year, as part of the 
Capital Improvement I'rocram. to construct a 
irannre to be use<l by the Sanitary Division for 
the storane of mec-hanical street -cleaninK equip- 
ment and with some office space at 650 Albany 
street. Hoston. at an estimated cost of $200,000. 

This money was made available as the result 
of an order passed by the City Council under 
date of AuKUst 16. 1957. and approved by your 
Honor, in the amount of .$4,950,000. The afore- 
mentioned $200,000 is included in the amount 
authorized to be borrowe<i. 

Storage space for mechanical sweepers, 
front-end loadei-a. flushers and trucks working 
out of this yard is unfently nee<led. It will be 
advantageous to have some of the mechanical 
sweepers, which previously have been placed 
in dead storage, available during the winter 
months when a break in the weather permiU 
their use. In addition, new offices are needed. 
The present office building is over eighty (80) 
years old, and a replacement is badly needed. 
The demolition of this building will be in- 
cluded in the construction contract. 

It is my intention, subject to your approval, 
to engage the services of John Guarino of 2 
Lexington street. East Boston, as architect for 
this project. Mr. Guarino has submitted a 
proposal to me in which he agrees to under- 
take the design of the building and preparation 
of the plans and specifications, and supei-vision 
of construction at a fee based on 6 per cent 
of the total cost of the proposed improvement. 
This fee is standard, and no advantage would 
accrue to the city by publicly advertising for 
proposals for these services. 

I therefore respectfully request your author- 
ity to dispense with advertising and to award 
a contract to John Guarino. architect, of 2 
Lexington street. East Boston, for furnishing 
complete professional services in connection 
with the preparation of plans and specifica- 
tions and supervision of construction for the 
building to be constructed at the SaniUry Di- 
vision yard of the Public Works Department, 
650 Albany street. 

It is understood that the architect will ac- 
cept, as full payment for the furnishing of the 
aforementioned services, 6 per cent of the 
total cost of the contract award for the con- 
struction of the building for which plans, 
specifications, and construction supervision are 
to be furnished by him. 

Respectfully yours. 



GAS F ITH.N(i PERMITS 

The Building Department has issued 
the following gu.s fitting permits for in- 
stallation of appliances for the week end- 
ing Janu.'iry !l: 

Note: Wards are indicated in parentheses 
(4), (16), etc., followinE name of street. 



VETERANS' RETIREMENTS 

The Mayor ha.-- apiMox cd the following 
vrtoran.s' applications lor ret irenient : 

John DiLoreti, also known as Giovanni Di- 
I.oreti and Giovanni Loreti, 155 K street. 
South Boston, maintenance mechanic (paint- 
er). Sanitary- Division. Public Works Depart- 
ment. 

Harry F. Hunter. 36 McLean street, a.s- 
sisUnt drawtender. Bridge Division. Public 
Works Department. 

Frank Guerra, 671 Saratoga street. East 
Hoston. laborer. Sanitary Division, Public 
Works Department. 





1 

1,0< ATKiN 


IIST 


P. fJulesian 


1-17 .Arlington st (IR) 


$400 


K. Healy 


,'>! .\rniandine St (17) 


1 7 .50 


J. Freed man 


44 Bellevue »t C'O) 




1). Morgan 


21(8 Bolton St (0) 


.50 




.tl Brainard st (18) 


200 


1). {i'lXTu 


124 I) St (7) 


1.50 


.1. 1 n-,<liiian 


12 Devon st (12) 




1'. (Hlll'Sillll 


220 Fairniount av (18) 


3(")0 


W. Ci.nn. ll 


.") Franeonia st ( Ifi) 


1.5 


J. I'rcednian 


23 (ialena st (11) 


3.5 




:{3 (iranville st (Kl) 


.50 


I'. Cijpsian 


27 Hilton st (18) 


200 


H. Hinckley 


4<.* .laniaiea st (II) 


.50 


W. Connell 


.').■) Johnston rd (14) 


20 


.1. Freednian 


23 Lambert av (!») 




P. (iulesian 


H) N*e|>on8et a\' (18) 


250 




17 Parker Hill av (10) 




P. Ciulesian 


40 Pierce st (18) 


200 


P. (iulesian 


10.57 River st (18) 


200 


P. CiuIesian 


«.') SafTord st (18) 


200 


1). Morgan 


102 Sax ton (13) 


.50 


\V. Connell 


10 Selden st (17) 


.50 


D. I'uopolo 


1 10 Stoiighton st (13) 


7.5 




.'><) Sununit st (18) 


1.50 


L. Pike' 


17 Thomas pk (7) 


3.5 


P. ( Iulesian 


76 Washington st (18) 


200 


W. Howdy 


1320 Washington st (3) 


1.50 


P. Ciulesian 


.39 Westminster st (18) 


400 


J. Freed man 


261 West Newton st (4) 


80 


.1. Freednian 


.59 Whiting st (12) 




W. Awad 


66 Adanison st (22) 


100 


R. Ebba 


12 .\ntrim st (1) 


40 


F. Celli 


130 Babson st (18) 




B. Shillman 


107 Bloomfield st (17) 


60 




74 Chestnut av (10) 




V. Avery 


47 Cornwall st (11) 


25 


D. Carey 


2,5 Cortes st (.5) 


25 


F. Awad 


67 Dunbov st (22) 


25 


ft. Trethewey 


219 Uurnell av (20) 


250 


1-. .\verv 


40 Easton av (18) 


40 


R. Ebba 


117 Falcon st (1) 


20 


W. Awad 


281 Faneuil st (22) 




R. Ebba 


Rear 14 Frankfort st (I) 


20 


Ci. Trethewey 


7 (iranada av (18) 




J. Dunston 


24 Hanover st (3) 


r'".5 


("i Tretliewpv 


">.5 Hastings st (20) 


2.50 


(J. Trethewey 


9 Haw tliorne ter (18) 


170 




3 Howard av (13) 


40 


1>. Janis 


4.5 Howard av (13) 




W. Awad 


33 .Mansfield st (22) 


■'''■> 


R. Ebba 


180 Marion st (1) 


20 


S. Lit man 


19 Morlev st (9) 




E. Sawyer 


1 1 Myrtle .st (3) 


300 


\, Ciranara 


2.59 North st (3) 




Ci. Trethewey 


40 Oriole st (20) 


2.50 


R. Ebba 


28 Porter st (1) 




R Ebba 


103 Porter st (1) 


20 


W. Awa.l 


2.5 Portsmouth st (22) 




R. Ebba 


179 Princeton st (I ) 


20 


R. Ebba 


142 St. .\ndrew rd (1) 


60 


R. Ebba 


203 .Saratoga st (1) 


4.5 


R. Ebba 


2.57 Saratoga st ( 1 ) 


20 


R. Fbl.a 


442 Saratoga st (1) 


20 


\V. Awad 


47 .Saunders st (21) 




W. Emerv 


24 Seattle st (22) 


.500 


R. Ebba 


406 Sumner st (H 


20 


W. Connell 


78 Treniont st (22) 


20 


R. Ebba 


1 24 Trenton st ( 1 ) 


20 


I\ Averv 


17 Walk Hillst (19) 


25 


\V. Awad 


.571 A Washington st (22) 


50 


(i. Trethewey 


4298 Washington st (18) 


250 


(i. Trethewey 


4.501 Washington st (20) 


100 


(1. Trethewey 


497 Weld st (20) ^ 


225 


R. Ebba 


77 West Eagle st (1) 


20 


F. Odenweller 


219 East Sixth st (7) 


80 


A. Figler 


6 Winston rd (14) 


20 


(I. Trethewey 


1.5 Winton st (18) 


190 


11. ."^ellun 


33 Burgess st (8) 


235 


M. Wood" 


722 Dudley st (7) 


25 


1). Could 


22 (iranville st (12) 




I), (ri-arrell 


299 Grove st (18) 


.50 


\V. Fisliman 


30 Ruggles pi (17) 




W. Kislinian 


.34 Ruggles pi (17) 




W. 1 islinian 


.38 Ruggles |<i (17) 




1). Wrenctier 


940 Tn-niont st (9) 


8() 



J. 1 reed loan 
J. MacDonald 
W. Wisnia 
W. Crawford 
A. RusRO 
J. Principato 
J. Princiijato 
E. .Alieam 
J. Fopiano 
M. Vitalo 
H. Cieddia 

H. Cieddia 
W. Jacobs 
S. Kramer 
T. .Matthews 
T. Mathews 
A. Hebert 
W. Ilogan 
A. Hebert 

A. Hebert 
.M. Ciciolo 
M. ( "iriolo 

A. Hebert 
W. Hogan 
W. Hogan 
N. Rubin 
N. Rubin 
N. Rubin 
W. l-'afara 
S. Connolly 

C. Bevclander 
S. Connolly 
L. McCarthy 

E. .Mogel 

I. Silveretein 

B. D Agcwtin 

D. Palmariello 
S. Connolly 

F. Ricciardello 
M. Eskowiti 
W. Siathmary 
.S. Litnian 

Ci. Speros 
H. Mc.Mabon 
S. Connolly 
J. Dantona 
F. Ricciardello 
H. McMahon 
A. Oranara 



77 Walnut pk (11) 








1 10 Prxwk a*- (13)' ^ 




868 East Sixth st (0) 




79 Business st (18) 




24 Flw't «l (3) 




34 Hull st (3) 




221 I^ongwood av (4) 




71 Perkins st (2) 




76 .Midway si (6) 


1 00 


46 St. (jennain st (4) 


14 


126 .St. Botolph st (4) 




8 Sriiiller st (10) 




.56 ToplifT st (15) 


UKI 


70 Templeton st (16) 


II HI 


70 Templeton st (16) 




529 .Adams st (16) 


250 


99 Calumet st ( 10) 


l(K) 


39 Delmont st (16) 


1 50 


982 East Broadway (6) 




96 98 Erie st (14) 




8} (ilenwa.v st ( 14) 




1.5 Hilton st ( 18) 


2(MI 


21 liolten st (22) 




760 Huntington av (10) 


"'(ill 


37 .Asheville rd (18) 


60 


40 .Aslievilie rd (18) 


60 


49 .Asheville rd (18) 


fiO 


149 .Athens st (6) 


30 


14 Bow er st (12) 


1 3.5 


9 liowker st (3) 


.50 


41 Brook av (8) 




103 Prook av (13) 


40 


727 Centre st (19) 


375 


38 Cunimington st (21) 


M 


732 East Eighth st (7) 




73 Endicotl st (3) 


65 


68 George st (8) 


.50 


19 (iladeav (11) 


8.5 


19 Havelock st (14) 




22 Hiawatha rd (18) 


20 


149 Manthome rd (20) 


8.5 


100 .Northampton st (8) 


100 


10C5 River st (18) 


100 


31 Robey st (8) 


100 


16 Selden st (17) 




91 S|>encer st (17) 


600 


10 Summer st (18) 


85 


31 Tileston st (3) 


1 ,3(iO 


66 L'nion st (21) 


10 


.50 West Broadway (6) 


100 


8 Townsend st (18) 


1.50 



PLUMBING PERMITS 

The Building Dei)artment has issued 
the following ])liimbing jicrmits for in- 
stallation of plumbing fixtures for the 
week ending .January 

Note: Wards are indicated in parentheses 
(4), (16), etc., following name of street. 



Pn MBER 

E. .Martin 
L. Pike 

E. .Martin 
J. Donnelly 
J. Kelley 

G. Trethewey 
J. Donnelly 
R. Sawyer 
R. .Sawyer 
.A. Ciranara 

F. Dodd 

(i. Trethewey 
(i. Trethewey 
W. McKenna 
D. Ayles 
D. Avies 
J. larodi 
J. larodi 
L. Pike 
F. Sullivan 
N. Rubin 
L. Duniwin 
L. Dumwin 
S. Mogel 
M. Wallen 
N. Powers 
A. Milligan 



Location- 

.304 .Amor\- st (11) 
17 Thomas pk (7) 
16 Vinson st (16) 
.394 (ieneva av (15) 
51 Boylston st (3) 

9 Hawthorne ter (18) 
58 Hemenway st (4) 

1 1 Myrtle st (3) 

10 Newmarket 8<| (8) 
2.59 North st (3) 

92 State st (3) 
497 Weld st (20) 
15 Winter st (18) 
Mather School 
42 Beacon st (5) 
100 Boylston st (5) 
21 Walworth st (20) 
25 Walworth st (20) 
4.53 Washington st (3) 
13 .Morrissey Blvd (13) 
40 .Asheville rd (18) 
7 Bowdoin pk (15) 
47 Bristol st (3) 
727 Centre st (19) 
50 Itasca st (18) 
.36 .Manning st (18) 
GO West Broadway (6) 



500 
1.200 

3.50 

17(1 
1.200 
2.000 
4,200 
30 

2.50 



1.200 
3.000 
10.000 
900 
900 
400 
26.000 



Jan. 17 



CITY RECORD 



65 



BLILDINQ OPERATIONS DURING 1958 (WITH FIVE=YEAR COMPARISON) 





1958 


1957 


1956 


1955 


1954 


Num- 
ber 


Cost 


Num- 
ber 


Cost 


Num- 
ber 


Cost 


Num- 
ber 


Cost 


Num- 
ber 


Cost 


l-yp.; II 

T .IV 

\' 

\I 


40 
7 
73 
34 
454 


§26,863,700 
2.193,200 
2,334.600 
328,800 
4,421,400 


28 
10 
99 
40 
397 


$16,086,100 
2,534,300 
4,444,300 
293,500 
3,577,200 


32 
16 
99 
41 
545 


$21,454,600 
5,231,000 
2,917,600 
437,150 
5,324,850 


45 
9 

126 
50 
760 


$10,289,900 
1,724.000 
4,758,775 
197,665 
7,365,065 


38 
12 
90 
44 
638 


$11,090,161 
2,211,000 
2,250,820 
410,805 
5,974,965 


il new construction 


608 

5.668 


$36,141,700 
12,678,900 


574 
4,827 


§26,935,400 
14,756,465 


743 
4,716 


§35,365,200 
11,327,441 


990 
5,570 


$24,335,405 
12,955,418 


822 
6,466 


$21,937,751 
9,116,650 


i! construction 


6,276 


848,820,600 


5,401 


$41,691,865 


5,450 


§46.692,641 


6,560 


$37,290,823 


7,288 


§31,0.54,401 


Jing. 

Elrvators, alterations, freight 

SiL'ns, projections 

l ire escapes 

- r.klers 


6,274 
2,080 
1,195 
15 
65 
153 
319 

140 
381 
456 
180 
74 
60 


S972,200 
2,817.400 
1,015.900 
506,800 
1,512,600 
321.600 
638.500 
162,800 
44.900 
282,300 
619,700 
413,300 
154,200 


2.006 
6,239 
1.054 
25 
44 
90 
156 

307 
456 
239 
112 
40 
60 


•52,944,151 
811,630 
903,207 
1,442,990 
1,698,100 
123,400 
112,940 
181,770 
86,825 
415,500 
635,150 
494,592 
60,475 


2,376 
6,885 
603 

36 
109 
214 
492 
295 
321 
251 
117 
49 
63 


§2,432,589 
845,613 
419,019 
186,770 
747,290 
116,390 
272.997 
230,068 
90,770 
266,025 
458,110 
287,038 
21,400 


7;357 
612 
24 
34 
142 
233 
549 
397 
182 
183 
102 
91 
53 


§2.141,201 
799.938 
371,881 
105,885 
747,100 

80,476 
1,086,920 
245,410 
117,085 
136,208 
450,445 
281,409 

86,720 


2,658 

348 
28 
27 
128 
227 
440 
905 
112 
57 
96 
32 
74 


§2,795,490 
737,476 
429,4.35 
108,919 
413,926 

76,534 
223.193 
249,325 
187.830 

93,939 
141,800 
242,345 

52,690 


iutal 


11,713 


S9,462,000 


11,213 


$9,910,730 


11,847 


$6,374,070 


12,594 


§6,650,648 


11,644 


§7,997,657 


Total all work 




858,282,600 


16,614 


$51,602,595 


17,297 


$53,066,720 




$43,941,471 


18,932 


$36,807,303 

























AMENDMENTS TO ORIGINAL 
AWARD OF DAMAGES 

The Maj-or and Public Improvement 
Commission have approved the follow- 
ing: 

That the amount of $280 be awarded to John 
Corey for all damages sustained under the 
order of the Public Improvement Commission 
and Mayor of March 6, 1957, for the laying 
out and construction of June street, West 
Roxbury. 

That the amount of $150 be awarded to 
George H. and Harr>' N. Oshry for all dam- 
ages sustained under the order of the Public 
Improvement Commission and Mayor of Oc- 
tober 16, 1957, for the laying out and construc- 
tion of Topeka street (formerly Bumham 
street), Roxbury. 



CLAIMS APPROVED 

The Mayor, on recommendation of the 
Corporation Counsel, has approved the 
following votes of the Committee on 
Claims: 

Arthur J. White, Jr.. 34 Cook street. 
Charlestown, for compensation for personal 
injuries caused by a hole in the sidewalk at 
the curbing on Mystic place, corner of Cook 
street, Charlestown, October 20, 1957, by pay- 
ment of $290. 

Anthony C. Pctrone. 54 I street. South Bos- 
ton, to be reimbursed as a result of an ac- 
cident which occurred on November 2, 1957, 
when a motor vehicle belonging to the Parks 
and Recreation Department, which he was 
operating collided with an automobile owned 
by Irving Chait, by payment of $50. 



Leo J. Sullivan, 440 Norfolk street, Mat- 
tapan, for reimbursement as a result of an 
accident which occurred on July 28, 1958, when 



a motor vehicle belonging to the Sanitary Divi- 
sion, Public Works Department, which he was 
operating, collided with an automobile owned 
by Arthur J. Donisi, by payment of $28.30. 



No. 7. 

CITY OF BOSTON. 



ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES DEPART- 
MENT, PURCHASING DIVISION. 



Proposals for Furnishing Dry Goods and 
General Clothing to the Boston City 
Hospital. 

Proposals may be obtained at Room 53, City 
Hall. At this room the bids will be opened 
and read Thursday, January 29, 1959, at 12 M. 
The bidder must leave his proposal with a cer- 
tified check for $100, payable to and to become 
the property of the City of Boston if the 
proposal is not carried out. A duplicate 
bid, without cheek, must be left with the 
Auditor prior to the time for opening bids. 
Envelopes containing bids to be sealed and 
marked "Proposal for Dry Goods and General 
Clothing." The successful bidder must furnish 
a faithful performance bond for one half the 
total estimated amount of the contract with a 
surety company authorized to do business in 
Massachusetts. The Purchasing Agent reserves 
the right to accept or reject any and all bids, 
or any part of a bid, and to award the con- 
tract as he deems for the best interests of the 
city. 

John V. Moran, 
(Jan. 17.) Purchasing Agent. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



DEPARTMENT OF SCHOOL BUILDINGS. 



Invitation for Proposals for Furnishing 
and Installing New Stage Equipment 
at the James P. Timilty School, John 
Eliot Square, Roxbury, Mass. 
The City of Boston, acting by the Superin- 
tendent of Construction of the Department of 
School Buildings, Boston, Mass., hereinafter 
referred to as the Awarding Authority, invites 
sealed proposals for furnishing and installing 



new stage equipment at the James P. Timilty 
School, John Eliot square, Roxbury, Mass. 

Proposals will be received until 12 o'clock 
noon, Monday, January 26, 1959, at the office 
of the Awarding Authority, fourth floor, 26 
Norman street, Boston, Mass., at which time 
and place they will be publicly opened and 

Proposals shall be submitted in duplicate 
on forms obtained from the Awarding Au- 
thority. Each copy of the proposal shall be 
properly filled out, signed and inclosed in a 
sealed envelope, plainly marked with the name 
of the bidder and the description of the work 
bid upon. One copy shall be filed at the oflice 
of the Awarding Authority, designated above, 
and the other copy shall be filed at the office 
of the City Auditor, City Hall, Boston, Mass. 
Both copies shall be filed before the time 
stated above for the opening of proposals. 

A bid deposit in the form of cash or a cer- 
tified check on, or a treasurer's or cashier's 
check issued by a responsible bank or trust 
company, payable to the City of Boston, in 
the sum of $200. shall be submitted with the 
copy of the proposal filed with the Awarding 
Authority. The bid deposit shall be in a sepa- 
rate envelope, properly marked. 

No bidder may withdraw his bid within 
thirty days after the actual date of the open- 
ing thereof. 

The successful bidder will be required to 
provide by insurance for the payment of com- 
pensation and the furnishing of other benefits 
under the Workmen's Compensation Law, 
General Laws ( Ter. Ed.), chapter 152, to all 
persons to be employed under the contract, 
and suflicient proof of compliance with the 
foregoing stipulation will be required before 
commencing performance of this contract. 

A perfoi-mance bond, issued by a surety 
company satisfactory to the Awarding Au- 
thority, in the full amount of the contract 
will be required of the successful general con- 
tractor. 

The Awarding Authority reserves the right 
to waive any informalities and to reject any 
and all bids if it be in the public interest so 
to do. 

Charles A. Callanan, 
(Jan. 17.) Superintendent of Construction. 



CITY Kb: CORD 



Jan. 17 



IIKAI. PKOPERTV DKPARTMKNT 



AttTtoa. To Bi Hm^ on nia I'Bmmu 
TfiMtAT. J*at«aT 27. I«a» 



rHAKI»TOWN 



BOSTON- 




• mill »l<)n- (varant), 
Miniiiiiini (irirc 

MaKET 

>u Vn>aiii l.iii.l. 1. 101 wiiiati- fn-t. 
Minimum |>ric<-. t200. IVpuwi. S20U. 

-I .I TU BOSTON 
- ? Suroxii Sratrr 
t.< land. 1.300 aaiuarp frrt. 
pnrr. UM IV|Kwt, S2.'iO. 

KOXBl KY 
naBK Cnvrt. NiiariiiriwT 8iDr. tKn lOHJ 
.M. IMHI 1 h. «..vt Sracrr 

! J.'jnH wiuaiT fwl. 

»M« l>r|«»ll. $000. 



.HHH tsi> '.'miO ■JV.IJ AMI 2SH 

\Vta|IIMlTn\ STRr.KT 

1 Varant land. 2.>.708 ar|uarp fnrt. 
.Ndmmuni imrr. K.OOO. Drixwui. 

IXlRrUFSTKR 

^ WK^Trai-i SiiiK 

- i»wn Nfi, 1777 and 



U>T SO 

nr 220 tVlhi atrwi). 
il. Mioinnini price. 

» KirrKKLT SlDK 

adjarvnl No. 47). 
il. Minimum prin-. 



rm-r Turlk I'ond 
2.7'. wiuarr fwt. 
t\.2M. IVK«it. 



\U..-1 KO.XBIRV 
HKtycii'K Stbket. Lot B 
I 20 r.ti. Vacant land ladjaccnl No. 6C), 
hV7n fiumn- U-rt Ki-iidcnttal. .Minimum price. 

Tii«i -ii STMr n. l.on. 1I.J. IH. I IS. *M' 

W II I n Sra» rT. I.OT 1 12 
: M \ ' !,.| (corner Thrtiah and 

:> K<-aidrnlial. Mini- 

*7W. 

i» 4!l AM. .W 
1 n ar 2:{22 JXiO Ccnlrc 
„ti. . ^ I ..,,,.,1, f. . I Kcaidi-otial. .Minimum 
prirr >;.>.'iU lli-|HMii. t2.'iO. 

Nm ll»»»N SlKKKT. 1.0TI« 4.1 AMI 44 

1 .'lO i-.y \acani land i.W-'< Ufi fiom Sliinaon). 
11 IMU wiiian' Ilrnidcntial. .Minimum price. 
•U7A. Ili-|N»il. 

KivKHiiKw Stbkkt. Ixit .W 
2.00 r u \acant land (KM (eet (rora No. 7(M. 
2 tt.'H aiiuaFT- (i-«-t . Kemdential. .Minimum price. 
DeiKMit. KiOO. 

Ki.i.H«ooii t^TnntT. I.OT i:n 

2.10 C M. \Bcant land il.VI (i-<-t frt.iii No. 10). 
4.2<K1 Miiian- f.t-l. Ketidential. .Minimum pnce. 
«2UU IVi^wii. $2(X). 

K»KM\<ilT STKK».-r. I.OT* l.VI. 1 .W. 1.56 
2.1'(» f.M. Vacant land ladjacent No. 19), 
12.(i;U) •.piari- feel. Kcsidential. .Minimum r>ri<*. 
»7:iO. DciKwit. $7.'iO. 

Bhook Kah« Komi. Lot 127 

2 .1.1 i-.u. Vacant land ladjacent No. .W). .1.120 
aiiuarr feet. Kemdential. MiniiiiiMii price. $100. 
IVimml. $100. 

BRI(;HTON 

II COHIIAM STBlihrr 

2.5.J I'.M. Tliu-o-Btory hiick (vacant). 0.000 
s>iuare feet. BunineBH. Minimiini piicc. $.5,000. 
I>t>o«it. $1,000. 

BRAiNtinii KoAO. SotriiEAKT SiuK. Rear 

:».0.5 ivM. Vacant land (rear No. 10 and 18). 
1.801 wiuan' fei't. Kemdential. Minimum pric«-. 
$400. IViKMit. $400. 

I>e|iumt in casli or certified clieck rei|iiired at 
tlw tune and place of sale, balance of sale piicc. 
if anv. to(n-tlier willi the |>a.vment in lieu of taxes 
pn'»riil»<l li.v law to h<- paid in 30 days. The 
CuiiiiinHKioner n-wrven the riKht tii reject any and 
all hidf. Ml saleii mibjtci to confirmation by the 
("oiiiiiuttiH- on Kon-clcwed Real KfUte. .Successful 
hiddeiH Mill lie n-<|uiied to i>ay rrcordinK fees and 
for ."<tate excise Hlani|>s on deeds. .Attention is 
called to C lmptcr 247 of .Acts of 19.55. 
Hehman Carp, .Ioiin J. .McCIbatii. 

Commitsionrr . Aurtiontrr. 

(Jan. 17.) L.\ 5100. line 44.5 



proposal shiiuld be enclosed in an envelop. 
»ealc»l. marked •I'ruposal for SeweraRe Worli^ 
in Sherrin Street. Windham Road. Austin 
Street, and Gullet in Private Land and Grew 
Avenue Extension. Hyde Park." and left at 
Room 506 (Contract Office), fifth floor. Citjr 
Hall Annex, before 2 P.M. of WEDNESDAY. 
FEBRUARY 4. 1959. with a certified check 
for EIGHTEEN HUNDRED (l.SOO) DOL- 
LARS, payable to and to become the property 
of the city if the proposal after acceptance is 
not carried out. The proposals will then 
be publicly opened and read in the Hearins 
Room. 401 City Hall Annex. 

Proposals must be made in duplicate, the 
sealed duplicate, without check, to be deposited 
by bidder with the City Auditor previous to 
the time named for opening the bids. All pro- 
posals must be from bidders of record on file 
at Room 506. City Hall Annex. There uiU be 
a charge of tuo doUara NOT REFUND- 

AlihK. lor each »el of contract documenU 
taken out. If the price of any item appears 
to the Commissioner to be abnormally high or 
low. or the bidder nc-iflects to bid on each and 
every item, it may lead to the rejection of the 
proposal containing such price. The r^te 
per hour of the wages to be paid to mechanics, 
teampters, chauffeurs and laborers in the work 
to be performed under the contract shall 
not be less than the rate of wages in the 
schedule determined by the Commissioner of 
Labor and Industries of the Commonwealth, 
a copy of which schedule is annexed to the 
form of contract referred to herein. Copies 
of said schedule may be obtained, without 
cost, upon application therefor at the office 
of the Commissioner of Public Works. Before 
commencing performance of this contract, the 
Contractor shall provide by insurance for the 
payment of compensation and the furnishing 
of other benefits under chapter 152 of the Gen- 
eral Laws (the Workmen's Compensation Law 
so called) to all persons to be employed under 
this contract and shall continue such insurance 
in full force and effect during the term of 
this contract. The undersigned reserves the 
right to reject any or all proposals or to 
award the contract as he deems best. 

Robert P. Shea, 
(Jan. 17.) rommissiOTicr of Public Workt. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 

ITHLIC WORKS DKIWRTMENT. 

SE\VERA(iE WORKS 

Proposals for Sewerage Works in 
Sherrin Street, Windham Road. 
Austin Street, and Outlet in 
Pri\ate Land and (irew .\\enuc 
Extension, H>de Park. 

The Commissioner of Public Works of the 
City of BosUin. Room 506 (Contract Office), 
City Hall Annex, invites proposals from citi- 
tens of the United States and corporations or 
other U-gal associations wherein the controlling 
interest to the extent of at least over one 
half thereof is owned by a citizen or citizens 
of the United States, for sewerage works in 
Sherrin str«t. Windham road. Austin street, 
and outlet in private land and Grew Avenue 
Extension, Hytle Park. A performance bond and 
also ■ labor and materials or payment bond, 
each of B surety company igualified to do busi- 
ness under the laws of the Commonwealth and 
satisfactory to the Commissioner and eac^t in 
the sum of 100 per cent of the contract price 
will he required of the successful contractor. 
Forms of proposals mav be obtained at Room 
506 (Contract Offlcol. Citv H.hII Annex. The 



Proposals for Fi'Rnishinc General Schooi 

AND OpTICE St'PPLIES FOB THE BOSTON 

Plblio Schools. 
The School Committee of the City of Boston 
invites bids for furnishing and delivering at 
the Supply Room of the School Committee, 440 
Hrookline avenue. Boston, general school and 
office supplies as per schedule. Proposal forms 
are obtainable at the office of the Business 
Manager of the School Committee, 15 Beacon 
street, tenth floor. Envelopes containing pro- 
posaN must be sealed and plainly marked 
"Proposal for General School and Office Sup- 
plies." The bid must be in duplicate. One 
copy, signed by the bidder, and accompanied 
by a certified check payable to the City of 
Boston in the amount of two hundred dollars 
($200), must be left at the office of the Busi- 
ness Manager on or before twelve o'clock noon 
on Monday, February 2, 1959, Copies filed 
with the Business Manager will be publicly 
opened and read at twelve o'clock noon of the 
day stated. The other copy, also signed by the 
bidder, must be filed with the City Auditor, 
City Hall, Boston, Mass., previous to the time 
named for the opening of the bids. The 
School Committee reserves the right to reject 
any or all bids and to accept the bid or bids 
which it deems best for the interests of the 
City. The bidder awarded the contract must 
furnish a suitable b<md or dei>osit of money 
or other security for the faithful performance 
of the contract in the amount of not less than 
50 per cent thereof. 

Leo J, Burke, 
ntisinrs* Manager of the School Committee. 
(Jan, IT,) 



.Iax. 17 



CITY RECORD 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Police Uniforms. 
The Police Department of the City of Boston 
invites proposals for the making and delivering 
of police uniforms. The bidder must use the 
form of proposal to be obtained at the office 
of the Property Clerk, 154 Berkeley street, 
Boston, and deposit with his bid. at the office 
of the Police Commissioner, a properly certi- 
fied check for $1,000, payable to and to become 
the property of the Police Commissioner for 
the City of Boston, if the proposal is not car- 
ried out. Proposals will be publicly opened 
and read on Friday, January 23. 1959. at 
twelve o'clock noon, at the office of the Police 
Commissioner, 154 Berkeley street, Boston, 
Mass. The Police Commissioner reserves the 
riirht to accept or reject any or all proposals 
any part of a proposal, and to award the 
• vHCt as he deems for the best interests of 
Police Department of the City of Boston. 

. bond will be required of the successful 
I- 1. in an amount equivalent to 50 per cent 
. 1 the estimated amount of the contract. 

Leo J. Sullivan, 
(Jan. 17.) Police Commissioner. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES DEPART- 
MENT, PURCHASING DIVISION. 



Proposals for Furnishing Annual-Type 
Plants for the Parks and Recreation 
Department. 
Proposals may be obtained at Room 53, City 
Hall. At this room the bids will be opened 
and read Friday. January 30, 1959, at 12 M. 
The bidder must leave his proposal with a 
certified check for $100, payable to and to 
become the property of the City of Boston 
if the proposal is not carried out. A dupli- 
cate bid, without check, must be left with 
the Auditor prior to the time for opening 
bids. Envelopes containing bids to be sealed 
and marked "Proposal for Plants." The suc- 
cessful bidder must furnish a faithful per- 
formance bond for one half the total estimated 
amount of the contract with a surety company 
authorized to do business in Massachusetts. 
The Purchasing Agent reserves the right to 
accept or reject any and all bids, or any part 
of a bid, and to award the contract as he 
deems for the best interests of the city. 

John V. Moran, 
(Jan. 17.) Purchasing Agent. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



PENAL INSTITUTIONS DEPARTMENT. 



SALE OF PIGS AT THE HOUSE OF COR- 
RECTION, DEER ISLAND, BOSTON, MASS. 



Solicitation of Bids to Purchase Pigs at 
Deer Island, Boston, Mass. 
Sealed bids for the sale of one hundred and 
fifty (150) surplus pigs, weight about one 
hundred (100) pounds each, will be received 
by the Penal Institutions Commissioner, Room 
805, Citv Hall Anne.x, Boston. Mass., up to 
10 A.M.. January 26, 1959, and shall immedi- 
ately thereafter be publicly opened and read 
alcud. 

Said pigs were raised at Deer Island and 
may be seen there any day, except Sundays 
and holidays, between 8 A.M. and 4 p.m. 

The conditions of sale of pigs will be as 
follows: 

1. Bids are to be made on a basis of price 
per pound for the entire lot. 

2. Weighing of pigs to be bv a representa- 
tive of the Sealer of Weights' and Measures 
Department. Citv of Boston. 

3. The delivery of the pigs will be made at 
the piggery at Deer Island. 

4. Any attendant charges in connection 
with the sale are to be assumed by the suc- 
cessful bidder. 

5. Terms of Sale: F.O.B. Deer Island. The 
sum of two hundred and fifty dollars (.'?250), 
cash or cei'tified check, made payable to the 
City of Bcston. is to be deposited by each bid- 
der together with his bid. The $250 shall be 
considered as part payment for the pigs by the 
successful bidder. The balance, cash or cer- 
tified check, made payable to the City of Bos- 
ton, is to be paid on delivery of pigs after 
being weighed. 

e. The bid deposits of all other bidders will 
be returned immediately following payment of 
balance of purchase price by the successful 
bidder. If the successful bidder does not pay 
the balance of the purchase price and remove 
the pigs from Deer Island not later than 
February 3. 1959. the bid deposit shall become 
the property of the City of Boston as liquidated 
damages. The next highest bidder will then 
be designated as the successful bidder by the 
Penal Institutions Commissioner. 

7. The successful bidder will provide the 
transportation for the pigs from Deer Island 
and shall remove the pigs from Deer Island 
not later than 4 p.m., February 3, 1959. 

8. The Commissioner reserves the right to 
accept or reject any and all bids. 

Edward L. Fribl, 
Penal Institutions Commissioner. 
(Jan. 17.) 



CITY OF' BOSTON. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES DEPi'.RT- 
MENT, PURCHASING DIVISION. 

Proposals for Furnishing White Opaque 
Book Paper for the Printing Section. 
Proposals may be obtained at Room 53, City 
Hall. At this room the bids will be opened 
and read Wednesday, January 28, 1959. at 12 M. 
The bidder must leave his proposal with a 
certified check for $100, payable to and to 
become the property of the City of Boston 
if the proposal is not carried out. A dupli- 
cate bid, without check, must be left with the 
Auditor prior to the time for opening bids. 
Envelopes containing bids to be sealed and 
marked "Proposal for White Opaque Book 
Paper." The successful bidder must furnish a 
faithful performance bond for one half the 
total estimated amount of the contract with 
a surety company authorized to do business 
in Massachusetts. The Purchasing Agent re- 
serves the right to accept or reject any and 
all bids, or any part of a bid, and to award 
the contract as he deems for the best interests 
of the city. 

John V. Moran, 
(Jan. 17.) Purchasing Agent. 



Proposals for Uniform Shirts. 
The Police Department of the City of Boston 
invites proposals for furnishing and delivering 
police uniform shirts. The bidder must use 
the form of proposal to be obtained at the 
office of the Property Clerk, 154 Berkeley 
street, Boston, and deposit with his bid, at 
the office of the Police Commissioner, a 
properly certified check for $1,000, payable 
to and to become the property of the Police 
Commissioner for the City of Boston it the 
proposal is not carried out. Proposals will 
be publicly opened and read on Friday, Janu- 
ary 30. 1959. at 12 o'clock noon, at the 
office of the Police Commissioner, 154 Berkeley 
street, Boston, Mass. The Police Commissioner 
reserves the right to accept or reject any or 
all proposals or any part of a proposal, and 
to award the contract as he deems for the 
best interests of the Police Department of the 
City of Boston. Surety bond will be required 
of the successful bidder, in an amount equiva- 
lent to 50 per cent of the estimated amount 
of the contract. 

Leo J. Sullivan, 
(Jan. 17.) Police Commissioner. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 



Assessors' Notice to Taxpayers. 

City Hall Annex, 
Boston, January 1, 1959. 
Returns Must Be Made On or Before 

January 31, 1959. 
Particular attention is called to the As- 
sessors' notice posted upon City Hall and 
various other places throughout the city rel- 
ative to making returns on personal property 
subject to taxation. 

Earle R. Barnard, 

Assessor. 

(Jan. 10, 17, 24,31.) 



CITY OF BOSTON. 

BOSTON TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT. 

Proposals for Furnishing and Installing 
Traffic Control Signals at Ten (10) 
Intersections in the City op Boston, 
Mass. 

The City of Boston, acting by the Traffif 
Commissioner, hereinafter referred to as thi 
Commissioner, with offices at 112 Southampton 
street, invites proposals from citizens of the 
United States and corporations or other legal 
associations wherein the controlling interest 
to the extent of at least over one half thereof 
is owned by a citizen or citizens of the United 
States, for furnishing and installing traffic 
control signals at ten (10) intersections in 
the City of Boston, Mass. A performance bond 
and also a payment bond, each of a surety 
company satisfactory to the Commissiioner and 
eaoh in the sum of 100 per cent of the con- 
tract price win be required of the successful 
contractor. Forms of proposals may be ob- 
tained at 112 Southampton street. Each pro- 
posal should be filled out, signed, enclosed 
in an envelope, sealed, marked "Proposal for 
Furnishing and Installing Traffic Control 
Signals at Ten (10) Intersections in the City 
of Boston. Mass.," one copy of which is to be 
left at 112 Southampton street before 12 M. 
(Eastern Standard Time), on Thursday, 
January 29, 1959, with a certified check for 
five hundred (500) dollars, payable to and 
to become the property of the city if the 
proposal after acceptance is not carried out. 
The proposals will then and there be publicly 
opened and read. 

Proposals must be made in duplicate, the 
sealed duplicate, without check, to be deposited 
by the bidder with the City Auditor previous 
to the time named for opening the bids. If 
the lump sum price of any item appears to 
the Commissioner to be abnormally high or 
low, or the bidder neglects to bid on each and 
every item, it may lead to the rejection of 
the proposal. The rate per hour of the wages 
to be paid to mechanics, teamsters, chaufTeursi 
and laborers in the work to be performed 
under the contract shall not be less than the 
rate of wages in the schedule determined by 
the Commissioner of Labor and Industries of 
the Commonwealth, a copy of which is an- 
nexed to the form of contract referred to 
herein. Copies of said schedule may be ob- 
tained, without cost, upon application there- 
for at the office of the Commissioner. Before 
commencing performance of this contract, the 
Contractor shall provide by insurance for the 
payment of compensation and the furnishing 
of other benefits under chapter 152 of the 
General Laws (the Workmen's Compensation 
Law so called) to all persons to be employed 
under this contract, and shall continue such 
insurance in full force and effect during the 
term of this contract. The undersigned re- 
serves the right to reject any or all proposals 
or to accept any proposal or any part of a 
proposal should he deem it to be for the best 
interest of the city so to do. 

City of Boston, 

Timothy J. O'Connor, 

(Jan. 17.) Traffic Commissioner. 



MAVOR'S OFFICE. 

73 ( ,iy lUII T-l LA 3-11 



I'mt 

IttmtalUwn. 

• Irl.LA 3 2100. 

CITY COINCIL. 

' , 1' 1 !.-.r. Cily lUII. 



an (trwl. EmI 
Jk . \i Tbomu park. 



.13 Wr*t Kiglilii atnvl, 
I nil. It Harrinilua 
I M Broi>k Vunn rtmd, 
tj Ruakui •tfwt. Wc»t 

'ii((J<. CItrk a/ Cammiilrts. 
I I r>OKXU.L. Ctly Vttttnurr. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

ms l> l<t««%. CkairmaK. 1 Pir-iidrnt 

r.«d. Wr.i Ho,hur>. 

. '11 I lliiiLH. T/i Willow ttrrcl, 

\|oHiiow. .122 .\danM •trwl. Oor- 

I.. RciLLT. 10 roninicmwnillli 

.."rT. Jn.. 10<;k-nd»k .irr-rt. I>..r. 



XDMIMSTRATINT: SERVICES. 
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 
DEPARTMENT. 

WiLl ltW AnTIII R KlILI V. Ittrtrlor. 

inlirr. M I itv Hull TrI I. A :i .MOfl. 

Ai-« , , I. . . 

WlLLUM \. 

Juil<< I' 

S«Mi ri. K (.<i..i.«i>. .Su/v.riJKt. 
omrr. 25 «H)- lUII. TrI. I.A :t .MOO- 

K»t. -.ur, :ti« .117. 



J«MK> J. I' 
Oftirr, 171 \ 
ADMINISTRAtl> 



ItOARD. 



DIJ'AH I MI.NT. 
• ■<> lUII Annoi. Tel. 



lU'MiK or RcviBW. 
TiioMt* A. l-i.tiiurrT, 

Kl>«tBt> f. Ml'LLkK. 

Kablk R. Hjtiivtan. 

AUDITINQ DEPARTMENT. 

Ronm II. (-Ilr Hull Trt I.V .1 .MfKI 



OFFICIAL DIRECTORY 

BLILDIN(i Dtl'AKTMENT. 
Hi n i.ivo DiMniox. 
Oflk*. vol r,ty 11.11 Atin«-«. Tel. I.A » 5100. 
TlloM*« J. Ili iiiii-". Huiliiing CommiMttonrr . 

Ik>*Hi> oi Afftm.. 
HAMfU, To»i«.r.i.i.o. rAoifiwii.. 

|l..<Hi' •» KxtuiwrB*. 

JolIK « ;i ■ ' ' ' > "'■in- 

Botli - <•»» KlTTKHK. 

Tll01l^- I'OMB. 

• Ommimiion. 

WlLLUM \i > l;. M>. r*/itniia«. 

( OMMirTKK ON Ll< E!«»IU«. 

TiiuMA* J. Hiaiiiw. 

KKt!« la -X. COTTKB. TiMOTlIT J. O f OSNOB. 
HIL41XIN lllUL ARCIIITKCTt H»L foMMIBBIOS. 

JoiiM CoKMAV. Chntrm'in. 
KbanK J. {'OKIIII.IN. Srrrelnru. 

CITY CLERK DEPARTMENT. 

R.»m 22. City Hall. Tel. LA 3-5100. 
Waltem J. NlALLor, Citv Clerk. 

CITY PLANNING BOARD. 
n.«m 101. City lUll Annrn. Tel. LA 3-5100. 
TiMOTIIV J. RtuAN. Jb.. Chnirmnn. 

HotHii OI Zoning AvivnTur.ST. 

.\LIICBT V. CoLKMAN. r'/l/lirlflrtn. 

Olliw. 1 KM* City Mall Annex. Tel. LA 3 5100. 
Zf)MN<; CO.MMISHION. 
CIVIL DEFENSE. 
OHie.-. 115 ><«iitluiiiii.t<in hln^t. Til. 

HI 2 3020. 
Fbancih C. Clkary. Direrlor. 

ELECTION DEPARTMENT. 
OITicc, 111 City Mnll Annex. Tel. LA 3-5100. 

CuUMIKalONCH. 
David Lahkkb. Chairman. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 
Kxecuti%-e Headriuarleni. 115 Southampton 

.trect. Tel. HI 2-8000. 
FRANriB X. CoTTirH. Commutioner. 
Lro C. Dbircoll. Chief of Department. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 
OfTioc, Haymarket wiuare. Tel. CA 7-1300. 

Hl-.AI.TII Dl VIRION. 

Jons H. Caii.ev. Commifioner. 

rriii.ic H»:ai.tii Coi-.scil. 
Aliicbt a. Hornkr, .M.I)., Chnirmnn. 

Kkoikthv Division. 
1004 City Hall Annex. Tel. LA 3 5100. 
ClIABLiy H. Mackik, Cily Hegittrar. 

Wr.KlllTH ANIl Mkakl'rem Divioion. 
OOiec. Ktt City Hall Annex. Tel. LA 3 5100. 
John 1'. MK'artiiy. Seiltr. 

HOSPITAL DEPARTMENT. 
Main. 818 HarriiM.n ave. T. l. KK f. 8f-00. 
KiniARIt J. Condon, I'rttiHmt of TruAtrrt. 
I)n. John K. Cjinlin. Superintendent. 

Sanatobii-m Division. 
Dr. David S. Sherman, Superinteniirnl. 
11 1. BL 8-7900. 

LoN.i Ihlani. Division. 
John K. M<-< Iili.ivhav, Suprrinlendent. 
Tel. I'll 3 1371. 

LAW DEPARTMENT. 
H<K.ni 1(K)3. U«>vr» Building, 11 Beacon 

.in-et. Tel. LA 3 «200. 
William L. Baxter, Corporation Counsel. 

Workmkn'k Compenmation Service. 
Boom 7011. Cilv Hall Annex. Tel. LA 3-5100. 
TiioMAM L. .MK'oRMACK, Agent. 

LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 
Oiriee, Library BiiiMinit. Coplev 8<|unre. Tel. 

KK (i .5400. 
Kbwin D. Canii\m, I'retiiient of Trxuttee. 
Milton K. Lord, Director. 

PARKS AND RECREATION 
DEPARTMENT. 
Ofliee, 33 B<'neon ..tn-et. Tel. CA 7 (i'.l40. 
Kr\nk H. Ki.li.h, CnmmiAninner. 

Tabk, Pi hlk- Croi ndk, Bath, 
Kkreation Divinionh. 
I'm.- Bank Bl<lg., Jaiiiaicawav. Tel. 

J A I r.ion. 

CuMirriRV Division. 
OMiee, 33 IWacon »ti.-et. Tel. CA 7 fi'J40. 
PENAL INSTITUTIONS DEPARTMENT. 
Hoom so:,. City Hall Annex. Tel. LA 3-5100. 
Kdwabd L. Kriel, Commistioner. 
House of Correetion, Deer Island. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 
Headciiiarten, 154 Berkeley street. Tel. 

KE 6-6700. 
Leo J. Sl-LLIVAM, Committianer. 
I'BtNcta J. HENNE»sr, Superintendent. 



PLBLIC works DEPARTMENT. 

This de|>artiiient and all its division hewl- 
•iiiarters are located in City Hall .Annex. 
Tel. LA 3 5100. 

KoitLBT 1*. Shea, Commistinner, Room 503. 

.AlTOMOTivE Division. 
Timothy J. O'Leary, C/.i>/ Engineer, Rooui 
511. 

Bridge Divisio.v. 
John J. Mc<'all. Division Engineer, Room (iOl. 

Highway Division. 
KiTiiioBi) J. Kellev. Dirition' Jinoinrrr, 
Koom .501. 

Sanitary Division. 
John V. Flaherty, Dirition Engineer. Hixjiii 
.507. 

Sewer Division. 
Kdwabd fl. A. Powers, Dirimm Enginur, 
Koom 701 . 

Scbvev Division. 
James W. Haley, Chief Engineer, Room 40:i. 

Water Division. 
Daniel M. Sillivan, Dirinon Engineer, 
Room 007. 

Prune Improvement CoMMishioN. 
Herman Carp, Chairman. 
KoiiERT P. Shea and Timothy J. O'Connor. 

Commiimionert. 
U<H,M, 40.3. City lUlI. Annex. Tel. LA 3-5I0(J 
Kxl. m. 

REAL PROPERTY DEPARTMENT. ^ 

Dr>NOVAN, Aseiitt'tnt Commisnionrr. 
Hwmi m.>. City Hall Annex. Tel. LA 3-5100 
T his deimrtiiient als<i includes the following: 
Committee on Foreclo-kh Real Kstatk. 
Property Division. 
HriLi)iN<is Division. 
.Market Division. 
Omc<-, Quincy Market. Tel. CA 7 .5382. 

RETIREMENT BOARD. BOSTON. 
Rooms 30 32. City Hall. Tel. LA 3-5100. 
Walter J. .M alloy, Chnirmnn. 
Joseph 1'. Ijilly. John C. Kabaclius 

TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT. 
112 ."VMitliampton stieel. Tel. HI 2 "700. 
Timothy J. O'Connor, C ommimioner. 

TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 
JAMfji K. CiLDEA. Colterlor-Treiturer. 
l^»)m 10. City H.TI1. Tel. LA 3-5100. 
Treasi'by Division— Collection Division 

Sinking Fund Commissioners. 
William B. Caroi.an, Chairman. 

VETERANS' SERVICES DEPARTMENT. 

Otriee. ISComhill. Tel. LI 2 7940. 
VktoR C. Bynoe, Commimiianer. 
Fr\nk T. Pedonti. Supervisor of \'etcriuf' 
Cr-iret. 

14 State etrtH t. Tel. LA 3 4005. 

WELFARE DEPARTMENT. 
James S. Malooi , Chnirman. 
William F. Lally. Serretaru. 
Office, .Administration Building, 43 llawkin.s 

street. Tel. CA 7-8.320. 
Temporary Home, 47 Chardon gtrc«'t. Tel. 

LA 3-2;i37. 

OTHER SERVICES. 
AUDITORIUM COMMISSION. 

33 Beacon street. Tel. CA 7-6940. 
William D. Ireland. Chairman. 

BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF 
SCHOOL BUILDINGS, 
Office. 20 Norman street. Tel. CA 7-.57.50. 
Joseph F. O'Connell. Jr., Chairman. 

Department ok School Bvildinos. 
Olfice. 28 Norman street. Tel. CA 7-.57.50. 
Charles .A. Callanan, Superintendent of Con- 
st ruetion. 

BOSTON FINANCE COMMISSION. 

Office. 24 School street. Tel. LA 3-1022. 
.Anthony J. Yoi ng. Chairman. 

BOSTON HOUSING AUTHORITY. 
Office. 230 CongiTss street. Tel. LI 2 04.50. 
Frederick .A. Cromv. C/i<iiVm/in. 

BOSTON REDEVELOPMENT 
AUTHORITY. 

73 Tremont street. Tel. RI 2-0500. 
Joseph Lund. Chairman. 
Kane Simon i as. Director. 

LICENSING 'BOARD, 
Office, 24 Province street. Tel. CA 7-2470. 
Clarence R. Klam. Chairman. 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 
Omce. 15 Beacon street. Tel. CA 7-5500. 
Dennis C. Haley, Superintendent of Schools. 
Leo J. Burke, Butinesi Manager. 



CiTT or BoBTON i ^n^ l Printing Section 



CITY RECORD 

Official Chronicle of Boston Municipal Affairs. 

Vol. 51 Saturday. January 24, 1959 No. 4 

PRUDENTIAL HEAD REAFFIRMS FAITH IN HUB 



Carrol M. Shanks, President of the Pruden- 
tial Insurance Compan}' of America, at a 
city luncheon held in his honor on January 8, 
stated as follows: 

I Avould like to take this opportunity to 
reaffirm our faith in the future of Boston and 
New England. 

As you all know, we based our original 
decision to come here on the best data our 
economists and others could develop. So far, 
the general trends as we detected them three 
or four years ago seem to be materializing. 
This doesn't mean that Boston is out of the 
woods, because it isn't, and it won't be for 
some time to come — but there are unmistak- 
al)le indications of progress. 

We felt that the industries that ^\evc leaving 
the Boston area and New England generally, 
while they were important from the stand- 
point of large-scale employment and gross 
income, were less important to the future of 
this area than the new industries that were 
moving in. This has proved to be the case, 
and the rise in per capita personal income for 
this area is a good indication of what is really 
happening. With automation and other ad- 
vances in business and industrial operations, 
there will be a tendency throughout the na- 
tion to elevate the status and skills of workers, 
and Boston and the New England area are 
simply leading the parade. This head start 
is likely to prove highly profitable in the 
years to come. 



Before we made our decision to come here, 
it was obvious that the people of Boston were 
determined to do something concrete about 
solving their problems. We have seen this 
happen in several major cities across the 
country, and have been a part of the develop- 
ment of some of these cities. In every case, 
there has always been a solid corps of business 
and community leaders who have taken the 
responsibility for getting the job done. In 
the comparatively short period that we have 
been active in Boston on this project, we have 
seen that kind of citizen leadership crystallize 
here, and have watched it function with 
increasing efficiency and effectiveness. 

In the last year or two, we have seen an 
increasing improvement in new construction 
and renovation. We confidently expect this 
activity to increase in the years to come. I 
think it is safe to say there is a greater need 
for new construction in Boston than in any 
other major cit>' in the country. I believe 
your recent Greater Boston Economic Study, 
which has been reported in the newspapers, 
Ijears this out. 

But Boston still has some very grave and 
difficult prol)lenis. We know that as well as 
anyone. The tax problem could hardly be 
more serious, and solutions are not going to 
come easy. It is startling to discover that 
during the past thirty years, tax-exempt 
property has more than doubled in terms of 
dollar valuation, while the total value of 
(Continued on page 72) 



INDHX TO 
CITY HALL 



THE PRINCIPAL MUNICIPAL SERVICES 



ADMIMXTUATIVK SKI{VIC« 

ith I 

Ailminwlralivr Ihrinun 



,ir I ml JUwrorfit 



ALI>I11M> 

HdbMia ArrounU 



( rmrlrn I'll 
ClIV « 



..,r,l ) 

■ n ) 

(('4Ninnl HHit ) 



' ) 



Nirll ^i>l> I rrmil* (I uunnl »p|>r ) 
8«uhU\ Sport* ((Vjunal appr ) 



MiTting*. Mon<Ja 



M 



4lh floor 



Ciiy DorumvnU 
CITY RK(X)KD .3rd floor 

( <•MIM.AI.NT8 blVISKtN 2nd fl-^.r 
I DIT IMON .'Jrd i 

' itv r.mplovrr* 

' 2nil C.-.r 

. HONK I.A .1 1100 
2nd floor 

,,t u\ l.irrnm 3rd floor 

<\> (ttoalon Common) 

i.' -iiM 3rd fliwr 

III riUI.Mi:NT I«»Am) 3rd floor 

TItl \SI HV m\ ISION l.t fl<K.r 

CITY HALL ANNEX 



' A l(<^>air Sho|i« 



ri.ANNIN<; l«»AUO lllh I 

/x>ninK Adju»liii«iU 
/uninK Map* 



SUi floor 
6U) floor 
5th floor 



. ■ ' .■ i: ililt it l{r|Hur« 
.stm-t < »(n-iim|{» 
rrrmil • >tfirp 



Mh floor 
il.liiiih (Villcrlionp 

7lh fl<».r 



Siirvi v IHvu.ic.li Itli n<ior 

StO-rl ArrrpUJir« 

Sln-<-t I. HUH 
Wniit Divwioii . tilh floor 

Mrtrr UrwIuiK 

I'lililir Improvrmrat Comraiiaion 

4Ui floor 

ItlM. PK(»I'KHTY . 8th floor 

l^nrprlm^l Ural KjlUtr 
Markrt* 

< >(I-Slrrrt I'arking 
i'lilihr Huildinfp 
KKCI.STKY UIVISIO.V . 10th floor 
Hirlhu. I>rath« it Marna(r 
Orlificatm 

WKIC.HTS A m.KS^l llKS )st floor 

Mfafuring IVvirM 
WORKMKX'S COMI'KXSATION 

7th floor 

OUTSIDE CITY HALL 

■ l\ K I.Ml>Uii\ I MI NT (••iMMITTEK 

14 Statr Stn-rt I.A 3 1100 

Civil. DKFKNSi: HI 2-3020 

IIS Soulhamplnii Strwt 
I)1;MoI.ITION ((rt-mml) 

M St.it<- Stm-t I.A 3 1100 

KIN ANCK ( (tM MISSION I.A 3 1622 

21 School Stn-< l 
KIUi; III 2 8000 

1 15 Southampton Strwt 
Klammalilr A I'.xpkwivp .Matrrials 
KiK'l < III Humers it StoraKF 

IllK|MTlionK 

Kin- Abrm IIf.nl<|ii.irtpr» 

.VI Krnw.-iy KK 6-1100 

iii:ai.th . ca 7-1300 

II:i\ m.nrkd .Spi.-in- 
Hurial IVrmil." (NiRht.", City llo.ipil.ih 
Dump IVrmilB 
Krown DoiwrrtJ" I.ironsos 



CITY RECORD 



Thomas F O D»t. Wllor 

P NirnotAii P mw x ' M XI. Aucx-laU Editor. 

EtirmiiAi. Orrtr*. Roam »S. Citr H»ll. 



STREET AGENCIES. 
OM SoaU Nm SuimL OM Sonlh ntraixf 
•ubwar AIm Nm SUnd. Am floor. Citr 



Kunrral I)ir»-< lorn I.ircnsrg 
( iari>axr TnuifiKirt IVrmila 
llawkrrc it I'ltldleni Licvnnra 
llralth Ivlui-alioii IjilMinitory 
llralth SUtistii-ii .Milk Lircnurs 
Health I nita MoK-U 
IIOSI'ITAI. 

818 llarri«»n Avoniic KK C-86(^) 
lumt lioHton Kclirr Station 

n I'orli r Str«-t . U) 7-.36<X) 
IxiiiK Maiid lloxpiul rU 3-1371 
.Sanaluniim 

2I'.I KivcrStrot t HI, 8-7'K)') 

IKU SIMIKCOUUIXTION OC 3 27i.<i 

Ihvr InLuid 
IIorSINC AI TIKIUITY 

(IrnomI ()flir«*. ZUi Conpiw Sir.-. ! 

I.I 2 04.VI 

ApplirntionK. Ill MilkSt. LI 2 W50 
LAW LA 3-6200 

1 1 H«':iron Slrwt 
LIHKAUY KK 0-54O0 

Coplpy Scpiiirc 
LICKNSINC HOAUn CA 7-2-170 

24 l'rovinc-<- Strwt 
Alroholir Iti-vpragra 
Automutir .\miucnient Devices 
HowlinK .MU-yg 
Clul) I.iwn.v.-* 
Common \°ictiuller8 
Kmplovmcnt .\gencie« 
HoteU' 

IxxlsinK Hoiues 
roolKooms 
Shooting Oalleries 

MORTIAHY 

818 Harrison Avenue KK 6-6767 
KI-: 6-0768 
.NKIGHBOUHOOD RICHABILITA 
TKJN COMMITTKES 

14 State Street . LA 3-1100 

PARKS A RKCREATION CA 7-6940 
:« lieacon Strwt 
Ii4-arh and I'oois 
Cemeteries (City-owned) 
(iolf Courses 
Parkways ()eriipanrie.« 
riay^^unds 



I'ulihr Baths 
Trees 



KK 0^;7(KI 



HOLICK 

154 Berkeley Street 
Auctionwrs Il.-u-kneys 
Bieyrles Junk De.ilers 

Dogs I'awnbrokers 
Firearms Csed Cars 

Wagon A Hand Carts 
TRINTINC SIXTION LA -.iAHa 
174 North Strwt (Street Books) 

Ri;oi:vi:i.<ii'.MKXT aitikirity 

73 TremonI Strwt RI 2 O'Am 

CrlKin Renewal 
SCIKMII. BI II.DINCJS. 
lioard of Commissioners of 
2li Norman Strwt . C.\ 7 57.'(l 
SCH(M)I. CO.MMITTKi: 

15 Beacon Strwt CA 7-55<Ni 

BootliLicks. .NewslMjvs (12-16 years) 
45 .Myrtle Street . . C.\ 7 -55(hi 
TRAFFIC HI 2-77(111 

1 12 Southampton Strwt 
Ixiading Zones Parking Meters 
Traflic Signals Parades 
VICTKRANS' C.RAV^:S . LA 3-4(;( 

14 State Strwt 
VirrKRANS' SKRVICKS . RI 2-4Ci i 

18 Comhill 
WKLFARK . CA ,7 &-!20 

43 Hawkins Strwt 
.\id to Dc|)endent Children 
Chardon Strwt Home 
( ieneral Relief 
I)Ls:iliility .■Kssistance 
< lid .\gr .\s.«ist.inw 
Permits for Street Solicitations 



Jax. 24 



CITY RECORD 



FIN. COM. DESCRIBES ROLE OF REDEVELOPMENT BOARD 



January 16, 1959. 
To the Honorable the Mayor. 

This report discusses the rela- 
tionship between the Boston Rede- 
velopment Authority and the City 
of Boston. 

Summary 

The city is entering a new era. 
with respect to the financing of 
urban redevelopment. Heretofore, 
redevelopment las illustrated in 
the New York Streets project, the 
West End area, and other fed- 
erally-participated programs) has 
meant a contribution by the city ot 
only one third of the net cost. It 
has also meant a continuous finan- 
cial control by the federal govern- 
ment, since the latter supplied two 
thirds of the net cost. 

A new concept of redevelopment 
(as illustrated in the currently dis- 
I cussed Ro.xbury project and the 
j Government Center project) has 
I come into being and provides that 
the city will advance all the funds 
1 for acquisition, demolition and 
preparation of the area. 

As a result, the customary 
budgetary and auditing controls 
lieretofore supplied by the federal 
government will be absent, since 
there is no federal money involved. 
In a word, this new departure 
leaves a great void in the contr )1 
of city funds once the money 
leaves the city's hands. 

The city's funds involved are 
substantial: an amount of Sl,- 
500.000 is mentioned for the Rox- 
bury redevelopment project and 
an amount ranging between S15.- 
000,000 and S20,000,000 for the 
"Government Center. 

Clearly, some counterpart of the 
customaiy federal controls men- 
tioned above, and present hereto- 
fore in urban redevelopment, 
should be provided for tliis new re- 
lationship between the Boston Re- 
development Authority and the 
city. 



Description of Controls 

Tile cu.^tomary financial control 
l^rovided ])y the federal government 
in redevelopment projects are com- 
prehensive. In the typical urban 
redevelopment project, which is fi- 
nanced largely by federal funds, 
the following procedure is followed. 
A budget of estimated costs of the 
various elements of the project is 
la-epared by the Redevelopment 
Authority. This is reviewed, re- 
vised, if necessar>', and finally ap- 
proved by the Federal Housing 



Redevelopment 
Board Head OK's 
Audit Idea 

Chairman .Joseph ^^^ Lund of 
the Boston Redevelopment Au- 
thority, on .January 19, endorsed 
a reconmiendation by the Bos- 
ton Finance Commission that 
proper municipal officials be em- 
powered to make audits of any 
expenditures by the Redevelop- 
ment Authority on projects 
where only city funds are to be 
used. 

"The suggestion is construc- 
tive, and we are heartily in 
favor of it." ^Nlr. Lund said in 
behalf of the Redevelopment 
Authority in commenting on the 
Finance Commission report. 

'Mr. Lund revealed, in fact, 
that the proposed contract on 
the contemplated Whitney Street 
development in Roxbury con- 
tains provisions for an audit and 
inspection by the Mayor or his 
designated agents of all expendi- 
tures by the Redevelopment Au- 
thoritv. 

:\Ir.' Lund further .-^tated that 
every safeguard in the federal 
redevelopment contracts has 
been incorporated into the con- 
tract for the proposed city- 
financed Roxbury development. 



and Home Finance Agency, and 
this becomes the budget for the 
project. The Housing and Home 
Finance Agency requires a quar- 
terly report on a prescribed form 
from the local Redevelopment Au- 
thority. ^Moreover, federal audi- 
tors may appear at any time to 
audit the books of the local Re- 
development Authority. 

In such projects the federal gov- 
ernment approves demolition con- 
tracts, personnel and procurement 
policy, the purchase price of each 
parcel of property taken, the legal 
expenses involved et al. in a word, 
at virtually ever>- step in a federal 
redevelopment project, the federal 
government dictates the terms. 

The Finance Commission feels 
that provisions for a prototype of 
such a system of control should be 
made by the city government be- 
fore funds are adA'anced to the Re- 
development Authority for both 
the projects under discussion, 
namely, the Roxbury project and 
the Government Center project, 
and for future projects of this type 
in which the city supplies the 
funds. 

This control would cover such 
items as administration, planning 
and legal expenses; acquisition ap- 
praisal-, site clearance and prepa- 
ration, purcliase of real estate et al. 
A natural corollar\' of such a con- 
trol would be to invest the City 
Auditor with the authority to audit 
the operation of the Boston Re- 
development Authority with re- 
spect to these items, cariying out 
a control similar to the federal 
program. 

Imposing this restriction on the 
txpenditure of these funds by the 
Boston Redevelopment Authority 
will in no way impede the execu- 
tion of these redevelopment proj- 
ects. It will simply insure that 
the Redevelopment Authority will 
operate within a framework of 
budgetary and auditing control. 



12 



CITY RECORD 



Jan 



Minilar III iH< < t to tiiat uliirli (li< v 
have Ufti working with in privi- 

ParaJlel Cases 

A imrallil to tliii* situation was 
iit«i! in tiir UHo of city 
i-v till' H«»fiton Housing Au- 
. in tJir •'o-raik'«i C'liapt^r 

• ',2 pntKTHni in which appruxi- 
iiat» ly $ir>.*>(J().(JOO of city money 

It- to liuild hcm^"^ for vct- 
ran?«. At that time U«-n years 
uoi the l-'inance ( 'oiumisision 

lUeil attention to the absenre of 
uditing control by t-lic City Audi- 

• • >r. 

At that time, the Finance Com- 
■II. seckinn to Ret City of 
Auiiitiim I'ontrol over the 
aseti iM this public hous- 
iiH piogruni, sUitetl: 

"Although the Boston Housing 
Authority is a corporation separate 
and distinct from the City of Bos- 
ton Corporation; and therefore is 
not strictly a city agency, never- 
theless, in effect, it is a municipal 
•leency, spending city-raised funds 
ml funds provided for the city, 
lid exercising a distinct local 
unction." 

One form of control hits already 
Itch discusso<l by the Redevelop- 
iiiciit Authority. It is the infor- 
mally fxprcssnl intention of the 
Kcilevcldpniciii .\utiinrity to estab- 
ii>h in the case of the ( iovernnicnt 
Center project a pai» l of real es- 
tate ex|>ert.« to review the properly 
.Hc(|uisitioii :ippr!iisals. It is re- 
port«'«l that this panel device lia.s 
'mtu u.oetl by the Massachusetts 
I iirnpike Authority. However, it 
• nilfj Ih> jviinted nut that the 
rr lint exactly parallel. The 
u^etts Turnpike Authority 
iire<l by revenue bonds and 
not by state or city funds. For 
this reason the city should partici- 
I'lte in the creation of such a 
inel. 

Recommendation 

The Finance Ctnnmissinn reconi- 
i' tids that in view of the iiiip(>n(|- 
ing transfer of city funds in 
the amount*^ of $1,500,000 and 



5.|.'i.(H)«i.(HK) In *20.(),)U.()(J() ciii n iiily 
discussed for use in the Hnxbury 
and Covernment Center projects, 
res|H'ctively, provision for the fol- 
lowinu be made: 

That the resiHinsible city ofli- 
«-ials be em|>owered to tiike all 
tiiose e.«.>*ential stei)s which are 
taken cu.«tomarily by the federal 
agencies when federal funds are 
involved; these have been spellcil 
out above in this report. 

These devices can be built into 
this new relationship of the city 
and the Redevelopment Authority 
by ( 1 1 amending the enabling 
statute; or (21 by specific contract 
or agreement between tlic city and 
the Redevelopment Authority. 
Implications for the Future 

."significant implications for the 
future with respect to redevelop- 
ment are already apparent. "A 
l.'ill increasing the amount and 
term of indebtedness a city or 
town may incur for housing, rede- 
velopment and renewal projects" 
has been filed with the 19.59 Legis- 
lature. One effect of this bill, if 
passed, will be to increase the 
amount the city may borrow for 
this puri)o.<e. outside the debt 
limit, from the present 2 per cent 
of the average of assessed valua- 
(ion of .5 per cent. This means, in 
terms of dollars, increasing the 
present limit of approximately 
S28.000.000 to S70.000.090. in the 
case of Boston. 

An iiKleterminate amount of this 
borrowing |iower may well be used 
for wholly city-financeil redevelop- 
ment. One purpose of this report 
is to stimulate thinking in terms 
of designing local nmnicipal con- 
trols over city funds which may 
be devoted to redevelopment proj- 



rci- iiiiiiirdiatily pnij)n>ed am! 
the future. 

Respectfully submitted, 

.\.\THOXV J. Yui NG. Chairmav 
H. \V. DwKJHT Rini), 

KotiKU .1. .\l'.!ZAll). M.I)., 

Maxwkll B. < ;ho.ssman'. 

Thf Finance Comini.sslvi 

TnoM.vs .1. MiRPHV. 
Executive Sccretanj. 



Prudential . . . 

(Continued from front page.) 
taxable property has gone down 
more than .«J400" million. In 1927. 
there was 22 per cent as much tax- 
free j)roperty a.s ta.xahle; but l)y 
1957. there wa.s o\er 60 per cent as 
much tax-free property a.s taxable, 
and the trend was .still moving in 
the wrong direction at an acceler- 
ated pace. This means that, unless 
something is done, the rate on 
existing property cannot help going 
up — as it has during the past thirty 
year.s — to compensate for the added 
expen.se load to the city, and to 
make up for depreciating values of 
the taxable property. I don't 
know what the final an.swer to this 
complicated problem will be. Init 
I am certain of one thing: nothing 
can be done about this situation 
without a great deal of new cnii- 
struction and extensive renovation 
to increase the value of taxable 
property. \'alue cannot be in- 
creased simply by stepping up 
assessments: it has to be increa.^ed 
by niaking jjrnperty more efficient 
and more productive. 

Ta\ Plan Great Help 
As you all know, we worked with 
various I(>aders in the community 
and with municipal officials to 
develop a tax plan that would make 
possible the construction and opera- 
tion of Prudential Center. This 
plan was somewhat different from 
many of the traditional formulas 
used in Boston, but is a widely u.-^ed 
basis for determining value for mu- 
nicipal taxation. , This plan should 
make Prudential Center practical 
over the long term, and if applied 



JAX. 24 



CITY RECORD 



73 



to other new coiistructioi: projects, 
should greatlj- expedite the kind of 
building program that can materi- 
ally affect tax rates in this city. I 
ani gratified that the Greater Bos- 
on Economic Stud3% as reported in 
the papers, points to some such 
formula as both necessary and 
desirable for the City of Boston, to 
benefit not only the new taxpaj'ers 
but to relieve the load on present 
taxpayers as well. 

J'inally, I want to pay a special 
tribute to the remarkable coopera- 
tion we have had from the people of 
Boston. Prudential Center is one 
of the largest projects of its kind 
ever \uidertaken in the I'nited 
States and probabh' in the world. 
At best, it would present difficult 
engineering, construction and foun- 
dation problems, and the soil condi- 
tions in the Prudential Center area 
are far from the best. But what- 
ever the complications have been, 
and there have been many, the 
leadership in Boston has been quick 
to help find solutions. The I\Iu- 
nicipal Coordinating Committee has 
cut through an immen.se amount of 
red tape so that we could proceed 
at top speed. The Auditorium 
Commission, under the leadership 
first of the late Glen Sherrard, and 
now of Bill Ireland, has done an 
extraordinary job in deciding upon 
the type of auditorium that Boston 
should have, and in proceeding 
forthwith to get it built. We were 
once concerned that we might be 
delayed by the construction of the 
auditorium, since the nature of this 
undertaking requires that eA-ery- 
thing go up at once. Now it looks 
as though we are going to have to 
keep moving ourselves in order to 
keep pace with the auditorium. 



Praises Mayor 

Mayor Hynes, of course, has 
never let up in his enthusiasm or 
cooperation, and has volunteered 
help wherever and whenever 
needed. 

The newspapers and the radio 
and television stations have been 
most helpful in keeping people in- 
formed of the progress of the proj- 
ect; and by focusing public atten- 



tion on some of our more difficult 
problems, they have helped us find 
reasonable solutions. We would 
have a difficult time finding another 
city in the United States that is so 
conscientiously served by civic- 
minded news outlets. I can assure 
you this has l)een a rewarding ex- 
perience. 

With the demolition of INIechanics 
Hall this morning, we took the first 
concrete step toward the realization 
of Prudential Center. We Avill con- 
tinue to mo\ e ahead as rapidl}^ as 
possible. By March or April at 
the latest, you will begin to seethe 
pile drivers at work, and a year 



from now we should ha\'e virtually 
completed the foundations for the 
entire center section of the project. 
B}'^ the end of the year we will be 
under way on our large office 
l)uilding. 

In the meantime, the hotel will be 
under construction and we expect 
it to be completed at about the 
same time as the city finishes the 
auditorium building. This .should 
be about the middle of 1961. 

In short, we are delighted that 
we are really moving at last, and 
we appreciate all the help you have 
given us. 



OLIVER W. PARK NAMED PRINCIPAL 
ASSISTANT TO THE NEW ASSESSOR 



Earle R. Barnard, Boston's new 
assessor, in January, aimounced the 
appointment of Oliver W. Park as 
his prhicipal assistant during the 
initial transition period. For the 
past two years ^Ir. Park has served 
as resident consultant for the eciual- 
ization survej^ of commercial prop- 
erty, as a member of Reeves Co. 
which specializes in the study of 
assessing practices and the modern- 
ization of as.sessing functions. 

'Sir. Park, who has left the 
Reeves firm to serve as temporary 
executive director, has participated 
in valuation studies in other cities, 
as well as \-ari()us management 
studies in industry and the federal 
government. I'.arlier this year he 
was on assiiinnient with the Cali- 
fornia l.ciii.-lature, .surveying asses.s- 
ing practices throughout the state 
of California. In addition to i^eing 
a realtor, Mr. Park is a \ eteran of 
l)oth World War II and Korea, 
ha\'ing served at sea with the U. S. 
Xavy during the first conflict, and 
as director of industrial relations 
for MSTS in Japan during the 
Korean emergency. 

In announcing the appointment, 
Mr. Barnard stated that Mr. Park, 
in addition lo sharing his adminis- 
trati\e rcsponsiijilities with him, 
would be primarily responsible for 
coordinating the development and 



installation of improvements in a.s- 
se-ssing technirjues and procedures, 
many of which have alread\' been 
put forth by the Assessing Depart- 
ment staff. 

One significant development is 
expected to be the establishment of 
a statistical research unit, respon- 
sible for collecting sales and rental 
information, and coordinating the 
adoption of assessing standards in 
cooperation with the deputy as- 
sessors and the assistant assessors. 
Such standards of comparison will 
help to assure equity of assessments 
within assessing districts, within 
property types, and between dis- 
tricts and property types. 

At a later date it is intended to 
estabhsh a permanent position of 
administrative assistant to the as- 
sessor. This will be a career posi- 
tion, to be filled preferably by a 
career employee from within the 
Assessing Department, to coordi- 
nate all of the internal procedural 
and valuation matters of the de- 
partment and to provide for con- 
tinuity of administration, regard- 
less of changes in the position of 
assessor, which is appointive. 



t 



CITY KKCORI) 



.I\N. 2i 



STATE CONTROL OF MUNICIPAL FINANCES IN MASSACHUSETTS 



Jan.. L I'h.I).. 

m'u's and S<M-i- 

!ty, Wun-f-btiT. 
>r till' paiirl iiii 
!<• ('utitri)l nf 
ill Mii.'s^M'hu- 
ii (if till- Thin! 
( <>iii< II IK I- oil Miiiiii-ipal 
initinii hfl«l ill tin- liohtoii 
I ' IV ami altriiil»<l l>y 
I ity rmploycH-.s. 
i; ill thr pain-l werr: 
H, Diiif, Dinrtor «»f 
Statf Drparlmctit of 
iioii.s aiui Taxation, whose 
topii- \\m "Control of Ixxal Hor- 
rowiiiK. " 

,los4«j)h K. Barrrsi. AKsistaiit Kx- 
(•••mni- S«'rn-tary. Boston Munici- 
pal UfM-anli Burt'au. wlio <Iis- 
(•U'^^M•<I "Tin- BalaiKCHl Biulgrt Hr- 
e|uirt' ninit . " 

K«l\vanl C\ Wilson, Chii-f nf the 
Bunau of l.o«al Asscssnn'iit . ('<»m- 
nioiiwralth of Ma-ssachuM'tLs, who 
s|M»kr on "I'rojH'rty Tax A.sm-ss- 
nuMit. ■' 

.l«ks<-pli v. \ai\W, ("ity Auditor. 
City of Boston, who discusso<l 
•'('Iintrol and SuiK^rvision of the 
' 'V nf B<»stoii as a Siwcial Cas<' " 

IM RODl CTORV REMARKS 
Ity Jamca A. Maxwell. Moderator 

\|:i->arliU""etts was a pioneer in 
.i\e|opiiiK an efTeetlve system of 
-tate e«»ntrol «»f niunieipal linanee. 
In the late nineteenth and early 
Miitieth centuries, as economic 
I p«tlitical alTairs became in<irc 
.\ demands on Rovemment 
and financial problems 
• '1. which were In-yond the 
parity of hical officials. Inter- 
iition by the state Iwth to aid 
lid to restrain seemi"*! in<licated. 
We are to hear tliri'e |)aiK'rs 
dealiiiK «ith (fii state c»)ntn»Is 
over local iMirrowinR; (/jI local 
pn>prrtv tax a^Ht^i-itnents. and (f> 
ud^ets. fi)> 
inn with 

Ml ol tliese controls are f|Uite 
! and all had a." their objective 
irc the lonR-run financial 
«»f iiiunicip.'d uovcrii- 

^IIK .• til. I r.ntr>'l. ',\, r, 



This Is the complete report 
of the second of six panel 
discussions at the Third An- 
nual .Municipal Conference. 



( -tabiislinl. a new objective oi 
uovernnieiit has eiiierneil. namely, 
that government, in its taxing and 
spendinR. should moderate and olT- 
-ct the swiiiRs of the business cycle. 
In recession, when privat<- sfH-nd- 
ing falls off. Rovernmeiit — espe- 
cially the finleral Rovernment — 
>hould put additional purcliasinR 
power in |K'o|)le's liaiuls by taxing 
iess or s|X'ndinR more. Conversely, 
in boom, when private spending is 
liiRli. Rovernment should reduce the 
flow of |)un'liasinR jniwer by s|M'nd- 
iiiR less :iiid taxing more. Imple- 
mentation ol" tlii- new junction is 
jirimarily the fluty of the federal 
government, and the ConRress as- 
sumeil this responsibility by pass- 
ing the Kniploynunt Ai t of 194(3. 

How far state and local finances 
can be assimilateil to a counter- 
cycle policy is a (juestion. But a 
related issue of some importance 
i^: Does a system of state control 
of local finances, aimed at protect- 
ing long-run solvency, conflict with 
:i feiler.d program of countercycle 
finance? For example, does the 
Massachusetts re(|uirement that 
local governments balance their 
liudRet.s annually exercise a per- 
verse cydiial efTect? If the fed- 
eral budget had to be balanced 
annually, it could not exert a coun- 
t(rcycle influence. H;is the re- 
tiuireiiient of annually balanced 
local budgets in Massachusetts im- 
peded—made more difficult — a 
feileral countercycle policy? 
Survey Made 

Last summer, three faculty mem- 
bers and two graduate stuiients at 
Clark I'liiversity received a grant 
from the Social Science Research 
Council to investigate this issue, 
and. more particularly, how city 
efficials in Massachusetts felt about 
the operation of the major state 
*"n ;ti. i;d controls. We interviewed 



mayors, city managers, treasurers, 
assessors, welfare directors, direc- 
tors of veterans .services, auditors 
of the twelve largest cities in tiie 
-tate. as well as appropriate state 
oHicials. Kverywhere we were 
cordially received, and almost all 
officials did their best to answer 
our (juestions. 

While our findings have imt 
properly ji'lle<|. I shall olTer a few 
observations. Local officers, ex- 
cept welfare officers, are not much 
worried about the financial impact 
of recession, and even welfare of- 
ficers are much less worried than 
they were a decade ago. Why? 
First, memories of the 19:30's have 
dimmed. .Second, m.iybe the bitter 
experiences of those years are now 
irrelevant. All three jHistwar re- 
ces.<.ions have been moderate, and 
have brought no new jiroblems to 
local finances. 

Note that I have not said that 
local officials do not worry about 
the finances of their city; I have 
said that they are unworried about 
the impact of recession. But tiie 
worries of city officials about fi- 
nances are continuous. Many of 
them do not see how. in the years 
ahead, governmental services <le- 
manded by citizens are going ic 
be financed without major >tru( - 
tural reforms. Woirie> of this -on 
are so much in their minds that iv< 
room is left for worries about n - 
cession. 

A third rea.son lor this attituilr 
is that financial problems raised 
by recession have diminished over 
the past decade. They have dim- 
inished chiefly with respect to 
welfare. Since 1950. the share of 
welfare costs carried by (he federal 
government has grown markedly, 
and this has softened the fiscal 
impact of welfare on city govern- 
ments. The key item here is gen- 
eral relief, the cost of which is 
borne wholly by local and state 
governments without federal aid 
This expenditure is cyclically vai 
able — up in recession and down 
In om. But it is much less iinpn 



Jan. 24 



CITY RECORD 



75 



t;int than a decade ago because 
expansion of other welfare pro- 
grams lias drained away potential 
recipients of general relief. At 
present, its recipients consist of a 
static group of unemployables 
under sixty-five years of age, not 
blind, and not permanently and 
totally disabled, plus a variable 
group of employables who have 
temporarily exhausted their rights 
to unemployment benefits or wlio 
fall in need during the waiting 
period. 

Other Observations 

One other observation derived 
from our survey concerns the bal- 
anced budget requirement (about 
which ]Mr. Dine is to give a paper). 
It is that this operates somewhat 
in a countercyclical manner. The 
balance required is, of course, a 
planned balance and this had led 
to actual surpluses in good years 
and actual deficits in recession. 
AVhy? Because estimates of rev- 
enue by cities tend to be lower 
than actual revenues in a year 
when the economy is on the mend ; 
the estimates tend to be higher 
than actual revenues when the 
economy is going downhill. Thus 
unplanned actual surpluses accrue 
in good years; unplanned deficits 
in recession. These are objectives 
of countercycle finance. In this 
respect, therefore, the conflict 
which might l)e expected between 
state financial controls aimed at a 
long-run objective and the objec- 
tive of countercycle finance does 
not Ovist. 

STATE CONTROL OF LOCAL 
BORROWING 
By Herman B. Dine 

To many municipal administra- 
tors, any form of state control over 
the affairs of a municipality is an 
infringement on the i^rinciple of 
home rule, although it i> generally 
agreed that municipalities should 
be under the control of the state 
only in so far as it may be neces- 
sarj' to insure the general welfare 
of the state as a whole. Cities and 



towns in this Commonwealth are 
creatures of the Legislature and 
liave no inherent power to tax, 
spend, or borrow money In the 
case of Whiting v. Mayor of Hol- 
yokc. 272 Mass. 116, the Supreme 
.Judicial ( iiurt stated that" . . . 
The r\\\v> and towns of this Com- 
monwealth have no inherent but 
;:nly a delegated power to raise 
and expend money. Their rights 
in this particular rest upon legis- 
lative grant; if the authority is 
not found in express terms or by 
necessary implication in some act 
of the (ieneral Court, it does not 
exist. The numerous authorities 
to this effect need not be collected. 
It is the doctrine of the early, the 
late, and many intervening deci- 
sions." 

Historically Speaking 

Historically, it appears that 
prior to 1875 there existed no legis- 
lation which would in any way 
restrict i)()rrowiii>i hy the cities 
and towns of thi> ( 'ouinioiiwfalth. 
In 1875 the Legislature passed the 
first municipal indebtedness act 
which aimed to restrict the pur- 
poses for which money may be 
borrowed, to prevent the authori- 
zation of loans for the purpose of 
meeting other loans at maturity, 
to prevent refunding for an inriefi- 
iiite period of loans issued in antic- 
ipation of revenue, and to proxide 
a definite method for the payment 
of debt issued. In passing the 
first municipal indebtedness act. 
the Legislature established the 
principle that the right of cities 
and towns to administer their fi- 
nancial affairs was not an unlimited 
right. In con-truing this act in 
1876. the Ma>-acliu-etts Supreme 
Court, in tlic ca-c of AiKiirnw Xa- 
tionnl Bank v. >n.,fh Ihuil, ,,. 128 
?^Iass. 505. ^tatl•(l a^ lollow-; ■'The 
statute thus deprives cities and 
towns of the authority to contract 
debts for borrowed money, which 
they had previou-ly ii()--os>ed, 
whether derived from express 
grant, or held to exist as an im- 
plied power; and, instead of it, 



gives to these municipalities a 
limited power which can be law- 
fully exercised only in the mode 
.specially pointed out. It contains 
a positive prohibition of all debts 
( ontracted for borrowed money in 
any other mode. The plain object 
of the law is to protect cities and 
towns from the creation of munici- 
pal debts without sufficient neces- 
sity and consideration, and without 
proper provision for payment, and 
to prevent improvident and reck- 
less expenditures of public money, 
as a natural consequence of debts 
so contracted. All its provisions, 
reasonably interpreted, with refer- 
ence to these salutary ends, must 
be regarded as prohibitory. They 
establish a plain limit to the exer- 
cise of the power to borrow 
money." 

Essential Features 

The essential features of the 
1875 act were to prescribe the pur- 
poses for which del)ts may be is- 
sued and the period for which loans 
may run. Specifically, it authorized 
borrowing money for the following 
purposes : 

1. For supplying the inhabi- 
tants with water, such loans to be 
payable within thirty years. 

2. For accjuiring land for pub- 
lic playgrounds and parks, such 
debt to be payable within thirty 
years. 

3. For establisliiiiii a municipal 
lighting plant, to Ijc borrowed for 
a period not exceeding thirty 
years. 

4. For constructing sewers, pay- 
able over a period of thirty years. 

5. For connecting estates with 
j)ublic sewers, such debts to be in- 
curred for a period not exceeding 
three years. 

6. For l)uilding schoolhouses 
;:ntl other public buildings, and 
procuring land therefor, debt in- 
curred for this purpose to be pay- 
able within twenty years. 

7. For all other purposes. Debts 
incurred fen- any purpose other 
than those mentioned were to be 
payable within ten years and, in 



C I I \ R E CORD 



.Ian. 24 



•V tii Hi»«i«iii, 

I;., 1 to Uirrow 

■Utr nil M-!*" milhticHl 

•I. tii; tin- 'ir^t 

' for it 
iitliority 

- iiuMuy l<«r curniii cx- 
i Artiially, iiiuiunp.'ilitic's 

Imrrtiwiil In pn»vitle for ovrnlrafU*. 
for |>nhltr w-flfrin* pun*"^**^. 

M ..nrc. for ^tr(•et 
(•x|H'nsrs. for 
-. vU: This 
■ phtilf iiH-nly tiuouraKni iMir- 
AinR fur «>niinnr>' t>x|X'n.Ms ami 
.|r«i l«» pyraiiml Uic iixo>> <ltl»t 
Miir muniripaliticjs. 

1910 Amendment 

lift until llMd tiKii the 
lAKi.-laiurt' puhsH-fi u reKiivc call- 
inn fnr ft romplftr report on the 
irir-s <»f all nnini<ipaliti<- 
\\ a> inaili- in l'J12 v, i 
- iitlinRilisolosurcs. The i< 
IM>rt in fubstance indicateii that 
substantial debt was out-tandinR 
thnHiRhout the ('omnmiiwcalth tor 
current ex|>ensei*, that tciiijxirary 
loans isjiU(Hl in antieipation of rev- 
«nue of fine year were pai<l from 
tlie pmrmis of revenues of suc- 
rie<linn years, that where sinking 
ftuuls were establisheil for the pay- 
mat urinR debt no provision 
I niaile fnr annual rontri- 
i«i thr sinking fund to meet 
the »iut>tandinK indebtedness on 
maturity, and nu»ney Ixirrowed 
from publii- tnist funds held by the 
< nie» and towns ha<l not been re- 
Act of 1913 
ri-sult of the disclosures 
loatlc in the report, the I-egislature 
in 1913 rnarted the so-ralle<l "Mu- 
• ' ■ 1 Aft" whieh is now 
ipter 44 of the (len- 
■ .1 whirl) providtnl the 

"•vvinn majtir elements: 

A budget pystom for all cities. 
Kstnblishment of finance or ad- 
>i«.i>r>- committees in towns. 



1 (iiliadf tin- ovinlrawiiiK ol .ip- 
propriation- voted by city councils 
or town meetings. 

IVohibited the establishment of 
additional sinking funds. 

Clearly specific*! the purposes 
f«»r which cities and towns may 
Inirrow money. 

SiH-cified the maximum fwriod 
for which loans may Ik- issued. 

Ke(|Uired that all debt be issued 
iin tin- serial plan and that n(» sub- 
se(|Uent payment on niaturing debt 
be greater than the preceding pay- 
ment. 

It further attempted to establish 
a pay-as-you-go jxilicy by requir- 
ing that, as a contlition precedent 
to the auth<»rization of a loan by a 
city or town, a sum e juivalent to 
25 cents on each $1,000 of the as- 
sessed valuation of the municipal- 
ity for the preceding year must be 
provide<l for from available rev- 
I Miiiil- or froiii taxation. 

Court Opinions 

In n iirriiig to the Municipal Fi- 
nance Act, the Massachusetts Su- 
preme Court in the case of Flood v. 
Hodiifs. 231 Mass. 252. spoke of 
the act as follows: "... The 
manifest pur{«>^c of the frainers of 
the act was to set rigici barriers 
against expenditures in excess of 
apjtropriaticns, to prevent the bor- 
rowing of money for current ex- 
penses, to confine the making of 
long-time loans strictly to raising 
mon(;>' for permanent improve- 
ments, and in general to put cities 
u|)on a sound financial basis so far 
as these enfls can be achieved by 
legislation ..." 

In s«»m»' states the amount of in- 
ticbtedness which may be incurred 
by a municipality is prescribed by 
their constitutions. The constitu- 
tifinal provision insures stability 
but the statutory provision, limit- 
ing indebtedness in Massachusett.s, 
gives greater flexibility and possi- 
bilities of meeting changed confli- 
tions jironijitly: likewise, it pre- 
sents opportunities f(»r i-onstruct- 
ing and carrying out a progressive 



jirograiii. If everything were sta- 
ti('narA-. there is no doubt that a 
constitutional provision relative t(t 
the debt limit of municipalities 
would be preferable, but if we are 
to meet tlie pmbleins of the day 
as they must be met. if we are to 
keep abreast of the times, it seems 
essential that we have the power 
to change the .statutes without 
great loss of time which necessarily 
accompanies the changing of state 
con^titution^. 

Current Statute 
Sections 7 an<l 8 of chapter 44 
of the (Jeneral Laws, as n<tw in ef- 
fect, prescribe the purposes for 
which cities aiul towns may borrow 
money and the periixis of time for 
which loans may be issued for the 
various purpo.-^es. Until 1952 tlu 
I (irrowing capacity of a town wa- 
limiteil to 5 per cent of the average 
valuations of tiie property an<i mo- 
tor vehicles of the town for the 
three jjreceding years, such valua- 
tions being reduced by the valua- 
tion of the property abated in 
those years and, in the case of 
cities, it was limited to 2\ per cent 
so that, if it was necessary to issue 
debt for general purposes In-yond 
the 2\ per cent debt limit, special 
legislative authority wa,s necessary. 
In 1952 the Legislature j)rovided 
that cities and towns may incur 
debt beyond the 2 \ and 5 per cent 
for general jnirposes with the ap- 
proval of the State Emergency Fi- 
nance Board provided that, in the 
case of towns, the indebtedness 
may not exceed 10 per cent and. in 
the case of cities, 5 jX'r cent of the 
average of ihe assessors" valuations 
of the taxable property for the 
three i)receding years. Further- 
more, in 1950 the Legislature 
amended ehapter 645 of the Act-; 
of 1948. which is an act grant ini; 
state aid towards school construf- 
tion, 4iy providing that cities and 
towns m.iy borrow for school proj- 
ects which have the approval of (he 
State School Building Assistance 
Commission outside the statutory 



Jan. 24 



CITY RECORD 



77 



(k l)t limit with the approval of the 
Slati' Emergency Finance Board. 
Thr General Court thus delegated 
1(1 a State board the authority to 
aiitliorize debt beyond the normal 
iicl)t limits and vested discretion- 
ary powers in that board tn dctcr- 
miiu' the municipality's ability to 
tiiiance the projects without im- 
IMwing too great a burden on the 
tax])ayers. 

A- a result of the extensive 
>(ln)ol construction program now 
being carried out in Massachusetts, 
the debt of Massachusetts cities 
and towns, as of the close of the 
year 1957, has reached an all time 
liigh. Thus on December 31, 1957, 
the direct net debt of all municipal- 
ities was $572,700,000 and the 
ratio of debt to valuation for all 
municipalities was 5.86. The out- 
look for 1958 would indicate a 
further increase in indebtedness 
over 1957 due very largely to debt 
incurred for additional school con- 
struction. Loans for school con- 
struction have been issued for the 
twenty-year maximum period al- 
lowable by law and some municipal 
officials have advocated a change 
in the law allowing borrowing for 
school construction for a period of 
thirty years. It appears, however, 
that whatever might be gained, 
tax rate-wise, by reduced payments 
in principal as a result of a thirty- 
year bond issue for school con- 
struction would be offset in the 
long run by the increased interest 
rates resulting from such long-term 
borrowing. 

Auditorium Loan 

In 1957 the City of Boston was 
authorized to borrow $12,000,000 
for the construction of a municipal 
auditorium, the loan to be payable 
over a period of forty years. If 
this loan were to be issued for 
forty years, the city, at prevailing 
interest rates, would have to pay 
at least 4 per cent so that in forty 
years against a loan of $12,000,000 
the citv would be required to pav 
$9,840,000 in interest or an addi- 



tional cost of 82 per cent. On the 
other hand, if the loan were issued 
for the con\-entional twenty years, 
the city could borrow for 3.75 per 
cent and the interest on the loan 
over the twentv vears would aggre- 
jiate S4.72r),0f)U.' or an additional 
cu-t of 39 per cent. 

If school construction is to con- 
tinue at the pace now being fol- 
lowed, consideration will have to 
be given to a reduction in the 
period of time for which loans are 
being issued instead of an increase 
in the period. 

THE BALANCED BUDGET 
REQUIREMENT 
By Joseph R. Barresi 

In any discussion of a subject 
such as the "Balanced Budget Re- 
<iuirement" it is necessary to insure 
that everyone is speaking the same 
language. Thus before going any 
further on the subject, a few basic 
definitions seem apropos. 

The budget is a financial plan for 
raising and spending money to 
operate a government and to meet 
its outstanding obligations — that's 
the definition the book gives. Gen- 
erally, this financial plan or state- 
ment is considered as composed of 
a collection of expenditures and 
reA-enue estimates gathered together 
shortly before the begiiming of a 
fiscal year to furnish a basis for 
determining the general property 
tax levy. 

In the discussion today we should 
think of the budget and the budget- 
ary process in its broadest implica- 
tions, and that includes all phases 
of municipal operation and man- 
agement as well as all the fields of 
public finance, including the ex- 
penditures program, re\-enue sys- 
tem, and borrowing policy. It 
touches all economic resources of a 
community or country that are 
taxed for support of that govern- 
ment. 

Too often people think of the 
budget only in terms of the budget 
document with which I'm sure you 
are all familiar. Throughout this 
discussion, however, we are talking 



of the budget in its broade.st impli- 
cation. 

Meaning of Unbalance 

Logically, a budget is unbal- 
anced either if expenditure exceeds 
re\enue, or if revenue exceeds ex- 
penditure; it's only exactly bal- 
anced when revenue and expendi- 
ture are exactly ecjual. But ac- 
cording to common usage, it's .said 
to be unbalanced only if expenditure 
exceeds re\'enue. 

An uiil)alaiice caused by an ex- 
cess ill i-e\-eiuie is a i ;m <- phi iimhichoii 
indeed in I-iostoii. Soine cities and 
towns ill ^Massachusetts almost an- 
nually end up with a revenue sur- 
plus which they u.se to reduce suc- 
ceeding years' tax rates. 

Economists have put forth sev- 
eral philosophies with respect to the 
budget, balanced and unbalanced, 
and its relationship to the economj' 
especially at the national level. 

Just a brief moment to examine 
them. The classical economists, 
such as Adam Smith, were opposed 
to unbalanced budgets. They felt 
that there was a fundamental har- 
monjr of intere.st in economic so- 
ciety. The invisible hand operating 
in a competitive society reconciled 
all conflicts and therefore the role 
of the state must and should be 
narrow. 

The modern economists led b}- 
Keynes believe that the economic 
order is harmonious except for its 
inability to achieve stability. This 
defect is overcome by governmental 
fiscal action. The state exerts a 
balance wheel for economic activity. 

Now I point out these economic 
theories only to show that at the 
national level there is disagreement 
as to whether or not the budget 
should be balanced. Whether you 
are on one side or the other the 
federal deficit spending does affect 
economic activity. 

At the local level there are no 
economic theories as to the role of 
the municipal budget. Nowhere in 
textbooks do you find any argu- 
ment as to the balanced or unbal- 
anced municipal budget and its role 
in economic activity. 



c n ^ R R C O R D 



Jax. 24 



Priiikiplc in I lux 
Iii-timl W iH II \vi«lfly acrppt«l 

..I. 

lie 

i- ■ '''f- 

,„„„„.,,, MiddfM 
I I, . <»n 
pul»li«- works until the 
■ i fMioniic forces of the fp<l- 
• government* can Ik? 

iliuiR in the Cieneral 
i.l .\Ia.-v.sirhu.H«'tts that siMcif- 
ilv -iateH that nnuiicipal lnidKets 
. lu»lanre<I. Nctwhc rc in the 
<»IK«rative provisions of the 
, irter is there any laiipiane 
lu l.jilaiieinK the eity"s hudKet. 
Chapter ')".> of the ( leneral I.uws 

us eloM'jst t«t fyiyiriR— althounh 

not in exaet wordfl — that a local 
J.ii.lc' t should Im« balanced. 

I he Balance Wheel 

1 1,.- ( hapter in section Zi prcv 
vides that the assessors shall an- 
nually assess taxes to meet expenses 
for which no other rexcnue can l»e 
exp<'cte<l. In other words the prop- 
ertv tax is a balance wheel. It 
sh.iuld balance the budRet because 
it should aniount to the difference 
l»etwe<'n estimat<'<i expenses and e.s- 
tiniat<Ml other revenue. 

This theoreti<al and automatic 
balancing doesn't work. Several 
common factors, at least common 
to Hoston. can create an imbalance 
at the end of a fiscal year. I^te 
declaration of a tax rate and the 
re.Mdtinn delay in the receipt of tax 
rcvrnne is one factor. A drop in 
■ \<\ of a state-share*! tax is 
.\ refund of taxes preater 
M( ipat«Ml and provided for 
other, 
are some of the very rea- 
: ir the succession of unbal- 
anceii budRcts. lietter known as 
operating (leficits, in Bo-^ton. 

Their effect is to create a shortage 
of cash an«l to force an extraor- 
dinary amount of temiwirary bor- 
rowing until the lonp-d for niil- 
lotiinni of repoateH years of revenue 
• ' I nation or 
■ le action 
.1 to. 



I iinJiiiK lAptclicnt 

Hosloii ha.s exiM'rienced inibal- 
anees or oiM-ratiiiR deficits regularly. 
'I'he palliative of funding has l>een 
u.mhI in 1939 and 1950 to .straighten 
out the financial cri.sis. The fund- 
ing <'xpe<lient ill the past, however, 
hasn't worked lM'caus<! it failed to 
wi|M» out the basic causes. 

Ijist year another financial crisi.s 
built up as a result of a .succes.sioii 
<tp<-rating deficit.s. 

.\t the clfKse of 1956 the accunui- 
late<l operating deficit had built up 
to close to million. This was 
caus<Hl by one or a combination of 
the.s<' faciors: overestimates of reve- 
nue, heavy cash refunds of property 
taxes (overlay deficits), and uncol- 
lect e<l taxes. 

I nder the law as it exi.sted cer- 
tain items in the annual operating 
deficit had to be raised in the fol- 
l(»wing year's tax levy. i.r.. overlay 
deficits." That part of the operating 
deficit due to uncollected taxes is 
(•Iear(Hl up as they arc collected or 
converted to tax titles. 

The only parts of the operating 
deficit, therefore, not re.storable by 
law were overestimates of revenue. 
.\t the end of 1956. the accumulated 
net operating deficit not required 
to be raised amounted to •**16.2 
million. 

Remember that this pyramid of 
operating deficits contributed 
greatly to the city's cash shortage 
and its need for i.s-suing tax notes in 
the year for pajmient from the fol- 
lowing year's taxes. 

Overestimates Explained 

The S16.2 million net deficit was 
made up of the following overesti- 
mates of revenue during the pre- 
ceding ten years. 

1. Special authorizations of the 
State Tax Commission. 

2. Overestimates of motor vehicle 
exci.se taxes. 

3. Overestimates of departmental 
receipts. 

4. I'ailure of the Massachusetts 
Port Authority to pay the city the 
S7.9 million for the Sumner Tunnel. 

The other major factor in the 
op<'rating deficits was due to over- 
lay deficits. 



\'.n(\i year the city sets aside a 
percentage of its tax levy as u 
reserve — called an overlay — t ■ 
cover lo.s.ses resulting from abat< 
nients and uncollectible taxes (n 
real and personal property aijii 
polls. 

When abatement-s on a given tax 
levy exceed the amount in the ovci 
lay, a deficit results. To prevci 
overlay deficits from piling up yc. 
after year, as the revenue (leficn 
did, the law re(|uires that they 1" 
rai.sed in the tax levy of the follou- 
ing year. 

Overlay Deficits 

As of IJecember 31. 1956. overlay 
deficits amounted to S5.3 million. 
It was also estimated that another 
S18.5 million in future abatements 
on the tax levies of 19.56 and prior 
years would have to Ik; granted. 

Overlay deficits have "plagued 
Boston for three decades. Their 
recurrence can be traced to in- 
defen.sible a.s.ses.sed valuations and 
an inadetiuate overlay reserve. 

This was the financial barrel that 
the city was over in 1957 as a re.sult 
of repeated budget imbalances. 

Although the overlay deficits 
would be rai.sed by future taxation 
they would have a serious impact 
on future tax rates. The only way 
to clear up the revenue deficits was 
to be ble.s.sed with revenue .surpluses 
or to take funding action. 

The Funding Act of 1957 was 
resorted to. As a method, it is 
frowned upon by students of public 
finance. It has failed in the past. 
It was supported this time only be- 
cau.se it attempted to eliminate the 
basic cau.ses of the trouble by but- 
toning up the loopholes. 

The act authorized the city to 
borrow S45 million to wipe the 
slate clean. More important, how- 
ever, it provided that overestimates 
of revenue be rai.sed in the next 
year's tax rate thus discouraging 
ballooning of revenue estimate for 
the purpose of setting an artificial 
tax rate. 

It further provided that esti- 
mated receipts must not exceed 
actual receipts of the prior year. A 
more realistic overlay reserve of not 



.Tax. 24 



CITY RECORD 



79 



li than 5 per cent was also spelled 

out. 

It was hoped that such a reserve 
t()<iether with continued recognition 
of abated valuations when fixing 
as.sessnients together with a stabi- 
lized tax rate would tend to elimi- 
nate future overlay deficits. 

Thus the funding act tried to 
wipe the slate clean and provide 
that future imbalances because of 
revenue deficits would be made up 
the next year. It hoped to elimi- 
nate overlay deficits entirely by 
pi()\iding an adequate overlay 
reserve. 

f^ince the tax rate has taken 
.sharp successive jumps overlay 
deficits may be back with us again. 
As of August 31 there was only $1.8 
million left in the 1957 overlay 
reserve of !|6.2 million. 

Summary 

The summarize: A budget is 
primarily considered as out of bal- 
ance when expenditures exceed rev- 
enue. An imbalanced budget is 
acceptable at the national level be- 
cause it is used as a balance wheel 
in the economy. 

At the local level the principle of 
a balanced budget is widely ac- 
cepted. 

There are no laws or ordinances 
which require or spell out a balanced 
budget in Massachusetts. 

Boston has suffered through a 
succession of imbalances over the 
year which have put her in a 
financial strait jacket. The 
Funding Act of 1957 was an attempt 
to release the city from this bond 
and remedy future imbalances. 

PROPERTY TAX 
ASSESSMENTS 
By Edward C. Wilson 

Any consideration of the subject 
"State Control of Municipal Fi- 
nances" in Massachusetts as it re- 
lates to property tax assessments 
needs, it seems to me, to have 
pointed out clearly that in many 
respects there has always been some 
degree of state control over prop- 
ert}'^ tax assessments. 

The decisions of our courts ha^'e 
held for many years that although 



local assessors and local tax col- 
lectors are locally selected by elec- 
tion or appointment in accordance 
with the General Laws, the moment 
these officers are selected and quali- 
fied, they become public officers 
whose authority runs throughout 
the Commonwealth and whose du- 
ties are prescribed by the General 
Laws and whose acts are likewise 
controlled by statute. 

Legal Determination 

The Legislature determines what 
is and what is not subject to taxa- 
tion as well as what property is 
exempt. It also defines how prop- 
erty shall be valued for local tax 
purposes and, incidentally, the law 
of this Commonwealth is still that 
property subject to local taxation 
shall be assessed at its full and fair 
cash value. Thus the law contem- 
plates that all property subject to 
local taxation shall be valued by 
the local assessors at its full and 
fair cash value. To a large extent 
up to and including the decade of 
the 1920's, property was valued 
more nearly at the level contem- 
plated by statute than is now the 
case. The experience of the depres- 
sion years of the 1930's created 
such havoc in the assessment levels 
of local property and the bitter 
experience which many boards of 
assessors faced in the 1930's due to 
falling property values resulted in a 
low level or ratio of assessment by 
the middle 1940's. The rapid ad- 
vance of prices which challenged 
the capacity of the most qualified 
assessors' oflfices and clearly out- 
stripped the abihty of others to 
keep abreast has resulted in local 
assessed values in our cities and 
towns which represent only a frac- 
tion of full and fair cash value. 

Recent surveys which have been 
made indicate that the value of 
of both real estate property and 
tangible personal property subject 
to local taxation is well in excess of 
$20,000,000,000 whereas in 1958 
the assessed value of such property 
by the assessors is approximately 
$9,000,000,000. However, there is a 
tremendous need for further equal- 
ization. 



Home Rule Practice 

Massachusetts is in the forefront 
of those states which asscirt a high 
degree of loc.til home rule and in no 
field of municipal finance is it more 
evident than in property tax assess- 
ments. If all property were subject 
to local taxation and there existed a 
real e(}ualization of property assess- 
ments, perhaps there would be tax 
equality. However, in every sys- 
tem of taxation there is imbedded in 
one form or another a system of 
exemption from taxation; and where 
legislative thought is expressed in 
dollar limits on exemption, then 
any system of valuation of property 
which is based on ratio as.sessments 
distorts this ecjuality most unfairly. 
It results ill the ie(|uirement to 
exempt far more of the real value of 
property than was ever contem- 
plated or intended by the Legisla- 
ture. It is clear that a $4,000 
exemption limit based upon an 
assessment ratio of 33| per cent 
results in an exemption which ac- 
tually has a value of $12,000. 

There is currently more interest 
today than at any time that I have 
known in this matter of property 
assessments and property equaliza- 
tion because to a large degree the 
property tax in Massachusetts is an 
open end tax with no limitation so 
that the re(iuirements of the cities 
and towns to furnish governmental 
services, regardless of how high 
this figure may soar, must be met 
by a tax imposed on propert3^ 

To a greater and greater degree 
the tax on tangible personal prop- 
erty is diminishing in relative 
importance. This again is due to 
the expanding exemption of such 
property from local taxation. In 
the first case in respect to house- 
hold furniture and effects, the 
Legislature recognizing some years 
ago the inflationary situation in- 
creased from $1,000 to $5,000 the 
value of such property exempted; 
and in the case of corporations be- 
cause they are reached for taxation 
by an income tax on the corporate 
profits, the tangible personal prop- 
erty of such corporations has been 
largely removed from the local tax 
rolls. By and large in Massachu- 



CITY RECORD 



Jax. 2 



il |ir«»|XTly taxch urc iii- 
\ tjix<>s li'vied oil real 

Recent Lesislation 

III I'.i.'W) the bKi.-Iatiirc n-coKniz- 
iiiK the IHM"*! for gn-atiT ociuality in 
liK-al pr«»ixTly asM^s.-^iiu-nts r.stalw 
IihIimI l)y chaptrr ()4«» of th(' Acts i.f 
lllo.'i wiiifh iiiMTlcil Mclioiis 7.\, 
7M. 7( ". 71). and ?!•; in ( haptcr 5S a 
Uiirniii of l,<Mal AsM's-snicnt in (he 
I )fpartniciii of Corporations and 
Taxation. Chapter t>4*.t n-coKiiizfil 
tin' firmly j'.>.lal)lish<'<l priiuipN" of 
lioiiir rill*' l>ut il di«l provide that a 
citv i>r town liy appropriate action 
tif tin' city KovfrnniPiit or llic town 
n»H'tinK«-ould request tli< State Tax 
('•uniiUK^ioii for the e.stahlisliniont 
of an a.HsosHinent system in its eom- 
munity. These provisions eon- 
tem|)lated thiit any a.s.sr.>.sment sy.<- 
tem instaileil hy the State Tax ("oni- 
initwion should ho .such as would 
\yo most cfTrctivo in providing 
ndo<|unte maps for a.s.se.ssment pur- 
poM-s. in maintaining detailed and 
acciirate ri-cords of each parcel of 
proiMTty a.s,ses.sed and K<''>^''"jdly to 
prcxlnce uniform aii<l e(|uital)le val- 
uations and a.s.s<'.ssments throufihout 
the city or town in accordance with 
law. it was further jjmvided that 
the exiM'ii.s's of installing .such a 
system, while paid primarily hy the 
Commonwealth, could he a.s.se>.s<>d 
approximately at cost to the cities 
and t«>wns that had adf)pted the 
provisions of the act. To date, 
eleven cf>mmmiities in Mas.sachu- 
.setts have votefl to adopt the state 
a.ssoKsment system and the State 
Tax C«)nimi.s.si(in is in the process of 
making thes<' installations. 

CONTROL \N[) SIPF.RMSION 
Ol THt CITN or BOSTON 
\S \ SPI CI M. C \SK 
I»> Joscpli P. t ally 
i'he title of the subject assigned 
■ I me for this panel di.sru.ssion — 
"Control and SuptTvisifin of the 
City of Host on as a Special Ca.se" — 
threrts our attention to the subject 
of home rule and it rniRht l»e well at 
the ouf.set to make a few ol>.serva- 
tinns in regard thereto. 

Municipal hojue rule in its broad- 
est s<«nse means the power of local 



w»lf-povernment. .\ny power of 
lo<al .self-government, therefore, in 
what«'V<'r maimer arising, whether 
inherent as .sometimes claimed, or 
conferretl or recognized by eon.stitu- 
tional or statut<»rv grant, or powers 
emanating from the people of the 
local coiinnunity themselves and .set 
forth in a charter authorizcni by the 
.state law. would be iiichuhKl. It 
may be .said then that the idea of 
home rule in its comprehensive 
.sense includes (I) the choice of th<' 
character of the municipal organ- 
ization, that is. the selection of the 
charter: (2) the nature and .scope of 
the municipal .service, and (3) all 
local activity in carrying out or en- 
forcing state law or municipal regu- 
lations by local resident officials. 

City is the Creature 

The state is regarded as the 
creator and the numicpal corpora- 
tion as the creature. The city may 
do what the state authorizes and 
nothing more. Contrary to general 
opinion, the idea of local .self- 
go\-ernment or home rule does not 
exist and, in fact, never did exist, 
because of this very fact alone. 

In Ma.s.sachu.setts, all cities and 
towns are controlled in their gen- 
eral activities by the (leneral Laws. 
Chapter 31) concerns municipal gov- 
ernment. Chapter 40 concerns the 
powers and duties of cities and 
towns. Included in this chapter are 
the pro\isions concerning the pur- 
po.ses for which cities and towns 
may ajipropriate and spend public 
funds. Chapter 41 concerns the 
officers and employees of cities and 
towns. This chapter defines the 
powers and duties of municipal 
officials and the rights and privi- 
leges of employees. Chapter 44 — 
of very great importance — provides 
for the control of municipal finance. 
Chapter 31 is th(> civil service .stat- 
ute. Chapter 32 governs the pen- 
sions and annuities of officials and 
employees. Chapter 59 concerns 
the as.ses.sment of local taxes, and 
chapter 60 the collection of local 
taxes. The.se chapters which have 
been mentioned pertain directly to 
the administration of local govern- 
ment. Cities and towns are also 



governed by pertinent provisions di 
all other provisions of the Clencral 
Laws. 

Recent Legiflation 
In addition to the Cioneral La\\>, 
there are other statutes enactefl by 
the Legislature, some of which 
aj)ply to all cities and towns and 
.some are applicable to specific cities 
and towns. An example of the 
former would be chapter 252. .Vets 
of 1<»57. .\n .Vet .\uthorizing Cities 
and Towns to Horrow on Account 
of Public Welfare; and an example 
of the latter would be chapter 717, 
Acts of 1!>.57. An Act to Provide for 
the I'unding of Certain Overlay and 
Other Deficits by the City of P(»- 
ton. which will ho di.scus.sf>d in more 
detail as an excellent example of 
specific control of a municipality by 
the state. These .statutes are gen- 
erally referred to as .special laws and 
this brings us to the .suliject of thi> 
discour.se — the ( ontrol and super- 
\ ision of Boston as a special case. 

Our Special Treatment 
It will not be possible in the time 
allotted to discu.ss completely every 
instance where Bo.ston receives spe- 
cial treatment in the applicability 
of (Jeneral Laws. In many .sections 
of .some of the Ceneral Laws to 
which I have referred, Boston is 
excepted from the applicability of 
the Cleneral Law. This is particu- 
larly true of the chapter concerning 
municipal finance. Where there are 
exceptions, it will usually be found 
that there is either a special law- 
covering the subject or the provi- 
sions of the chapter apply. For 
example, section 32 of chapter 44 
concerns budget in cities. Boston 
is excepted from the applicability 
of this section and we find the law- 
applicable to Boston, so far as bud- 
get is concerned, in chaper 486 of the 
Acts of 1909 as amended, the char- 
ter of the city, which is also a 
statute. Sometimes the (leneral 
Law- applies to all other cities and 
towns and special provisions in the 
.same law- apply to Bo.ston. For ex- 
ample, section 7 of chapter 44 of 
the General Laws spells out the pur- 
po.ses for which cities and towns 
may incur debt. The statute pro- 



Jax. 24 



CITY RECORD 



\ ides that no cit,v or town may 
authorize debt unless a certain sum 
IS appropriated in the tax levy for 
the same purpose. So far as other 
cities and towns are concerned, the 
sum must be equal to 25 cents for 
each one thousand dollars of valua- 
tion of the previous year, but Bos- 
tnii must appropriate a sum eciual to 
10 cents for each thousand dollars 
of valuation. In the same section 
there is the provision that if a loan 
is to be authorized for the purchase 
of departmental ecjuipment, other 
cities and towns must make an ap- 
propriation from re^•enue for each 
department, and the exception for 
Boston is that only one revenue 
appropriation must be made re- 
gardless of the numl)er of depart- 
ments concerned. In the same .sec- 
tion, provision is made for the au- 
thorization of debt for ferry, fire, 
institutional or police boats, but 
only Boston could authorize a bond 
issue for such a purpose; and again 
in the same section, only Boston 
could authorize a bond issue for 
parkways within or bounding on or 
connecting with any public park. 
There are manj^ other in.stances 
where portions of chapters of the 
(ieneral Laws do not apply to Bo.s- 
ton, but as I have stated previously, 
either a special law or a charter 
provision covers the subject. 

Other Examples 

Let us consider a few other ex- 
amples of control or supervision, 
which apply specially to Bo.ston. I 
have prcA-iously mentioned the 
Funding Bill of 1957 as a type of 
legislation applicable to a specific 
city. This statute contains i)rovi- 
sions applicable onl.v to Boston Init 
similar situations in other cities and 
towns are covered in a different 
manner. For example, in Boston 
the total of short-term loans issued 
in anticipation of revenue which 
may be outstanding at the end of 
the year is limited to the total out- 
standing real estate, personal prop- 
erty and poll taxes of the current 
and the preceding years. There is 
no such limitation for any other 
city or town. The proceeds of tax 
title loans issued by Boston is 



restricted to the repayment oi 
short-term loans issued in anticipa- 
tion of revenue. Other cities and 
towns may use the proceeds of tax 
title loans for ordinary maintenance 
purposes. The statute provides 
specifically that overestimates of 
receipts used in the computation of 
the tax levy be appropriated in the 
succeeding year's tax levy. There 
is no specific pi'ovision of law 
covering this subject relating to 
other cities and towns but such a 
requirement might possibly be in- 
ferred in section 23 of chapter 59, 
the chapter concerning the assess- 
ment of local taxes, which section 
concerns the fixing of local tax 
rates. The statute also pro\-ides 
for Boston that the estimate of 
revenues, except revenues to be re- 
ceived from the state, used in 
computing the current year's tax 
rate cannot exceed the actual re- 
ceipts of the preceding year. In 
other cities and towns the esti- 
mat(Hl re\-enues may be in excess of 
the preceding year's receipts, with 
the written a])proval of the Com- 
mission of ( 'orpoi'ations and Ta.xa- 
tion. Boston must appropriate at 
least 5 per cent l>ut not more than 
6 per cent of the net financial re- 
(luirements for a reserve for abate- 
ments. Other cities and towns may 
appropriate any amount not ex- 
ceeding five per cent. 

Special Statutes 

In other areas, Boston is go\'erned 
by special statutes. A yavy im- 
portant matter covered differentl.y 
in Boston is the appropriating 
power of the School Coinnuttee. 
In Boston, the School Committee 
may appiopriate for school pur- 
poses: (1) the unexpended appro- 
priation balances of the preceding 
year; (2) the estimatetl school 
revenues of the current year; and 
(3) an amount not in excess of S21,- 
200,000. The School Committee 
may also appropriate a sum not 
exceeding 50 cents foi' ciu-h si, ()()() 
of the average* valuation of the 
three preceding years for the con- 
struction and furnishing of new 
school buildings; and a sum not ex- 
ceeding -SI. 70 for each -SI, 000 of 



■valuation for the alteration and re- 
pair of school buildings. All School 
Committee appropriations are sub- 
ject to the approval of the Mayor 
who has veto power, but the School 
Committee may override a veto 
by a four-fifths vote. An appro- 
priation for general school purposes 
in excess of the total of the three 
items first referred to must be 
made by the City Council with the 
ai)proval of the Mayor. It may be 
interesting to note here that, in 
Bo.ston, all appropriations and loan 
orders originate with the Mayor, 
except appropriation and loan 
orders for school purposes. School 
Committees of other cities and 
towns have practically unlimited 
appropi'iatiu!; powei- foi- school pur- 
poses. These cities and towns are 
controlled by chapter se\'enty-oiie 
of the (Ieneral Laws, 'fliere lia\'e 
been many instances of where 
failure to include in the tax levy the 
total amount reeiuested by School 
Connnittees for the operation and 
maintenance of public schools has 
resulted in litigation, and in al- 
most ever_v instance, the courts 
ha\'e ordered the city and town to 
appropriate the deficiency together 
with a penalty equal to 25 per cent 
of the deficiency. Boston has 
ne\'er been involved in any litiga- 
tion of this sort because of the 
special statutes relating to the 
School Committee appropriating 
power. 

Still More Examples 

There are two other examples of 
special treatment of Boston in the 
administration of its internal af- 
fairs, namel\^ the Police Depart- 
ment and the Licensing Board. In 
1906, the Legislature enacted a 
slatut<\ chaptei' 291, An .Vet to 
rro\iele tor the .Vpi^oint nient of a 
Licensing Board and a Police Com- 
nussioner of the City of Boston. 
Litigation is presently pending in 
the coiu'ts concerning the inter- 
pretation of this statute and re- 
questing a judicial decision as to 
the extent of the powers conferred 
on the Police Commissioner insofar 
as they relate to appropriations and 
expenditures. With the exception 



i 



CITY R n C O R 



.I\N. 24 



<lini>nlM ri*laliiiK l<* I'oiii- 
nf ifTlniri » ffirinls. no 



hiih Mlal«-.-. timi . "All ix- 
tor the iimiiil«'iuinc<- of 
•'• p!iy of Iho p<iliro. 

■I apluTf* uiuJ other 
. <i all iti<-i(if'iital cx- 
IM iiM s 111. iiriiii in thr ixTforinanre 
of ihi' of saitl (-ollllnis^ion(>r 

or in ihi- a«ltninihtration of tsaid 
|Mili»f hIuiII In- |mi(i hy I he <-i»y of 
MM>^tiin upon the rc-fiiii^ition of sniti 

— Miner. " A similar 
latiile applies to the 
I _ I . ii«l. I «lo not wish to 

iliMUM the various phases f»f the 
eontroversy niul I mention it only 
to indieale the nnii|ue position of 
one <tf the ni.-ijor depart nu-nts of the 
fity. The Police ( 'onitnissioner and 
memlMTs of the LieensinR Hoard 
are ap|>ointfHi by the ( l(»vern(jr. 
Polii-t* offirials of otlxT cities and 
towns are a|)poiiit4 d hy lo<-al au- 
thorities and the departmental ap- 
propriations and exjH'ndilun's are 
suhjer t to the same r»'Kiilat ions that 
■it>ii'\ til other di'partniciils. 

Iloslon I nii|iic 
Uo-iiiii IS al.M) uiii(|ue in that 
there is iiii-lude«i in the charier 
provision for the establishment of a 
Finnnop ('«»mmission. consist ing of 
five members appointeii by the 
(lovernor. It is the duty of the 
I inance Conunission to investigate 
any and all matters relating to 
appropriations, loans, expenditures, 
ar«'<»unts. and methinls of adminis- 
tration affectinp the City of Boston 
or the County of Suffolk, or any 
.l- t<.irtii,ciit thereof, that may ap- 
'lie Commission to rec|uire 
I 'ion. and to report thereon 
iiic to time to the Mayor, the 
'v Council, the (lovernor or the 
leral Court. Other cities and 
■I" not have .un official in- 
iiK iMHjy with the liroad 
|)«ts.s4',ss«Hl by tlie Hoslon 
lance Commi.ssion. 
Ko'-ton isals*»unif|uein its county 
liip The C«mnty of Suf- 
ides lioston. Hevere. Win- 
i ' i i ' i , Tl„. County 



ConunissioiMTs of Suffolk County 
are the Mayor and City Council of 
1' ' ■ : the .Municipal Coinicil of 
: the City Coun<-il of He- 
■ III their r»'S|K'clive cities; and 
liie .M-lcctnwn of Wintlirop in .said 
town. The .\uditor and Trea.surer 
c»f the City <if Boston are resjjec- 
tively .\u<lilor and Trea.surer of the 
Ciiunty of SufTfdk. In other coun- 
ties, tile <'(nnily commi.ssi<niers are 
electeil as such and. with the excep- 
tion of Nantucket county, county 
treasurers are al.so electe<l. In 
Nantucket, the trea.surer of the 
town of Nantucket is al.'^o county 
Trea.surer. .Ml appropriations for 
SufTolk County are made by the 
Mayor and City Council of Bo.ston 
and all amounts so appropriated for 
county purpo.ses are included in the 
tax Ir-vy «if the City of Boston. 
The Legislature makes all appro 
priatioii.s for county purpo.ses for 
all other counties and a.s.ses.se.s the 
appropriations on the cities and 
towns within the respective coun- 
ties in accordance with a formula 
ba.sfd on valuations c.stabli.she<l by 
.statute in 1945. 

It would be impossible to di.scu.ss 
every instance of difTerences in 
statutes concerning the administra- 
tion of Boston and other citie.s and 
towns. There are two large vol- 
umes of special statutes relating to 
Boston comprising a compilation 
through 1937 and the statutes en- 
acted since that time would prob- 
ably make another volume. A 
comprehensive discu.s.sion of all of 
them and a compari.-;on of the laws 
relating to similar situation.s in 
other cities and towns could be the 
.subject of an entire course and 
could provide an excellent basis for 
a thesis for an academic degree. I 
offer this as a .suggestion to Pro- 
fe.s,s()r Maxwell to be pa.s.-<ed on to 
his students in political economy. 

I have attempted to touch some 
of the examples of the uniqueness of 
Boston's pasition. I sincerely trust 
that I have been able to contribute 
something to the general informa- 
tion which you already have about 
otir city. 



City Council 
Standing Committees 
for 1959 

City ("(iiincil I'rc-i lent Ildw.ird V. .\1< - 
I.iiiiK>ilin. Jr.. on Jariiiary M). aiuiuiinccd 
the followinx coniniittt-t- appoint men t« for 

i:.\i:rrTivi-: 

All the nn'.nl crs. CoiMiriljor Whilr. 
fhairin 111. f'oiitifiii.ir Kcrrijian. vice chair 
man. 

.\IM'I{;)IM{I.VTI(>.\S AM) l INANCi: 
C<»iiii(illorfi HiiU'.-'. laiinclla. \Vhil<'. 
Foley. KorriRan, Coffey. McDoiiough. 

C'LAI.MS 

Councillor.* .McDonounh. lannella, Cof- 
fey. Picmontc, Mine.*. 

CONFIRMATIONS 
Counr illors I lines, F'oley, lannella. 
Kerrisraii. MeDonoiiKli. 

IIOSPITAI.S 

Coiineillor.'* Foley, Mine.*, lanmlla, 
McDonouRh. White. 

INSPKCTION OF PHISONS 
Councillors l*iemonte, .McDonough. 
Kerri^.m. Coffey. Foley. 

I.KCIISLATIVK MATTKRS 
Councillors lannella. Pienionte. \\ hite. 
McDonouKh. Foley. 

LICKNSKS 
Councillors Picmonte, Coffey. Kerrinan. 
Ilinc.^, lannella. 

ORDINANCKS 
CouiK-illors Coffey, White. Kerrigiiii. 
nines, Piemonte. 

PCBLIC HOCSINC. 
Counrillors McDonough. Kerrigan. 
White. Coffey. Piemonte. 

PI HLIC LANDS 
Cotincillors Foiew \\hite, llinc.<. laii- 
nell.i, Coffey. 

PI BLIC Sl.RVICi; AND 
Ri:CRK.\TI()N 
Councillors White. Folev. Kerrigan, 
lannella. Coffey. 

RILKS 

(^>un(•illors Kerrigan. White, Foley. 
Lannella. Piemonte. 

CRBAN RKDF.VKLOP.MKNT. RI!- 
HABILIT.VTION AND RKNKWAJ. 
Councillors Foley, Kerrigan, White, 
nines. Coffey. 

On the above-named committees, the 
first named memt)er is ohairman, tlif 
second named member is vice chairman. 



Jan. 24 



CITY RECORD 



83 



REALTY ADVISERS REPORT ON EQUALIZATION SURVEY 



The Mayor, on January 19, re- 
leased the following report of his 
Realty Advisory Committee on the 
status of the equalization survey: 

The Mayor's Advisory Commit- 
tee, which you appointed in May, 
1956, to "provide policy, direction, 
and guidance in the conduct of an 
equalization survey designed to 
equalize assessed values on all in- 
come-producing properties on a fair 
and equitable basis," is pleased to 
be able to report to you that as of 
the end of 1958 substantial prog- 
ress has been made. Accomplish- 
ments include the following: pre- 
liminary surveys regarding prop- 
erty classifications, valuations and 
exemptions; completion of an in- 
tensive rental -urvey for valuation 
purposes; the development of oper- 
ating and valuation standards 
specific to Boston experience; the 
indoctrination of assistant assessors 
and technicians employed by the 
survey in techniques and practices 
required for equitable assessing; 
determination of land values in the 
central business district and sur- 
rounding areas; the completion of 
the city's first comprehensive land 
value maps (which are also being 
utilized by the Survey Division, 
Public Works Department, City 
Planning Board, and Traffic Com- 
mission I ; the collection of detailed 
descriptive information on most of 
the taxable parcels in Wards 3. 4, 
5, 6, and 21, where the bulk of the 
city's assessable value is situate, 
and the valuation of these parcels 
at fair and equalized values accord- 
ing to consistent standards; the ap- 
plication of machine accounting 
techniques to the economical proc- 
essing of valuation data. Probably 
the most significant product of the 
survey to date has been the train- 
ing of certain of the permanent 
Assessing Department personnel in 
the Reeves techniques for the sys- 
tematic collection, analysis, and 
processing of valuation data in or- 



der to arrive at equitable assess- 
ments, thus providing a trained 
nucleus of personnel to carry out 
the new assessing program on a 
continuing basis. 

Support Lacking 

Despite commendable achieve- 
ments (which more than justify the 
program ) your committee must re- 
gretfully inform you that much 
more could have been accomplished, 
given the active support of the 
Assessor of Taxes and broader 
participation by assessing person- 
nel. Adequate facilities in appro- 
priations, equipment, training, and 
competent supervision liave been 
made available. Yet as of the end 
of 1958 there will still remain a 
number of specialized parcels in 
Wards 3, 4, 5, 6, and 21 to be com- 
pleted and the quality and descrip- 
tive detail of the woi'k done will 
not have come up to the standards 
we still hope to see achieved i)y a 
better organized Assessing Depart- 
ment. The program has suffered 
from a short-work year (April to 
Deceml)er ), a lack of sustained in- 
terest and application on the part 
of many in the Assessing Depart- 
ment, and a limitation of the num- 
ber of assistant assessors partici- 
pating in the program. More im- 
petus must be given the program 
immediately, through active sup- 
port of the Assessor of Taxes, to- 
gether with working correlation 
and review with the Assessing De- 
partment, or the program will not 
only not be completed in 1959, but 
more serious, when completed will 
not have the validity which is 
achie^•able and which is desirable 
to protect the city. 

At the inception of the plan to 
equalize assessed valuations, it was 
agreed that commercial and apart- 
ment properties would be studied, 
and that fair and equalized values 
would be assigned to all such prop- 
erties; residential property (one to 



four families, inclusive) being ex- 
cluded from the survey. 

Suggest Partial Reports 

It was considered desirable, but 
not necessarily essential, to com- 
plete the survey in all wards before 
the ^•aluations of any particular 
group of properties were recom- 
mended for adoption. In order to 
follow the procedure which has 
proved successful in other cities, 
our study should be continued un- 
til all relevant properties have 
been valued on a fair and equalized 
l)asis. Tiien a complete report can 
be submitted. Meanwhile partial 
reports of valuations should not be 
issued or published in any form by 
the equalization survey. Such in- 
formation, assembled in connection 
with the properties surveyed, can, 
of course, be available to assessors 
in determining their values. In 
this connection, the above stric- 
tures are not intended to discour- 
age tlie continuing improvement of 
assessing ])ractices and valuations 
within the Assessing Department 
and the continuing correction of 
inequities as previously recom- 
mended by the Mayor as a part of 
the regular assessing routine. 

Foresee Proper Balance 

The equalization survey staff 
has made an analysis of recent 
sales in the entire city which con- 
firms prior analyses by the Real 
Estate Board, and it appears that 
there are heavy overassessments of 
many commercial properties in the 
central business district. It ap- 
pears, also, that this overassess- 
ment can be offset against under- 
valued commercial and apartment 
properties within and without the 
central business district. (Although 
many residential properties are as- 
sessed substantially less than mar- 
ket value, they are already heavily 
taxed because of the high tax rate 
in compariosn with other cities in 



CI T > R R C O R n 



24 



tiM- iiiiuun.i Houtvir. iM|U>ili£a- 
Hon wlim nrhirviNl will probnbly 

,1 

I ' ■ . nil 

It f KM) (iix rti(4-. l ilt- iiii|M>''iU«>ii of 
.nv :i.|<IHMiniil lovy »in mil t-^lHtv 
J III liny tax Tiitr nvrr $100 
:iliiin to Ikmiik ronfiM-a- 
...inlil n-uh ill InwcrinK tin- 
nrtUHl valur ol inv»-j.tiii«-nt pn»|)or- 
tit* wliiili ill turn would, tlurcfon-. 
Hp|N-ar a^M•^M•<l at i\ Wnuw wliirli 
will Ik- ill rxi-«>s »if fair (•a^ll lliarkrt 
vaUu'. If (ivrra.»M-s!.|iu lit of coiii- 
iii«Ti-ial proiM-rtios ir> l>uilt into 
(<|UaliEi-<l valuis tin- liunlcn wlii«li 
ihc Imnu- owner will fvintually 
Imvo to iK-ar iM-i-onir-^ iiiaKnilicil. 
lM>raaH<< tlic tax bam- shrink* fur- 
tlii-r ami tin- rate spirals. 

Residential Inequities 

Milmuuli it>-iiliiili:il pntprrty 
i » not fonif wnliiii tin- M-opc of 
tills coinmittve i which we ri'con- 
niiol it would Im' a very dcsirahli 
factor, b«»tli iMilicy-wist> and Ic- 
gally. if iniHjuitii's in residential 
"fsjiincnt^ — relative to each other 
Mil Id l)o eorrcrtc<l. 

Recommendations 

1. I)««pitr dur iii:ti»iiily to com- 
plete the ainouiii of >\irvey work 
«lesire«l rlurinR 1958 because of 
:iforenienti«»ne<l fact4trs. it is rec- 
oiiiincnded that the survey Ih' colii- 
pleti'il in 1959 as scheduled, and as 
early in 1959 as is practicable in 
unler that iMpialiration conclusions 
ran Ik- made available to the As- 
sosMir of Taxes for review and use 
during 1959 in si'ttiuK assessed 
values f(.r 1960. 

2. To exiH-ilite the program, 
when each wnnl is completed it 
should be reviewe<i promptly by 
the .^"'MiMwr of Taxes, and any 

«»f difference discussed 
e<|Ualix!iti<»n ilirect<tr or 

UllttlT. 

I hc e«|iialie«i| value-, and the 
li-rlyinK. -up|iortinK descriptions 
■.<<T m.iny parcels, will b<-nefit by 
^••n'cninu and review. This is par- 

• •;' -ir ,M. -111. . .-ven \H-r- 



lect a>.-es.-iiieiit> would !»»• .-ul»ject 
t<i dispute in the preM-nt tax and 
n-«»noniic climate. 

I«:ick of effective review eouhl 
prove costly to the City of Boston 
in M-veral ways: («l los.«i of rev- 
enue. lM'caus<> as.se.«<sments may In- 
based ujMin uiiiieces.«iarily l«iw eco- 
pomic rental e-tiiii:ite~ tas re- 
{Mirteti iiy lield analysts and un- 
corrected by review!; t6i addi- 
tional expense of defemlinn pro- 
IMc-i-il Jissessed values which minht 
l»e un>upportable on their own 
merits, or in comparison with 
neinhborinij |)roperties; (rl loss of 
confidi-nce in e(|Ualized values (as 
bi'iiiK neithi-r e(juitable or «lefen- 
siblei by the public. projHTty own- 
ers, or the Appellate Tax Hoard, 
which would further encourage re- 
(juesis for abatements and Appel- 
late Tax Board hearinps. 

3. The Advisory Board feels 
that it iiiinht be particularly help- 
ful in com|)letinK the (-(jualization 
>urvey. .-is well as helpful to the 
asse.«sors in actually determininp 
their asse.s.«ed values, if they could 
be re(|uired in connection with their 
assessing proce<lure to use the 
e<lualization survey forms for as- 
>»iMblinK till' inforiiiatioii on wliich 
the asses.>ied value of properties is 
to lie sub.HMiuently detenninecl. 

4. It is further recommendi-d 
that provision be made for a 60- 
(■r 90-day grievance period in or- 
der that proposed equalized values. 
!is approved by the .\ssessor of 
Taxes, may be discussed with the 
taxpayers, under the supervision or 
direction of the Assessor of Taxi->. 
thus enabling the city to receive 
such a<lditional information as the 
taxpayer may be encouraged to 
Mibmit at that time. This proec- 
fhire will add to the accuracy of 
assessments actually placed upon 
the tax roll and protect the city 
against any serious errors in data 
upon which assessments may have 
been based. In such discussion the 
a.->^essor should consider values of 
similar properties .so as to make 
certain the assessments on them 



iiave been ecjuaiiznl. 

5. It is essential that cverj' ef- 
fort be made to retain at least .sonic 
of the more productive technicians 
during January, Februar>-, and 
March of 1959 in order that the 
entire <-ity can be completed bv the 
fall of 19.')9 

Conclusion 

An acceleration of the eciualiza- 
tion .-urvey and the translation of 
results into actual a>sessments is 
one of the most important steps 
that the city can take in helping to 
establish confidence in the business 
and financial community. There- 
fore, imnie<liate attention should 
be given to this program by the 
new Assessor of Taxes following 
his .'ippointment. 

Bertram A. Dki kkr. 
Representing Boston Municipal 
Research Bureau. 

WlLI,I.\M A. EvERfTTT, 

Representing Retail Trade Board. 

M.\X R. K.XRG.MAN. 

Re|)resenting Boston Real Estate 
Board. 

WlUI.lAM F. Kee.'<ler, 
Representing Boston Citizens 
Council. 

Rl( HARD S. WiLLI.s. 

Rejiresenting Boston Chamber of 

Commerce. 
Wm. .Xinm H Rkim.v. Chnirmnn. 



Reports Filed on Recent 
Conventions and 
Conferences 

The Mayor i> in icrcii)! of the 
following report.s of city officials and 
employees on their attendance, dur- 
ing recent months, at various con- 
ventions and conferences pertaining 
to their particular fields of endeavor: 

.\lbert Lee O'Banion. .">uperin- 
teiuient of the Fire .Marm Division, 
on attendance at the 63d Annual 
Conference. International Munici- 
pal Signal As.sociation. at Phila- 
delphia, Pa., October 20-23. 1958. 

Edward L. Friel, Penal In.stitu- 
tions Commis.sioner. on attendance 



Jan. 24 



CITY RECORD 



85 



at the Xew I-^iigland Polife Chiefs 
Conference, at iliami Beach, Fla., 
November 18-21. 1958. 

Timothy J. O'Connor, Traffic 
Commissioner, on attendance, with 
WiUiam T. Doj^e. Deputy Com- 
missioner, at the Institute of Traf- 
fic Engineers, at Miami Beach, 
Fla.. November 10-14. 1958. 

John F. Flaherty. Division Engi- 
neer, Sanitary Division, Depart- 
ment of Public Works, on attend- 
ance at the American Public Works 
Association Congress, at Kansas 
Citv. Mo.. September 28-October 1. 
1958. 

Walter J. Malloy. City Clerk, on 
attendance at the Twelfth Annual 
Conference of the National In.sti- 
tute of Municipal Clerks at To- 
ronto, Canada, May 19-22, 1958. 

Attendance at the Conference of 
the Massachusetts Association of 
Municipal Accountants and Au- 
ditors, at Great Barrington. Mass., 
October 5. 6, and 7, 1958, reported 
by John F. Fitzpatrick. Martin 
C. Fulton, William J. Keane, and 
Edwin J. Sullivan, all of the 
Auditing Department. 

Frank R. Kelley, Commissioner 
of Parks and Recreation; and 
Arthur A. English, General Super- 
intendent of Parks and Recreation, 
on their attendance at the 60th 
Annual Conference of the American 
Institute of Park Executives, at 
New Orleans, La., October 12-17. 
1958. 

School Department Reports 

The School Committee is in 
receipt of the following reports of 
conventions and conferences: 

Priscilla Richard. Assistant Di- 
rector, Department of School 
Lunches, on attendance at the 
American School Food Ser\-ices 
Association Convention, at Phila- 
delphia, Pa., November 16-20. 

Henry F. Barry, Head Super- 
visor, Department of Attendance, 
on his attendance at the Annual 
Convention of the International 
Association of Pupil Personnel 
Workers, at Detroit, Mich., on 
October 19-23. 



Thomas A. Roche, Director, De- 
partment of Indu.strial Arts, on hi.s 
attendance at the Annual Mid- 
Winter Conference for Directors of 
^'ocational Education, at North- 
ampton, December 3 and 4, 1958. 

Pauline Ehrlich, Assi-stant in 
Charge of Lip Reading Classes, on 
attendance at the Annual Conven- 
tion of the American Speech and 
Hearing Association, at New York 
City, November 17-19, 1958. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT ORDERS 

Januaiy 12. 
Gincral Order Xo. 373. 
The le.^ignation of Patrolman .John K. 
O'Biyan. Traffic Division, having been 
presented while charges arc pending 
against him, it is hereby accepted, to 
take effect as of Saturdav, January 10, 
1959, at 7.4.5 o'clock ,\.m. 



Mortality Report. 

For the week ending Jan. 1". 19.59. 

Population as of July, 19.58, Massachusetts State 
Census, 724,702; population estimated July, 1956, 
United States Census Bureau. 816,759; number of 
deaths (stillbirths exchided); Residents, 202; non- 
residents, 81 ; total, 283. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: All deaths, 
20.15; nonresidents deducted, 14.61. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: 

Last week, 20.14; corresponding week last year, 
17.23. 

Deaths by age periods, sex, etc.: Under one year, 
8; one year to four years, inclusive, 1; sixty years 
and over, 185. Total deaths: Males, 16G; females, 
117; deaths in hospitals and institutions, 219. 

REPORTABLE DISEASES: 
CASES AND DEATHS.* 



DlSE.\9E3 


Cases and Deaths 
Reported Week 
Ended 
Jan. 17, 1959 


it 

il 

o 


00 

— 2 

■|qo" 

i 


Cases 


Deaths 


Cases 


Deaths 


Anterior 










Pohomyelitis. . . 










Diphtheria 










Encephalitis 










Lethargies 










Influenza 










Measles 


11 




21 




Meningitis 














1 






Pneumonia (lobar) 




2 








12 




13 




Tuberculosis 










(pulmonary) . . . 


23 




15 


4 


Childhood Type 










Tuberculosis . . . 










Tuberculosis 










(other forms). . . 










Typhoid Fever . . . 










Whooping Cough . 











* Residents and nonresidents included. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT ORDERS 

Januar>- 20. 
General Order No. 2. 
I. Retirement. 
The following retirement, in accord- 
ance with section 6 of chapter 32 of the 
General Law.s, which became effective a.s 
of 8 A.M., November 9, 1958, is hereby 
announced : 

Fire Fighter (Arson Inspector) Ed- 
ward J. Fogarty, Fire Prevention Divi- 
sion. 

Fire Fighter Fogarty was appointed to 
the department on June 16, 1943, and he 
loaves the department with the be.st 
wishes of his associates. 

II. TRAX.SFER. 

The following transfer, which will 
become effective as of 8 a.m., Wednesday. 
January 21, 1959, is hereby announced : 

Fire Fighter George W. Sangster, Jr., 
from Ladder Company 17 to I'ngine 
Company 43. 

III. Ch.ange IX Rules and Regul.\- 
Tioxs, Boston Fire Department. 

The following change shall be made in 
Appendix XV, Rules and Regulations of 
the Boston Fire Department (See Gen- 
eral Order 8. February 15, 1957) : 

Paragraph 18, change '"When a third 
alarm is struck --" to "When a multiple 
alarm is struck " 

IV. Fire Alarm Box Installed. 
The following fire alarm box, which 

was established in General Order Xo. 58 
dated December 30. 1958, has been in- 
stalled and connected in circuit Xo. 83: 
12-3815. Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr., Me- 
morial School, Hale street and Gordon 
avenue. 

Company commanders will add the 
above box to circuit card Xo. 83. 

V. Change in A.D.T. Sign.als. 

Notice has been received from the 
American District Telegraph Company 
requesting that the following changes be 
made in tlie following A.D.T. signals 
located in the Massachu.*etts Memorial 
Hospitals. 750 Harrison avenue, Boston: 

A.D.T. Fire Assignment Xo. 351, con- 
trols Talbot building, south wing. Fire 
Department should enter at 82 East 
Concord street. 

A.D.T. Fire Assignment Xo. 349. con- 
trols Talbot building, north wing. Fire 
Department should enter at 55 Stoughton 
street. 

.\.D.T. Fire Assignment Xo. 336, con- 
nols Rohiu-on and Evans buildings and 
\'oM- Hall. Fire Department should en- 
ter at 750 Harrison avenue. 



86 



CITY R n CORD 



Jan. 24 



DEPARTMENT CMANUES 

! < -. < uif t>{ Acliiiiniiftrative Scn icw 
,i ihc- rollowing ppMonnil 

< ^rmi t>*r*rrMBWT. 

-wing cmploy- 
1 ■•n or prior I" 



.■ML ManUr. clvk aiMl 



M<>ud>'. 4: Sutannr Muriian, 6; 
I.. 6; Cecilia Mullen. I; Catherine 

<i,i.-.lir Nr^ll- 2: Phylli* Ni«ro. 
-. I <■ ., S; Manha 

:i: Muriel 
Kuhaim. 4: 



li,. ..iM.. ..1 111' lull.jwing employe*" 
m bren irmiiiuileU on or prior to Jiin- 

1 k Carroll, flfrnt-ehua ftre- 

■Uf follnwinic eiiiplo.v- 
i iiiin:ii<-.i <m or prmr to 



Mounry, I'atriria Eipo- 
\nnr I.. McKenney, floor 
! . h..ur; Catherine A. Mc- 

muuiih. nur>r, 11. TS an hour. 

I', t wi « k i-ndinK Jiinuar>' 6: 

witiK wii'kly nun« !< h.ive been 



V inK KiM^Tial niir!»e!< have been 
• ir the number of days in- 



van. 



Tt . • on Tooher. 

t. 1; Jacque- 

Mary White. 
J >: t II, 2; Monique 
> 8: Imosene Cilli*, 
Roue Jo>-ce, 4; 
. nila West. 2. 

l ilt .-^ iMi. - Hi ill. lollowinK employ- 
ee* have biH-n terminated on or prior to 
Jaiiu ■■<-\ 7 

(■■ ' aheth Murray, hospital med- 

ir., . a week; Terene Aiwolillo, 

fl.. :i week. 

I . iiti T. Barry. ambulance 

driM i. V' . - • :i wick; Josephine Barry, ho»pi- 
Ui medii-al worker, $47.75 a week; Manuel 
Baptiata. junior aiuiiitant resident, $1S2 a 
month: Lorraine Champa, laborator>- assisUnt, 
|.W a week: Charle* Corvino. hospiul medical 
worker. $47.75 a week: Kathryn Dunn, lab- 
oratory a»«l»tant, $50.25 a week: Corroll CafC- 
non. X-ray technician. $50.25 a week: Anne 
Marie C.ushuc. laboratory asslHtant, part time. 
$41.50 a week: Mary J. Kelly, hiwpital medical 
worker, $47.75 a week: John Unrlniur Lowry. 
junior a»iii.»Unl resident. $i:<2 a month; Wil- 
liam Paul I.uke, senior assistant resident, $lt<2 
n month: ralricia A. McCarthy. lai>orBtoo- 
n»'<i<<tant. $50 25 a week: Kridect O'Lauirhlin. 
hiwpilal medical wurker, $47.75 a week: John 
Thomaji Shea, hospital house worker, $47.75 a 
week; Maurice Srouji, senior assistant resident, 
$152 a month. 

The ."icrviees of the following employ- 
ees Iwive been teriiiiniited on or prior to 
J;iniiary 12: 

Permanent.— Dr. Arthur J. Donovan, assist- 
ant director. $686.67 a month: Antoinette 
Houirhton. dietitian, $81.75 a week. 

Tempcrar)-.— Iris M. Clarke, senior clerk and 
typist. $62.75 a week; Joseph J. Fitipatrick, 
clerk. $47 75 a week: Paul R. Donahue, hospital 
medical worker. $47.75 a week; Richard A. 
Curran. clerk. $47.75 a week: Leroy D. Aaron- 
son, intern. $132 a month; Donald J. Annino. 
Krnest M. Harsamian. chief residents. $222 a 
month: Mordecai K. Herkowitz. Raymond 
Bernier, senior assistant residents, $152 a 
month; Arrie CharoenphonB. Arnold H. Colcd- 
ny. residents. $1S2 a month: Luis A. Contra- 
maestre. Anesthesia. $222 a month; Francis V. 
Creeden, resido-nt. $182 a month; Raul M. 
Cuillar. senior a.ssistjtnt resident. $152 a month; 
Stanley A. Doret, resident, $182 a month: 
(leonte W. DouRan. Jose G Duarte, chief resi- 
ilent.H. $222 a month; Bernard Davis Grant. 
!ienii>r assistant resident. $152 a month; Dale 

H. Klinkiniter. Frances B. Hennessey, resi- 
dents. 182 a month; Herbert White, junior as- 
vistant resident. $1.(2 a month; William D. 
Tompkins, chief resident, $222 a month; John 

I. Sanders. Jorice A. Rivera. Chester C. Pryor. 
residenU. $182 a month: Robert M. Pitts, 
Thomas Morse, chief residenU, $222 a month: 
Albert F. Little, senior a.saistant resident, $152 
a month. 

Sanatorium Oivinion. 

The foilowinu personnel have .«iibmit- 
teil ihc ir resi(tnalions: 

Rita Dean, senior clerk and stenographer: 
Peter M. Foley, hospital house worker, pro- 
visional; Dr. Lov. K. Sarin, resident surjreon. 



Appointments. 



K.^hon .Mrli..t>..iiBh. «. l..,rraine 
•IL I; Mary Mrlx^od. Z: Nancy Miller. 



AnVIMSTKATIVI! SKRVlrKS DEPARTMENT. 
/>riM(in0 Srction. 
Christine Haffner. 279 Centre street. Ja- 
laica Plain, clerk and stenosrapher, $47.75 a 



Blll-UI.NG Dei-aktmk.nt. 
Robert M. Bender. 14 Spauldinx street, Dor- 
cheitter, buildinK inspector, $75.25 a week. 

City Planning Board. 

Albert Anthony Tappe. 142 Chestnut street, 
planninK desiirner. $117.75 a week. 

Richard S. Bolan, 44 Bradford avenue, 
Sharon, principal planner. $127.25 a week. 

.Seward Weber. 2 Scott street, Cambridxe, 
principal planner. $1.'{6.75 a week. 

Heautii Department. 
llralth lUriMion. 
Mary Patricia Venable. 410 Stuart street, 
public health nurse. $72.75 a week. 

Ho.spital Department. 
.Main Division. 
William S. Kaahnor. 169 Fairmount street, 
Dorchester, senior X-ray technician. $62.75 a 
week. 

Frances Powers, 94 Winthrop street, Rox- 
bury, clerk and typist, $47.75 a week. 

Sylvia Beck, 38 Theodore street, DorchesUr, 
laboratory technician, $62.75 a week. 

Carol I..ewis, 21 Haskins street, Roxbury. 
laboratory technician. $62.75 a week. 

William J. Lammers. 40 Brookway road. 
West Rfixbur>', watchman, $55.25 a week. 

June Lynch, 8 Isabella street, senior X-ray 
technician, $62.75 a week. 

Rena Karel, 74 Harvard avenue. Brixhton. 
senior X-ray technician, $70.25 a week. 

Edith Cumminirs, 12 Sanger street. South 
Boston, laboratory technician, $62.75 a week. 

Marilyn Meaicher, 10 Colebrook street. South 
Bo:«ton, laboratory assistant, $55.25 a week. 

hong Island Tlivirion. 
Clinton W. Bearse. 26 Dickens street, Dor- 
chester, hospital kitchen worker, $47.75 a 

Michael E. Harkins. 47 Oakridee street, Dor- 
chester, attendant nurse, $47.75 a week. 

James P. Conn-.)lly. 125 Causeway street, 
attendant nurse, $60.25 a week. 

Alfred E. Peters. 11.1 Warren street. Rox- 
bury, hospital kitchen worker, $47.75 a week. 

Michael J. Jackson. 16 Atlantic street. South 
Boston, hospital kitchen worker. $47.75 a week. 

Law Department. 
H'orA-moi's Compensation Service. 
Elizabeth White, .39 Norfolk street, Dorches- 
ter, clerk and stenographer, $47.75 a week. 

Licensing Board. 
Adrienne L. SavaRe. .36 Morcy road. West 
Roxbury, clerk and stenographer, $47.75 a 



Penal Institl-tions Departme.nt. 
Uou»e of Correction. 
William MacKay, 613 East Second street. 
South Boston, correction officer, $72.76 a week. 

PiBLic Works Department. 
High%ray Oirition. 

Robert Kaufman. 97 Mountfort street, la- 
borer, $55.25 a week. 

Paul R. Mitchell. Jr.. 10 Chestnut avenue, 
Jamaica Plain, laborer. $55.25 a week. 

Joseph P. Durkan. 755 Truman Highway, 
Hyde Park. laborer. $55.25 a week. 

Guy Impentore, 45 Bowdoin street, laborer, 
$55.25 a week. 

Ralph C. Cella, 9 Hanover avenue, laborer, 
$55.25 a week. 

.ScH-pr DifisioM. 

Joseph A. Ginnetty, 1545 Columbus avenue, 
Roxbury, laborer. $55.25 a week. 

Walter J. Adams. 6 Sachem street, Roxbury, 
laborer, $55.25 a week. 

Water Divition. 
John N. Feeney, 39 Forest Hills street, Ja- 
maica Plain, clerk and stenographer, $47.75 a 
week. 

Carmella Perez. .37 St. Alphonsus street. 
Roxbun-. clerk and stenographer, $47.75 a 
week. 



Jan. 24 



CITY RECORD 



87 



Welfare Department. 
Central Office. 

Russell Amaral, 1037 Dorchester avenue, 
Dorchester, clerk and typist, $47.75 a week. 

Edward Fitzgerald, 244 Kennebec street, 
Mattapan. clerk and typist. $47.75 a week. 

Mary D. Griffin, 49 Worthing-ton street, Ro.\- 
bury, clerk and t>T)ist, $47.75 a week. 

Joan Fisher, 252 West Broadway, South 
Boston, clerk and typist, •?47.75 a week. 

Alice G. Kelley, 560 East Broadway, South 
Boston, clerk and typist, $47.75 a week. 

Mary Sances, 544 East Seventh street. South 
Boston, clerk and typist, $47.75 a week. 

SUFFOLK COUNTY. 
East Boston District Court. 
Sylvester J. Wynters, 1022 Bennington 



Municipal Court of Boston. 
Ann M. Andriotti, 149 Webster street. East 
Boston, clerk, $47.75 a week. 

Municipal Court, Roxbury District. 
Robert C. O'Shea, 7 Rawson road, Quincy, 
$7,300 a year. 

Reinstatements. 

Fire Department. 
Joseph F. Garrity, 228 Geneva avenue, Dor- 
chester, storekeeper, $65.25 a week. 

Hospital Department. 
Main Division. 
Florence Sullivan, 252 Columbia road, Dor- 
chester, hospital medical worker, $55.25 a 
week. 

Margaret Rasmussen, 9 Bullard street, Dor- 
chester, clerk and typist. $55.25 a week. 

Catherine Worley. 21 Hamlet street, Dor- 
chester, hospital house worker, $60.25 a week. 

Sanatorium Division. 
Elizabeth Rizzelli. 19 Charme avenue, Ros- 
lindale, hospital medical worker, $60.25 a week. 

Long Island Division. 
H. Necmettin Ozalan, Long Island Hospital, 
assistant resident physician, $98.75 a week. 

Public Works Department. 
Automotive Division. 
James T. Dowd, 190 Green street, Jamaica 
Plain, mobile guard, $65.25 a week. 

Water Division. 
John J. Kemmitt, 136 Hamilton street, Dor- 
chester, laborer, $65.25 a week. 

Welfare Department. 
Central Office. 
Mary Wilson, 10 Willis street, Dorchester, 
senior bookkeeper, $70.25 a week. 

Changes in Status. 

Building Department. 
Rose K. Reynolds, 827 Canterbury street, 
Roslindale, from clerk and stenographer at 
$55.25 a week to senior clerk and stenographer 
(temporary transfer, 6 months) at $65.25 a 
week. 

City Planning Board. 
Frank J. Boutell, 113 Bateman street, Hyde 
Park, from planning assistant at $95.25 a 
week to junior planner (temporary) at $113 
a week. 

Health Department. 
Health Division. 
Frank P. Henry, 15 Elmira street, Brighton, 
from senior environmental sanitation inspector 
at $98.75 a week to principal environmental 
sanitation inspector (temporary) at $108.25 a 
week. 

Antoinette Lambiase, 48 Bowdoin avenue, 
Dorchester, from senior clerk and typist at 
$65.25 a week to principal clerk and typist 
(temporary) at $72.75 a week. 



Ho.spital Department. 
Main Division. 

George J. Marks, 61 Quint avenue, Allston, 
froTi third-class stationary engineer at $84.75 
a week to second-class stationary engineer 
(temporary) at $88.25 a week. 

John K. Gordon, 41 Sumner street, Dorches- 
ter, from senior X-ray technician (temporary) 
at $65.25 a week to senior X-ray technician 
(permanent) at $65.25 a week. 

Francis X. Drummond, 27 Pierce avenue, 
Dorchester, from senior X-ray technician (tem- 
porary) at $72.75 a week to senior X-ray 
technician (permanent) at $72.75 a week. 

O. Ronald Cantalupo, 544 Bennington street. 
East Boston, from senior X-ray technician 
(temporary) at $70.25 a week to senior X-ray 
technician (permanent) at $70.25 a week. 

Phyllis Skobeloff, 6 Howell street, Dorches- 
ter, from laboratory assistant at $55.25 a week 
to laboratory technician (temporary) at $65.25 
a week. 

Sheila C. Marks, 61 Quint avenue, Allston, 
from principal clerk at $84.75 a week to senior 
personnel officer (temporary) at $122.50 a 

Walter J. Dooley, 39 Webber street. Ro.xbury, 
from principal X-ray technician at $81.25 a 
week to head X-ray technician (temporary) at 
$84.75 a week. 

Marilyn M. Meagher, 10 Colebrook street. 
South Boston, from laboratory assistant at 
$55.25 a week to laboratory technician (tempo- 
rary) at $62.75 a week. 

Sanatorium Division. 

Mary McDonough, 100 Granite avenue, Dor- 
chester, from hospital medical worker at $60.25 
a week to senior hospital medical worker at 
$62.75 a week. 

Madeline Rowell. 9 Caton street, Mattapan, 
from hospital medical worker at $60.25 a week 
to senior hospital medical worker at $62.75 a 
week. 

Charles F. Kennedy, 481A East Broadway, 
South Boston, from hospital medical worker at 
$57.75 a week to senior hospital medical worker 
at $60.25 a week. 

Rachel Sullivan, 13 Electric avenue, Nan- 
tasket, from hospital medical worker at $60.25 
a week to senior hospital medical worker at 
$62.75 a week. 

George Dunn, 3 Monadnock street, Dorches- 
ter, from hospital medical worker at $55.25 a 
week to senior hospital medical worker at 
$57.75 a week. 

Eula Carey, 60 Castle street, from hospital 
medical worker at $60.25 a week to senior 
hospital medical worker at $62.75 a week. 

Gertrude Callow, 20 Cedar street, Mattapan, 
from hospital medical worker at $60.25 a week 
to senior hospital medical worker at $62.75 a 
week. 

M. Rosamond Santry, 419 Old Colony ave- 
nue. South Boston, from senior X-ray tech- 
nician (temporary) at $65.25 a week to senior 
X-ray technician (pei-manent) at $65.25 a 
week . 

Daniel Callaghan, 90 Adams street, Dorches- 
ter, from hospital medical worker at $57.75 a 
week to senior hospital medical worker at 
$60.25 a week. 

Parks and Recreation Department. 

Jean C. Groden. 296 River street, Mattapan, 
from clerk and stenographer at $52.75 a week 
to senior clerk and stenographer (temporary) 
at $60.25 a week. 

Eileen M. Rowley, 6 Kenney street, Jamaica 
Plain, from clerk and stenographer at $52.75 
a week to senior clerk and stenographer (tem- 
porary) at $60.25 a week. 

Public Works Department. 
Bridge-Tunnel Division. 
Rosario Dindio, 31 Bradfield avenue, Roslin- 
dale, from heavy motor equipment operator 
and laborer at $77.75 a week to working fore- 
man heavy motor equipment operator and la- 
borer (temporary) at $81.25 a week. 

Highway Division. 
Charles F. Green, 36 Bird street, Dorchester, 
from senior clerk and typist at $70.25 a week 
to principal clerk and typist (temporary) at 
$75.25 a week. 



Hanilarii Division. 
Francis B. McNamara, 396 West Fourth 
street. South Boston, from motor equipment 
operator and laborer at $70.25 a week to street 
cleaning and waste collecting inspector (tem- 
porary) at $75.25 a week. 

Step-Rate Increases. 

Department of School Buildings. 
Joseph M. Eich, senior electrical engineering 
draftsman, from $84.75 to $88.25 a week. 

Fire Department. 



Assistant Fire Chiefs. 

From To 
John E. Clougherty, $173.37— $188.50 

John F. Howard, 173.37— 188.50 

William A. Terrenzi, 173.37— 188.50 

Deputy Fire Chiefs. 

From To 
Richard A. Ash, $154.21— $169.34 

John J. Breen, 154.21— 169.34 

John J. Crehan (Medal), 154.69— 169.82 

James J. Flanagan, 154.21 — 169.34 

Edward J. Gaughan, 154.21 — 169.34 

Joseph F. Kilduff (Medal), 154.69— 169.82 
John F. Pettit, 154.21— 169.34 

John J. Ryan, 154.21— 169.34 

District Fire Chiefs. 

John J. Ainsworth, 
Michael J. Aylward, 
Carl S. Bowei-s, 
Edward D. Campbell, 
Frederick P. Clauss, 
William F. Dewan, 
Joseph L. Dolan, 
Albert F. Donahue, 
Edwin M. Finnegan, 
Francis X. Finnegan, 
Michael G. Foley, 
Daniel G. Ford, 
Edward J. Galvin, 
William D. Hart, 
Daniel P. Hegarty, 
William T. Hogan, 
William C. Jeffers, 
Gerald F. Keenan, 
Richard J. Lane. 
Edward T. Lynch, 
John J. McCarthy, 
Henry J. McCue. 
Andrew J. McElaney, 
Edward J. McNulty, 
John C. J. Merrill, 
James J. Murphy, 
Harry W. Murphy, 
John J. O'Brien, 
John J. O'Mara, 
John A. O'Neill, 
Walter F. Peters, 
John F. Sampson, 
Henry W. Shafer, 
Edmund J. Sheehan, 
Edward F. Sullivan, 
John J. Sullivan, 
George Thompson, 
Peter A. Thompson, 
Charles D. Travis, 
Amoreno R. Vitiello, 
Robert M. Walsh, 
Henry M. Wheeler, 
John H. White, 
Roger T. White, 

John A. Martin, district fire chief (Super 
intendent of Maintenance), from $163.79 t( 
$178.92 a week. 

Fire Captains. 

From To 



From 


To 


138.12— $153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 


138.12— 


153.25 



Michael R. Allen, 
Carl A. V. Anderson, 
Kenneth C. Arnold, 
Robert P. Beltramini, 
Frank A. Bergdoll, 
Vincent A. Bolger, 
John P. Brooks, 
James G. Buchanan, 
John P. Buckley, 
Joseph M. Cady, 



$118.19— $133.33 
118.19— 133.33 
118.19— 133.33 
118.19— 133.33 
118.19— 133.33 
118.19— 133.33 
118.19— 133.33 
118.19— 133.33 
118.19— 133.33 
118.19— 133.33 



CITY R CORD 



Jan-. 24 



nd W Kr*u>l. 

■ ..>l^ in. 



A. Wiwnlanrr. 



CUrh. flr* rapUin (>MliiUnt to 
••■Uuni rhirti (MnUII. from tlXT.M to 
IIU.>T • 

Cornvliu* K. Finniwiin. flrv captain (drill- 
from tItS.Ri to fUO.M a wr*k 

Firr l.lratpnanta. 



PrancU X. Brown. 

J>*n M HurVf ( Medal ». 



M . J ' r, . .. nifo. 

John K. ('iini(>>><-M. Jr., 

John I.. Campbell. 

Martin J. Canata. 

John J. Cannitr, 

Andrrw J. Canning. 

SUnlry W. Card. 

Sumner N. Card. 

William <:. Canienter. 

Morlcy J. Carter. 

John K. CaM. Jr.. 

Krancin P. Chapman. 

Jrrrmiah J. Cody. 
11. i .i 1 1 i:t Jcriimr P. C<>ffp>'. 
llll.li - IM.S3 Andrew F. C"llin«. 
IIH.I* - laa.SS Daniel P. ( iillini.. 
II. I<. I '.'in Kmmett F. Collini.. 

Frederick J. Collin-i. 

William P. C^nnell. 

Paul F. Cook. 

Michael J. Corrao. 
;,. 1 . 1 . (.'. John J. Coiitcllo. 
llK.ltf U;j,:ta John F. Creedon. 

- US.SS Franci» J. Cumminir». 
lis. 19 1SS.S.1 Jamen A. Dailey. 
11H.I» - Ua.SS j€«cph F. Daley. 
11H.19 lJ.^..^."t Jamen A. Dalton. 
1IH.1» - I3».3.H Archibald J. Devlin, 
imio ns.:!S Ceonte J. Devlin, 
p. nt t:l Philip F. Devlin. 

t Albert V. DImino. 

I Joseph C. Doherty. 
William P. Donahue. 

:- . . it Dennin J. Donovan. 

ilK.I'.' I James A. Donovan. Jr.. 

1IKM9— Thcrnan J. Donovan. 

11(1.19 - lSi.83 John A. Dovi. 
IIH.19- 183.S.H CeorKc T. Dowd. 
UK. 19— 1SJ.33 Francis P. Dowlinsr. 
11H.1»_ 1S3.33 Arthur I. Downinit. 
11K.19— 133.33 Robert A. Doyle. 
n«l'>- li:t."3 Thomas C. Dunbnr. 
: . : ; r; William F. Dyer. 

tjiwrence P. Dynan. 
1 F.dmund D. Farrell. 

Raymond E. Favret. 
t Thomas F. Feeney. 
1 John E. F'encer. 

James M. Finn, 
.1 Peter P. Finnesan. 
;:; Francis R. FittRerald. 
. I ; (KTald A. Flcminn. 
;i Charles M. Flynn. 

- . 11 Christopher S. Eraser. 

- . 11 Charles F. Freiberir. 

- ; ■ I.; John Fronirillo. 

It William D. Cavln. 

I I HiaKici Germano. 

- ; 11 David CoWmnn. 

- ; , ,i:i John A. Goodyear. 

:,:t Cieonte E. Craney. 

- ; . .1.1 Charles F. Griffin. 
IV , i.i.:i:t William F. Griffin. 

Ernest J. Grimm. 
William E. Hackett. 
Edmund J. Hairerty. 
Georjre R. Hainc-s, 
James E. Hnlpin. 
Warren A. Har.lv. Jr.. 
David F. Harrison. 
John R. Harrison. 
William O. Hawkins (Medal) 
Euirene W. Hayes, 
John A. Hayes. 
Thomas J. Hession. 
Joseph P. Hes«ion. 
John H. Hoar. 
From To Thomas J. Hobin. 
I10». 17— 1120.30 Thomas D. Hf>itan. 
1(1.'. t: •'M .'io Philip I. Howlett. 

. 10 Daniel J. Hurley. 
M Edward J. Hurley. 
.1 Jamen J. Hurley. 
Paul F. Hynes, 
..I 7s Charles J. Jones. Jr.. 
1US.17 l,!ii,:<n J< hn C. Kahachus. 
106.17 - UO.SO Joseph W. Karnela. 
10&.17— 120.30 Thomas F. Keeley. 
10S.I7— 120.SO Waller T. KeUey. 
105.17- 120.30 Andrt-w M. Kelly. 



lis. in i:(.t.:ij 

11K.19— I.«.33 

11 H.I 9— ISJ.JS 

I IN. 19— 13S.Xa 

118.19— 1S3.33 

118.19— IJJ.S3 



1105.17- 
106.66- 
106.66- 
105.17- 
106.17- 
106.17- 
106.17- 
101.14- 
lOl.U- 
108.17- 
106.17- 
106.17 
105.17- 
105.17- 
106.17- 
105.17- 
106.17- 
105.17- 
105.17- 
105.17- 
105.17- 
105.17- 
105.17- 
106.17- 
101.14- 
105.17- 
105.17- 
105.17- 
105.17- 
105.17- 
106.17- 
105.17- 
105.17- 
105.17- 
105.17- 
105.17- 
101.14- 
105.17 
101.14 
105.17- 
106.17 
105.17 
105.17 
105.17 
105.17 
105.17 
101.14 
101.14 
101.14 
105.17 
105.17 
105.17 
105.17 
105.17 
101.14 
105.17 
105.17 
105.17 
105.17 
105.17 
105.17 
105.17 
105.17 
105.17 
106.17 
106.17 
106.17 



105. r 
105.r 

105. r 



105.17 
105.17 
105.17 
106.65 
105.17 
105.17 
105.17 
105.17 
105.17 
105.17 
106.17 
105.17 
101.14 
105.17 
105.17 
105.17 
105.17 
105.17 
105.17 
101.14 
105.17 
105.17 



-1120.80 

- 120.71! 

- 120.7)4 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.80 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.80 

- 120.30 

- 120.80 

- 120.30 

- 120.80 

- 120.80 

- 120.80 

- 120.30 

- 120.80 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.80 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120..10 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120..30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120..'JO 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 
- 120.30 

- 120.."?0 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- '20.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.78 

- 120.30 

- 120..30 

- 120.30 

- 120.30 

- 120.viO 

- 120.,'!0 

- 120.30 

- 120..SO 
120..30 
120.30 
120.30 
120.30 
120.30 
120.30 
120.30 
120.30 
120.30 
120.30 



William D. Kelly (Master), 


tl 14.75— J129.88 


Richard A. Kemp. 


105.17— 


120.30 


Francis M. Kennedy, 


105.17— 


120.30 


James D. Kennedy. 


105.17— 


120.30 


John C. Kilruy. 


105.17— 


120.30 


Willard V. Kinit, 


105.17— 


120.30 


Walter J. I^Montaitne. 


105.17— 


120.30 


Frank J. Lans. 


105.17— 


120.30 


Anthony J. I^nKone, 


105.17— 


120.30 


Francis A. Lee, 


105.17— 


120.30 


Geonre F. I.,ee. Jr.. 


105.17— 


120.30 


Thaddfus T. I^wis, 


106.17— 


120.30 


Archibald A. MacDonald. 


105.17— 


120.30 


Robi-rt O. Maclnnes. 


105.17— 


120..30 


Anthony P. Mahoney. 


105.17— 


120.30 


John J. Mahoney. 


105.17— 


120.30 


Joseph F. Manning. 


105.17— 


120.30 


John J. Markham. 


105.17— 


120.30 


Charles E. Maps. 


105.17— 


120.30 


Gerard S. Mrlia. 


105.17— 


120.30 


Georjte W. Meuse. Jr., 


105.17 — 


120.30 


James A. Moran. 


105.17— 


120..J0 


Lawrence T. Morgan. 


105.17— 


120..30 


John J. Moriarty. 


105.17— 


120.30 


F'rancis J. Mulhern. 


105.17— 


120.30 


Geonre J. Mullen. 


105.17— 


120.80 


Gerard D. Murphy. 


105.17— 


120.30 


Mark W, Murphy. 


105.17— 


120.30 


Vincent P. McHrine. 


105.17— 


120.30 


John J. McCabe, 


105.17— 


120.30 


John J. McCorkle. 


105.17 — 


120.SO 


Richard P. McCormick. 


106.17— 


120.30 


Lett J. McElaney. 


101.14 — 


120.30 


William M. Mcfiourty, 


105.17— 


120.30 


Charles M. McCiowan, 


105.17— 


120.30 


Thoma-s J. McGrath (Medal) 


. 105.65— 


120.7K 


John J. McKenna. 


105.17— 


120.30 


Joseph D. McKeown. 


105.17— 


120.30 


Francis L. McLauirhlin, 


105.17— 


120.30 


William A. McI..auKhlin. 


105.17— 


120.30 


James F. McMahon. 


105.17— 


120.30 


James F. McMahon. Jr.. 


105.17— 


120.3U 


James A. McNeil. 


105.17— 


120.30 


Paul H. McNifT. 


105.17— 


120..3O 


Bernard McTernan. Jr.. 


105.17— 


120.30 


John E. Napier. 


105.17— 


120.30 


William F. Nasta. 


105.17— 


1-20.30 


J^'hn F. Noonan. Jr., 


101.14 — 


120.30 


John J. Norton. 


105.17— 


120.30 


Andrew E. O'Brien. 


105.17— 


120.30 


Francis X. O'Brien. 


105.17— 


120.30 


Paul J. O'Brien. 


101.14 — 


120.30 


Thomas F. O'tiara. 


101.14 — 


120..'io 


Philip A. O'Farrell. 


105.17— 


120.30 


John P. O'Malley. 


105.17— 


120.30 


Edward W. Owens, 


105.17— 


120.30 


John A. Pepe. 


105.17— 


120.30 


James W. Pierce. 


105.17— 


120.30 


William A. Pierce. 


106.17— 


120.30 


Michael F. Power. 


105.17— 


120.30 


William E. Powers, 


105.17— 


120.30 


Joseph A. Pucci. 


105.17— 


120.30 


Francis W. Quifrley, 


105.17— 


120.30 


Geonte E. Randall, 


105.17— 


120.30 


John C. Reardon (Medal). 


105.65— 


120.78 


R 'bert E. J. Refran. 


105.17— 


120.30 


Nicholas Repetto, 


105.17— 


120.30 


Stephen J. Riley, 


105.17— 


120.30 


Patrick J. Roache, 


105.17— 


120.30 


Winthrop S. Robins, 


105.17— 


120.30 


James F. Rolfe. 


105.17— 


120.30 


Georpe I.. Rooney. 


105.17— 


120.30 


John A. Rose. 


105.17— 


120.30 


Georye J. Roy. 






Joseph Rufririero. 


105!l7— 


120r3O 


Harri.- R. Ryerson. 


105.17— 


120.30 


Albert Sacco. 


105.17— 


120.30 


Frank P. Sacco, 


105.17— 


120.30 


Georjre M. Sacco. 


105.17— 


120.30 


Ralph F. Saniras. 


101.14— 


120.30 


Renzo R. Santannelo. 


105.17— 


120.30 


Robert J. Shauirhnessey. 


105.17— 


120.30 


Arnold L. Snell. 


105.17— 


120.30 


Gerald F. Stamm. 


105.17— 


120.30 


I.eo D. Stapleton. 


101.14— 


120.30 


Walter Steadman. 


105.17— 


120.30 


Edwin G. SteidinKcr. 


105.17— 


120.30 


Alfred Sudhalter, 


105.17— 


120.30 


Dennis J. Sullivan, 


105.17— 


120.30 


Francis P. Sullivan. 


105.17— 


120.30 


John J. Sullivan, 


105.17— 


120.30 


John J. Swan. 


105.17— 


120.30 



Gerard E. McGowan. fire lieutenant (lieu- 
tenant chief inspector) . from Jl 16. 47 to $131.60 
a week. 



Jax. 24 



CITY RECORD 



8 9 



Albert L. O'Banion. superintendent of Fire 
Alarm, from $154.21 to $169.34 a week. 

James E. Laughlin. assistant superintendent 
of Fire Alarm operations, from $138.12 to 
$153.25 a week. 

Earl F. Lyons, assistant superintendent of 
Fire Alarm Division, from $138.12 to $153.25 
a week. 

Joseph E. Donovan, general foreman of 
Fire Alarm construction, from $125.86 to 
$140.99 a week. 

Principal Fire Alarm Operators. 



Radio Repai 





From 


To 


Henry M. Lyons, 


$118.19— $133.33 


John M. McCarthy, 


118.19— 


133.33 


Edward C. O Hehir, 


118.19— 


133.33 


Francis G. Tapp, 


118.19— 


133.33 


Senior Fire Alarm 


Operators. 






From 


To 


William J. Bat«s, 


$105.17— $120.30 


Walter J. Butkiewicz, 


105.17— 


120.30 


John H. Chinetti, 


105.17— 


120.30 


John J. Connell, 


105.17— 


120.30 


Charles F. Connors, 


105.17— 


120.30 


James N. Fix, 


105.17— 


120..30 


William H. Griffin, 


105.17— 


120.30 


John P. Lane, 


105.17— 


120.30 


Frank E. Leahan, 


105.17— 


120.30 


John P. Manning, 


105.17— 


120.30 


John L. McFadden, 


105.17— 


120.30 


Thomas N. Osborne, 


105.17— 


120.30 


Robert L. Sullivan, 


105.17— 


120.30 


William H. Sullivan. Jr., 


105.17— 


120.30 



Frank A. Mizer, senior fire alarm operator 
(temporary), from $105.17 to $120.30 a week. 

Edward W. O'Connell, senior fire alarm 
operator (temporary), from $101.14 to $120.30 



Operators. 

From 



To 

$85.24— $105.36 
81.22— 96.36 
85.24— 105.36 



Edmund T. Burke, 
John J. Maguire, 
John M. Murphy, 

Charles A. O'Dowd, 85.24— 105.36 

Edward T. Tracy, 87.16— 105.36 

Henry M. Wheeler, Jr., 87.16— 105.36 
Daniel J. O'Brien, foreman of inside wire- 
men, from $118.19 to $133.33 a week. 

Inside Wiremen. 

From To 
$97.12— $120.30 
97.12— 120.30 
97.12— 120.30 
101.14— 120.30 
97.12— 120.30 

Foreman of Linemen and Cable Splicers. 

From To 
Alexander A. Campbell, $118.19—5133.33 
Frederick J. Harris, 118.19— 133.33 

Working Foremen Line and Cable Splicers. 

From To 
$105.17— $120.30 
105.17— 120.30 
101.14— 120.30 
105.17— 120.30 
105.17— 120.30 
101.14 — 120.30 
101.14— 120.30 



Hubert J. Curley, Jr., 
Thomas J. Dolan, 
Eugene J. Flynn, 
John Grana, 
James F. O'Connell, 



Timothy Cadigan, 
Charles T. Donovan, 
Paul D. Hackett. 
Herbert F. Kearns, 
James R. Lowell. 
Charles E. McCarthy, 
Arthur W. Wagner, 



Cable Splicers. 



Robert W. Callahan, 
Patrick J. Carter, 
Frederick G. Duffy, 
John F. Flynn, 
Francis J. Wallace, 



Joseph W. Donovan, 
William A. Flynn. 
Richard M. Mackey, 
John P. Mahoney, 
Joseph H. Marks, 
Thomas J. O'Donnell, 
Charles J. McLaughlin, 



From 
$81.22- 



To 
$96.36 



78.35— 93.43 
85.24— 105.36 
85.24— 105.36 
81.22— 96.36 



From 


To 


$78.35— 


$93.48 


78.35— 


93.48 


85.24— 


105.36 


85.24— 


105.36 


81.22— 


96.36 


81.22— 


96.36 


78.35— 


93.48 



From To 

$78.35— $93.48 

85.24— 105.36 

85.24— 105.36 

85.24— 105.36 



James D. d'Entremont, 
Anthony R. D'Ambrosio, 
Francis C. Keane, 
Clarence A. Moore. 

Robert E. Harrington, motor equipment 
operator, from $90.22 to $105.36 a week. 

Joseph W. Flavin, electrical equipment re- 
pairman, from $94.05 to $109.19 a week. 

Stephen A. Lydon, electrical equipment re- 
pairman, from $94.05 to $109.19 a week. 

Francis L. Clegg, working foreman machin- 
ist, from $101.14 to $120.30 a week. 

William J. Zuzevich, machinist, from $85.24 
to $105.36 a week. 

Fire Lieutenants. 

From To 
$105.17— $120.30 

105.17— 120.30 

101.14 — 120.30 

105.17— 120.30 

105.17— 120.30 

105.17— 120.30 

105.17— 120.30 

105.17— 120.30 

105.17— 120.30 

105.17— 120.30 

105.17— 120.30 

105.17— 120.30 

105.17— 120.30 

105.17— 120.30 
lieutenant (medal), 
week. 



Francis X. Thompson, 
Frederick J. Timmins. 
Donald F. Toomey, 
Michael Tuberosa, 
John P. Vahey, 
Herbert B. Varley, 
Guy J. Vicini. 
Vincent D. Vitale, 
John J. Waldron. 
John J. Walsh, 
Peter H. Walsh, 
James E. Welch. 
Frederick W. White. 
Edmund L. Wipperman 
Joseph F. White, fi 
from $105.65 to $120.7; 



Fire Fighters. 



Anthony A. Abban, 
Joseph B. Abban, 
Joseph P. Abbis, 
Albert Abramoski, 
Anthony Acevich. 
Joseph F. Adams, 
Albert J. Adomaitis. 
Paul J. .Agnew, 
Frederick V. Ahern, 
John C. Ahern. 
William F. Ahern. 
Martin E. Ahlstrom (s 

operator) , 
Gaetano A. .\lbanese, 
William P. Albanese, 
John T. Aleks, 
Charles R. Alexander, 
John S. Allen. 
Walter F. Almeida, 
Sebastian Alongi, 
Frank R. Altimar, 
Peter J. Altomare. 
William P. Amrhein, 
Peter J. Anastasia, 
Robert N. Anderson. 
James J. Anderson, Ji 
William H. Anderson, 
Kristo A. Apostol, 
Paul P. Arathuzik, 



From 
$81.22- 
81.22- 
81.22- 
87.16- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
90.22- 



N. 



lao. 



Peter V. Arnao. 
Edward J. Arsenault. 
Sarkis A. .Arzoomanian, 
William C. Aspessi, 
Angelo A. Attardo, 
Arthur T. Austin, 
Walter G. Austin. 
William W. Austin (Medal) 
George L. Aylward, 
Joseph G. Babb. 
Edward F. Bachofner, 
Paul J. Bacoi. 
George F. Bacigalupo, 
Louis M. Bacigalupo, 
Oscar Backer, 
Charles E. Bagley, 
Daniel J. Bagley, 
Rocco J. Baglio, 
Francis J. Baker. 
Charles F. Baldner, 
Richard M. Baldwin, 



ink P. 



rresi, 
Barrett, 



85.24- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
81.22- 
90.22- 
78.35- 
90.22- 
87.16- 
87.16- 



90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
81.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.70- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
78.35- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 

81^22- 
87.16- 
85.24- 
85.24- 



To 
$96.36 
96.36 
96.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 

107.28 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 



105.36 
96.36 
105.36 
93.48 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 



105.; 



105.84 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
93.48 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 



96.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 



Aloysius P. Barron, 

Joseph E. Barron (aid to dep 

uty chief), 
Robert J. Barron, 
Francis X. Barry, 
James J. Barry, 
William J. Barry, 
Raymond F. Bastian, 
Henry E. Bateman, 
Charles C. Bazylinski, 
Robert D. Beagle. 
Russell C. Bean, 
Edward C. Becker, 
William A. Bell, 
Francis J. Belmore, 
Michael J. Benkis, 
Joseph L. Benson. 
Henry E. Bernasconi, 
Richard G. Berninger, 
Ralph E. Berry, 
Vito J. Bertolino, 
William E. Bills. 
Walter Bithoney, 
Robert E. Bluthardt, 
John J. Bogue, 
Stephen E. Bogue, 
John F. Booth. 
Arthur F. Bopp, 
Ralph A. Borden, 
Michael A. Bordonaro, 
Biagio B. Bordonaro, 
Paul J. Bouche, 
William Boulanger, 
Leo G. Bowen. 
Robert F. Bowen. 
Carl F. Bowei-s. 
Robert E. Bowie, 
Joseph P. Boyd. 
Robert J. Boyd, 
Joseph Boylan, 
John A. Boyle, 
Leo T. Bracken. 
Andrew J. Brady, 
Frederick J. Bradv. 
Robert G. Brady, " 
Lester W. Brasher (engineer 

High Pressure). 
Frederick C. Brauner, 
John F. Brennan, 
Joseph O. Brennan, 
Martin J. Brennan, 
James E. Brodbeck, 
Ralph C. Brogna, 
Alfred J. Bromowski, 
Alonzo P. Brooks. Jr., 
Charles H. Brown, 
Herbert M. Brown, 
Terence F. Brown, 
Theodore M. Brown, 
William C. Brown, 
Raymond F. Brundage, Jr., 
Harry Brundige, Jr., 
Robert W. Brundige, 
Michael J. Bruno 
Kenneth C. Bruvnell. 
Harry E. BiTant (Medal), 
Frank F. Bucelwicz, 
Charles M. Buchanan, 
Paul W. Buchanan, 
Bernard P. Buckley, 
Frank G. Buckley, 
Lawrence F. Buckley, Jr., 
Timothy S. Buckley, 
Walter J. Buckley, 
Arthur W. Bunker, 
Charles C. Bunker, 
Joseph S. Burgess, 
Albion E. Burke. 
John J. Burke, 
Thomas J. Burke. 
William F. Burke, 
William R. Burke, 
Charles A. Burns, Jr., 
Daniel J. Burns. Jr., 
Robert N. Burrill, 
James J. Burton 
John E. Burvvell, 
Frederick F. Bur>' (engineer 

Motor Squad), 
George E. Butler, 
Stanley J. Bykowski, 
Fred J. Bvrne, 
Frederick J. Byrne, 
Robert E. Bvrne, 
Gerald F. Cahill. 
William J. Cahill, 



From 
$90.22- 



90.22- 
85.24- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
81.22- 



90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
81.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 



90.22- 
87.16- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
85.24- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
87.16- 



90.22- 
81.22- 
90.22- 



90.22- 

9o!22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
81.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 



87.16- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 



90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 



109.19 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 

96.36 
105. .36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 

96.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 

93.48 
105.36 
105.36 
105.30 
105.36 



105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 

96.36 
105.36 
105.30 

96.36 
105.36 
105.36 

96..S6 
105.36 
105.84 
105.36 
105.36 



105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 



105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 



105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 



105.; 



90 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 24 



Kru« To 





r*ui w. 

J..»n !■ 


Cartrr, 

J. C«.*y. 







■.7.I., iii:,..H<i 

90.22 - lOS.SB 
i»o.22 - lOi.SS 
ti-.l6 - lOft.SS 
H7.U- 105.S6 
»7.1«— 108.S6 
W.8J— 108.S6 



lu5.:iB 
105.36 
lOK.^R 



90.22- 
90.22- 
HI.22- 
87.16- 



J.-r,.r. J ( , ...u.M,. 

J«4n>h A. CmtoU (riiBlnrcr. 

Motor Squad). 

Arthur I,. C«irvpl». 

Jwi>h W. C*urvcl». 

R.*prt M. CrurvrU. 

Haim A. Ctialinrr«. 



J. ClvHarw 
Paul J. CUnry. 



90.99- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
S7.16- 
H1.22- 
87.1S- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
87.16- 
87.16- 

94.05- 
85.24- 
90.70- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
87.16- 
87.16 



105..16 
10S..^6 
96..'i6 
106.36 



109.19 
106.36 
106.S6 
96.36 
10S.86 

109.19 
105.36 
105..'«6 
105.36 
105.S6 
105.36 
96.36 
103.36 
105.36 
105.36 
106.36 
106.36 

109.19 
105.36 
10S.84 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
106,36 
105.36 
93.48 



h rum 

Paul K. Condon, 

K6wmri P. C»nlry. ^L II" 

Ja^ E. Conir,. 87. »- 

1^ E. Conlcy. «7 >«- 

Walt*r J. Conlry. 85.24— 
pdcr J. Cjnn«-ll)r (rnslnccr In 

«*ar«f, HiB* Pr«.urr». 
rharim J. Connolly, 'J!?— 
Mward P. Connolly. 90.22- 
John K. Connolly, 87.16— 
J.«rph P. Connolly. 90.22— 
Mirharl A. Cjo nelly (.-nirinccr 

m charwc. Motor Squad). 108.63— 
Mirharl J. Connolly. 
Thomaii K. Cannolly. 
William K. Connolly. 
William V. Connolly. 
Paul C. Connom. 
Themaii K. Connor* (Maator), 
John J. C'naldino. 
Jamn H. Conway. 
Jamnr J. Conway. 
John J. Conway. Jr.. 
Charlc K. Cook. 

Kobcrt A. Cook. 

Francis B. CooU-y. 
Jamn K. Coolcy. 

Alfred W. Copithorn. 

Jamrx J. Corbctt. 

Jimrph I,. Corbelt. 

William V. Corbctt. 

John T. Corcoran. 

Peter I.. Corcoran. 

J.«eph H. CorUi... 

John K. Corninh. 

James K. Cjrriiran. 

Michael J. Corriitan. 

Kraneig H. Corwin. 

Walter W. CirwHn. Jr.. 

Felix F. Co«Krovc. 

William E. Conitrove. 

Charles L. Costcllo. 

Francis A. Co»tel1o, 

James G. Costello. 

Paul J. CoBtello (aid to commi 



S6 

87.16 lOi.36 
•0.70 - 106.H4 
87. 16— 105.36 
•0.22— 105.36 
90.22— 105. .36 
90.22- 105.36 
90 22 105.36 

■.16 



90.22 
90.22 
87.16— 
85.24— 
90.22— 
99.80— 
90.22 — 
90.22 — 
90.22— 
90.22 — 
87.16— 
90.22 — 
87.16— 
87.16— 
90.22— 
90.22— 
85.24— 
90.22— 
85.24— 
90.22— 
90.22— 
90.22— 
87.16— 
90.22— 
90.22— 
90.22— 
90.22— 
90.22— 
87.16— 
90.22— 
90.22— 



■ioner) 
Cieorne A. Couithlin. 
Arthur E. Cox, 
Owen J. Coyne. 
Charles A. Coye. 
Thomas J. Coyne. 
Samuel J. Craddock. 
Paul D. Craven. 
John J. Creedon. 
lA>uis Crifo. 
Paul D. Crimmons. 
Leon C. Criapo, 
Donald D. Crocker. 
Charles A. Cronin. 
Frank J. Cronin. 
James H. Cross. 
Joseph F. Crossen. 
John F. Crowley. 
Joseph F. Crowley. 
William J. Crowley, 
Warren J. Cudmore. 
William C. Cudmore. 
John P. Culhane. 
Robert J. Culhane. 
Arthur J. Cullinane. 
Robert C. CulMnanc. 
William J. Cullinane. 
James M. Cullity. 
Robert F. CiiUity. 
Frederick A. Ciimminns, 
John J. Cumminirs. 
John J. Cunnally. 
Maurice W. Cunniff. 
Pnul F. Cunniff. 
William A. Cunninicham. 
Carl F. Cuqua (aid to a-ssistant 

chief ). 94. OS- 

John P. Curran. 90.22— 
Joseph P. Curran. 87.16 — 

P'ul F. Curran. 90.22 — 

Philip F. Curran. 85.24— 
Thomas E. Curran. 90.22— 
Henry Currie (chief marine 



97.88- 
87.16- 
85.24- 
90.22- 
85.24- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
85.24- 
78.35— 
87.16— 
87.16— 
87.16— 
90.22— 
90.22 — 
87.16— 
90.22— 
90.22— 
87.16— 
90.22— 
90.22— 
90.22— 
85.24— 
90.22— 
87.16— 
90.22— 
85.24— 
78.35— 
87.16— 
87.16— 
90.22— 
87.16— 
85.24— 
85.24— 



To 

105.36 
105.3€ 
105.S6 
105.36 
105..-I6 



105.S6 

105.36 
106.36 
105.36 

118.77 
106 .S6 

105.36 
105.86 
105.86 
105.86 
114.94 
105.86 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.86 
105.36 
105..36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
103.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
106.36 
105.86 

113.02 
105.36 
105.36 
103.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
103.36 
105..36 
93.48 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 



105.S6 
10S.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105..36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
93.48 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
103.36 

109.19 
105.36 
105.86 
105.36 
105.36 
103.36 





From 


To 


Gtom H. Cutlip (enifineer. 




Motor Squad 1 . 


»94.05— $109.19 


Stanley F. Ctamowski, 






Richard T. Ualey. 






Georjfe W. Daly. 


90 22 




Anthony P. D'Ambrosio, 




10s 


Edward D'Ambrosio, 




103 36 


Leonard A. D'Amico, 


. 


105 36 


Thomas Danilchuk, 


^j.;; 

91 


lOS Hfi 


Joseph A. Dantona, 






Francis L. Danze. 


90 22 

^"22 


10' "if 


Joseph A. Dashner, 




lOS 36 


Jasei>h M. Davenport, 


^. Jg 


lOS tK 


Norman F. Davidson, Jr.. 


„1'_„ 


105 36 


James C. Deaicle, 




ins 3fi 


Ralph N. Dean, 


81 22 


96 86 


R'jbcrt R. Dean, 


„(, 


93 4>> 


Russell C. DeDominic, 


un'22 


ins 


Ernest Deeb, 


!l- IB 




James R. Delaney, 


90 29 


In tfi 


Albert W. Delonif. 


»- 1 K 




Ronariu M. DeMarco. 


99 


los'^fi 


Raymond J. Dempsey. 


90 22 


los'sr 


Edward F. Denault, 


BKOA 


105 36 


Deniel A. Denehy. Jr., 


MO 99 


105 36 


Edward J. Denehy, 


99 


10K 3f 
jU?'* ' 


John F. Denehy, 






Dennis E. Dennehy, Jr., 


MO 29 


105 3r 


Michele A. Depesa, 




J 


Liberalo DeRosa, 


90 22 


105 tf 
lOS^fi 


Paul J. DeRosa, 


90 22 




William H. Derrah. Jr.. 


Qn 99 


105 36 


Albert E. DeSaulniers, 


H- le 


1 ft5 •Ifi 


Frank A. DeSisto. 


8" 16 


105 '16 


J<>seph A. Desmond, 


„|'„2 


96 86 


William J. Desmond, 


^ijf 


105 36 


James J. Devancy, 


90 22 


105 36 


Edward W. Deveau, 




ins 36 


James M. Dever, 


on 99 
an'it, 


105 36 


John J. Dever. 




ins 36 


John J. Devine. 


22 


105 36 


Leo F. DeWne, 


90^22- 


105.36 


Charles F. Dewan, 


90.22— 


105.36 


Paul H. Dewan. 


90.22— 


106.36 


Gardner A. DeYoungr, 


90.22— 


105.36 


James V. DiBello. 


90.22— 


105.36 


Bartolumeo J. DiBenedetto, 


85.24— 


105.36 


Ernest N. DiBenedetto, 


85.24— 


105.36 


Cecil Dickinson, 


87.16— 


105.36 


Leo W. Diehl. 


87.16— 


105.36 


Arthur W. Dillon, 


78.35— 


93.48 


William P. Dilworth, 


85.24— 


105.36 


Vincent Dimino. 


86.24— 


105.36 


Euirene. G. Dinneen. 


87.16— 


105.86 


Jerr>- DiPrizio. 


87.16— 


105.36 


Louis DiRocco, 


90.22— 


105.36 


Pasquale DiRocco. 


90.22— 


105.36 


Peter J. DiRocco, 


90.22— 


105.36 


Ysaye W. DiRosario. 


90.22— 


105.36 


Salvatore H. DiStefano. 


90.22— 


105.36 


Robert M. Doheney. 


90.22— 


105.36 



enBineerl 
William F. Curtis. 
Thomas. L. Cushinir. 
Joseph A. Culcliffe. 



99.80— 114.94 
87.16— 105.36 
105.36 
105.36 



90.22- 
90.22- 



Fire Fighters. 

From To 

Edmund F. Doherty. J90.22— $105.36 

George E. Doherty, Jr., 87.16— 105.36 

John J. Doherty. 90.22— 106.36 

John T. Doherty. 90.22— 105.36 

Joseph P. Doherty, 90.22— 105.36 

Paul V. Doherty. 90.22— 105.36 

Walter G. Doherty, 90.22— 105.36 

Charles E. Dolan. 90.22— 105.36 

Raymond R. Doldt. 90.22— 105.36 

George T. Domaldo. 85.24— 106.36 
Francis P. Donahue (engineer. 

High Pressure). 94.05— 109.1 !> 

John B. Donato. 87.16— 105.36 

James F. Doneghey. 90.22— 105.36 

Andrew W. Donlan. 90.22— 105.86 

Thomas E. Donlan. 90.22— 105.36 

James H. Donnelly aid to 

chief of department), 97.88 — 113.02 

Bernard L. Donohue, 90.22— 105.36 
Edward C. Donovan (engineer, 

High Pressure) (Medal), 94.53— 109.67 

E^ward C. Donovan. Jr.. 78.35— 93. 4t* 

James F. Donovan. 85.24— 105.36 

Jeremiah J. Donovan. 81.22— 96.36 

John F. Donovan. 90.22— 105.36 

John J. Donovan. 87.16— 105.36 

John J. Donovan. 85.24— 105.36 

John V. Donovan. 90.22— 105.36 

Joseph J. Donovan, 85.24— 105.36 



Jan. 24 



CITY RECORD 



Robert E. Donovan, 
Robert R. Donovan, 
William E. Donovan, 
James J. Doolan, 
Francis J. Dooley. 
Richard F. Doolin, 
Arnold S. Doran, 
John J. Doucette ei 

Motor Squad), 
Paul V. Dougherty, 
William J. Dougherty, Jr 
Frank S. Douglin, 
William B. Dow, 
Charles R. Dowd aid 

sistant chief), 
Joseph M. Dowd, 
William A. Dower, 
Walter H. Dowgiallo, 
Francis J. Dowling. 
James J. Downey, 
John F. Downey. 
Joseph A. Downey. 
Maurice A. Downey, 
Joseph J. Downing, 
John F. Doyle, 
Joseph C. Doyle, 
Joseph P. Doyle, 
Walter J. Doyle, 
William P. Doyle, Jr., 
Francis R. Drake, 
Robert B. Drew, 
David I. Driscoll (mol 

paratus engineer) , 
John E. Driscoll, 
Thomas E. Driscoll, 
William E. Driscoll, 
George P. Duclos, 
Francis Duffy, 
Hugh F. J. Duflfy, 
James P. Duffy, 
John W. Duggan, 
Charles H. Dunbar, 
John B. Dunbar, 
John J. Dundon. 
William C. Dunn, 
Henry M. Durand. 
Melvin J. Durant, 
Edward P. Dw>'er ( 

Superintendent of 

nance) , 
Joseph T. Earner, 
Martin J. Earner, 
Chester W. Eastman, 
Harry G. Eastwood, 
William L. Eaton. 
Casimer E. Eekler, 
Frank J. Eckler, 
Frederick J. Eggers, 
Roger W. Eggers, 
John J. Ellis, 
Robert E. Emerson, 
Daniel R. Emery, 
George V. English, 
Harold J. Ennis, 
Frank J. Enrici, 
Edward M. Epstein, 
Richard G. Erwin, 
Simon I. Escott, 
Eugene W. Estey, 
Edward J. Everett, 
John F. Fadden, 
John E. Fagan, 
Joseph J. Falcone, 
Vincent A. Falcone, 
Frank P. Fall. 
John P. Fallon, 
Carmen F. Fama, 
Leo J. Fama, 
Charles Famulari, 
Joseph P. Farley, 
Francis P. Farrell, 
Bernard E. Farwell, 
William H. Fay. 
Maurice G. Feeley, Jr., 
John J. Feeney, 
John J. Feeney, 
Joseph P. Feeney, 
John P. Femino, 
Canice J. Fennelly, 
William C. Fennelly, 
James J. Fennesscy, 
Francis B. Fermano, 
Francis A. Ferola, 



From 


To 


$87.16— $105.36 






on 99 




on 99 




Qft 99 




8 1.16 


105.36 


87.16 ■ 


105.36 






8 24 


105 36 


78.35 — 


93.48 


90.22— 


105.36 


90.22— 


105.36 


94.05— 


109.19 


90.22— 


105.36 


90.22— 


105.36 


90.22— 


105.36 


90.22— 


105.36 


90.22— 


105.36 


90.22— 


105.36 


90.22— 


105.36 


90.22— 


105.36 


90.22— 


105.36 


90.22— 


105.36 


87.16— 


105.36 


90.22— 


105.36 


90.22— 


105.36 


85.24— 


105.36 



From 



To 



138.12— 153.25 
90.22— 105.36 
87.16- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
85.24- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
85.24- 



105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 

105!36 



M4.U0— 
85.24— 
87.16— 
87.16— 
90.22— 
90.22— 
87.16— 
90.22— 
90.22— 
87.16— 



90.22— 
90.22— 
90.22— 
87.16— 
90.22— 
87.16— 
81.22— 
90.22— 
85.24— 
78.35— 
87.16— 
90.22— 
90.22— 
90.22— 
90.22— 
90.22— 
85.24— 
90.22— 
87.16— 
90.22— 
87.16— 
90.22— 



105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
96.36 



93.48 
105.36 

96.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 



105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 



Joseph A. Ferrari, 
Richard A. Ferrari, 
Philip P. Ferren, 
Albert J. Ferretti. 
Vernon H. Feurtado, 
Norman A. Fickett, 
Walter S. Fields, Jr., 
James L. Finch. 
Fred L. Finn. 
Paul L. Finn, 
Gerard F. Finnegan, 
Robert T. Finnell, 
Daniel G. Finnerty, Jr., 
Thomas M. Finnerty, 
Guido S. Fiorenza, 
Benjamin H. Fiske. 
Daniel E. Fitzgerald, 
Edward Fitzgerald. 
Edward F. Fitzgerald, 
Joseph C. Fitzgerald, 
Joseph P. Fitzgerald, Jr.. 
James L. Fitzgibbons. 
Edward L. Fitzpatrick, 
Thom-is G. J^itzsimmons. 
Everett a. r laherty, 
John P. Flaherty. 
Michael A. Flammia, 
Daniel J. Flannagan. Jr., 
William V. Flannery. 
John P. Fleming, Jr. (ars 

William J. Fleming (Medal), 

Donald K. Flynn, 

Edward J. Flvnn. 

James J. Flynn, 

John E. Flynn, 

John J. Flynn, 

Joseph G. Flynn, 

Joseph I. Flynn, 

Paul Flynn. 

Thomas J. Flynn, 

Thomas P. Flynn, 

William P. Flynn. 

Edward J. Fogarty (ars 

inspector), 
Harry F. Fogarty, 
Edwin H. Foley, 
James M. Foley, 
John A. Foley, 
John J. Foley. 
Malcolm E. Foley, 
Richard C. Foley, 
Robert P. Foley (Medal), 
Thomas F. Foley, 
William E. Foley. 
William J. Foley, 
William H. Foley, 
John J. Force, 
James D. Ford, 
James E. Ford, 
Lawrence F. Ford, 
Edward L. Forrest (seco 

marine engineer), 
Frank N. Forte. 
John J. Foscaldo, 
William H. Foscaldo. 
Vincent M. Fountaine, 
Joseph C. Frackleton, 
Thomas F. Fraher (engineer 

charge, Cardox), 
Chester S. France, 
Stanley A. France, 
William J. Francis, 
Lester W. Franklin, 
James J. Freeman, 
Angelo Frizzi, 
Donald J. Frost, 
Angelo J. Fucillo. 
Everett P. Fuller, Jr., 
James W. Gabaree, 
Stephen J. Gabriek, 
John J. Gaddis, 
Stephen L. Gaffney, 
Francis L. Galizio, 
Daniel J. Gallagher, 
Daniel T. Gallagher. 
Francis W. Gallagher, 
James D. Gallagher, 
John F. Gallagher, Jr., 
James J. Galvin, 
William F. Galvin, 
Frank Gambardello, 
Walter L Garrity, 



$85.24— $105.36 
85.24— 105.36 
87.16— 105.36 
90.22— 105.36 
85.24— 105.36 
87.16— 105.36 
81.22— 96.36 
90.22— 105.36 
90.22— 105.36 
85.24— 105.36 
87.16— 105..36 
90.22— 105.36 
90.22— 105.36 
90.22— 105.36 
90.22— 105.36 
90.22— 105.36 
90.22— 105.36 
90.22— 105.36 
85.24— 105.36 
90.22— 105.36 



105.36 



90.22— 105.36 
85.24— 105.36 
87.16— 105.36 
90.22— 105.36 
S7.16— 105.36 
S7-16— 105.36 
90.22— :05.36 
90.22— 105.36 

87.16— 105.36 
90.70— 105.84 
90.22— 105.36 
90.22— 105.36 
87.16— 105.36 
87.16— 105.36 
90.22— 105.36 
90.22— 105.36 
90.22— 105.36 
81.22— 96.36 
90.22— 105.36 
90.22— 105.36 
90.22— 105.36 



1.22- 



105.; 



90.22— 105.36 
87.16— 105.36 
90.22— 105.36 
90.22— 105.36 
90.22— 105.36 
90.70— 105.84 



.16- 



105.; 



90.22— 105.36 
85.24— 105.36 
90.22— 105.36 
85.24— 105.36 
90.22— 105.36 
87.16— 105.36 
90.22— 105.36 

90.99— 109.19 
85.24— 105.36 
85.24— 105.36 
85.24— 105.36 
87.16— 105.36 
87.16— 105.36 

97.88— 113.02 
87.16— 105.36 
85.24— 105.36 
87.16— 105.36 
90.22— 105.36 
81.22— 96.36 
87.16— 105.36 
87.16— 105.36 
87.16— 105.36 
87.16— 105.36 
85.24- 
85.24- 
90.22- 
90.22- 

87!l6- 



.24- 



105.36 

105!36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 



90.22— 105.36 
90.22— 105.36 
90.22— 105.36 
81.22— 96.36 
90.22— 105.36 
85.24— 105.36 
90.22— 105.36 



Joseph E. Gavin, 
Anthony J. Gawlinski, 
Acacio J. Gazo, 
John J. Geagan, 
William H. Geary, 
Frank J. Gemellaro, 
Francis J. George, 
Ralph H. George, 
John J. Gesweli, 
Thomas H. Getherall, 
Roger J. Gettens, 
James T. Giger, 
George E. Gilbrook, 
John F. Gilbrook, Jr., 
Hugh J. Gillen, 
Jchn J. Gillespie, Jr., 
Joseph A. Gillespie, 
Joseph M. Gilmore, 
William C. Gilmore, 
Walter F. Ginnetty, 
George W. Girvan, Jr., 
Michael J. Giunta, 
James L. Glasheen, Jr., 
John J. Glennon, 
Arthur L. Glover, Jr., 
John L. Glynn. 
Michael J. Goggin (aid to 

Julian J. Goglia. 
James M. Goodfellow, 
Thomas F. Goodwin, 
Harold E. Gorham, 
Thomas F. Gorham, 
Robert T. Gorman, 
George J. Gottwald, 
Robert L. Gould, 
John E. Govoni (first m: 

engineer) , 
Frank W. Goyette, 
Richard O. Goyette, 
Anthony Grace, 
John H. Grady, 
William J. Grady (enginee 

charge. Motor Squad), 
Edward W. Graff, 
John A. Graham, 
John F. Graham, 
James M. Grana, 
Daniel W. Grant, 
Charles E. Graul, 
Jameo A. Gray, 
George J. Green, 
Edward W. Greene, 
William F. Greenwood, 
John J. Gregor, 
Edward T. Gregory, 
Frederick J. Grenier, Jr., 
Chauncey W. Griffin (engi 

High Pressure), 
Donald R. Griffin, 
James F. Griffin, 
John A. Griffin, 
John M. Griffin (master), 
Thomas V. Griffin, 
David J. Griffiths, 
William J. Griffiths, 
John F. Grimes, 
Arthur E. Grimm, 
Harry Groinic, 
Donald R. Gummeson, 
James P. Gunn, 
Francis D. Gunning, 
Lawrence J. Gunning, 
Edward E. Gurnon, 
Sigmund A. Gurski, 
William F. Guzowski, 
Gabriel S. Gyukeri, 
William Hagerty, 
William T. Hagerty, 
Albert F. Hall, 
Edward E. Hall, 
Lawrence J. Hall, 
Warren F. Hall, 
William H. Halpin. 
Alfred F. Hamel, Jr. 

burner inspector), 
Robert J. Hamilton, 
William J. Hammond, 
John E. Hanbury, Jr., 
John J. Handren, 
John J. Hanley, 
John M. Hanley, 
Thomas J. Hanley, 



$87.16- 
90.22- 
85.24- 
90.22- 
87.16- 
85.24- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
85.24- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
78.35- 
87.16- 
87.16- 
87.16- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
78.35- 
90.22- 



90.22- 
85.24- 
90.22- 
85.24- 
85.24- 
90.22- 
87.16- 

97.88- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
87.16- 



103.6.3- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
78.35- 
90.22- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
85.24- 
90.22- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
87.16- 



81.22- 
87.16- 
78.35- 



90.22- 
90.22- 
87.16- 



90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 



90.22- 
87.16- 
85.24- 



$105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 93.48 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 93.48 

- 105.36 

- 113.02 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

■ 105.30 

- 105.36 

- 113.02 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

■ 105.36 

- 105.36 

■ 105.36 

• 105.36 

- 105.36 

• 105.36 

■ 93.48 

• 105.36 

■ 105.36 

- 105.36 

■ 105.36 

• 105.36 

■ 105.36 

• 105.36 



109.19 
96.36 
105.36 
93.48 
114.94 
105.36 
93.48 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.30 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 

105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 24 



W.ii - 105.S6 

90.22 - J0S.S6 

»0.22 - I0S.S6 

XT. 16 \OS.M 

K-.IR - 105. S6 

90.22 - I0S.S6 

- i((,s.n6 



li'.-- I. Hr.ly. 
rb>m» J. H»«nup. 
William (' Hrra. 
John l». Horlrn. 
J<-«ph T !!• 
Iv.n 11. H 
Adrl.n J. II 
J..hn P. H. 

H.>hrr\ I. H 

J.apfih Hrnr>. 
Th-mw J. H<-nr>. 
Mrl H Hrn.nn. 
J..hn J. H«Tn..n. 
Frmnri* C. Hrwion. 
iHwnrc B. Hlclinr. 
Kdwsrd J. Hicrins. 
Jamn A. Hinins. 
Rirharti J. Hininn. 
Tboma. J. Hinln*. 
Charln K. Hroir. 
John J. Hoar. 
Jwph K. Hoar (» 
Charlra W. Hofaan. 
Jamn I.. H<>ban I 

aUlant rhi^f>. 
Rohrrt IV »l 
WaUrr II H 
John M II 
(>i)rwf J. H 
Jamn K. H ■ > 
Kdward Homrr. 
Ro«M>rt C. Hwlnr. 



Arthur J. Howard. 
John K. HowaH. 
Arthur U. Hnwrll. 
Patrick C. Howrll. 
Jakn C. Howland. 
Harrr S Hu-rhrr. 

H - ' • - 



»0.»9— 
•0.22— 
•0.22— 
K7.l«— 
87.16 — 
87.16— 
90.22- 
90.22— 
90.22— 
90.22— 
KS.24— 
87.16— 
90.22— 
90.22— 
90.22— 
8S.24— 

90]22— 
87.16— 
90.22— 
90.22— 
90.22— 
87.16— 
87.64— 
90.22— 

94.0S— 
87.16— 
90.22— 
87.16— 
85.24 — 
85.24 — 
87.16— 
90.22 — 
90.22— 
90.22— 
87.16— 
94.05— 
90.22— 

i 

97.88- 
85.24- 
90.22- 
85.24- 
90.22— 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 



94.06- 

87.16- 
90.22- 
90.22 - 
90.2^- 
90.22 
• I duly). 92.14- 
•'(1 22- 



100.19 
105..16 
106. :t6 
106.36 
105..'<6 
105.:i6 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.86 
105.36 
106.36 
105.36 
106.36 
105.36 
106.36 
105.36 
106.36 
106.36 
105.36 
105.36 
106.36 
105.36 
106.36 
105.36 

109.19 
105.36 
105..36 
106.36 
105.36 
106.36 
105..36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
106.36 
109.19 
105.36 

113.02 
105.36 
106..'t6 
106.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 



109.19 
105..36 
105.36 
106.36 
105.86 
105.36 
107.2K 
106.36 
106.36 



VlncMl P. Hurlw, 

W.lfr F. Hurley. 81.22- 96.86 

William H. Hurlry. 90.22- 05.86 

J.«.c,.h I,. Hurric. 90.22- 105.86 

Klrhar.1 K. Hutrhin.on. 90.22- 106.86 

Mirh.rl Imbrian... 90.22- 105.36 

(;«.r«c Indclicat... 90.22- 105.36 

Ricco T. Int.mti. 87.16— 105.86 

William H. Irvin.-. 87.16- 105.86 

Alphonac J. Jarkmauh. 87.16- 105.36 

Arlhur I.. Jackaon. Jr.. 90.22— 105.86 

Frank C. Jacob.. 85.24- 105.36 

rharlc» J. Jacobwm. 87.16— 105.36 

Richard J. Jakaun. 90.22— 105.36 

John K. Jamraun. 87.16— 106.86 

John J. Jcnninif.. 90.22— 105.86 

Kenneth J. Jcnninif.. 90.22- 105.36 

Anthjny H. Jcnylo. 85.24— 105.86 
Raymon S. Jewell (enifinccr in 

chamel. 103.63— 118.77 
Tarneliua W. A. Johnson. 90.22— 105.36 
Ua%id K. Johnson. 90.22— 105.36 
Leonard H. John.on. 90.22— 105.36 
Leonard C. Johnj.on. 81.22— 96.36 
Cilberl W. Jonea (arson in- 
spector) (Medal). 90.70— 
Willard K. Jones. 90.22— 
Hernard J. Judite. 90.22— 
Peter W. Judjte. 85.24— 
Henry V. Jundtil. 85.24 — 
Walter Kabachus. 90.22— 
Alexander I,. Kaiorek. 90.22— 
Anthony W. Kane. 90.22— 
Francis A. Kane (enuincer. 

Motor Squad). 94.05— 

Henry V. Kane. 87.16— 

John S. Kane. 90.22— 

Vincent D. Kane. 81.22— 

William J. Kane. 90.22— 

Francis .M. Keanc. 90.22— 

John J. Kearno". 90.22— 

Walter J. Kearney, 85.24— 

John P. KcBveney. 90.22— 

I,e«. J. Keefe. 90.22— 

Paul W. Keefe. 90.22— 
William F. Kcefc (i>holo>rra- 

pher). 90.22— 

Paul P. Keeley. 81.22— 

Edwin T. Keenan. 87.16— 

Edmund L. Keif. 87.16— 

Daniel J. Kelleher. Jr.. 85.24— 
J. Kelleher (second marine 



105.84 
I05..36 
105.36 
105.36 
I05.,36 
105.36 
105.36 
105. .36 

109.19 
105.36 
105.36 
96.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 

105..36 
96.36 
lOo.-'Je 
105.36 
105.36 



enirineer) . 


94.05— 


109.19 


William F. Kelleher. 


90.22— 


105.36 


George D. Kellen (aid to co 


n- 




missioner ) . 


97.88— 


113.02 


John E. Kelley. 


87.16— 


105.36 


John T. Kellcy. 


81.22— 


96.36 


Lawrence P. Kelley. 


90.22— 


105.36 


Thomas J. Kelle)-. 


87.16— 


105.36 


Walter R. Kelley. 


90.22— 


105.36 


William J. Kelley. 


90.22— 


105.36 


Edward V. Kelly. 


90.22— 


105.36 


John J. Kelly. Jr. (photoit 






pher) . 


87.16— 


105.36 


Patrick J. Kelly. 


81.22— 


96.36 


Russell J. Kelly. 


90.22— 


105. .36 


Thomas E. Kelly. 


90.22— 


105.36 


James M. Kenealy. 


90.22 — 


105.36 


Joseph F. Kenneally. 


90.22 — 


105.36 


Richard D. Kenneally. 


90.22— 


105.36 


William J. Kenneally. 


90.22— 


105.36 


liernnrd J. Kennedy. 


90.22— 


105.36 


Joseph E. Kennedy. 


90.22— 


105.36 


Joseph P. Kennedy. 


90.22— 


105.36 


Richard W. Kennedy (arson 






spector) . 


90.22— 


105.36 


Charles C. Kennc>-. 


87.16— 


105.36 


Edward F. Kenney. 


87.16— 


105.36 


Edward J. Kenney. 


90.22— 


105.36 


Edward P. Kenney, 


81.22— 


96.36 


John r.. Kenne>-. 


87.16— 


105.36 


William P. Kenney. 


81.22— 


96.36 


Daniel F. Kent. 


90.22— 


105.36 


Timothy J. Kerins. 


90.22— 


105.36 


Thimas J. Kerwin. 


86.24— 


105.36 


Edward H. Keyes. 


87.16— 


105. .36 


Robert J. Ke)'e». 


87.16— 


105.36 


Henry H. Kiernan. 


90.22— 


105.36 


Thomas F. KiMay. 


90.22 — 


105.36 


Vincent J. Kilduff. 


90.22 — 


105.36 


Emmett J. Kiley. 


86.24— 


105.36 


Joseph E. Kilroy, 


87.16— 


105.36 



Charles W. Kimball. 
Anthony M. Kindamo. 
Dominic J. Kolonovich, 
AnBclo. J. Koutrouga, 
John J. Kralt, 
Walter D. Kripp. 
Walter W. Kuctin. 
Walter F. Kurpeski. 
Frank LaCambria, 
Ralph LaCambria. 
Laurence 11. LaCaase. 
Philip C. LaCaacia, 
Uanu'l P. Laffan. 
John E. P. Laffin. 
Cerald R. LaFlamme, 
Robert E. Lainic. 
Charles F. Lamb. 
Edward H. Lambrecht. 
Paul J. Lambrecht. 
Uuindino F. Landolphi, 
Ji»eph E. Landry, 
Paul E. Landry. 
Thomaa F. Lane, 
Leo H. Lanu. 
Alfre<) E. Lanitdon. 
Lloyd V. Lanirill (aid to deputy 

cnief » . 
Roy li. Lanirill. 
1 homas F. Larkin. Jr., 
Robert L. LaRose. 
Pasquale LaSelva, 
Robert J. Laubenslein, 
Anthony F. Laurano, 
Thomas E. LaVerne. 
Joseph W. H. Lavin, 
Richard C. Lawler. 
Franklin E. Lawrence. 
John J. Leahy (master) 
Arthur J. Leary, 
Hollis J. Leary. 
Victor R. Leaiott, 
Ceorjte F. LeBlanc, 



90.22— 
87.16— 
90.22— 
90.22— 
90.22— 
90.22— 
87.16— 
87.16— 
87.16— 
85.24— 
85.24— 
90.22— 
85.24— 
85.24— 
87.16— 
90.22— 
85.24- 
90.22— 
87.16— 
87.16— 

94.05— 
90.22— 
90.22— 
87.16— 
90.22— 
90.22— 
90.22— 
87.16— 
90.22— 
85.24— 
90.22— 
99.80— 
87.16— 
90.22— 
78.35— 
87.16— 
90.22— 
90.22— 
87.16— 
78.35— 



n05.3C 
105.36 
105.36 
105. .36 
lu5.;>6 
105.36 
105.36 
105.,36 
105. ,36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.86 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.3G 

109.r.« 
105.36 
105.3'. 
105.3« 
105.36 
105.3<> 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.:(6 
114. »4 
105.36 
105.36 
93.48 



87.16- 
90.22- 
90.22- 



87.16- 
78.35- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
87.16- 
87.16- 

90.22- 
90.22- 
87.16- 



90.22- 
90.22- 
87.16- 



105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
93.4S 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
106.36 
93.48 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 



Robert J. Leonard. 85.24— 
Nicholas F. Lepore. 85.24— 
James E. Lewis, 90.22— 
Thomas P. Lewis, 87.16 — 

Thomas F. Leydon, 87.16— 
Louis C. Liberatore, 
Kenneth E. Liddell, 
William B. Linnane, 
Francis G. Linso. 
Michael Liotta, 
Vincent M. LiotU, 
Arthur J. LoKan, 
GeorKe J. Lohnes. 
Howard K. Lomas, 
Martin A. Lombard, 

Paul F. Lombard, 
Michael J. Lombardo. 

William F. Ix>mbardo, 

Raymond T. Lonergan, Jr. 
( photoRrapherl , 

John J. LonK, 

Edward F. Loonie. 

Philip R. Lorinsr, Jr., 

John M. Lounhman. 

William E. Louehnane, 

Edward V. Lowney, 

Wilbur W. Luacaw, 

Joseph A. Luca-s. 

Robert H. Lundquist, 

John R. Luoneo, 

Bernard M. Lydon, 

Daniel J. L>'don. 

John J. Lydon. 

Thomas S. Lydon. 

John E. Lydstone (assistant 
cardox enirineer), 

Edward M. Lynch (aid to chief 

of department), 97.88— 113.02 

HuKh F. Lynch. 90.22— 105.36 

Paul H. Lynch. 87.16— 105.36 

Richard W. Lynch, 85.24— 105.36 

Warren T. Lynch. 90.22— 105.36 

William G. Lynch. 90.22— 105.36 

Georne L. Lyons. Jr., 90.22— 105.36 

Patrick J. Lyon.s. 90.22— 105.36 

James MacCune, 87.16— 105.36 



105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 



94.05— 109.19 



Jan. 24 



CITY RECORD 



Bernard C. MacDonald (engi- 
neer in charge), $ 

Charles C. MacDonald. 

Edward J. MacDonald, 

Grant J. MacDonald, 

John A. MacDonald, 

John E. MacDonald, 

Reid B. MacDonald, 

Robert B. MacDonald. 

Lawrence D. MacDougall, 

Archibald A. Maclnness, 

Warren R. Maclnness. 

Franklin E. MacKay (Medal), 

Nilus J. MacKey, 

Robert F. MacKey. 

Hugh E. MacKinnon, 

John A. MacKinnon, 

Murdock J. MacRae (engineer. 
Motor Squad), 

James A. Madden, 

John J. Madden (engineer in 
charge) . 

Norman L. Maddock, 

John J. MafTei, 

Nicholas S. Maffei, 

Harold M. Magee, 

Pompio J. Magistri (aid tn 
deputy chief), 

Leslie W. Magoon, 

James 0. Maguire, 

John M. Maguire, 

Thomas J. Maguire, 

Alfred E. Maher, 

Francis X. Maher. 

Francis X. Maher. 

Jchn F. Maher, Jr., 

John T. Maher, 

James J. Mahon, 

Edwin C. Mahoney, 

Harold J. Mahoney, 

James H. Mahoney, 

John J. Mahoney, Jr. (aid to 
assistant chief), 

Joseph I. Mahoney. 

LeRoy J. Mahoney. 

Vincent G. Mahoney. 

Albert G. Malcolm. Jr., 

George J. Malette. 

Joseph W. Mallin.son, 

William T. Malone. 

Edward H. Malunev. 

Joseph W. Mandevillo. 

John R. Manning, 

John T. Manning, 

Paul V. Manning. 

William D. Manning. 

Webster J. Mansour. 

William J. Mantville, 

Frank J. Marcella, 

Albert L. Marley, 

William E. Marotta, 

Arthur R. Marr, 

Donald C. Marr, 

Frank J. Marr (ai-son in- 
spector) , 

William Marranzini, 

Joseph M. Martin, 

Charles Martindale, 

Anthony Masiello, 

Joseph V. Mason, 

Henry W. Massie, 

John B. Matthews, Jr., 

Robert J. Matthews, 

Peler Mastrangelo, 

Harold T. Matulaitis. 

Carleton W. Mayer, 

Norman L. Mayer, 

Francis X. Mayo, 

Nelson J. Mayo, 

Nicholas Mazza, 

John J. Mazzeo, 

Fr'incis G. Mearn (engineer. 
Motor Squad) , 

Edward J. Meleedy, 

Joseph L. Mello, 

George L. Mellor, 

Frank Meloski, 

Domenic Memmolo, 

Anthony R. Menno, 

Frank P. Meroski, 

James J. Merrick. 

Lorenzo D. Merrill, 



90.22- 
87.16- 
,S7.16- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
S7.()4- 
90.22- 
S7.1fi- 



10.S.63- 
90.22- 
87.ie- 
90.22- 
90.22- 

94.0.5- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
87.16- 
87.16- 



90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 



90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 



85.24- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
78.35- 
90.22- 
78..35- 
90.22- 
78.35- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
85.24- 
90.22- 
87.16- 



94.05- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
90.22- 



-$118.77 

- 105. .S6 

- 105.36 

- lOo.m; 

- 105. 3i; 

- 105.:!li 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.84 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 



118.77 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 

109.19 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
93.48 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 



105.36 
103.36 
105.36 



iu.'i.3i; 

105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 

105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 

93. 4S 
105.36 

93.48 
105.36 

93.48 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.3G 
105.36 

109.19 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.38 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 



Robert C. Merritt, 
Charles R. Messina, 
.Joseph A. Middleton, 
Z.lzi-law .Miei-zvk( 
.1 'hii .1. Mikulski 
M\l.s i'. iVIilch. 



ski. 



Misi- 



John 



$90.22- 
78.35- 
87.16- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
87.IG- 
78.35- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
87.16- 



87.16— 105.36 



-$105.36 

- 93.48 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 93.48 

- 105.36 



Har,.lil A. .Mitchi-II, 
William T. Mitchell, 
John L. M:iffitt. 
Alfrtd R. Mwiraii. 
Lester \V. M inarch. Ji 
John C. Monteiro, 
Anthony M. Montell. 
Francis R. Mi>ntfllo. 



William 
Hubert 
John T 
Joseph 
I'tler i 
Thom;-.s 



li. Mor 



Lu 



Kaymonil li. Morehouse, 

Gf.-rse E. Morey, 

John V. Morgan. 

Joseph V. Morgan, 

John G. Mariarty. 

Leo E. Morrin (first marine 

engineer, steam). 
James J. Morrison, 
John M. Morrissey. 
Richard M. Morrissey, 
Raymond P. Morse, 
Alvah G. Moseley. 
Daniel W. Mnynihan, 
Francis J. Moldoon (aid to as- 

.sitant chief). 
James H. Mullane. 
Patrick F. Mullane, 
Donald R. Mullen. 
John J. Mullen, 
Jchn R. Mullen. 
Martin H. Mullen. 
Ralph L. .Mullen. 
William J. Mullen, 
John G. Mullins. 
Albert J. Munichiello, 
James R. Munzert, 
Frank J. Murano. 
Francis A. Murphy (engineer. 

High Pressure). 
Francis A. Murphy, 
Francis C. Murphy, 
Francis J. Murphy (master), 
Francis L. Murphy. 
Garrett J. Murphy, 
George E. Murphy. 
Ge.irge E. Murphy. 
Gorald E. Murphv. 
James V. Murphv. 
J.)hn C. Murphy. 
John J. Murphy. 
Joseph H. Murphy (second 

marine engineei"), 
Joseph W. Murphy, 
Paul J. Murphy, 
Philip J. Murphy. 
Richard F. Murphy, 
Robert F. Murphy. 
William T. Murphy. Jr.. 
Joseph L. Murray. 
Joseph M. Murray. 
Joseph P. Muiiay. 
Paul T. Murray. 
Joseph D. Muscato, 
Edward F. Mutrie. 
Thomas F. Myei-s. 
Leo M. Myott, 

Lawrence J. McAdams (first 

marine engineer, Diesel), 
Francis T. McAlpine, 
Hugh J. McArdlc. 



•Ml.:;:: 
85.2 1- 
85.24- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
85.24- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
S7.16- 
85.24- 
90.22- 
90.22- 



87.16- 
87.16- 
87.16- 
87.16- 
90.22- 

94.05- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
85.24- 
85.24- 

94.05- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
99.80- 
81.22- 
85.24- 
90.22- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
87.16- 

94.05- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
87.16- 
87.16- 

95.97- 
85.24- 
90.22- 



105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 



105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 

113.02 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 

109.19 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.3(; 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 

109.19 

105. 

105. 

114. ;i4 

96.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 



109.19 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 

111.11 
105.36 
105.36 



Francis P. McCabe, 
Francis P. McCabe, 
George J. McCabe, 
James J. McCabe, 
John P. McCabe, 
George F. McCaflferty, 
Charles E. McCarthy, 



Cornell 
Edward 
Francis 

Francis 



W 



McCarthy, 
F. McCarthy, 
J. McCarthy, 
I'. McCarthy (second 

' irj incer) , 
M ii-thy, 

McCarthy, 
•>!• I ■irthy, 
I M-thy, 
M' I I, -thy, 
Mc( ■ ii-thy, 
K McCarthy, 

M. I arthy, 
S- McCarthy (engineer. 



Jc, ph a. M, rauley, Jr., 
Frciicriek W. McClennan, 
William H. McClennan, 
George McCloskey, 
John J. McCloud. Jr.. 
Francis X. McCormick. 
Henry F. McCormick, 
Jnhn J. McCi-ackin tapparatu 

John J. McCue. 
Eugene E. McDevitt, 
Matthew McDonagh, 
Edward F. McDonald (aid t 

deputy chief), 
James W. McDonald. 
John J. McDonald, Jr., 
Francis X. McDonnell. 
Joseph F. McDonnell (master) 
Charles F. McDonough. 
Francis H. McDonough, 
James F. McDonough, 
John J. McDonough, 
Martin J. McDonough, 
Raymond M. McDonough. 
Stephen J. McDonough, 
Daniel L. McDougall, 
Bernard McEachern, 
Gerald J. McEachern, 
Daniel J. McEleney, 
James F. McEleney, 
Walter J. McEvoy, 
John J. McFadden. 
Edward J. McGah, 
Charles W. McGee, 
Francis C. McGerity, 
Robert D. McGilveary, 
George V. McGilvery, 
Richard J. McGinn, 
John J. McGinnis, 
Janufl li. McGintv. 
William F. McGoldrick (aid t. 

assistant chief), 
James F. McGonagle 

aid) . 

Terence J. McGonagle. 
Francis A. McGowan, 
George E. McGowan, 
Paul J. McGowan, 
Timothy J. McGowan, 
James J. McGranachan 
James L. McGrath, 
James L. McGrath. 
John J. McGrath, Jr., 
Joseph I. McGrath. 
William J. McGrath, 
Edward M. McGuire, 
John F. McGuire, 
John G. McGuire, 
John J. McHugh, Jr.. 
William D. McHugh, 
Daniel T. Mclnness. 
John J. McKenna. 
James J. McKernan, 
David J. McKinnon. 
Alfred M. McLaughlin. 
Francis X. McLaughlin, 
James F. McLaughlin, 
Jchn C. McLaughlin, 
John J. McLaughlin. 
John J. McLaughlin, 
John P. McLaughlin, 
John P. McLaughlin, 
Louis M. McLaughlin, 



To 
-$105 36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 93.48 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 109.19 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 

- 109.19 



90.22- 
99.80- 
87.16- 



90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 

90.22- 



90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
87.16- 
85.24- 
85.24- 
81.22- 



( relief 



94.0.5- 
87.16- 
87.16- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
85.24- 
87.16- 
87. le- 
ss. 24- 
78.3.5- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
85.24- 
87.16- 



9U.22- 
90.22- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 



■ 93.48 

■ 109.19 

• 105.36 

• 105.36 

■ 105.36 

■ 114.94 

■ 105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 

96.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 

96.36 



109.19 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
93.48 
105.36 



105.; 



105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 



•i 4 



CITY RFI CORD 



.Ian. 24 



»*.»7- 

90.U- 
»0.M - 
»0.t2- 



111.11 
lU.M 

lOft.Sfi 
I0&..^6 



. h.ll. 
J ■, ] N.<ul»r«. 
M«'>l M NoUn. 
Paul V. N"l«n. 
Huhrri I). N'tan. 
J.«*l>h r No"n«n. 
Kntx-r*. W. No<in«n. Jr.. 
iitnrtr N. N'>rri» in 

Ht«h Prr-urrt. 
Mwani J. N • 
Ch«rir< K <' 
UanM J. <> 
Hu«h K. < ' I 
J.m~ r. <> 
Jobn C. t> II- • 
John y. Olirico. 
Juhn J. OHrirn. 
HarMn J. OH'.r 
JMul K. on 
|UH»rtl T " 
Konuld J " 



B4.*4— 
•0.22- 
HI.22— 
«7.I6— 
•0.22- 
90.22- 
«7 ir. 



85.24- 
90.22 
H5.24- 
80.22- 
90.22- 
87.16- 
90.22- 



105.S6 
I06..16 
96.X6 
106.S6 
105.36 
I0&.36 
105. S6 



105.36 

ins.xe 

105.36 
106.36 
10S.36 
10S.36 
105.36 
93.48 



87.16- 

87.16 

90.22- 

r. M.24- 
(mmst«r), 96.74- 
87.16-^ 
90.22- 
90.22- 

Jr.. »0.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 

I. 78.8S- 
81.22- 
90.22 
87.16- 



1H,-,.H6 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105..3G 
105.36 
114.94 
105.36 
105..36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
93.48 
96.36 
105.36 
105.36 

111.11 
105.36 

10.S.S6 
■I1-..36 



94.05— 109.19 



Jam.- .J ('..w 

Aire J. Panwuk, 
Cupiirr <;. Panciocco. 
Kirh.ir.l K. P«rr (fimt marine 

. • ' r. steam » . 
1 . .1 I'arcnlcau, 



190.22- 
90.22— 
87.16— 
H5.24— 
90.22 — 
85.24- 
90.22- 
90.22 - 
90.22 - 
90.22- 
87.16 - 
Kj.24- 
90.22 — 
90.22— 
78.35— 
90.22— 
87.16- 
85.24- 

97.88— 
87.16- 
85.24— 

90.22- 
85.24- 
90.22 — 
90.22- 
81.22- 
90.22- 



Jaiix^ W. Parka. 
Uanirl J. Parma, 
Vincent J. Paiicucci. 
Clifford K. Paachal. 
L»ul» (i. Paulino. 

Krnmt M. Pecoraro. 87.16- 

Anlhony J. Peluao. 90.22- 

Louia A. Pepper. 90.22- 

Richard J. Pero. 90.22- 

William E. Pero. 90.22- 

Roy H. Phelan. 90.22- 

Uoyd C. Phillipn ( Medal! . 87.64- 

Miehacl J. Piantedmi. 87.16- 

Krank J. Piaxia. 85.24- 

Martin K. Pierce. 90.22- 

Melxer T. Pietroski. 85.24- 

John P. Pinchicri. 87.16- 
Robert O. Pineo (assistant eniti- 

neer of motor apparatus). 118.19- 

Joseph K. Pishkin. 90.22- 

Joseph L. Pisterino. 85.24- 

NeUin J. Pitman. 87.16- 

Willlam K. Ploof. «7.16- 

Kredcrick A. P.>Birio. 87.16- 

Paul K. Porter. H7.16- 

Albert N. Potter. '"1.22- 

Wilfred R. Po». -7.16- 

Ji.hn J. Power. ■"22- 

Joseph L. Pow.r-. -T-IG- 

Maptin J. Powers. '.10.22- 

William P. Powers. 85.24- 

Jamcs T. Prendentast. 90.22- 

HernaH K. Pritchard. 87.16- 

Krank A. Quails. 90.22- 

Comelius K. Quinlan. 87.16- 

Kdward T. Quinlan. 90.22- 

Richard J. Quinlan. 90.22- 

Jamet. A. Quinn. 85.24- 
Joseph M. Quinn (aid to chief 

of department I. 
Thorna* A. Radcliffe. 
William Radicwici. 
Edward C. Radxik. 
Harold I-. Ralston. 
Robcrtt E. Randall. 
HradUy F. RatUiran. 
(ieonte W. Ray. Jr.. 
JamrH F. Reardon. 
John J. Reard.in. 
Joseph A. Reardon, 
Joseph J. Reardnn, 
I.e« C. Reardon, 
Paul H. Reardon, 
Thomas C. Reardon, 
William J. Reardon. 
William L. Reard 

lation* officer). 
John C. Reed, 
James D. Reean. 
James R. Rnran. 
John F. Resan. 
John F. Rnran, 
John A. Reilly, 
J<*n F. Reilly. 
\r,„.'.l N. Reis, 
l: 1 ' .1 Reynolds, J 
\ Ricci, 
1 Rice. 
I Richards, 
J.n,.- I. Riley, 



« 1 05.36 

- lOtJie 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 
105.36 

- 105.36 
105.36 

- 105.36 

- 105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 

93.48 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 

113.02 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
96,36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105,.'?6 
105.36 
105.84 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 

133.33 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105..36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.86 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 



97.88— 113.02 
87.16— 105.36 
87.16— 105.36 



87.16- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
81.22- 
85.24- 
85.24- 
90.22- 
85.24- 
90.22- 
85.24- 
90.22- 
87.16- 
90.22- 



( public re- 



>7.16- 
'.m.22- 
'.•0.22- 



87.16- 
87.16- 
90.22- 



105.36 
105.36 
96.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 

124.52 
105.36 
105. .16 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
93.48 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
1 05.36 
105..S6 
105.36 
105.36 



James F. Rilry. 


$90.22— »105.3i. 


Thamas C. Riley. 




90.22— 


105..(f> 


Thomas J. Riley (buildinir 






custodian 1. 




99.80— 


114.94 


Edward B. Ri»t, 




90.22— 


105.36 


Jamis M. Rixio (second 


marine 






envineer) . 




90.99— 


109.19 


William F. Roache. 




87.16— 


105.36 


Ce.jrire A. Robbina, Jr., 




87.16— 


1U5.36 


John A. Riibcrtjon, 




90.22 — 


105.36 


Alan W. Robinsjn. 




85.24 — 


1U5.36 


John F. R.ibinson. Jr., 




87.16— 


105.36 


Cerald F. Roche, 




90.22 — 


105.:i6 


Anthony J. Rock, 




90.22— 


105.36 


Edward T. Rock. 




87.16— 


105.36 


John W. P. Rogers, 




87,16— 


105.36 


Benjamin S. Roman, 




87,16— 


1U5.36 


Edward U. Rooncy, Jr., 




90.22— 


105.36 


Joseph M. Roper (enirineer. 






M..tor Sguad). 




94.05— 


109.19 


Joseph F. Rorkc. Jr.. 




85.24 — 


105.36 


Vincent P. Rosata, 




81.22— 


96.36 


Henry Riwe, 




87.16— 


105.36 


Herbert J. Rose. 




85.24 — 


105.36 


Charles .M. Roianski, 




81.22— 


96.:ifi 


James F. Roy. 




85.24— 


105.:'.i. 


Arthur K. Rufrgere. 




85.24 — 


105.:i.. 


(Uaruc V. Rull. 




85.24— 


105.:fi. 


("lonte H. Rushton, 




81.22— 


96.:ii. 


Lea F. Rusk. 




87.16— 


105.:ic-, 


(;eMnte C. Russell, 




90.22— 


105.:io 


Aloysius A. Ryalls 


seconfl 


90.99— 


109.1 '.< 


marine engineer). 




Charles L. Ryan. 




87.16— 


105.3'. 


Cearnc H. Ryan. 




87.16— 


I05..i(; 


James M. Ryan. 




90.22— 




Leo A. Ryan, 




90.22— 


105.:it. 


Arthur C. Rylcy, 




87.16— 


105.:ii, 


Henry D. Sacco, 




90.22— 


105. HI. 


Henry E. Sacco. 




90.22— 


105..K, 


Richard P. Salerno. 




87.16— 


105.30 


Cejree W. Sanirster, Jr. 




87.16— 


105.36 


^>lwBrd T. Saniuk 


aid to 






deputy chief). 




89.07— 


109. IS 


Joseph P. Saniuk. 




87.16— 


105.36 


Biaftio F. Sanniizaro, 




87.16— 


105.36 


Frank M. Sanseverino. 




87.16— 


105.36 


Michael C. Santoianni. 




87.16— 


105.36 


Joseph M. Santoro, 




87.16— 


105.36 


Albert F. Sanfenl, 




90.22— 


105.36 


Clifford L. Santent. 




87.16— 


105.36 


Paul L. Saulnier. 




85.24— 


105.36 


Joseph T. Savaite (assistant 





Pressure) . 


97.88— 


113.02 


RDbert E. SavaBe, 


87.16— 


105.36 


William R. Savickas, 


90.22— 


105.36 


Edward T. Scanlan. 


87.16— 


105.36 


Carl E. Schadhauscr, 


90.22— 


105.36 


Frank P. Schadhauser, Jr., 


90.22— 


105.36 


Walter F. Schmidt, 


90.22— 


105.36 


Henr>- J. Schneider, 


87.16— 


105.36 


William F. Schneider. 


90.22— 


105.36 


John J. Schoficld, 


85.24— 


105.36 


John F. Scott. 


90.22— 


105.36 


Joseph F. Scott, 


90.22— 


105.36 


Charles E. Seaboyer (enirineer. 






Motor Squad ) , 


94.05— 


109.19 


Geonte T. Searles, 


87.16— 


105.36 


Alfred R. Sears, 


90.22— 


105.36 


Alfred R. Sears, 


87.16— 


105.36 


Leo R. Sennett, 


90.22— 


105.36 


Albert A. Serino. 


90.22— 


105.36 


Anthony J. Serra. 


87.16— 


105.36 


Henry J. Servent, 


85.24— 


105.36 


James H. Sexton. 


87.16— 


105.36 


Roland P. Sferrazza, 


90.22— 


105.36 


John F. Shannon, 


90.22— 


105.36 


Edmund J. Sharp, Jr., 


90.22— 


105.36 


Harry C. Shea. Jr.. 


90.22— 


105.36 


James P. Shea (arson in- 






spector) , 


90.22— 


105.36 


James T. Shea. 


90.22— 


105.36 


John G. Shea (enirineer. Motor 




109.1" 


Squad). 


94.05— 


John H. Shea, 


90.22— 


105.36 


Joseph A. Shea, 


90.22— 


105.36 


William D. Shea, 


85.24— 


105.36 


Roeer E. Shea (enitinper. Motor 






Squad ) , 


94.05— 


109.1fl 


James B. Sheedy. 


78.35— 


93.48 


John J. Sheedy. 


85.24— 


105.36 


n.Hvid K. Sherhan. Jr.. 


90.22— 


105.36 



J AX. 24 



CITY RECORD 



95 



Francis J. Sheehan, 
John D. Sheehan, 
James A. Sheehan, 
Joseph T. Sheehan, 
Michael E. Sheehan. 
Thomas Sheehan, 
Henry J. Sheridan, Jr., 
Peter J. Sherlock, Jr., 
Aidan J. Shields, 
David Shubert, 
Mitchell J. Sikora, 
Edward M. Simpson, 
Thomas G. Slyman, 
Frank T. Small, 
Robert E. Small, 
Andrew V. Smith, 
Ernest C. Smith, 
Francis N. Smith, 
Fred I. Smith, 
George P. Smith, 
Hilbert L. Smith, 
Philip L. Smith. 
Robert W. Smith, 
Walter G. Smith, 
Walter J. Smith, 
Leo J. Souza. 
Matthew R. Souza, 
Francis J. Spacco, 
Arthur P. Spacone, 
William W. Sparrow, 
Gerard D. Spear, 
Albert G. Spitz, 
William J. Spitz, 
Joseph P. Spolidaro, 
William R. Sprague. Jr., 
Philip E. Spruill, 
Camilo C. Squillante, 
Rocco A. Staffier. 
Joseph C. Stanewick, 
Roy J. Stanley, 
George E. Stanton, 
Walter E. Stearns, 
Frank B. Steele, 
Frederick H. Stetson, 
Charles C. Stevens, 
George J. Stewart. 
Walter J. Stewart. 
Richard F. Stirling. 
Ralph S. Stockbridge, 
Charles L. Stokinger, 
Walter L. StoU, 
William A. Stowe, 
Henry J. Strachan, 
Rodney W. Stratton, 
Bernard J. Sullivan, 
Daniel A. Sullivan, 
Daniel G. Sullivan. 
Edward L. Sullivan. 
Francis C. Sullivan. 
Frank A. Sullivan, 
John C. Sullivan. 
John J. Sullivan, 
John M. Sullivan, 
Joseph W. Sullivan, 
Leo T. Sullivan, 
Paul C. Sullivan, 
Robert P. Sullivan, 
Thomas G. Sullivan, 
Timothy F. Sullivan. 
Walter A. Sullivan (aid to c 

of department). 
Walter P. Sullivan (Medal), 
William G. Sullivan, 
James M. Sutton. 
Julius C. Sutton, 
Galvin W. Sweeney, 
Edward J. Sweeney, 
Hugo C. Sweeney, 
Robert M. Sweeney, 
William A. Tassinari, 
William R. Tehan, 
Albert Templeton, 
Frederick W. Thomas. 
Ernest G. Thompson. 
John G. Thompson. 
John V. Thompson. 
Leo R. Thompson. 
Paul N. Thoresen. 
Joseph P. Thornton. 
Lawrence J. Thornton. 
Walter F. Thurston. 
Eugene F. Tierney, 



From 

$78.35- 
87.16- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 



85.24- 
90.22- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
87.16- 
87.16- 
85.24- 
87.16- 
87.16- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
85.24- 
90.22- 
85.24- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
90.22- 



87.16- 
90.22- 
85.24- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
85.24- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
87.16- 
X7.16- 



90.22- 
90.22- 
85.24- 
90.22- 
85.24- 



To 

$93.48 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.31) 
105.36 
105.36 
105.31; 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.:!ii 
105. 3i; 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.3G 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 

• 105.36 
105.36 
105.36 

■ 105.36 
105.36 

■ 105.36 
105.36 
105.36 

- 96.36 

■ 96.36 

• 105.36 



113.02 
105.84 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 



$87.16- 
87.16- 
78.35- 



94.05- 
90.22- 
85.24- 
90.22- 
85.24- 
87.16- 
85.24- 
90.22- 



1.24- 



Motor 



Francis P. Tierney, 
William F. Timmins, 
Thomas M. Tobin, 
Alfred P. Toner (apparatus 

operator) , 
Louis S. Toscano, 
William F. Tracey (engineer. 

High Pressure) , 
Llm p. Trainor. 
J;jhn J. Trementozzi, 
Gordon A. Tiezzi, 



P. Il l- A. Umile, 
K Kv aid T. Upton, 
ML-lvin V. Upton, 
Frank E. Utley, 
John S. Varner, J 
Jc;hn P. Vaughan, 
Frank M. Vecchrv, 
Victor C. Veeehio, 
Francis W. Veino, 
Pasquale A. Venezii 
Domenic R. Vitale, 
Walter C. Vitt, 
Nicholas Vogel, Jr., 
Reginald H. Vyse, 
George M. Wade, 
Robert K. Waggett. 
George V. Walker. 
Chester I. Wall (first marine 

engineer, Diesel), 
Thomas J. Wall, 
Coleman F. Wallace, 
James Wallace. 
John P. Wallace. 
Frtderick F. Walsh, 
Frederick J. Walsh, 
James F. Walsh, 
James M. Walsh. 
James P. Walsh. 
John J. Walsh (eng: 

Squad) . 
Joseph P. Walsh, 
Richard A. Walsh. 
Richard F. Walsh. 
Thomas J. Walsh, 
Thomas V. Walsh (master) 
Timothy J. Walsh (aid to 

sistant chief), 
William E. Walsh, 
William J. Walsh. Jr.. 
Francis J. Walton. 
Gerard F. Walton 

marine engineer), 
Paul D. Walton. 
John P. Ward. 
Daniel M. Watson, 
George F. Weadick, 
George W. Welch, 
John Wercmey. 
Lawrence W. Westholm, 
Thomas Whalen. 
Walter F. Whelan. 
John D. White. 
John F. White, 
John F. White, 
Lawrence T. White. 
Ralph R. White, 
Woodrow F. White, 
William J. Wiegand, Jr., 
Francis A. Williams. Jr., 
Frank E. Williams. Jr., 
John C. Williams, 
Joseph R. Williams, 
Michael F. Williams, 
Charles Wilson. 
Edward J. Wilson, 
William J. Winn, 
Bernard F. Woods. 
Joseph B. Woods, 
William H. Woods, 
Arthur J. Wright (engineer 

High Pressure). 
Edward E. Wright. 
William F. Wright. 
Harold J. Yandle. 
Henrv W. Young. Jr.. 
William L. Young. Jr., 87.16 
Arthur W. Zahn, 90.22 



90.22- 
81.22- 
90.22- 



87.16- 
81.22- 
90.22- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
87.16- 

95.97- 

87.16- 
87.16- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
87.16- 
85.24- 
87.16- 
90.22- 

90.99- 
81.22- 
87.16- 



90.22- 



(second 



90.22- 
90.22- 
85.24- 
87.16- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
85.24- 
90.22- 
81.22- 
90.22- 
85.24- 
90.22- 
90.22- 
87.16- 
90.22- 



90.22- 
85.24- 
90.22- 



94.05- 
87.16- 
85.24- 
87.16- 
81.22- 



$105.36 

■ 105.36 

■ 93.48 



109.19 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 

96.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 

96.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 

111.11 



109.19 
96.36 
105.36 



109.19 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 

109.19 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
96.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 



105.36 
105.36 
105.36 

109.19 
105.36 
105.36 
105.36 
96.36 
105.36 
105.36 



Public Wokks Depaktme.nt. 
Highway Division. 

Ignatius Champa, head clerk, from $91.75 
to $95.25 a week. 

William Connors, junior civil engineer, from 
$88.25 to $i)l.75 a wc(-k. 

Joseph liurkc, rii jtor equipment operator 
and laborer, from .<i;7.75 to $70.25 a week. 

J. (iuklen. motor equipment operator and 
lahoier, froin $(;2.75 to $65.25 a week. 

James McCrjrmick. paver, from $67.75 to 
$70.25 a week. 

F. McElroy, laborer, from $60.25 to $62.75 
a week. 

Patrick Sullivan, heavy motor equipment 
operator and laborer, from $70.25 to $72.75 
a week. 

Sanitary Division. 

Stephen J. Mazaka, street cleaning and 
waste collection inspector, from $81.25 to 
$84.75 a week. 

Henry L Szymielewicz, laborer, from $57.75 
to $60.25 a week. 



rl D! 



Survey Division. 
Robert P. Mehegan. head clerk, from $95.25 
to $98.75 a week. 

Water Division. 

Charles F. Barry, machinist, from $70.25 
to $72.75 a week. 

Thomas F. Graham, machinist, from $67.75 
to $70.25 a week. 

Frederick Johnson, clerk and typist, from 
$47.75 to $50.25 a week. 

Irene Kassler, senior clerk and stenographer, 
from $67.75 to $70.25 a week. 

Margaret L. Mack, senior account clerk, 
from $70.25 to $72.75 a week. 

Vincent J. Mosca, clerk and typist, from 
$50.25 to $52.75 a week. 

Robert Tully, senior storekeeper, from $81.25 
to $84.75 a week. 

Retirement Board. 
John J. Reynolds, senior account clerk, from 
$60.25 to $62.75 a week. 

Welfare Department. 
Central Office. 

Theresa Boggio. clerk and typist, from 
$55.25 to $57.75 a week. 

Mary Shonk, clerk and typist, from $52 75 
to $55.25 a week. 

William Rogers, painter, from $70.25 to 
$72.75 a week. 

Dale Kintz, principal statistical machine 
operator, from $77.75 to $81.25 a week. 

.Anthony Sarno. principal statistical ma- 
chine operator, from $81.25 to $84.75 a week. 

Anna G. Krapohl, rest-room matron, from 
$52.75 to $55.25 a week. 

Hallie Ford, senior clerk and typist, from 
$70.25 to $72.75 a week. 



Peter _ .4polis. ^social worker, from $ 

Edna Franks, social worker, from $77.' 
$81.25 a week. 



Anthony Bushlow, supervisor of supplies 
(temporary transfer), from $95.25 to $9,S.75 

SUFFOLK COUNTY. 
District Attorney's Office. 
George E. Hurley, legal aid, from $81.25 to 
$84.75 a week. 

Superior Criminal Court. 
Katherine McKenna, principal clerk, from 



$72.75 to $75.25 a week. 



Q6 



CITY R R C QRD 



Jan. 24 



( in ..r l!..it.>\. 
rbboani oprratur, Irom 



RoiarRY Di«T«irr. 

nior e\rrk, from |«7.75 



J,,r, . . f -rnlor fUrk, from M7.7S 

1 > a wnk. 

Ml'SM-irAI. COI'BT. WWT ROXRIWY DwniHT. 
' ' .. W. Norton. rUrk. from t&2.7& to (&S.25 



OVERTIME ALLOWED 

Till- Mayor has .npproved Ihc followinjt 
n «|inv»t : 

IIBrAKTMINT OT STIIOOI. KKILOINCS. 
John c:. O'Donnrll. 21 houra at $3 an hour; 
l-'rank J. Dairy, 6 houm at f.t an hour. 

Ki«« iHB-AirriiltKT. 
I,. Crimn. hrad rlrrk. 14} h»ur« 
<. 'iM J. HarrinrUin. hca<l 
< ; an hour; Jcmrph P. 
k, 6 houm at t:i an 
principal rlrrk and 
,• .«■. h.iv H.r-h 



Meaitii Defabtmbnt. 



HOHPITAL DRPARTMKNT. 
Main Dirition. 
Mary Murray, prinrjpal clerk. 2 hjure at 
< i ' K ■ »i . . T, Moylan. head clerk. 7 

Mary Smillcomb .princi- 
$;i an hour; Katherine 
. :t hniim at $:{ an h'Hir: 
, -iripal nimlical stemiKra- 
r. 1 h iir- »: J. I an hour. 

Charin Lynch. IhirH-claiu ataUonary eniri- 

« h ■ •.• ti' ir: Albert Bonrtti. 

■ . . r. S hours at 
lirKt -class steam 
hour: .\rthur 
..ry enirineer, 8 
.l.hn I.eary, workine 
hours at t.S an hour: 
'1' nd clerk, .Si hours at 
Kolan, executive secre- 
■ii>. 7 h u' ..■ an hour: Dorothy Harris, 
principal medical stenoKraphrr, 4 h<iurs at 
1.^ an hour. 

.VannforiNm PIvhion, 

.\pproviil \y.ut bt'cn jtiven to pay ovcr- 
liiiio lo Ihi' foUowinu-naiiu'il i iiii>liiyros 
who v.xTn over $77 a wick. an additional 
■ layV pay for workinK I)ici nil>rr 2.5. IO'kS: 

James Karry, Kernard Bonner, enrinceni: 

Kr,.HrrlrV Crsn.!.!!. flrrmnn: A.liini IIowk!!-. 



pttal h.u. 
nurse. 
Jam<^ Tti 

An.l . M 



IM1..1 nurse: 
•. Winifred 
K lward Cur- 
\\ i:lnim Doherly, 
il kilihen workers; 
• inc. Kmnia Kark- 
Quilly. principal 
Anna Cochran, hos- 
Krn<-!rt Lawllee, bead 



irineer. I hour at l.t an hour: 
I .1. ■i.ian, I hour at $.1 
entrineer, 2 hours 
ni I laith. chief power 

pi;, an hour: Bema- 

deti. I' I . 11 hours at J.T an 

hour. K. .MuiKl i.iiiMi II. suntirnl nurse, 4i 
hcuni at $3 an hour. 



PUBLlr WORK.S DeI'ARTMBNT. 
Frederick L. Can-in, associate civil cnirineor, 
4 hours at $4 an hour; Charles D. Sullivan, 
personnel assistant, 4 hours at $:{.'5 nn hour. 



VETERANS' RETIREMENTS 

Tlio .M:iyor lias ajiprovi d llio following 
v(t»T:in.s' appiication.s for retirement: 

Edward F. Stockman. 9 Division street, 
Brockton, senior buildine custodian, Frank V. 
Thompson School. School Department. 

John J. Crowley. 690 Tremont street, la- 
b:)rpr. Sanitary Division, Public Works De- 
partment. 

Lawrence J. Wiemert, 30 Cross street, 
Charle.«t<iwn, laborer. Highway Division, Public 
Works Department. 

John Csrnetta. 279 Sumner street. East 
Boston, paver. Water Division, Public Works 
Department. 



CONTRACTS AWARDED 

The M;ivor .ijiproved the aw.ird of Ihi- 
loll iwinji eoiitrarts to tlie lowest elisil-le 
l.idders: 

Dk: AurMKNT OK .Sciiooi, Hi ii.DiNi.s. 
Shop Machinery 

riimisliinu. inslallinc. ami di-livcrine metal 
wiirkinc iiinrliini-.«. wiMMiworking iiiarliines, and 
fliiK't nielal e<|iii|iiiient in the new P.o8ton Terhni- 
rul lliuli School, awarded to O. V. Killam & Son. 
Iteiiis I'l. 47. 48. 60. 6.3. 6.5. in the ainoiint of 
?3..V.t8.r>.-i. (See details of bidding printed below.) 

riirnisliinK, delivorinc. and installing metal 
uorkinK iiiarliines, wcMiilworkinK iiiacliines. and 
»lni-l metal iv|iii|>iiii'nl in tlie new I'.oston Teehni- 
nil IliKli School, awanled lo Could Industrial 
Supply Comimnv, Inc.. Items JO. 2.3, 24, 2.5, 4.5. -4li. 
.53. .5.5, .56, .58. .5't. 61. in the amount of J6..563. J7. 
(Details of hiddinK printed below.) 

I'limiKliinK. delivrrinif. and installine metal 
workinii iimrliinos. umidworkinK machines, and 
hIiii'I iiK-tal ■'•iiiipiiient in tlio new Boston Techni- 
rnl IIieIi ScIiooI. awarded to Prown 4 Shame 
.Maniifactiirinic foiiipanv. on Item I'.t. in tlie 
amount of ?4,78.5. (IVlails of bid-line printed 
below.) 

delivering, ami in.aliillini! metal 
liines. niMMlworkine iiiaeliines. and 
i'ii|>nient in the new Boston Technical 
iwardetl to B. 1). I'nmks Company, 
I • li 8, .57. 64 . 67, in the amount <".f 

»ii.:t4.S.-'0. (l)eUils of liiddinn prinle.1 below.) 



I'lirnishinir. delivering, and installing nielal 
iiiarhines. woodworking marbines, and sheet metal 
i-'|iiipni?nt in the new Boston Technical High 
Soliool. awarded to Joseph Beal t'ompanv. Inc., 
on Items 3. 4, 68. in the amount of »3 1 .4 1 .5.6.3. 
ll>e t!iila of bidding printeil below.) 



Sil.o.,!. awurJed to 
:.v on hems 13. 14, 16, 17 ■ i :. i . 
uinooiii of «7!l.204.i!4. (Details of l.i.i.liiiK i rmnil 
below.) 

rumishing. delivering, and installing metal 
working Iiiacliines. woodworking machines, and 
hl.ii-t iiielal e<|iiipnienl in the new Boston Techni- 
cal lligli .Shool. awarded to William II. Field 
("omiuuiv. on Items 12. 20. 27. 28. 2!l, 30. 31, 32. 

34. 3.5. 36. .37. 41. 4'.». .50. .51. .52, in the amount 
of ;4 1.184.10. (Details of bidding printed below.) 

Furnishing, delivering, and installing metal 
working iiiacliines, woixlworking machines, and 
sliiM't metal <'<|iii|<ment. in the new Boston Techni- 
.al High School, awardeil to Packard Maeliiner> 
Compaiiv, on Items I. 2. .5. fi, (1. 10. II 1.5, 22. in 
the amount of ?1 27.31 7.!t6. (Details of biddin/.' 
i rinl.il below.) 

Bi In wiTe as follows: 

ll.m I. 7S Lathi Packard Machiner>- Com- 
Iiany, SI02,.521 : Could Industrial Supply C?ompany, 
$127. .570. 

lirm J. Elira Eii<iipminl.- Pack&rd Machiner\- 
Company. $1,822.76. alternate. $7.49.5.96; (lould 
Imliislrial Supply Company, $5,720. 

lIrm .1. i lAithrt. -Wigglesworth Maehinen,- 
Company. $13,176; Joseph Beale Company, Inc.. 
$12,824.60; Could Industrial Supply Company. 
$7,479. 

Ilim Ejira Equipment. — Wigglesworth Ma- 
cliiner\- Company. S1.2!>6: Joseph Beale Coni|)any. 
Inc., $3,I30.8;{; Ciould Industrial Supply Com- 
Iiany. $2,728. 

Ittm 5. s iMthis.' Packard Machinery Com- 
pany, S:{,8.{0: W. H. Field (Tompany. Inc., 
$4,384.80: Joseph Beale Coniiianv, Inc.. $3,560; 
B. D. Brooks Coiiiiiany, Inc.. S5.215.20; Gould 
Industrial Supply Company. $1,000. 

Iti-m '!. Ejtra EqMipmin'.. — Packard Machiner>- 
Company. $490; W. H. Field Company. Inc.. 
$519; Joseph Beale Company, Inc., $1,157; 
(iould Industrial Supply Company. $542. 

Itvm 7. I Tiirnt /-a(/if.~-Packard Machiner>- 
Company, $3,000.* 

It'tn S. .', J'lHal Drilling Machines. — Wiggles- 
worth -Machinerj Company. $8,973; Joseph Beale 
Company, Inc.. $3,801; Boston Alachinery anil 
l ool Company. $0,066.40. 

Itrm 9. ■', Drill /Vfs.trs.— Wigglesworth Ma- 
chinery Coniriany, $1,233; Packard .Machinery 
Comjianv, S3.52; W. II. Field Company. Inc.. 
$882.40; Joseph Beah- Company, Inc., $7.5.5.60; 
Could Indii.-ilrial Siii.iily Company. $380. 

Il,m 10. .; Dr.ll /V,«,:.. Wigglc.sworth Ma- 
chinery Coiiiriany, $1.0;»9.6S; Parkard .Machiner>- 
Company, $820; W. II. Field Company, Inc.. 
$862; Joseph Beale Company. Inc., $398.60: 
(Joiild Industrial Su|>|ily Com|iany, $360. 

Item II. ■', I'rrlal r/rinrff r.<. -Wigglesworth Ma- 
chinery Company. $1,518.60; Packard Maehinen, 
Company, $1,117; .loseph Beale Company, Inc.. 
$1.I0:{.26; tiould Industrial Supply Company. 
$1,080. 

Item li. .', Brnrh f7ri>i.ff rj>.— Wigglesworth 
.Machinery Comr>any, $740.88; W. H. Field Com- 
pany, Inc.. $500; Joseph Beale Company, Inc., 
$60.1; Could Industrial Supr-ly Company, $300. 

Itt m 13. .1 Hackmirs. -Wigglesworlh Marhinery 
Company, $4,929; Lynde Farquhar Company, 
$2,9.54. 

Ilrm 14. -i Plain S'laprr.i.— Lynde Faniuliar 
Company, $2.3..58.5. 

Item 15. i Milling .Var/imcs.— Packard Ma- 
chiner\- Company, $^,900; Cincinnati .Milling and 
('•rinding. $12,948. 

Ilrm Its. >l Milling Marhinm. — Lynde Farquliar 
Company. $11,802; Cincinnati .Milling and Crind- 
ing, $:{:), 39J; Brown & Sliarjie Manufacturing 
Company, alternate. $79.3,50. 

Item 17. Eilra Equipment. —l.ynAe Farquliar 
Compan.y. $2..502; Cincinnati Milling and Crind- 
ing, $2.15,5; Brown A Sliarpc Manufacturing; Coni- 
|.any. alternate, $2,877.60. 

Item IS. I I'lain Crivier. — Lynde Farfpihar 
Company, $7,377; Brown & .Sliarpe Maniifart'iring 
Coiiil.anv. alternate, .<I().35I. 

Il!m l:>. I Sur/a,; f,V,n.^r.— Wigglesworlh Ma- 
chinery CoMi|i:iny. $').iriS; L.ynde Farquhar Com- 
I>iny. SJ.SI3; Brown A: Sliarix! Manufacturing 
Company, alU'rnate, $1,785. 

Item iV. 4 h'lirnafeii. — Packard Machinery 
Company. $312; B. D. Brooks Company. Inc., 
$979.2;): C.ould In.lustri.il Supi.ly Compiny, 
$780; Kill.iiii * Son, $808. 



Jan. 24 



CITY RECORD 



97 



I .m 21 6'* Machine Vis<-x. — Kaufman Inilus- 
tml Hardware. $1,999; Boston Macliincry and 
Tool Company. S2.373.88; Gould Industrial Supply 
Company, SLOoO; Killam & Son. $1,903.88. 

Item 22. 2 S^iapfrs.— Packard Maclunery Com- 
pany. SI, 292; Gould Industrial Supply Company, 

Item2S. 2 Milling iVocAincs.— Gould Industrial 
Supi>lv Company, SI,600. , ,. 

Item 24. 2 Drill Presses. — Packard Alaclunery 
Company, S336; Govild Industrial Supply Com- 

'"'//fm 25. 2 Screuculling Laf/ifs.—Packard Ma- 
chinery Company, $900; Gould Industrial Supply 
Company. $760. 

Item S6. 1 Arbor Saw Bench.— Vt . H. Field 
Company. Inc., Sl,908. , 

Hem 27. S Arbor Saw Benc/ifs.— Wigglesworth 
Machinery Company, $3,054.50; W. H. Field Com- 
pany. Inc., $2,654.25; Gould Industrial Supply 
Company, $2,654.25. 

Hem 28 1 Radial Saw. — W. H. Field Company. 
Inc., $679.20. , ^ 

Item 29. 3 Band Sau-s.— 1\ igglesworth Ma- 
chinery Company. $2,597.19; W. H. Field Com- 
pany. Inc.. $2,318.85; Gould Industnal Supply 
Company, $2,318.85. 

Item 30. 22 Blount Lathes.—V, . H. Field Com- 
pany, Inc., S18.590. 

Item 31. 1 Hand Jointer.— \\. H. Field Com- 
pany, Inc., Sl,014. 

Item 32. 4 Scroll Saws.— W igglesworth Ma- 
chinery Company, $1,078.80; W. H. Fie d C m- 
pany. Inc., $901; Gould Industrial Supply Com- 
pany, $901. , , 

Item 33. 4 Drill f resscs.— \\ igglesworth Ma- 
chinery Company. $1,677.96; W. H. Field Com- 
pany, Inc.. $1,501.60; Gould Industrial Supply 
Company, 51,501.60. 

Item 34. 6 Pedal Grinders.— A\ igglesworth 
Machinery Company. $1,127.85; W. H. Field 
Company, Inc., $943.75; Joseph Beale Company, 
Inc., $915.10; Gould Industrial Supply Company, 

Item So. 5 Bench Grinders. — Wigglesworth Ma- 
chinery Company, $701.10; W. H. Field Company, 
Inc.. $625; Joseph Beale Company, Inc., $753.75; 
Gould Industrial Supply Company, $625. 

Item 36. 1 Wood Shaper.—W. H; Field Com- 
pany, Inc., $1,603.50. ^. , , ^ 

Item 37. 1 Surface Planer.— H. Field Com- 
pany, Inc., $5,885; Gould Industrial Supply Com- 
pany, $2,785. , , . , 

Item 38. 1 Hand Sato Setter.— No bids. 

Item 39. 1 Saw Sharpener. — No bids. 

Item 40. 1 Saw f lier.- No bids. 

Item 41. 1 Setting and Filing Machine.—^ . H. 
Field Company. Inc., $221. 

Item 42. 1 Re-toother.— No bids. 

Item 43. 1 Sander. — No bids. 

Item 44. 1 Key il/ac/ijne.- Killam & Son, 
alternate, $2,226. 

Item 4-5. furnaces.— Packard Machinery Com- 
pany, $1,0,54; B. D. Brooks Company, Inc., 
$1,843.20; Gould Industrial Supply Company, 
$I,.540; Killam & Son, $1,967. 

Item 40. 1 Bench Furnace. — Packard Machinery 
Company, $42.25; B. D. Brooks Company, Inc., 
$19.40; Gould Industrial Supply Company, 539..')0; 
Killam & Son, $41. 

Item 47. 10 Soldering Furnaces.- Packard Ma- 
chinery Company, $205; B. D. Brooks Company, 
Inc., $2.59; Gould Industrial Supply Company, 
$194; Killam & Son, $191. 

Item 48. 3 Benders.— B. D. Brooks Company 
Inc., $838..50; Gould Industrial Supply Company 
$829.32; Killam & Son, $826.77. 

Item 49. 2 Bench Gr^n<^er.s.— Wigeleswortli Ma- 
chinery Company, $280.44; W. H. l-ield Company, 
Inc., $250; Joseph Beale Company. Inc.. ?300.2o; 
Gould Industrial Supply Company, S2.50. 

Item SO. 2 Pedal Gnnrfers.— Wigglesworth Ma- 
chinery Company, $451.14; W. H. field Com|)any, 
Inc., $358; Joseph Beale Company. Inc., ¥349.20; 
Gould Industrial Supply Company, S3.38. 

Item 51. 1 Drill Press.— Wigglesworth Ma- 
chinery Company, $400.05; W. H. Field Company, 
Inc., $380.15; Gould Industrial Supply Company, 
$380.15. 

Item 52. 2 Drill Presses.— Wigglesworth Ma 
chinery Company. $838.98; W. H. I'icld Company, 
Inc., $750.8C; Gould Industrial Supiily Company, 
$750.80. 

Item S3. 1 Angle Iron Xolcher.— B. D. Brooks 
Company, Inc., $104. .50; Gould Industnal Supply 
Company, $93.50; Killam & Son, $98.92. 



Item ;<;. ; Attgle Iron Shear.— B. D. Brooks 
Comjianv, Inc. $55; Gould Industrial Supply 
Company. $50; Killam & Son, $54. 



1 ;i own & Sharp e 

M: $1,970; B.D. 

Ki,,,,; Mild Industrial 

Supply (. . -on. sue. 

Item ' H. D- Brooks 

Compan.\. : -1 Industrial Suppyl 

Company. >vr,, 1.,>| . ,v S..n. SIGO. 

Item 61. 1 Bo.- nml fan Brake.— B. V. Brooks 
Company, Im-.. S:i:!2.:i7; Gould Industrial Supply 
Company, S3.32.2-; Killam & Son, $380.29. 

Item 02. 1 Spot Welder. — B. D. Brooks Com- 
pany. Inc.. S148; Gould Industrial Supply Com- 
pany, 8148; Killam <t Son, $139.* 

Item 63. 1 Brace and U'tre Bender.— B. D. 
Brooks Company, Inc., .?79; Gould Industrial 
Supply Company, $75; Killam & Son, $72. 

Item 64. 1 Koter Punch. — B. D. Brooks Com- 
pany, Inc., $399. 

Item 65. 1 Hi: ' B. D. Brooks 

Company, Inc., > lustrial Supply 

Company. $169; 1. 1 '• 

Item 66. \1 Ilardn. - i, !. 1 .ould Industrial 
Supply, Company, alternate, S170. 

Item 67. 1 Spot ireider.— B. D. Brooks Com- 
pany, Inc., $189; Gould Industrial Supply Com- 
pany, S190. 

Item 68. 12 Floor Type LafAes.— Wigglesworth 
Machinery Company, $19,967.40; Packard Ma- 
chinery Company, alternate, $13,817; W. H. Field 
Company, Inc., $17,434.20; Joseph Beale Com- 
pany, Inc., $15,160.20; Gould Industrial Supply 
Company, $19,072.20. 

Totals. — Packard Machinery Company, $127,- 
317.96; Lynd-Farquhar Company, $79,204.84; 
W. H. Field Company, Inc., .$41,184.10; Brown & 
Sharpe Manufacturing Company, $4,785; Joseph 
Beal Company, Inc., $31,415.63; B. D. Brooks 
Company, Inc., $1,133; Boston Machinery and 
Tool Company. SG.OCn.lO; Gould Industrial Sui>- 
ply roiiipnny,'Sr,,.-)K3.27; Killam & Sou. S3,.-j98.(;.>. 



Ala 



illar 



PUBLIC Works Department. 
Sewerage Works 

Deaf. Mr. Mayor: 

Your approval is respectfully recpiested to 
the award of a contract for sewerage works in 
Veterans of Foreign Wars Parkway (east 
sidel fr.m Ciaidncr st n>ct .'>(MI feet northerly, 
We<t RjxliuiT. to .lolin Hotti. tO^M Adams 
street, Doii-hestcr, Mass.. the second lowest 
bidder, in the amount of S,.li>2. 

ment dated December 24, l'.'5S, th.' lowest bid- 
der, Sweeney Corpoi-ation, Ho.x .-Xrlington, 
Mass.. asks that they be allowed to withdraw 
their bid due to an error in one of the major 
items of his proposal. 

Under the circumstances, it is my opinion 
that the best interests of the city will be seryed 
on the award of this contract as outlined aboye. 

The work to be done under this contract is 
to be completed March 31. 1959. 

The following proposals were received De- 
cember 23, 1958, after publicly advertising in 
the City Record, December 13, 1958: 

Sweeney Corporation, $4,623.75; John Botti, 
$7,982; Mystic Constraction, Inc., $8,682.20; 
Manning Construction Company, $9,528.50; Jo- 
seph Capone, $10,945; Roslindale Construction 
Company, $11,131.10; Alco Trucking Company, 
Inc., $14,205. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert P. Shea, 
Commissioner of I'ublic Works. 



CONTRACTS AWARDED 
WITHOUT ADVERTISING 

Health Department. 
Reyistry Divinion. 
Prints of Records 
Dear Mr. Mayor: 

On July 25, 1958, your Honor approved a 
( till act with Recordak Corporation, 99 Bc<l- 
ii.ft. Boston, Mass., in the sum of 
o provide 49.019 prints of our records 
ill. i.eriod April 1, 1958, to March 31, 

At this time we should like to provide for 
the furnishing of an additional 24,509 prints 
between now and the end of the contract 
period. 

Therefore, I respectfully request authoriza- 
tion to dispense with public advertising and to 
amend the contract in the sum of $2,500 to 
cover the cost of the additional prints which 
are to be supplied at the existing contract unit 
price of 10.2 cents per print. 

I am of the opinion that nothing is to be 
gained by public advertising as this firm's per- 
formance is most satisfactory, and it is a 
specialist in all types of copy work. 

Respectfully yours, 

Charles H. Mackie, 

City Registrar. 



EXTENSION OF CONTRACTS 

The Mayor ha.s approved extension of 
tlic time limit on completion of the fol- 
lowing contracts: 

Department of School Buildings. 

Sellars Oil Burner Service, Inc., for addi- 
tions and alterations to heating systems at 
various schools, extended from December 15, 

1958, to February 13, 1959, because of delay in 
delivery of materials. 

Washington Contracting Company, Inc., for 
construction of a play area at the Bigelow 
School, SouBh Boston, extended from Decem- 
ber 10, 1958, to May 15, 1959, because with 
winter approaching, the asphalt furnaces close 
and work cannot be resumed until spring. 

S. M. Levin Company, Inc., for furnishing 
and delivering furniture to various schools, 
extended from December 31, 1958, to March 
31. 1959, because of delay in receiving ship- 
ments from factoi-y. 

D. Antonellis, Inc., for alterations to welding 
shop at Boston Trade High School, extended 
from January 5, 1959, to February 27, 1959, 
as contract could not be completed due to 
delay in rtcciving mechanical equipment. 

Public Works Department. 
Charles Todesca, for sidewalk narrowing in 
Massachusetts avenue, from approximately 200 
feet south of Clapp street to railroad bridge, 
extended from December 31. 1958, to June 30, 

1959, because the above-referenced contract 
was not awarded until December 24, 1958. 

The Yeomans O'Connell Company, for safety 
barriers and chain link fence in Border street, 
Everett street, etc., extended from December 
31, 1958. to May 1, 1959, because the con- 
tractor has been ordered to do additional work. 

Hersey Manufacturing Company, for fur- 
nishing labor and material necessary to repair 
or rebuild and test Hereey water meters for 
the Public Works Department (Water Divi- 
sion), extended from December 31, 1958, to 
March 31, 1959, due to a lacUn-y personnel 
cutback during the first six months of 1958. 



WANT $200,000 CODE JUNKED 

Representatives of professional and trade 
groups have appeared before Houston, Texas, 
City Council asking that the new building 
code which the city has been working on for 
16 years, spending around $200,000, be junked. 



OS 



CITY RE CORD 



Jan. 24 



l»Ll MBINli I'liKMITS 
Tlif lliiiMiiiR I)<'|i:«rimi-iit Iim iamjnl 
(III ■ iMTinim for in- 

.! , \luTv» for the 



Hard* ate iiiiltLalcd in parvnlheac* 
. •<<.. following name of MrMt. 



J I,... »- «. 
O. Jojf*» 
J. O Neil 
J. O KMI 
J. O-NnI 
J. O N»il 
8. KHIrtn 
A. Uwf 
r. Cilyaa 
K. Krilrai 
A. Milllaao 
C Crawford 
\ M.n.rnii 



. ■ II 
..itl, r.t .III 

lit (4) 

J7 MurlitiwooH Kl (10) 
.11 MuMinoood (t (19) 
:{.*>'.) ArlsniK at (ini 
1 1 VI fvntn- M (I7l 

I' rav (I7i 



Coi-r 
»75 

1.250 
I. JSC 
l.(UO 
175 
100 
I or) 
I (XK) 
1.(100 
MJOO 
1.000 
.VV) 

non 

800 



.50.000 
000 



A. triiara l-'i ( iK-ntniit llill av (211 

A. Siahly RirhMil at (1.1) 

(J. KaU ftll H. .irrn,- .i. I 

W. rirhak 58 II' 
A. Frm»rr 2.' T' 

J. 

J. <•( 

\. MaiT«r<j 
I. Brimbcnt 
A. Fidrr 
N. Privn 

a. TrrllK-wy Puplar «t (18) 



.i« \V.11..„ M JO 
230 (aiiibridcc «t (3) 
10 Chiimian •! (17) 
OM-mi Dudley at (8) 
lUI Oraiucc at (20) 



1*00 
.000 
19.-I 



1 .«.-rf) 
KM) 
2.V) 



<i\S nTTINU PERMITS 

rii«' ItiiililiriK Dcparliiu'iit htin issued 
llic fi>l|(>\sinK Ki"< li'tiiiK permits for in- 
••l.illation of appliiktii-es for tin- week end- 
iuK Jfinuary Hi: 









tl50 


• 5) 


50 


'•) 


900 


151 


78 


.>-«lth a 


V (21) :«) 




25 


■ i (I!)! 


23 


.1 ((• 


100 




IIHI 







K. CliiiHiiaii 
(-. Haaira 

I,. I.(ixlan 
J. Kounry 
V. Tuif 
J. Kiiwllo 
C Clynn 
J Hynn 
J. 11} nn 
( '. <ilynn 
J. Uinillo 
A. Millisan 
A. .Millisan 
J. Hynn 
J. Fly on 
J. Klvnn 
■ llynn 



J. Ilvr 
W. \Vi 



A. Milliitao 
J. K(i|>ian<> 
J. Klynn 
V. ( iiorttanci 
J. Hvnn 
J. Klvnii 
J. Klynn 
<;. Turk 
A. .'*tnlily 
\V. (-..nn.-ll 
II. Ilinrkli'V 
W. ( -..nm ll 
J. Dnxroll 
I'. Kam ll 
». SiiiK.n 

W. Fialiniun 
S. Connolly 
.S. Uow n 
F. Colli 
L. Jacobs 
L. Jttcuba 
II. Farod 
W. FiMinmn 
K. Kolly 
\V. Connt-ll 

H. I'srrKi 
A. Stahly 
A. Ilibirl 
S. Connolly 
\V. Connoll 
A. Ili bi rt 
\V. Conncil 

A.lanm 
.s. Adams 
S. Adaii.8 
A. Hiirklrv 
C. Katz 
F. Od. nw. ll. r 
I . O.lcnwplln 
F. (Klc-nwtllcT 
.*itan>t« 
Kramer 

I. . Vmro 
M. Carlin 

J. FrcTilman 
K. LaCcntra 
II. Carey 
I). Blanty 
I). HIancv 
.1. MrCiisk. r 
.1. Mr( ii,.k< r 
A. FiKl.T 
A. FIkIit 
\V. Chaw 
W. Cliasr 
.1. Minal.an 
.1. Minalian 
.1. .Minalian 
.1. .Minahan 
.1. Minalian 
.1. .Minalian 
J. .Minalian 
.1. Minalian 
.1. Minalian 
C. Romano 
C. Romano 
C. Romano 
C. Romano 
C. Romano 
C. Romano 
C. Romano 
C Romano 
C. Romano 

(■ H..tn:,n.. 



AS Soiitii lliintinittun av 
I2H I.I-' .•<iinin<'r at iHl 
M H|ir.-.|»i ll at (15) 
:t8 \Vintliro|> at (18) 
2:i4 Bakrr at (20) 
IWCIhHw^ at (I) 
071 DfirfliMtpr av (I.I) 
1129 Dorclicatcr av (13) 
1021 Dorrlicatrr av (16) 
2:«t I. at (71 



10(1 

27 .stu.l.ri.l^. -t 17 

237 Qiiincy at (14) 

fl8 .Suiilli at (II) 

1 Wall at (2) 

0«3 \Va»liini£ton at (17) 

WJ'.t \Viu.liinitt<in (19) 

r.8 Willow rt (71 

1(W W<«t villi- at (13) 

27 W«Kxl»Bid Park at (1.1) 

;»80 Aniory at (1») 

1 18 lt<miimont at (16) 

m Hollflowrrat (7) 

7i:i Centre at (11) 

.H Cliiekatawbiit at (16) 

763 Columbia rd (7) 

cmi Dudley at (l.JI 

908 Eaat Brtiadway (6) 

1 3 Calena at (11) 

104 Glendower rd (18; 

14 HamnKiod at (9) 

4!) Hollander at (12) 

Xi Howe at (15) 

324 La OranKe at (20) 

Ifi Maple St (20) 

8.5 Mesainm-r at (18) 

298 Metropolitan av (18) 

IH Newaere rd (18) 

12 Oakliiirst at (14) 
1.30 Orlando at (18) 
27 Richfield at (13) 
3.">6 .*!uniner at (I ) 
.50 Thomdike at (8) 
201 Victory rd (16) 
37 Waverlv at (12) 
31 Westulow St (16) 

13 (lordon pi (7) 
33 Mt. Ida rd (15) 

30 Thetfonl av (17) 

till McnninKton at (1) 
4(51 East Seventh st (6) 
223 West Fifth at (6) 
270 West Third st (0) 
64 Chelsea st (1) 
23 Dacia st (13) 
23 Dakota st (13) 
42 Esmond st (14) 
200 H st (7) 
8 .Minot SI (3) 

31 North Anderson st (3) 
31 llollinKSworth st (18) 
19 OakridKest (17) 

92 Metropolitan av (18i 

23 RaleiBh rd (18) 

(i.59 fifil Blue Hill av (1 1) 

92 RadclilTe st (18) 

46 East SprinKlield st (8) 

668 Massachusetts av (8) 

.-.8 Bost.mia av (22) 

l.)3 Cambridne »l (22) • 

69 Euslon rd (22) 



201 Harvard av (211 

239 Kelion st (21 1 

242 Lake st (22) 

166 North Beacon st (22 

28 Portsmouth st (22) 

31 Bav st (13) 

18.1 Centre st (16) 

72 Clifton st (8) 

162 Columbia rd (13) 

13 Dickens st (15) 

303 East First at (6) 

81 Elmer rd (16) 

63 Ridgewood st (15) 

19 Vinson st (16) 

30.1 Washington st (16) 



20 
300 

60 
973 



750 
20 
1.50 
100 
3.123 



(201 



Me 



35 
.500 
15 



2.50 
600 
200 
1.700 



230 
230 
.500 
2.50 
273 
2.50 



TRAFFIC RULINGS 

Ti mfKirary 
The TnifTie Coiiunis.sion has voted a.« 
follow.«: 

That as urgently required by considerations 
of public safety and convenience, for a trial 
perioti of sixty (60) days, the Traffic Rules 
and Rexulationa of the City »f Boston are 
amended as follows, effective December 12. 
1958: 

Article VI. Section 10 (Left Turns Pro- 
hibited), is amended by inserting in iU proper 
place in the alphabetical arrangement under 
the caption "Dorchester" each of the following: 

Blue Hill Avenue. 

Into River street, easterly. 

Cummina Highway. 

Into River street, easterly. 

Article VI. Section 11 (Only Right Turn 
Movements Permitted), is amended by insert- 
ing in its proper place in the alphabetical 
arrangement under the caption "Dorchester" 
the following: 

River Street. Eastbound. 

Into Blue Hill avenue, southerly. 

Article VI. Section 14 ( U Turns Prohibite<l ) . 
is amended by inserting in its proper place in 
the alphabetical arrangement under the cap- 
tion "Dorchester" the following: 

Blue Hill Avenue. Southerly. 

To Blue Hill avenue, northerly, at River 

The Traffic Commissioner has promul- 
gated the following ruling: 

Whereng, If during the emergency created 
by traffic conditions in the Kneeland Street 
area due to the fact that the completion of 
construction of the John F. Fitzgerald Ex- 
pressway is temporarily terminated in the 
vicinity of Kneeland street, vehicles were to 
continue to be prohibited from making left 
turns from Stuart street, Boston Proper, into 
Tremont street, southerly, conformably to thf 
rules and regulations of the Boston TrafTc 
Commission otherwise operative, public travel 
would be substantially impeded; and 

Wherraa, The Boston Traffic Commission 
ha.s taken no action on the matter because 
notice of the effect of the present situation 
did not ccme to the attention of the Boston 
Traffic Department in time for a traffic engi- 
neering study of the matter to be presenteil 
to the last meetirg of the Boston Traffic Com- 
mission: and 

Whcrean, Public safety and convenience re- 
quire that remedial measures be invoked as of 
Januar>- 6. 1959; and 

I17icrra«, A meeting of the Boston Traffic 
Commission is not scheduled to be held prior 
to Januao' 6. 1959; now, therefore. 

Pursuant to the power vested in me as Traf- 
fic Commissioner of the City of Boston by St. 
1929, c. 2(>3. s. 2B (as inserted by St. 1957. 
c. 253. s. 5). I hereby promulgate the follow- 
ing rule and regulation to take effect forth- 
with and to be operative only until the end of 
such emergency or the expiration of one 
month from the dale hereof, whichever is 
earlier: 

For the period aforesaid, the following left 
turn prohibition is suspended: 
Stuart Street, Boston Proper. 
Into Tremont street, southerly. 

The Traffic Commis.sion has voted a< 
follows: 

That as urgently required by considerations 
of public safety and convenience, occasioned 
bv the installation of water and sewer connec- 
tions to the Blue Cross-Blue Shield building at 
No. 133-147 Federal street. Boston Proper, for 
a period estimated to be thirty (30) days, the 
following street is one way in the direction 
indicated, effective January 13, 1959: 

Federal Street, Boston Proper. 

From High street to Franklin street. 



.Tax. 24 



CITY RECORD 



99 



IMPROVEMENTS VOTED 

The Mayor and Public Improvement 
Commission have approved the follow- 
ing: 

Hyde Park Private Way 

Whereas, On October 30. 1957, permission 
was granted to prepare for public travel 
Mansur street, West Roxbuo' and Hyde Park 
districts, from Metropolitan avenue to Grew 
avenue: and 

Whereas. On November 6, 1957, Sevenel. 
Inc.. entered into an agreement with the City 
of Boston relative to the installation of water 
and sewer facilities and the construction of 
said Mansur street; and 

Whereas. Said Sevenel, Inc., deposited with 
the City of Boston the amount of $2,000 in 
accordance with the provisions of said agree- 
ment; and 

Whereas, All of the provisions of said agree- 
ment have now been fulfilled and permission 
has been granted to open said Mansur street 
to public travel; it is hereby 

Voted, That the sum of $2,000 be paid to 
Sevenel, Inc. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



REAL PROPERTY DEPART- 
MENT. 



Proposals fok Furnishing Fifteen Tons 
Broom Wire. 

Proposals m.iy be obt:<ined at Room 53. City 
Hall. A' xh)^ i-.iom the bids will be opened 
and m.l Thm-.lay. February 5. 1959, at 12 M. 
The l.i.l^Ur niu>: leave his proposal with a 
certifitil check for .$1(10 payable to and to 
become the property of the City of Boston 
if the proposal is not carried out. A dupli- 
cate bid, without check, must be left with the 
Auditor prior to the time for opening bids. 
Envelopes containing bids to be sealed and 
marked "Proposal for Broom Wire." The 
successful bidder must furnish a faithful per- 
formance bond for one half the total esti- 
mated amount of the contract with a surety 
company authorized to do business in Massa- 
chusetts. The Purchasing Agent reserves the 
right to accept or reject any and all bids, or 
any part of a bid. and to award the contract 
as he deems for the best interests of the city. 

John V. Moran, 

(Jan. 24.) Purchasing Agent. 



Proposals may be obtained at Room 53, City 
Hall. At this room the bids will be opene<l 
and read Wednesday, February 4, 1959, at 12 M. 
The bidder must leave his proposal with a cer- 
tified check for $100, payable to and to become 
the property of the City of Boston if the 
proposal is not carried out. A duplicate 
bid, without check, must be left with the 
Auditor prior to the time for opening bids. 
Envelopes containing bids to be sealed and 
marked ■'Proposal for Loam." The successful 
bidder must furnish a faithful performance 
bond for one half the total estimated amount 
of the contract with a surety company au- 
thorized to do business in Massachusetts. The 
Purchasing Agent reserves the right to accept 
or reject any and all bids, or any part of a 
bid, and to award the contract as he deems for 
the best interests of the city. 



(Jan. 24.) 



John V. Moran, 
Purchasing Agent. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES DEPART- 
MENT, PURCHASING DIVISION. 



AUCTION SALES ADVERTISED 
FOR JANUARY 27, 1959, 
POSTPONED 
^YILL BE READVERTISED 
BEFORE SALE. 

Herman Carp, 
Commi.-isioner. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES DEPART- 
MENT. PURCHASING DIVISION. 



Proposals for Furnishing 150 Granite Gut- 

TERMOUTH EdGESTONES. 6 FEET LONG, TO 

THE Paving Division, Public Works De- 
partment. 

Proposals may be obtained at Room 53, City 
Hall. At this room the bids will be opened 
and read Thursday. February 5, 1959. at 12 M. 
The bidder must leave his proposal with a 
certified check for $100, payable to and to 
become the property of the City of Boston 
if the proposal is not carried out. A dupli- 
cate bid, without check, must be left with the 
Auditor prior to the time for opening bids. 
Envelopes containing bids to be sealed and 
marked "Proposal for Guttermouths." The 
successful bidder must furnish a faithful 
performance bond for one half the total esti- 
mated amount of the contract with a surety 
company authorized to do business in Massa- 
chusetts. The Purchasing Agent reserves the 
right to accept or reject any and all bids, or any 
part of a bid, and to award the contract as 
he deems for the best interests of the city. 

John V. Moran, 

(Jan. 24.) Purchasing Agent. 



Proposals may be obtained at Room 53, City 
Hall. At this room the bids will be opened 
and read Tuesday, February 3, 1959, at 12 M. 
The bidder must leave his proposal with 
a certified check for $100, payable to and to 
become the property of the City of Boston if 
the proposal is not carried out. A duplicate 
bid, without check, must be left with the 
Auditor prior to the time for opening bids. 
Envelopes containing bids to be sealed and 
marked "Proposal for Gas Mask Canisters." 
The successful bidder must furnish a faithful 
performance bond for one half the total esti- 
mated amount of the contract with a surety 
company authorized to do business in Massa- 
chusetts. The Purchasing Agent reserves the 
right to accept or reject any and all bids, or 
any part of a bid. and to award the contract 
as he deems for the best interests of the city. 

John V. Moran, 

(Jan. 24.) Purchasing Agent. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proposals for Furnishing Dry Goods to the 
City Departments. 

Proposals may be obtained at Room 53, City 
Hall. At this room the bids will be opened 
and read Tuesday, February 3, 1959, at 12 M. 
The bidder must leave his proposal with 
a certified check for $100. payable to and to 
become the property of the City of Boston 
if the proposal is not carried out. A dupli- 
cate bid, without check, must be left with the 
Auditor prior to the time for opening bids. 
Envelopes containing bids to be sealed and 
marked "Proposal for Dry Goods." The suc- 
cessful bidder must furnish a faithful per- 
formance bond for one half the total estimated 
amount of the contract with a surety company 
authorized to do business in Massachusetts. 
The Purchasing Agent reserves the right to 
accept or reject any and all bids, or any part 
of a bid, and to award the contract as he deems 
for the best interests of the city. 

John V. Moran, 

(Jan. 24.) Purchasing Agent. 



Proposals may be obtained at Room 53, City 
Hall. At this room the bids will be opened 
and read Wednesday, February 4, 1959, at 12 M. 
The bidder must leave his proposal with 
a certified check for $100, payable to and to 
become the property of the City of Boston 
if the proposal is not carried out. A dupli- 
cate bid, without check, must be left with the 
Auditor prior to the time for opening bids. 
Envelopes containing bids to be sealed and 
marked "Proposal for Crushed Stone." The 
successful bidder must furnish a faithful 
performance bond for one halt the total esti- 
mated amount of the contract with a surety 
company authorized to do business in Massa- 
chusetts. The Purchasing Agent reserves the 
right to accept or reject any and all bids, or 
any part of a bid, and to award the contract 
as he deems for the best interests of the city. 

John V. Moran, 

(Jan. 24.) Purchasing Agent. 



ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES DEPART- 
MENT, PURCHASING DIVISION. 



Proposals for Furnishing Toweling for the 
Parks and Recreation Department. 

Proposals may be obtained at Room 53, City 
Hall. At this room the bids will be opened 
and read Wednesday. February 4, 1959. at 12 M. 
The bidder must leave his proposal with a 
certified check for $100, payable to and to 
become the property of the City of Boston 
if the proposal is not carried out. A dupli- 
cate bid, without check, must be left with 
ihe Auditor prior to the time for opening 
bids. Envelopes containing bids to be sealed 
and marked "Proposal for Toweling." The suc- 
cessful bidder must furnish a faithful per- 
formance bond for one half the total estimated 
amount of the contract with a surety company 
authorized to do business in Massachusetts". 
The Purchasing Agent resei-\'es the right to 
accept or reject any and all bids, or any part 
of a bid, and to award the contract as he 
deems for the best interests of the city. 

John V. Moran, 

(Jan. 24.) Purchasing Agent. 



CITY REECORI) 



Jan. 21 



ilRAioM KnuacT, 



I IIV (II IIOSMIN. 
HUSTON TKAKKIC COMMISSION. 



I.E.1 J. lUKKK. 

nwiN«M Uanagtr of tkt School CommilUe. 
(Jan. U.) 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 



NoTiCB TO Taxpayers. 

CITY Hall Annbx. 
Boston, Janiaby 1, 1959. 
RKTi'iKa MIST Bb Maok On or Brtore 

Jani:ary S\, 1959. 
TartleuUr attrntlon U called to the As- 
iwuon' notire poated upon City Hall and 
varioua other placca throushout the city rel- 
ative to makins retura> on personal property 
tubject to taxation. 

Earui R. Barnarp, 

A—euor. 

(Jmi. 10.17.14.11.) 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



il R.w>m 5S. City 
■A 1 he opened 
at 12 M. 
.1 with a 
'< and to 
> . ..f Bnnton 
■ 1 .1-.. A dupli- 
• be left with the 
f ir opening bids, 
•o bo sealed and 
i^'.rial Chemicala." 
niiint furnioh a 
f if one half the 
•h. r .ntract with 
111 bualneH 
AKcnt re- 
• any and 
1 to award 



John V. Moran. 
/'Mrr>i<i«iii0 Agent. 



KKUI'LATIONS. 
.nd Revula- 
;imended an 



i\. S«-c'.u.n .(. I'arl 2 ( I'rjhibition 
I , in amended by irnicrtins in ita 

. .. in the alphabetical arranKcment 
oapliun "Brirtton" each of the 

Road. 

>ide, from Poller »lre*t to Lake 
.8 A.M. to 6 P.M. 

riibered aide, 8 A.M. to 6 P.M. 

Section 3, Part 2 (Prohibition 
I. in amended by inaertinK in its 
>■ in the alphabetical arrannement 

ripUon "Roxbury" the followins: 

.N r ti side, from Hishland street to Lam- 
birt avenue, 24 hours. 
Article IV, Section 3. Part 2 (Prohibition 
of I'arkinK), is amended by insertinK in its 
proper place in the alphabetical arranKcment 
under the caption "West Roxbury" the fol- 

Wood»ide Avenue. 

South side, from Washinirton street to 
Forot Hills street, 8 A.M. to 6 P.M. 
Article IV, SecUon 5, Part 3 (Restrictions 
in Five Cent Parkinit Meter Zones), is 
amended by strikine out the following: 
Avery Street, Boston Proper. 

South side, from Tremont street to Wash- 
inifton street, 9.30 A.M. to 6 P.M. 
Temple Place, BoBton Proper. 

South side, from Tremont street to Wash- 
inglon street 9.30 A.M. to 6 P.M. 
Wcirt Street, Boston Proper. 

Northeast side, from opposite the south- 
easterly street line of Mason street to 
Tremont street, 9..Sfl A.M. to S P.M. 
Article IV A, Section 4. Part 2 (Prohibition 
of Parking in Downtown Boston), is amended 
by strikini; out the following;: 
.Avery Street. 

North side, from Tremont street to Wa.sh- 
inirton street, 7 A.M. to 6 P.M. 
Temple Place. 

North side, from Tremont street to Wash- 
inirton street, T A.M. to 6 P.M. 
West Street. 

Northeast side, from Washinirton street 
to opposite the soulhea»tcrly street line 
of Mason street, 7 A.M. to 6 P.M. 
Article IV A, SecUon 4, Part 2 (Prohibition 
of Parkins in Downtown Boston), is amended 
by insertinK in its proper place in the alpha- 
betical arranKcmcnt each of the followinn: 
Avcr>' Street. 

Both sides, from Tremont street to Wash- 
inicti'n street, 24 hours. 
Temple Place. 

Both sides, from Tremont street to Wash- 
ington street, 7 A.M. to 6 P.M. 
W«t Street. 

Northeast side, from Washinirton street to 
Tremont street, 7 A.M. to e p.m. 
Article V, Section 1 (One-Way StreeU), 
is amended by striking out the following : 
Franklin Street. Boston Proper. 

From Congress street to India street. 
Article V, Section 1 (One-Way Streets), 
is amended by inserting in its proper place 
in the alphabetical arrangement under the 
caption ••Boston Proper^' the following: 
Franklin Strfct. 

From Fe<lcral street to India street. 
Article V, Section 1 (One-Way StreeU). 
is amended by inserting in its proper place 
in the alphabetical arrangement under the 
caption ••Brighton" the following: 
Strathmore Road. 

From Commonwealth avenue to Knglewood 



\ . \ 1. .-^.c-lion lU (Left Turns Pr..- 
hiiir.".)i. i- animded by inserting in it« proper 
place in the alphabetical arrangement under 
the csption ■•Dorche»ter^^ each of the follow- 
ing: 

Blue Hill Avenue. 

Into River street, caatcrly. 
Cummins Highway. 

Into River street, easterly. 
Article VI. SecUon 11 (Only Right Turn 
.Mavementa Permitted), is amended by in- 
serting in its proper place in the alphabetical 
arrangement under the caption "•Dorchester" 
the following: 

River Street, Eaatbound. 

Into Blue Hill avenue, southerly. 
ArUcle VI, SecUon 14 (U Turns Prohibited ) , 
is amende*! by inserting in its proper place 
in the alphabetical arrangement under the 
caption "•Uorchcster" the following: 
Blue Hill avenue. Southerly. 

To Blue Hill avenue, northerly, at River 
street. 

Article VII (Exclusion of Vehicles), is 
amended by adding the following new section: 
Section 3A. Exclusion of Vehicles from Pub- 
lic Ways Designated as Pedestrian Malls. 
Vehicles are excluded from the following 
streets on all business days from 11 A.M. to 
3 P.M., except that this exclusion shall not 
apply to commercial vehicles making deliverio 
to or collections from business premises in 
the area: 

Temple Place, Boston Proper. 

From Tremont street to Washington street. 
West Street, Boston Proper. 

From Washington street to Mason street. 
A true excerpt from the minutes of the 
January 9, 1959, meeUng of the Boston Traffic 
Commission. 
Attest: 

W. T. Doyle, 

Deputy Committioner and Secretary. 
(Jan. 24.) 



PROPOSAUS for FfRNI.SHING NEWSPRINT PAPKK 

IN Packages and Blocks for Bosto-n 
Public Sciioois. 
The School Committee of the City of BosUin 
invites bids for furnishing and delivering at 
the several school buildings, in accordance 
with orders, newsprint paper in packages anil 
bl )cks. Proposal forms are ob'i.ainable at the 
ofTice of the Business Manager of the School 
Committee, tenth floor. 15 Beacon street. En- 
velopes con'taining pr.jposals must be sealol 
and pla.inly marked "Proposal for Newsprint 
Paper."' The bid must be in duplicate. One 
copy, signed by the bidder, and accompanied 
by a certified check for two hundred dollars 
(*2»n). payable to the City of Boston, must 
be left at the office of the Business Manager 
on or before twelve o'clock noon on Tuesday, 
February 10, 1959. C.'pics filed with the 
Business Manager will be publicly opened and 
read at twelve o'clock noon of the day stated. 
The other copy, also signed by the bidder, 
must be filed with the City Auditor. City Hall. 
Boston, Mass.. previous to the lime named 
for the opening of bids. The School Com- 
mittee reserves the right to reject any or 
all bids and to accept such bid or part of 
bid as may be deemed best for the interests of 
the city. The successful bidder will be re- 
quired to furnish a suitable bond or deposit of 
money or other security in the amount of 
not less than 50 per cent of the amount of 
the contract. 

Leo J. Burke, 
Btuinemi Manager of the School Committee. 
(Jan. 24.) 



CITY RECORD 

Official Chronicle of Boston Municipal Affairs. 

Vol.51 Saturday, January 31, 1959 No. 5 

MORE U. S. URBAN RENEWAL FUNDS SEEN 



Mayor John B. Hyiies is pinning his hopes for 
long-range continuance of Boston's urban renewal 
program upon the passage by Congress during its 
current session of the so-called Sparkman Bill 
(S.57). 

Under this bill, Boston would receive its propor- 
tionate share of the following program of federal 
assi-stance : 

1. A six-year $350 million annual capital grant 
authorization for urban renewal. The Housing 
Administrator would ha\e the authority to in- 
crease the grants by SI 50 million in any one year. 
The current fiscal year, 1959, would be included in 
the six-year period, and funds authorized would 
become available to the Administrator immediately 
upon enactment. 

2. Authorization of an additional $8 billion in 
FHA mortgage insurance. 

3. Extension of the termination date of the un- 
used portion of the 1956-1957 public housing au- 
thorization to '60 and '61, respectively, and author- 
ize an additional 17,500 new units of low-rent public 
housing to remain available until July 1, 1963. 

Mayor Hynes received personal assurances this 
week from the Sparkman subconunittee, which is 
now considenng the bill for the United States 
Senate, that the measure is moving along in a most 
encouraging manner. A committee spokesman 
pointed out to the Mayor that, since Congress 
failed to enact legislation on the subject last year, 
the question shall be considered a matter of "un- 
finished business which will be quickly enacted and 
forwarded to the President for his signature." 



The current federal legislation, if passed, would 
enable Mayor Hynes to give priority consideration 
to the South Cove and Mattapan renewal plans, 
which have already passed the preliminary stage; 
to have whole sections of the city, such as the South 
End and lower Roxbury officially declared urban 
renewal areas where federal funds would become 
available for planning studies, and spot renewal 
projects, and where FHA money would be placed 
at the disposal of property owners to improve whole 
neighborhoods. 

Last year the so-called Sparkman Bill failed of 
enactment in Congress by a narrow margin. The 
legislation this year is essentially the same bill. 

Under the provisions of state legislation the city 
is now empowered to borrow several millions of 
dollars for urban renewal purposes. It is the policj- 
of Mayor Hynes, however, to plan the city's pro- 
gram on the basis of federal assistance. He will 
i-ecommend city borrowing only as an adjunct to a 
highly-feasible, federally-aided project or in a 
particular instance where city borrowing is the only 
source of funds for the achievement of what is well 
recognized as an immediately necessary objective. 

Mayor Hynes, and the mayors of most of the 
nation's large cities are seizing every opportunity 
to stress the need for early action on the Sparkman 
Bill and of authorizing sufficient funds for urban 
renewal to eliminate the Eisenhower Administra- 
tion's present rationing formula and to permit 
cities to go forward in their plans with confidence 
that funds will be available when the plans are 
completed. 



INDHX TO 
CITY HALL 



LA ytm 

AKMIMSTKATIVK SKRVICra 

5lh floot 

Aiiminiatrmlirr l)ivim>ii 

I'rrannnrl DiviMoti 
I'urrKamni Ihvmon 

(Mtirr Murhinc Krpiiir l ull Hwmrnl 

Al UlTINf; ""<" 
llilU aiMl AfT»Mjm* 

I IT\ I I I II K .f"<l 
H. .nril a|.|.r ) 



( , < ' • I 'ounril it|>|>r ) 

J. in.il i«|i|ir ) 

' ■ ) 

M,. I -I I . i; ii- iCdiiiiril a|>|>r ) 
Suiiilat S|iurU (Cuiinril >|i|ir ) 

CITY (Ul NCII- 4tli Ho<.r 
Clrrk o( Cominitlrrp 
Counnl <"ommitl<T« 

(UnftiUr Wrrklv MrrlinicK. MoiKlavn. 

2 r M ) 

CITY MIJWKNfJKIt 4th floor 

Cily I)ocumml» 

CITY UKCOUI) . aril floor 
C»»Mri.AINTS DIVISION 2ml flmir 

CKKDIT IMON :»rd floor 

City i;m|>lovr«« 

MA\<>lt S tiKKICI. 2ii<lft.Mir 

IIOOR X <»M< >. TKI KI IKINK I.A:l I UN) 

rul.lir Olpl.nilioni. 2ii<l floor 

I jilrrtainmrnt I.jrrniMTi Mrd floor 

Nnrnhoy* (Hoalon Common) 
nii;SS IKKIM :tr<l n.mr 

UlTlltKMKNT HOAUl) :tr.lfloor 
Till ASl UY DIVISION . iKt floor 

CITY HALL ANNEX 

I A i 5100 

:inl llcHir 



THE PRINCIPAL MUNICIPAL SERVICES 



Tclrphonc 
ASSI-SSINt. 

Alwtrmont IVlilioiin 

K^I^Tftx™" 
mil.DlNC. . 
A|>|inilK - lliiildiiiK Ccxlr 
ApitrnU XoniiiK l>nw 
lliiililinit IVrmiti" A l'Un» 
Dpmnlitioii rrrmil* 
l lrrtrirnl ln>tallnli»n» 
l ilrvnior ( )|MTiitorK 
(fiirax<°'. I.iilirilnriiimi> A l(i.'|i: 
( iiut liirtnll»liimn 
llmtmf InrtailnlKiiia 
<>Iirn Air I'nrkmK SparrK 
riiimliinK InnlailntionK 



rul.lir Snfpl; 
Commitlrf on Lirrnw 

(^)I,I,r.(TIN(; DIVISION 
Muniniwl I.irti» 

T»« Collrrllonii 

II.KTION 

Votmg ( 'rrtifirntin 
\ i>lm( Uf^nlrntiiiii 

I'i;nai. instititioxs . 



I'l.ANNINC llOAltD IlU) floor 

^onm( Ailju«tin™u 
/mntng Map* 
IM HIIC Wf)UKS 

. -HHi 5Ui floor 

6Ui floor 
5th floor 

^ \ llrfuun 

IWrnil o«i'-<> 41 h Boor 

Slrrrl < >mi|»anri<-» 

i'nijiN-tionii iivrr HiKhwaya 

Nlilrwalk IjrpnWTi 
S.'iiiiUry Diviibon 5th flwir 

(iarlHirxp A Ruliliinh C^illiH-tionH 
Sf»<-r Divimon 7th fliwir 

Si'urr Kntraii"- r<-rmiti> 
SmitrT I.i<iiiTiN<; 

Survey Divimon 4lli floor 

Stm-I Arrrplaniin 

Sir.-. ! Linn. 
\V:it<-r Divimon filh floor 

Mi'l'T ItrniliiiK 

rulilir lmpn>vi-m)'nl Commimion 

4th floor 

Ui:\l. I'KorilltTV «th floor 

l-..r.-. lo«-.l K< :il l>t.ili- 
Miirk.l« 

orT-Sln-cl I'arkinK 
I'uhlic HuililinKK 
Ki;(;lSTKY DIVISION 10th floor 

Mirthx. DralhH A Marriage 
Certifiraten 

WKICHTS a MKASrUICS iBt floor 

Measuring DeviecM 
WOUKMI'.N'S COMI'KNSATION 

7lh floor 

OUTSIDE CITY HALL 

CIVIC imi*|{ovi;vii;nt committkk 

14 St.ile Sln'< l I. A :! 1 10(1 

Civil, DKKI'.NSi; III 2 :«>20 

1 15 Southampton Street 
I)I:M0I,ITI()N (C.. iM r:il) 

14 Slate Street l,A .i 1100 

KINANCK COMMISSION I. A :Mf.22 

21 Seli<K)l Stri-et 
KIIIK HI 2 8000 

1 15 Southampton Stni'l 
I'lammnhle A Kxplonivr Maleri.ils 
I'lii'l Oil Murners A Storage 
Irispeilidns 

l iri' Alarm IIeaili|uarlon> 

l enway . KK ti 1100 

iii;ai,tii , ca 7-i;hio 

I lay market Sipian- 
lliirial Permit* (Nights, City Hospital) 
I )unip Permits 
I'ror.rii Desserts l.ii^sra 



CITY RECORD 



PuMuhrd wrrkly 



Mayor, in accordsncr 
and city ordinance. 



TlloMAji F O Da 
r. NlCHoi 

EnrRMlAL Omn. Room ii, city Hall. 
Entered aa accond claaa maltrr at Boatoi 



STREET AGENCIES. 
OM South Nrwa Stand. OM South 
o aubway. AI>o Newa SUnd. Brat floor. 



AdvcrtiainK. 
A rate of •« per inch of 12 linn 
haa been eatabliahed for iiuch adv 

Reeortl. Advertiainic and other copy i 
in hand by i r.U. Wrdneoday of each 
inaure ita publication in the Saturday 



Kuneral Direclom Licenses 
(iarbagp Transport IVrraits 
liaiA'keni A I'etldlcrs Licenses 
Health IMuratioii Lalioratory 
Health SUtislies Milk I.irensen 
Health I'nila MoteU 
UO&VITAU 

RI8 Harrison Avenue KK • 

I jisl Ikiston Relief Station 

14 Porter Street . U) 7 ;>i.(«) 
l/)ne Island Hospital . PR3-i:S71 
Sanatorium 

24".( Uiver Street . HL 8 790<l 
IIOI Si: OF COUIUXTION OC .1 270(1 

Deer Island 
llorSINC. ArTIIOIlITY 

( leneral ( Kliees, ZiO C/Ongress Street 

Applieations, 141 MilkSt. U 2-645il 
l,A\V LA 3-6200 

I I Itearan Street 

LIHUAUV Ki; 0-5400 

Copley S<iuarc 
LICKNSINt; HOARD CA 7 2170 

24 Provinrr- Street 

.Mcoholie Iteverages 

Automatir Amusement Devices 

IJowling All. ys 

Chili Licenses 

Common VictuallcrB 

Kmplovment Agencies 

Hotels 

lx>dging Houses 
Pool Rooms 
Shooting (iallcries 
MORTCARV 

818 Harrison Avenue KK 6-C767 
KK G-676S 
NKICIIHOKHOOD RKHABILITA 
TION COMMITTKICS 

14 State Street LA 3-1100 
PARKS A RKCRKATION CA 7-6940 

:j:i licaeon Street 
He:tch and Pools 
Cemeteries (City-ownetl) 
( lolf Courses 
Parkways Occupancies 
Playgrounds 
Public Baths 
Trees 

I'OLICK Ki; 6 f.7()(i 

154 Berkeley Street 
Atictioneers Hackney.': 
Bicycles Junk Dealers 

Dogs Pawnbrokers 
Kirearms I'sed Cars 

Wagon A Hand Carts 
PUINTINC SKCTION LA -.i^im 
174 .North Slre<'l (Sireel Books) 

ri;i)i:vi:lop.mi:nt acthokitv 

73 TremonI Street . UI 2-0500 
I'rhan Renewal 
SCHOOL Bl ILDINOS. 
Board of Commissioners of 
26 Norman Street . . CA 7-5750 
SCIKKIL CO.MMITTKIC 

15 Beacon Street . CA 7-5.500 
Bootblacks, Newsbovs (12 16 years) 

45 Myrtle Street ". . CV 7-5500 
TRAKKIC hi 2 7700 

1 12 Southampton Street 
l/oading Zones Parking Meters 
Traffic Signals Parades 

VICTKRANS' GRAVICS la 3 4005 

14 SUtc Street 
VKTERANS' SERVICKS RI 2 46C0 

18 Comhill 
WKLFARI; . CA ,7 8320 

43 Haw kins Street 
.\id lo De|>endenl Children 
Chardon Street Home 
Cenerjtl Relief 
Disability Assistance 
Old .\ge .Assistance 
Permits for Street Solicitations 



lAS 31 CI TY REC ORD 103 

MODERN BUSINESS TECHNIQUES IN MUNICIPAL OPERATIONS 



Methods of putting niunifipal 
operations on a more solid business 
basis were discussed on one of the 
-ix panel sessions at the Annual 
Conference on ^Municipal Adminis- 
tration held at the Boston Public 
Library. March 20-21, 1958, at- 
tended by some 350 key city em- 
ployees. 

Charles M. Evans, head of a 
Boston management engineering 
firm, was the moderator of the 
panel. 

The panelists, and the subjects 
they discussed, were as follows: 

Donald F. Cotter. Bales Man- 
ager. New England Telephone \- 
Telegraph Company; subject, "Sav- 
ings Through Modernized Tele- 
phone Operations." 

.John J. Connors, First Assistant 
Collector-Treasurer, Treasury De- 
partment, City of Boston; subject. 
"Central :Maiiing Unit." 

John V. Moran, Purchasing 
Agent, City of Boston; subject. 
"Addressograph Operations. ' 

Arthur E. Feenan, Account Rep- 
resentative, Remington Rand Com- 
pany; subject. "I'nivac 60." 

REMARKS OF MODERATOR 
By Charles M. Evans 

The subject assigned to this 
panel for discussion might well be 
applied to the period we have just 
enjoyed. The coffee break appears 
to have become an established in- 
stitution in our daily work routine. 

Some of us may be inclined to 
resist revised methods and proce- 
dures, particularly if we are not 
certain as to their impact on our 
own particular jobs but I believe 
that I am on reasonably safe 
ground when I state that the coffee 
i)reak has come into general ac- 
ceptance as a comptiratively recent 
phenomenon in the conduct of the 
daily work of business and govern- 
ment. 

My staff has dug up for me the 
information that, in 1957, industry 



This is the complete report of 
the third of six panel discus= 
sions at the Third Annual Mu= 
nicipal Conference. 



in this country spent over $7,000,000 
for coff'ee alone. They did not fur- 
Tiisli me with this information with 
respect to government installa- 
tion-. 1 a-->ume, Mr. Feenan, that 
it would n (iuire one of your king- 
sized rni\acs in order to compile 
this particular statistic. 

On the more serious side, modern 
business techniciues are being ap- 
plied to three well defined areas, 
as management seeks to ascend the 
heights and attain tiie Himalaya 
of success which Doctoi' Hagan, 
Dean of the College of liusines- 
Adnunistration of lj()>ton Univer- 
sity, outlined to us at the luncheon 
meeting yesterday. If you will 
refer to the diagi-annnatic presenta- 
tion of elenu'iits of managing 
which Doctor liagan distributed at 
tliis meeting. I tiiink you will note 
that each of these areas i)l;iys an 
important part in the mechanism 
winch begins with the establish- 
ment of objectives and cairies 
through to the measurement of re- 
sults. 

Environment Helps 

The three particular areas might 
be defined as those relating to in- 
creasing employee jiroduction, 
streamlining otlice methods and 
proci'<lnres, and substituting ma- 
chine metliods for hand operation-^ 
in order to comi)ile the data which 
is requircfl as a sovmd management 
tool. 

We are aware of current think- 
ing, which is being reflected in the 
construction of modern ofiice build- 
ings, wliich seeks to rvvMv the en- 
\-ironinent that will mcrease cm- 
]-)loyee efficiency. I recently had 
the opportunity to tour the new 
home office building of one of the 
large life insurance companies lo- 



cated on a 70-acre tract just out- 
side of fiartford. The architects 
and engineers had to the casual 
eye incorporated every modern de- 
vice for improved lighting, both 
natural and artificial. The build- 
ing is completely air conditioned, 
the interior decoration of all areas 
inclufles the color schemes that 
])eople who specialize in this type 
of thing tell us will reduce em- 
])loyee fatigue, background music 
soothes the employee as he per- 
forms his various tasks, whether 
they be filing documents or render- 
ing an opinion on an involved tax 
case in the office of the general 
counsel. 

These various features which un- 
questionably have resulted in a far 
larger capital investment than 
would have been required had the 
iiuilding been constructefl accord- 
ing to standards prevalent twenty- 
five years ago seek to recover the 
individual productivity per em- 
jjloyee that had declined as a re- 
sult of the company's reduced 
work week, increased vacation al- 
lowances, more liberal sick leave 
benefits, and the various so-called 
fringe benefits with which we are 
familiar and which have resulted 
in less time that the employee 
spends on the job for which he is 
hired. 

Physical Features 

1 was extremely interested to 
learn that the careful and detailed 
studies prepared for the manage- 
ment of this particular company 
])iior to the planning of the new 
l;ome office building indicated that 
the installation of the particular 
physical features which I have 
mentioned and which create the en- 
vironmental working conditions 
that I have outlined pointed to the 
conclusion that the investment 
could be expected to result in em- 
ployee productivity comparable to 
that prevalent when the work week 
was forty hours. 



I U4 



CITY RE CORD 



Jan. 31 



AHfOiiniiiK that Uiih »»bjectivc if 
attained, the- inanaKPiiK'Ht of this 
parUiular m.-uratnf r«iinpany has. 
thm-forr. in tin- prfphiiinitiK of its 
l.( iiu- oHin- phiiil llif iiistalhi- 
tiiiii of itatuns that npnscnt 
rath«T an inn«)vation in oHicc huild- 
inK drsiRn i'ffi'rt<-<l csMntiallv a 
9 JHT r<'nt savinR in pay mil costs 
annually. I'm crrtain that tin- 
various Iratuns that haw Ik-ch in- 
(•«>r|»orat<(l into thr insurance 
huililniK tJiat 1 have inontiioned 
will receive cireful coiisideratitm 
hy ii\e city's IManninx Board and 
the architects and enKineers \vln» 
arc currently at work on the design 
<il Most«»n'- new city hall in the 
conteniplat«-d new novernnieiit 
center. 

I have taken the-e lew moment > 
III iliscuss the iMtti-nti.'d increase in 
employee pnuluetivity throunh 
cnnsidi'ratiijus relating to working 
ironment. My c«>lleagues on 
the panel will discuss with you the 
iictual attainments in this area 
that have heen .achieved through 
reviMHl meth(Hls and proccclure- 
aiid machine installations. 

Central Mailing 

The estahlishment of the central 
mailing unit was one of the early 
accomplishments of the Adminis- 
trativi- .S-rvicfs Department. Vou 
will Irani from Mr. Connors the 
\arious details governing the oper- 
ation of this service agency, the 
savings that it has accomplished, 
hut most unportant. its jxitential 
additional services which I am 
sure you will agree shouhl he ex- 
ploitcnl. »)nee they arc known to 
vou. 

^ ou will learn from Mr. Cotter 
the Telephone Company that 
III.' recently installed .automat ic 
dial int<'icomnHmication system at 
City Hall has givin the city the 
type of service which is currently in 
operation in over 80 \\cr cent of in- 
dustrial establishments, hanks, and 
in>^uranc«' companies in tlu" (Jreater 
Boston are;». I'm sure y«»u will he 
quite f.ascinated to hoar that this 
installation permits a suhst^tntial 



potential increase in the traffic load 
at the City Hall swit<-hl)oard de- 
spite tlie fact that the hoard itself 
is a five-position unit replacing a 
^even-IMl^ition manual switchboard. 

Mr. Moran. in whose division 
rests the respotjsibility for oper- 
ating the city's Printing Plant, will 
<xplain to you how the introduc- 
tion of addressograph e(iuipment 
has permitted the publication of 
the annual police and voting lists 
at a substantial reduction in man- 
hours and printing costs in com- 
|)arison with the former method 
which re(iuired the n-setting of ap- 
j)roxiiiiatcly five hundred thousand 
iiamo (a'ii year by the monotype 

Univac 

1-inally. Mr. Feenan will explain 
to you the working of the Univac 
installation which his company has 
recently (•omi)letcd in the office of 
the City .\uditor. This installation 
is currently being used by both the 
Asse.^^sing and the Auditing De- 
partments and you will be ex- 
triniely interested to learn that 
plans are currently under way to 
ojjerate the e(iuipment as a service 
unit for all dei)artments. There- 
fore, as Mr. I'eenan explains the 
eciuipment. you can perhaps visu- 
alize various operations that your 
(>wn j)articular department might 
be able to turn over to the new 
Univac installation which i^ even 
now carrying automation into the 
work load of two of the city's ma- 
ior departments. 

I feel certain that when the 
speakers have delivered their mes- 
s;iges to you. you will agree that 
the City of Boston is giving recog- 
nition to the mechanization poten- 
tialities to increasi' worker pro- 
I'.uctivity. The Addres.M)graph and 
the Univac installations may per- 
haps be regarded as pilot projects 
for the city. As they demonstrate 
their effectiveness. T think it is a 
fair i>resumption that we will see 
::dditional machine installations in 
(ther .agencies. Mr. Moran will, 
for example, unquestionably want 



to tell you the potentials of the 
addressograph eciuipment as a 
nu ans of ad()j)ting a revised billing 
procedure at the City Hospital. 

I 

Reports of Other Cities 

In this connection, it is inti n ot- 
ing to examine the extent of ma- 
chine installations in some of the 
communities where an earlier start 
may have been made. I am in- 
!(.rine<l that the city of Los An- 
geles, for example, has sixteiii 
punch card installations processiim 
such items as public works cost re- 
ports, criminal identification rei 
ords, payrolls, and jniblic housim 
rental bills. 

Los Angeles County report | 
seventeen electronic installation^ 
used to prepare tax rolls, record 
and index all legal documents, con- 
trol road maintenance co.-^ts, an- 
alyze traffic statistics, establish 
j)roperty lines, and prepare election 
notices as well as the biennial in- 
dex of voters. 

The New York City Transit Au- 
thority has established an elec- 
tronic processing center which is 
expected to save hundreds of thou- 
sands of dollars each year through 
complete ui)-to-the-minute inven- 
tory control over S20,000,000 worth 
of supplies scattered in sixteen 
warehouses and comprising some 
one hundred and ten different 
items. 

SAVINGS THROUGH MODERN- 
IZED TELEPHONE OPERATIONS 
By Donald F. Cotter 

It gives me great pleasure to 
take part in this panel discussion 
on "Slodern Business Techniques 
in Business Operations'' and more 
s|)ecifically to speak on "Savings 
Through Modernized Telei)lioiie 
(Operations." 

Veiy recently we installed an 
automatic dial intercomniunic.i- 
tion system at the Boston City 
Hall. A system similar to those 
that are in use in over 80 per cent 
of our industries, banks, and insur- 
ance companies in the Clreater Bea- 
ton area. 



Jan. 31 



CITY RECORD 



105 



The seven-position manual 
-witchboard was replaced by a five- 
IHisition automatic dial system. 

I liis means that everyone usmg 
the i.00 telephones off this system 
jiKiy intercommunicate without the 

(--istance of the City Hall opcra- 
iiir.<; it also means that all unre- 
.-tricted telephone users may coni- 
])k'te outside calls without any aid 
from the operators. 

The first savings tliat we can 
realize appear at the switchboard 
itself. The station users will coni- 
plete over 90 per cent of their calls 
automatically with no help from 
the City Hall operators. Here 
again we see a major savings in 
time and money. There is no lost 
time after the connection is made 
to announce the call or to reach the 
station user that placed the call 
that we had to do under the old 
manual system. 

Restricted Phones 

A further savings will be realized 
because over 20 per cent of the tele- 
phones in the new system are re- 
stricted from using tlic automatic 
dial apparatus for outgoing calls. 
This means that if it becomes 
necessary for one of these restricted 
users to make an outside call it will 
be placed through the operator and 
may be questioned. Under the 
previous manual system a reciuest 
for "an outside line" was not ciues- 
tioned and tliis led to abuse and 
unnecessary message usage. There- 
fore under the new sy>teni a sav- 
ings in message usage should re- 
^ult. 

Witli the manual switchboard 
which the City Hall used for many 
years it sometimes became im- 
possible for the operator to handle 
calls promptly because of the 
heavy telephone usage. ^Yith the 
new dial system the calls are 
handled rapidly even at busy 
times. This is because the dial 
machinery is absorbing the major 
share of the increased tcleplionc 
traffic. 



A greater A-oluine of calls with 
no increase in number of operators 
can be had with a dial system. 
This is done by routing all outside 
calls directly to the Telephone 
Company central offices without 
the assistance of an operatoi'. This 
leaves the operators to handle only 
incoming calls and certain long 
(listtmce calls. 

Automatic Brain 

The dial system never sleeps. 
The automatic l)rain in the dial 
.->>tcni >i)ec(ls your calls to their 
(k^tination within seconds after 
you have finished dialnig. h^ven 
at night, when the switchboard is 
unattendeil, calls may I'eacii tlieir 
destination l)y a simi)le night con- 
lection at the switchboard. The 
machine ringing of the dial system 
will carry on undei' llea^•y t rathe 
loads for long [)eriods of time and 
is not subject to fatigue which af- 
lects ])ersonnel on a manual system. 

Into this dial ^ystem can be in- 
corporated additional features sucli 
as dial dictation trunks which 
mean that by dialing a certain 
code a >tation user may be brought 
into a dicta.tini^ machine, one of 
many in a jiool or secix'tarial sec- 
tion. This also is a savings, in 
that many tlepartment heads and 
^upervisors haw access to imme- 
diate dictating lacilities without 
the cost of a full-time secretary. 
This is a feature which will l)e in- 
vestigated lor aiiplication in the 
near future at City Hall. 

A Master Directory 

It is anticijiatecl that in the fu- 
ture most of oui' municipal depart- 
ments will be inti'i-connected l)y 
direct lines between dial systems 
^0 that all city agencie> may inter- 
communicate with one another 
without the use of switchboard 
(>perators in any manner. This 
will be done by luning a master 
directory whicli will list all depart- 
ments and personnel in municipal 
government throughout the City of 
Boston. Let us vistialize the time 
and money which will l)e saved 



with this network of direct lines 
o\cr which thousands of calls 
which were previously pa.ssed man- 
ually through city-employed oper- 
ators now will l)e completed by the 
use of the dial apparatus. The in- 
stallation of the new dial system 
at City Hall Annex is another step 
toward- this tioal. 

Modi'in municipal governments 
are growing' and with their com- 
l)le.\ operation it has l)een necessary 
to adopt administrative mechani- 
zation whicii ])arrallek modern in- 
ilustrial i)lants. Beai'ing these 
llioughts in mind it is logical to 
have the ('ity of Boston adopt 
modern telephone tecliniciues and 
((|iiipnient which will do the job 
better and be moi'e economical 
lioin e\'ery \'iewi)oint. 

(lood telei)lione service doesn't 
tirow. It ha- to be planned. It has 
to be en<iip.eered to fit the recpiire- 
uieiit- of the user. The telephone 
is a tool winch directly affects pro- 
duction, ])l:;nning, and administia- 
tion. Its \ alue dejiends uj)on how 
well it fits the job. 

The virtue of the telephone as a 
communication iiie(linm lies in the 
fact that it is practically instan- 
taneous — it saves time. It is this 
time saving multiplied by all the 
opi)ortunities for saving time in the 
user's operations which represents 
tlie elKcieiicy gained and which re- 
sults in l)etter administration 
w iietlier it l)e industry or municipal 
government. 

CENTRAL MAILING UNIT 
By John J. Connors 

If modern business tecliniciues in 
municipal opei'ations were ever 
needed, it iii I lie liandling of 

(utgoiiifi mall, iiiteidepartmental 
correspondence, and po>taue of 
city dei)artnients. A few years auo 
interdepartmental correspondence 
required going to the Mayt)r's of- 
fice and the Auditor's olhce. ;uid 
reciuisitions for postage stamps to 
the bookkeeping section of the 
Auditor's office and eacli deiiart- 
ment did its own mailing. Cosl< 



I«6 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. :;i 



- ; -tag'- f«tainpi* kept mountinR 
If Id KUrh nn extent that 
iiiK lm«l to U- <I«»IM' to fon- 
tri>l ilirir um- ami liriim the ^o^tf 
down to 11 n'awmaWe hRUre. So, 
on AuKU-t I. 1955. Mr. Cliarle?- 
F«ix. then Dinrtor nf .\«lnnni!«tra- 
U\v S rviri-.. e-l;ihh.-lieil :i Centra! 
MaihoK I'liit. where all inatten- 
pcniiininn <«' •»"'•■ eorref^lMHuienee. 
• vce t«taini»« W(»ul(l Ik- at one 
then-by >avinit a eUrkV 

. II time. The Colleetinn 

DiviMon tif the Treasury Depart- 
ment IninK till larKe>t inailiriK de- 
partment in tin- eity :in«l Ineause 
of artain Matutiiry afluiavit n- 
•luirements of the Tax Colleetcir. 
retcanliiiK 'latere of niailinK oriKinal 
hilN. demands, etc.. it wa.«i deeidi-il 
the unit iKHHime a part of the Col- 
lerting I)ivi>ion. loeatinl on the 
Neninii f1<Hir of the Annex. At the 
tune, one flrrk tlid all our mailing. 
With the e»talili.<hment of the imit. 
an<»ther elerk wa.-* added and with 
the-e two < kTks all mail and cor- 
n>|)ondenre is handled for the en- 
tire city, a mo^t cHii ient and lahor- 
«avinK way of haiidlinn these 
matters. 

The unit's iX's|)on>il)ililies are 
threefold: 

1. To handle .all outuoinu mail 
lor de|»artm»'nts located in City 
Mall and the .\nnex. 

2. To handle re(|uisitions for 
po^taRe of de|)artments out-ide 
( 'ity Hall and the Ann»'X. 

3. To han<lle all interile|)art- 
mental rorresp«indenee arising in 
any city or county olFice. 

Outgoing Mail 

Thi- is mail received fn)m de- 
partmentfi in City Hall and the 
.Vnni'X. rcfuiiring postage niet<T im- 
pro-ioiis. I Not mail .alrea<ly lu ar- 
ing jiostage stamps ! .\11 mail de- 
p»isited with the unit must he ac- 
mmpanieil hy a p«istaKe voucher 
preparni in duplicate-. Depart- 
ments de|Mi>iting mail will fill out 
the area on the vou«-her above the 
double line. When this mail is 
proresMHl, the unit will coniplcte 



the n-maining <letail (tn th<- vouch- 
<-r giving the readings of tin- met-er 
at the U-gmning and the end of the 
run and by subtrai-ting one fr<Hn 
tin- other, the amount of |>ostage 
us<-<l for that run. returning tin- 
original |M)stag(- vouclu-r to the de- 
partment. .\t the end of the 
month, the unit sends an invoice t<» 
each di-partment. showing the 
anioimt due the unit and re<|U(-sting 
a -taiidard invoice be sent im- 
mefliately. so the unit »-an jm-pari- 
a s|M-cial draft, for approval by the 
.\uditor. for reimburs<'ment of its 
monthly expenditure of meter j)ost- 
age. 

All envelo|H-s recpiiring postage 
should be submitted unsealed, with 
the envelope Haps placed over one 
another. If a department desires 
to .seal some of the enveloix-s be- 
fore giving them to the unit, they 
should be kept separate and prop- 
<ily faced. DifTen-nt size enve- 
lopes shoulil be k(-pt in a different 
bundh-. and mail of difTerent cate- 
gories such as special delivciy. 
i-egi>t(-red. certified, air mail, for- 
eign, seconil. third, fourth, and par- 
c(-l post should not be mixed with 
first class, regular mail. Mail of 
this special character should also 
be stamped with the category he- 
fore di-liv(-ry to the unit. 

Interdepartmental Mail 

This mail should he xgregated 
from the mail recjuiring iH)stage 
and so marked. Ck rks or mes.scn- 
gers making deliveries of this type 
niail shouKl also pii-k up any mail 
that may be on hand for his par- 
ticular department. 

Postage Requisitions 

City ;ind county oflices outside 
City Hall and Annex are allowed 
to r(-(|uisition postage stamps. 
These re(|Uests must be m\ a stand- 
ard inv(Mce fonn and accoin|)anied 
with a postage recjuisition. stating 
the numb«-r and denominations of 
stamps recjuired. These rcquisi- 
ticms will be filled immediately if 
our inventory is sufTicient. Otiier- 
wise. they will have to In- pur- 



<liased at the Post Dfhee and j)' 
f««-ated with a "13" before delivt i 
1 wiight say here, this is a slow aii 
costly process and certainly not a 
modern mailing procedure, when 
you consider stamjis must Ik- dainj)- 
ened and plae(-d on envelopes by 
hand. For those d(-paitmeiits 
tising |><»stag(- stamps for mail that 
i< to be returnefl to the (U-partment. 
such as daily activity n-jxtrts. a 
.statement should Ik- |)rinted (»n tlie 
uiV(-lojx- in accordance with Postal 
.Manual, Part 143.5. "no postage 
necessar> ". Postage has been |)r( - 
paid by XVZ Department and your 
address. TlK'>e envelopes could l)i 
run through the meter postage ma- 
chine, in whatever dentmiinat ion- 
needed, at the rate of 175 pi r 
minute. If postage is recjuested l)y 
a department having a meter ma- 
chine, a check will be issued for tin 
.'imount stated on your standard in- 
voice form. It is interoting lo 
note. po.stage savings for 1950 
amounted lo $7,500. an<l $8,000 lor 
1957. 

Machines L sed b> the L nit 
I have already told you that the 
j;ostage meter machine will place a 
meter stamp and seal the envelope 
at the rate (tf 175 per minute, in 
any denomination ie(|uired from 
( lie half a cent to nine dollars and 
ninety-nine cents. In cases where 
the envelope is too large to go 
through the machine or where post- 
age is required for pan-el post, 
will provide a sticky tajx- with i 
amount of postage ne(-essaiy. Sin 
the unit was established, we addi l 
in 1957. a folding machine and ii 
inserting machine. In a departnn ir 
.-imilar to the Collecting Division 
having a large folding or insert i' 
jiroblem. or both, hand operatic 
reach a substantial total of wn: 
hours per employee per day or 
week, a dull monotonous drudgei^ 
in short a costly headache. In n 
division this phase of mailing \\ 
j.lways a bottleneck in niailii 
800.000 original bills. At times 
used as many lus 40 employees 



Jan. 31 



CITY RECORD 



107 



,m t out the bills and with hand 
folding and one insert with the bill 
;ind interruptions we probably 
a\ craged between 125 and 150 bills 
\x r person per hour. 

Folding Machine 

This machine can fold paper 
sizes from 3 inches by 3 inches, to 
8^ inches by 14 inches, at the rate 
of about 80 sheets per minute, de- 
pending on the size, and can put 
two folds in an 8^- by 11 -inch sheet 
(regular letter paper I at the rate 
of 70 per minute, in one operation. 

Inserting Machine 

This machine opens the flaps and 
tln-oats of envelopes, inserts into 
them a bill or letter automatically, 
seals it, counts it. places a postage 
meter impression on it, stacks it, 
and gives you the amount of post- 
age used, in one continuous opera- 
tion, at the rate of 3,000 to 4,000 
per hour, depending on the number 
of inserts. It is cciuipped with 
electronic detectors, which auto- 
matically stop the machine if 
more than one bill, letter, or insert 
is picked up or the envelope is 
faulty, and a small light will go on. 
indicating where the trouble occurs. 
One operator only is retjuired for 
the machine. During the past year 
the following departments have 
made use of the machine for their 
own purposes: Collector's, Treas- 
urer's. Assessing. Water, and Fire. 
A good example of its speed and 
efficiency occurred last Spring 
when the Fire Department, with 
two of their own employees, who 
had never seen the machine before, 
inserted 97.000 punch card bills, 
with an insert for oil permits, in 
four and a half days, where before 
it took ten employees five weeks to 
do the same job. 

Future Planning 

In the not too distant future, we 
contemplate delivering interdepart- 
mental correspondence, and picking 
up outgoing mail from all depart- 
ments located in City Hall Annex. 
This service should be a savings 



both to the departments and the 
city. 

In closing, may I say, when the 
folding and inserting machines 
were purchased, it was wdth the 
understanding that they would be 
available to all departments, and 
with that in mind, I would bo 
happy to schedule your need.s for 
folding or inserting or both, when- 
ever the machines are not in use. 

ADDRESSOGRAPH OPERATIONS 
By John V. Moran 

The City of Boston is, I believe, 
the only major city in the United 
States required l)y statute to pro- 
duce an annual list showing persons 
in residence in the city as of Janu- 
ary 1 each year, and also to pro- 
duce in bulk form a voting list, a 
^upplementary voting list, and a 
second supplementary voting list 
each year. Other major cities oper- 
ating under laws of their particular 
.'-tate have no such requirement 
and have, in most instances, de- 
veloped more efficient means of ac- 
complishing the results obtained by 
the publication of these lists. This 
is merely another example of ob- 
solete legislation under which the 
City of Boston has been forced and 
is being forced to operate. 

500,000 Names 

Prior to 1956, these list compris- 
ing some 500,000 names were reset 
each year by a monotype process. 
In printing terms, as you may sur- 
mise, a monotype system means 
that each letter of each word is cast 
as a separate unit. Each year, af- 
ter the publication of the lists, this 
type was dumped and salvaged by 
remelting the lead alloy which was 
then reused for the casting of the 
new monotype. 

In view of the fact that the ma- 
jority of people in the city do not 
move to new addresses each year, 
it appeared in seeking means for 
economies in the operation of the 
city that this method of producing 



the lists was a repetitious waste of 
time. Accordingly, in 1956 the ad- 
dressograph system for producing 
these lists was installed in the 
Printing Section as a substitute for 
the letter press method of produc- 
tion. 

It is not my purpose at this time 
to take the position that the ad- 
dressograph system is the only or 
in fact is the most efficient method 
of producing these lists. I am sure 
that that question is moot. It is 
however my position that the ad- 
drcssograph process is a giant step 
:;way from the wasteful and ex- 
travagant method formerly used 
for production of these lists. The 
addressograph process uses plate 
units consisting of a metal frame 
into which is inserted a separate 
piece of metal bearing the em- 
bossed address or other informa- 
tion. The embossing is accom- 
plished by the combination of two 
(operations: first, the keyboarding, 
and secondly, the automatic or 
manual graphotyping. As the word 
implies, the keyboarding is a 
process similar to typing. How- 
ever, instead of a typed copy the 
keyboard produces a perforated 
paper roll similar in size to ticker 
tape with the perforations similar 
to perforations in the old player 
piano roll. The roll of perforated 
tape is then loaded into the graph- 
otype machine and as it feeds 
through the grapliotype automati- 
cally selects and embosses each 
letter, and when the plate is com- 
jjlete it is discharged from the 
grapliotype machine into a waiting 
tray. The embossed metal plates 
are then inserted into the metal 
frame and the proofs of the plates 
are run ofi on a special stock. 
These printed proofs are then in- 
^erted into a slot at the upper part 
of the frame and become the 
identification of that particular 
plate. The embossing produces 
raised letters printed through wide 
inked ribbon when pressure is ap- 
plied, and the results closely dupli- 
cate hand typing. 



108 



C I T Y RECORD 



Jan. 6\ 



St .,.,.. .if Plates 

iTil ill special 
1' «»ur f>>- 
U-in ol t uialonuinn or imU-xinn. of 
.MunT. follow* till- wait! ami pri- 
• Mucturi- of the t ity «j tlial 
irii pnrim t the plaU*.** art* 
lu .ih .mini alpliJilK-tically a-s to 
^tm■te ami nuiiuriially as to Una- 
tion on tlif particular stn'ct. Tlif 
platf!* in the City Print inn Library 
lint namiN adtlnss. .-ex, year of 
Itirtli. wanl and precinct, licinlit 
and iMtlitical designation. In addi- 
tion to tlii!< they are keyinl or 
tr.hlH'tl to indicate males over .<ixty- 
five years of age. noncitizens. |x>- 
litical ih>i)ination. and end of tray. 
The cml oi tray doi^niition is iin- 
|Miitant so that the plates will he 
refiUnl exactly as they were before 
the impressions were taken. 

It i> possible throUKh the use of 
these key- or tab> to select between 
hfty (')6i or sixty {&.)* difTerent 
ty|X's of information for transfer- 
tnce. An example of information 
|)ro<iuc«'d by such tabbing is that in 
the 1957 police list there were 
•J2.').32() nhilcs and 261.101 females, 
and in the 1957 voting list there 
were 211.234 ilemocrats. 35.olo re- 
publii ans. and 89.196 independents, 
liy this same process it is ixissible 
t«» rea<lily print a list of aliens or 
men over sixty-live, or lists of re- 
llectinn any dther type of informa- 
tion tiiat minht be desired simi)ly 
by tabbing or keying the plates. 

Advantages of Process 

There are many advantages to 
'ic !uldressogra|>h process: 

1. The embossed metal i)lates 
.ive consistently uniform results. 

2. Mistakt's are easy to correct 
u the graphotyiM' without discard- 
,g a |)late or a frame. 

3. The |)Iate is easily and abso- 
utely i«lentified by a |)rinted ])ro()f 
1 it.self maintained in the frame 

iiiiiking it easy to read, file and 
handle. 

4. lnformati(»n keys or tabs on 
•lates can be changed at any time 

ithdut luiikini: new pl.ites. 



'i. The njelal frames on the 
twi.-part plates can be reused with 
relatively sUiall cost for the newly- 
emljosse<i metal an-a. 

0. The metal plate is fire resist- 
ant and able to withstand water 
and lire-fighting chemicals. 

When the system was inaugu- 
rated in 1956 for a>*e on the police 
an«l voting listss. I believe 500.000 
of these plates were embossed 
based on information derived from 
the 1955 i)olice list and the 1956 
v.iting list. Due to the diHicultio 
associateil with the intnuluction 
and installation of new equipment 
anil the necessary time required to 
familiarize employees with the new 
imices.x. it was not until 1957 that 
the police list was completely proc- 
ts.siMl at the Printing Plant and it 
was this year. 1958. when the sys- 
tem really showed itself effective 
in the annual police list. The use 
of prei)rinted cards by police offi- 
cers in the 1958 police list con- 
tributed toward the reduction of 
a|)proximately fourteen (14) days 
from the usual time recpiired for 
this police assignment. In addition 
to tliis. there was obviously lts> 
likelihood of error or misinter])re- 
tation of information furnished in 
the handwriting of the various po- 
lice officers. In other words, it was 
only in those instances where there 
was a change of residence that any 
handwritten cards were reijuired. I 
have talked with several police of- 
ficials and police officers all of 
whom are enthusiastic in their 
praise of this revised system for 
taking the list of persons resident 
in Boston on .lanuarv 1, 1958. 

In the printing of the lists, the 
information contained on the plates 
is printed directly onto a so-called 
papiT master which is then at- 
tachcil to M multilith machine and 
the results are i)rimed directly 
from this pnper master. The plate 
is a j)ermanen( record of each in- 
dividual listed and requires no 
chiuige unless the information per- 
tinent to that |)erson changes. 
Tl I IV w ,,,, ri -cttitig of the type 



each year. This of course ma- 
terially reduces the possibility of 
(•rror in compiling the lists. 

Big Annual Saving 

W'hih- tiie initial investment in 
tiie addressograph and muttilitii 
e<iuipmenl was substantial amount- 
ing to a|)proximately $100,000. it 
has resulted in annual savings 
which do not fall far >hort of tiie 
amount of the initial investment. 
We estinnue the approximate re- 
duction in the cost of producing the 
\ari(»us re(juired lists is as follow>: 
police list. $25,000: voting Hm 
S25.000: poll tax. .?3.0()0: poli<. 
mailing service contract. 5>25.(K)() 
j)olice overtime in listing. $10.(MK 
or a total annual savings by thi 
method of repriKluction of approxi 
mately S83.000. In arldition f 
these savings, we have used tin 
multilith machines, which were pur 
( based in connection with this pmj 
ect. for many of the city's ovcr-al 
printing reciuirements which wen 
lornicrly produced by the lettcr- 
])i-c— ])roc(--. 

"UNIVAC 60" 
By Arthur E. Feenan 

The name UNIVAC is one that 
connotes many things to many 
people — automation, push-button 
magic. et<'. Recently the Xeir 
York Time.s (.\ugust 14 1 even 
(juoted the Russians as having in- 
vente<l UN I VAC. 

Actually UNIVAC is the name 
ajjpliefl to several different elec- 
tronic computing systems manu- 
factured by the Remington Rand 
Division of the Sperry Rand Cor- 
poration. Their differences can bt 
found ])rimarily in size, speed, ver- 
satility, and. of course, cost. 
UNIVAC I was the first successful 
large-scale general jnirpose elec- 
tronic computer available for gov- 
ernment and business. Subsequent 
to it. come the UNIVAC Scien- 
tific and UNIVAC II. Thes« 
UNIVAC systems are categorizec 
as large scale — in capacity anc 
cost. 



Jan. 31 



CITY RECORD 



109 



Computer System 

The UXIVAC file computer sys- 
tem is a medmm-scale electronic 
computing system featuring a va- 
riety of input, output devices anfl 
random access storage. 

The UNIVAC 60 computer is 
small scale as compared to those 
previously mentioned. It utilizes 
punched cards for input and out- 
put feeding at a rate of 9,009 cards 
per hour. Arithmetically it can 
do 360,000 additions or' sulnrai - 
tions per hour; 72,000 multiplica- 
tions or divisions per hour. How- 
ever, with such speed, there is an- 
other very important feature — 
each calculation is autdmatically 
verified by UXIVAC hcioie the 
computer proceeds to the next 
step. An illustration of this auto- 
matic verification is as follows: 

*Step: 10 + 15 = 2.5 

1 Automatically: 25 - 10 - 15 = 

Therefore, if there is a momen- 
tary component failure at any 
time causing an arithmetic error, 
UXIVAC will not check to zero 
and will repeat this step until it 
does check or until the component 
failure is corrected. 

Three address progranuning log- 
ic is used with the UXIVAC 60. 
An illustration of this logic for a 
step: 

V, ^X^ V, = R ^ - 

In other words, the UXIVAC 
operates just the way you and I 
think. 

The power and simplicity of this 
type of logic is best seen in the ex- 
perience of City of Boston em- 
ployees in the Auditing and As- 
sessing Departments who have ac- 
tually done some of their own 
programming. 

What UNIVAC is Doing for the City 

While UXIVAC has been in- 
stalled a very short time, the work 
that has been and is being accom- 
plished is substantial. 



Assessing Department 

Real estate valuation cards were 
computed by ward for subsequent 
production of the real estate tax 
hills. Xot only were the necessary 
computations made and totals for 
land, building, total valuation, 
total tax and total parcels estab- 
lished by ward, but each card was 
audited for accuracy as the (•(imi)u- 
tations were being made. UXIVAC 
automatically rejected for correc- 
tion any incorrect cards. This real 
estate comjuitation saved six ma- 
fhine and manual operations nec- 
essary under previous operating 
techniques. 

Appi-dxiniately 18,900 personal 
prdiuTty cards were computed by 
ward lor ^-ubseciucnt in'oduction of 
the personal property tax bills. As 
was the case in the real estate com- 
putation, not only were the tax 
computations made. l)ut. as tliey 
were i)roccssed. the individual 
cards were checked for acctu'acy. 
(Stock in trade plus machinery 
plus live stock phis all other — to- 
tal value. I UXn'AC automatically 
icjected for correction, any incor- 
rect cards. This computation saved 
six machine and manual operations 
necessary under previous operating 
techniques. 

In excess of 130.000 excise tax 
cards are now bcinsj,- iirocessod on 
UXIVAC. Xot only is the tax 
computation being made by con- 
trols for total value Init also total 
tax and total lulls are being es- 
tablished. 

For the Auditing Dept. 

Ai)proi)riation accounting is 
jn-esently being performed on the 
UXIVAC. Commencing the fiscal 
year 1959, it will be possible to 
produce a daily report for the whole 
city and each department by ac- 
count showing current balances to 
date on: expenditures, unliciuidated 
encunil)i-ani(-, ai)i)ropriatioii cred- 
its, unencunibered balance, and un. 
expende(l balance. This reporting 
should pro\-ide easier and better 
control. It is accomplished with 
no additional load of manual key 



jninching and the elimination of 
manual posting of ledger cards. 
Payroll 

For the year 1959, UXIVAC 
will summarize individual payroll 
cards to produce yearly summaiy 
cards for tlic production of W-2 
forms for the whole city payroll. 
This will save considerable tedious 
work for all departments. 

At the present time several other 
ajjplications are planned for 
UXR'AC. We are working on a 
program for the Planning Board 
covering involved statistical anal- 
y>es. For the Printing Depart- 
ment certain co>i reports will be 
in-oduced in lO.lU. 

UXIVAC located in the Au- 
diting 1 )e|iaitiiieiit. However, ]Mr. 
Laliy. the City Auchtor, has em- 
plia>ize(l that it is or can be a pro- 
ducti^•e tool for all departments. 
It is available for all departments. 
In order to assure the greatest pos- 
sible utilization of UNIVAC by 
the City of Boston, Remington 
Rand and I offer our services for 
the analysis of your i)roblems and 
their application to I'XIVAC. 

SUMMATION BY THE MODERA- 
TOR 

You have hearfl our four panel- 
ists explain what the City of 
Boston has accomplished in the 
introduction of modern l)usiness 
techniques in the conduct of the 
city's business. We hope that the 
report on what has been accom- 
plished to date will serve as an 
inspiration to the various operat- 
ing deinirtuients and agencies to 
take inventory of their various 
metln)ds and procedures with the 
thought that many of these might 
be mechanized with a resulting in- 
crease in employee productivity. 

The challenge is a very direct 
i>ne. It is unnecessary for me to 
comment on the city's payroll 
costs. The statistical ratios of va- 
rious categories of city employees 
JHT one thousand population, or on 
the basis of any valid statistical 
yardstick, and the comparative 
figures with other large cities have 
been the subject of considerable 



I I I) 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 31 



riffiit «lu«cu»wion between the ad- 
iiiini»trati«in ami various civic 
Kr..u|>f*, 

The city tuiininiotraliot) lias a< - 
i-c|»t(i| till- conclusion that pny- 
roll coftts sliouM U- rniuci-d antl 
tin- niniilKT u( |M»^i^ions l«nlK»"tc(l 
to carry on tin- various ^«•rvi^•cs tif 
• ' I lly slioulil In- (ii'(Tfa.-c<l. 

- icli reductions arc RoinR to be 

—ililc only by finding better 
luetlioils of perforniinn the work 
necessary to extern! to the citizens 
of the City of Boston those serv- 
ices which have ln-eii denmnded 
ami which are beinn n-ndered as a 
matter of |»oli<'y. 

luiprovt-nieiit in op»'ratinn meth- 
ods and the consi-<|iient reduction 
in budjieted jiositions need not l)e 
regarded as a potential tlireat to 
the siTurity of the conscientious 
city einployce in the position he 
occupies. Reductions that would 
|H-rmit the administration to ob- 
tain its desired objectives in i)ay- 
roll reductions may be accoin- 
jtlished by attrition, or in other 
words by the evolutionary j)rocess 
of permitting retirement to create 
vacancij'!* and by reviewing tiiesc 
vacancies as they develop to es- 
tabli.Kh the need for continuing the 
position. 

You liave been informed that 
the I'mviir and the Adilressogi apli 
iii.-tallations. together with tlie 
Central Mailing I'liit. are to be 
n-garded as service facilities which 
should l»e u.<ed increasingly by all 
city de|)artiuents and agencies. 

^ ou have heard of the improved 
telephone service in City Hall 
which has resulted from the new 
dial installation an<l the potential 
adclitional use which would jieniiit 
the city to operate a central cleri- 
t .'d ageni y to transcribe tlictation 
which Would !»«• received on an ad- 
ditional mechanical installalion 
ti«'d to the new iiitern.'d tclejihone 
system. 

I think we can all agree that 
real |)rogre.ss has been made in the 
introduction of accepted mechani- 
cal methods to streamline the pro- 



TOTAL WELFARE CASELOAD INCREASES 
SLIGHTLY DURING MONTH OF DECEMBER, 1958 

l'\»llowiiig is a summary of the Welfare Department report for 
DeeeinlK-r. 19.V1: 

' I'ublie A.ssi.staiH-e paymeiit.s amounted to S;i.(KH».727 during Decem- 
Ikt. M>.')H. The.se disbursements were as follows: Old Age A.ssi.stance. 
$l.702.')(il ; Aid to Dependent Children. $737,772; Di.sability A.ssi.stanee, 
$.374.3(»0. and General Ilelief. $192,034. The Deeemlx'r, 1958. cx- 
IM-nditures were $2S9.739 more than the previou.s month. Thi.s was 
due to the payment of certain types of me<jical e.xpen.ses which were not 
paid in Nf)vemlH'r. 1958. 

• Ca.seload increases amounted to 215 ca.ses in Aid to Dependent 
Children, Di.sability A.sfci.stance, and General Relief. However, Old 
Age AK.sistance decrea.sed 1 19 cases. The net result was a rise of 96 cases 
to a departmental total of 20,130 cases. 

* The primary reason for the ca.seload increa.se is due to the less of 
employment frf)m discharge and layoff. This is a seasonal factor which 
has been experienced by the department over the years. 

Direct and Indirect Expenditures by Categories 





Total 


Old Age 
Assistance 


Aid to 
Dependent 
ChUdren 


Disability 
Assistance 


General 
Relief 


Totai 


93,006,727 
{100^; ) 


91,702,561 

(56 6'- f) 


9737,772 

(24 5r,) 


9374,360 
(12 5%) 


9192,03.', 

{6.4%) 




I^irect Pavmcnt.'' 


$2,214,5)<.K) 

(73.7<rf) 


$1,10:1.532 

(65. 2*^0) 


$694,515 
(«>4 1<7) 


$224,437 

(mo'-c) 


$186,512 

(97 K^) 


(To Clicntfi) 


Indin'i t I'avnients 


791,731 
(26 3',) 


593.029 
(:{4.8''r) 


43,257 

(5 9'-^ ) 


149,923 
(40 0^() 


5.522 
(2 9'v) 




Mofpit.ilization 

Physiciiuis 

Dnijfs iiiid Supplies 

N ursing Honu* Care 

Other 


.360..5I8 
3,281 

.57.708 
323.1H!) 

47,025 


236.573 
1.43!) 

4().70!( 
288.061 

26,247 


25.094 
1..321 
6.722 
424 
9,696 


98.623 
413 
8,676 
33,185 


228 
lOS 
],(i01 
1.52H 
2,05(i 






9,026 


Cost Per Case by Categories 


Total 


ttlS 52 


9101 41 


9160 32 


9117 80 


9100 12 




Direct Payments 


$83.63 


$66 09 


$150.92 
9.40 


$70 62 
47.18 


$97 24 

2.88 


Indirect Payments 


29.89 


35.32 



(Continued on next pafre.) 

cedures which are beinfr f,.ll„\ved 
to handle the city's administrative 
and clerical work load. 

^^"e will look forward with inter- 
«>t to the further progress that mav 



be expected to be made in this 
field and may properly be a sub- 
ject for discussion at the Fourth 
Conference on Municipal Admin- 
istration to be held in 1959. 



Jax. 31 



CITY RECORD 



Mayor Sets Forth 
His Position On 
Hospital Borrowing 

The Mayor, on January 26, sent 
the follo\vin<^- comniunication to the 
City Council: 

CiEXTLEMEX : 

I regret tliat I cannot accede to 
the requef^t contained in a resolve 
adopted by your Honorable Body 
on January 19, 1959, that I initiate 
:'.n appropriation order sufficient 
for the down payment on a loan 
inside tlie debt limit for hospital 
purposes. 

Chapter 44, section 7 of the Gen- 
eral Laws outlines in sixteen sub. 
.^ections the specific purposes for 
which debt could be authorized, 
within the limit of indebtedness. In 
no specification is there authority 
wliereby the City Council with the 
approval of the ^layor could le- 



gally authorize debt for "hospital 
purposes." It is because of this 
that on at least two occasions in 
the past special legislation was en- 
acted authorizing the City of Bos- 
ton to incur debt for remodeling, 
extraordinary repairs, and altera- 
tions to city buildings. If tlie Gen- 
eral Laws had permitted the au- 
thorization of debt for these pur- 
poses it would not have been neces- 
sary to seek special legislation. 

This is the leason 1 submitted to 
> ()ur Honorable Body on November 
24, 1958, an order ior the accept- 
ance of cliapter 668 of the Acts of 
1958. 

Under the provisions of this act. 
the city is specificnlly authorized to 
l)()rrow and expend 11,000,000 for 
i-eniodeling, reconstructing, and 
making extraordinary improve- 
ments to City Hospital build- 
ings. The act also provides that 



$2,000,000 from the proceeds of the 
sale of the Sumner Tunnel be ap- 
propriated for the same hospital 
purposes. Acceptance of the act 
would mean, therefore, that $3,- 
000,000 would l)c made available 
for extraordinary repairs at City 
Hospital. 

I believe that your Honorable 
Body is quite aware of the need to 
rehabilitate the physical plant of 
the City Hospital. A list of the 
more urgent needs of the institu- 
tion has been submitted to your 
Honorable Body, and the Trustees 
of the Hospital, together with the 
Superintendent of the Hospital, 
have more fully explained these 
needs to your membership. 

Tlw objection raised to the ac- 
ceptance of the act because of the 
te(iuirement that .12,000,000 from 
the <ale proceeds of the Sumner 
Tunnel be used for hospital repairs, 
latliei- than for tax rate purposes, 
might have some validity. How- 
e\er. in order to prevail upon the 
Legislature to authorize any bor- 
lowing, whatsoever, for extraordi- 
nary repairs at the Hospital it was 
necessary to consent to this quali- 
fying provision. 

If your Honorable Body rejects 
tlie pending order for the accept- 
raice of chapter 668 of the Acts of 
1958, the alternative must be the 
appropriation of $3,000,000 for ur- 
gent hospital repairs. The appro- 
priation of this sum would, of 
course, liave a rather heavy impact 
on the tax rate for 1959. 

It is my contention that the re- 
pairs in question are of such a na- 
ture that the cost thereof should 
not be reflecte-d in the tax rate of 
any one year. On the other hand, 
I am cognizant of the pressing ne- 
cessity of going forward with the 
repair program of the Hospital. 

The five Trustees of the City 
Hospital feel a deep responsibility 
in this matter. In their opinion, at 
least $3,000,000 must be spent for 
extraordinary repairs which sliould 



Welfare Caseload for December 

(Continued from previous page.) 

Expenditure Comparisons 



Categorj- 


Dec, 1958 


Compared to Last Month 


Compared to Last Year 


Nov., 1958 


Net 
Change 


Per 
Cent 
Change 


Dec, 1957 


Net 
Change 


Per 
Cent 
Change 


Total. . . . 


$3,006,727 


82,716,988 


+8289,739 


10.7 


82,965,534 


+841,193 


1.4 


O.A.A. . . 
A.D.C... 
DA 


SI, 702,561 
737,772 
374,360 
192,034 


.$1,488,544 
741,673 
338,312 
148,459 


-1- $214,017 
-3,901 
-h 36,048 
+43,575 


14.4 
0.5 
10.7 
29.3 


$1,767,957 
691,166 
357,959 
148,452 


-.$65,396 
+46,606 
+ 16,401 
+43,582 


3.7 
6.7 
4 6 
29 4 


G.R 


Accumulated Expenditures (12 Months)* 



Category 


Total 


Direct 
Payments 


Indirect 
Payments 


Total 


836,039,635 


$29,173,710 


$6,865,925 




Old Age Assistance 

Aid to Dependent Children 

Disability Assistance 


.$20,662,091 
8,798,316 
4,549,498 
2,029,7.30 


.$15,967,554 
8,158,483 
3,125,228 
1,922,445 


$4,694,537 
639,833 
1,424,270 
107,285 





Gross expenditures subject to adjustments. 



I I 2 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 31 



U- iniuir to pn-^rrvr cxixtine •'tnir- 
turi - lit 
.pi. 

Ilrcli .... . • - 

iiicnt.x, ami pn»vnlf ic»r In-itrr mtv- 
irc iimi iHToiiiiiKMlMtions for pn- 
tM'Htn. Tlic City H^l^pital Trustci-s 
ici'l :tn oltliKation to \u>i>{ that 
fiinil-. to till- aiiu.iint <.l $3.00().(KK) 
Ih- iiiaiii* availalilc for tlu- niiniiiiuin 
Mpnir iu-4-iU of tlic Hospital, and 
ii-rl furtluT that sfrviro the 
HoanI of Tru-xtw-s to hv inon- or 
h'-s fiitih' iiiih^s the \ins'u\ physi- 
lal phiiit ii'-c-tU of llic llo>pital an- 
met. 

h'itr (lie n'a.Kins licri-in outliiu-d. 1 
ino«t n-f>|HTt fully roquost that your 
lloiiorahlr liixly approve the ai- 
I i |)(ain r (»l cliaptcr (»t>8 of the 
ol 19.58. it i- nit».>^t ilcsirahU- aii<l 
iH'cc^sarN* tliat prompt action !>< 
taken on the order n«»\v pending in 
yoiir Honorable Body. 

He-pe.t fully. 

.1. n. I1ynk>. .\f„!i,>r. 

Mayor States Views on 
MTA Officials* Salaries 

Mayor John H. Hyiie.< on Janu- 
ary 27. issueil the followinn ^^tate- 
inent on the MT.\ propo.<ed salary 
increases: 

I feel tha( in .mhuc instanres. 
and nuist in.stances, inrroa.«e(! |)rn- 
jxtsed are deserved. 

There arc executives or officials 
or key workers on monthly .salary 
who are not included in general in- 
creases when granted. 

I am sure that Mr. Fitzsinunons 
and Mr. llyan are entitled to more 
comjH-nsation. How nuich that 
sh«»uld Ite I cannot jiass upon. The 
work «lone Ity the othei-s concerned 
in the salary adjustments is not 
known hy me an<l I am not in 
|)osition to !-tate whether or not 
their salari«s should he increa.sod. 

Naturally. I am concerned with 
any new and large expen<litme on 
the part of the MTA because .such 
new « xpen«litures arc added to the 
deficit. When these new rosts are 
because of increases to top officials. 



I am also concenied becau.se our 
own officials of the city should 
have salaiy adjustment which, at 
liiis time. I hesitate to make. 

The members of the Advisor>' 
Hoard to whom I talked are not 
unalterably opposed to the $43,000 
expenditme involved, and most of 
the members want to withhohl 
their opinions in the matter until 
they are certain that the salary 
increa^es are justified. 

This is a matter for the tnistees 
whom the Advisory Board will 
meet with if so recpiestcd. 

The Advisory Board does n(»t 
have any authority in the matter, 
however. an<l can only act in in- 
stances where capital exi)enditures 
are involved. 

New Interpretation 
Benefits Some 25- 
Year Employees 

DuiK an r. I V, ."^upervi.sor of 
Personnel, on .lamjary '2\, .sent the 
following notice to department 
heads: 

• Beginning February 4, li).")!), the 
following interpretation of Rule 10 
of the ("ompen.sati<»n and Cla.ssifi- 
calioii Plan for ("ity of Bo.ston em- 
l)loyees, as approved by his Honor 
the Mayor on January JO, 

will become etTei tive: 

• 1. llmployees with tw(>nty-five 
or more years of service creditable 
under the ( "onipen.sation Plan, shall 
be compen.'^ated on promotion (per- 
manent only), at the rate specified 
in Column the maxinuun .salary 
of the grade to which he is being 
promoted. 

• '2. Salaries of employees in the 
above-stated category who have 
been promoted within the past 
three years, and who have imt, as 
yet received the maxinuun .salary 
in the po.'sjtion they now hold, shall 
be adjusted lo the nuixinuun salary 
of the grade. 

• 3. Inasnuu h as Rule 10 is a part 
of the general Compen.sation Plan, 
the provisions described herein will 
ai)ply only to tho.se employees in- 
cluded within this plan, excluding 
l ire and Police rniformed Forces, 



Hospital Nursing Pensonnel, etc., 
which employees are covered by 
otlu-r plans. 

• PleiLM' forward immediately, the 
neces-sarv personnel forms (.\dju.st- 
ment in Compen.sation, (ieneral 37), 
listing all employees who (|ualify 
for adjustment. Make statement 
on form explaining adjustment. 

• Also, prepare a list of employees 
who will sub.se(|uently (lualifv for 
adjustment at a later date. 

• Retroactive adju.stments will not 
be granted. .Vs stated, the effec- 
tive (hite will be February 4, 10.")!). 

Juliloi 's .\til( : Th( above intcrpn - 
tatiou n'Jccls those einploijees of per- 
inaiienl .status trho hare not reached 
the top pay in their current classif ca- 
tion. 



David Lasker Heads 
1959 Heart Drive 

The -Mayor lias named David 
I.asker. ch;iirman of the Board of 
Flection Commissioners, city cm- 
l)loyees' chairman of the Heart 
Fund Drive. 

The campaign begins in Febru- 
ary. A representative for the 
drive has been ajipointcd for each 
department and city agency. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT ORDERS 

.I:inu:ir\- 20. 
a, ti, ml Ordrr Xn. 

Sorfct. Robert \V. McMan.imin .md Pa- 
troiiiun .John M. Ciorolo .ind John P. 
Xci\ Divi.-ion 14. arc iiorcby coiniiiendcd 
lor till' pcrlonnancc of mcritoriou.* police 
duty and each is granted three d-iys' ad- 
ditional vacation. 

At about 8.10 p.m., Wednesday, Janu- 
ary 7. 19.59. otiicers in the Sector A-L 
car. responded to a call to 12.5 Lanark 
road. JJrighton. I'pon arrival, Helen C. 
Tooniey. 38 years of .ige, and sinplr. of 
that addrcs.*, stated to the officers that 
at about 8.0.5 p.m., while .*he wa.-s walking 
home and when at the intersection of 
Kinro.s.s and Lanark road.<, Brighton, she 
was assaulted by a boy whom .<hc de- 
scribed as being about 12 years of age. 
.5 feet 4 inches, 110 pounds. She .stated 
that after knocking her to the ground, 
tlic hoy forcibly took her brown leather 
shoulder strap handbag which contained 
.ipproxiniately $70 in V. S. currency, a 
cliarge pl.ite. checkbook, rosary beads, 
and personal papers. She further stated 
tiiat the boy fled in the direction of 
Cleveland Circle. 



.Iax. 31 



CITY RECORD 



I 1 3 



Patrolmen John P. Nee and John M. 
Ciccolo, in the Sector R car. with Scrgt. 
Robert W. McManamin, assigned to the 
duty of patrol supervisor, also responded 
to this call and immediately began a 
-rarch of the vicinity for the abovc-de- 
M-ribed youth. At the intersection of 
( )i kney and Sutherland roads, Brighton, 
these officers obser\ed a boy who an- 
swered this description. I'pon seeing the 
l^olice, this boy ran into an alley in the 
ri AV of Orkney road, and a lengthy- chase 
through the aUeys and back j-ards fol- 
lowed. During this chase, Patrolman 
( "iicolo fired four warning .s-hots into the 
iir from his service revoh er. but the boy 
( nntinucd to nm. The boy was finally 
apprehended in the rear of 1894 Beacon 
-treet. Brooklinc. by the above officers, 
md identified as one Raymond P. Car- 
i iugton, 14 years of age. of 28 Wyoming 
-rieet. Roxbury. He was arrested with- 
out a warrant for being a delinquent 
child, to wit: unarmed robbery. 

In the rear of 75 Strathmore road. 
15righton. these officers recovered Helen 
Toomey's handbag, containing all of the 
I'Lisonal effects, as well as an envelope 
with S20 in U. S. currency. After ques- 
iiining the boy at Division 14, the of- 

. rs recovered the remainder of the 

one}-, S52.17 in U. S. currency and coins. 
- the rear of 18&4 Beacon street. Brook- 
line. At that time, the suspect was 
\ iewed by Helen Toomcy and she posi- 
•i\ oly identified him as being the person 
who stole her handbag. 

Upon further questioning by the above 
otiicers. Raymond Carrington admitted 
responsibility for an earlier-reported 
handbag snatch. This previous offense 
was reported at about 6.35 p.m. on Satm- 
day, Januaiy 3, 1959, by Helen Clifford, 
of 80 Sutherland road. Brighton. She 
stated that at about 6.30 p.m., that date, 
as she was entering the door of her 
apartment building, a boy grabbed her 
natural-color, hemp-rope, handbag con- 
taining S12 and personal effects, and that 
he had run into the wooded area across 
the street from 80 Sutherland road. 

At the request of Mr. Thomas O'Brien, 
probation officer of the Brighton Court. 
Raymond Carrington was sent to the 
Youth Service Board for detention, until 
his arraignment in the Brighton Court. 
Irnia Carrington, mother of this boy, 
was notified of all these facts by Sergeant 
McManamin. 

At about 9 .\.M., Thursday, January 8, 
1959, Sergeant McManamin and Patrol- 
men Ciccolo and Nee had Raymond P. 
Carrington in juvenile .session at the 
Brighton Covut before Judge Charles 
Artesani. charged with two counts of 
being a delinquent child, to wit : unarmed 
robbery. The boy pleaded guilty to both 
counts, was ad.iudged a delinquent and 
committed to the Youth Service Board. 

Officers of Division 9 were advised of 
this arrest and upon being questioned at 
the Youth Service Board, this boy ad- 



mitted to six similar offenses on that di- 
vi.«ion. Raymond Carrington also im- 
plicated his brother. William Carrington, 
13 years of age, as being with him when 
two of these offenses were conunitted. 
On Thursday. January 15. 1959, Ra>- 
mond Carrington was arraigned on six 
counts and William Carrington on two 
counts, in the Roxbury Court, for being 
a delincjuent child, to wit: tmarmed rob- 
bery. 

The Police Commissioner is pleased 
to recognize the efficient police work per- 
formed by these officers, who. by their 
alertness and devotion to duty, appre- 
hended these two youths thus preventing 
similar attacks which might have resulted 
in serious injury or death to their \ic- 
tims. 

Januarj' 23. 
General Order Xo. 373. 
Patrolman John P. Horan, Division 11, 

is hereby commended for the perform- 
ance of meritorious police duty and is 
granted three days' additional \acation. 

About 4.45 .\.M.. on January 7. 1959, 
Patrolman John P. Horan, of Di\-ision 
11. while iiarrolling his route on Dakota 
street, near Washington street. Dorches- 
ter, hearfl the breaking of glass coming 
from tiie rear of 358 and .360 Washington 
street. Climbing over a 5-fool fence 
leading into the rear of the abo\e ad- 
dress, the officer obscr\ed a man stand- 
ing on a small roof in the rear of the 
Faneuil Hall Pro\"ision Company, lo- 
cated at 358 and 360 Washington street, 
Doi'chestrr. T*i>()n apiiroacliing this man, 
the officer notic.,1 ihat ho ha.l a lai-o 
pinch bar in hi> hand, ami aNo ol)~ci\cd 
that the heavy .si-reen on the first floor 
window had been ripped oft' at the 
bottom and a large pane of glass had 
been broken in the window. Patrolman 
Horan, who had drawn iiis sor\-ice re- 
voher. placed the m.m tnider arrest. The 
prisoner, a largo ]iowerful man who, if 
he had -( in tin otiiccr first would have 
exerted c\ ( i y ]>li\ sical effort to avoid 
arrest, whih walking with Patrolman 
Horan to a iiolicc signal box. made 
several \('ii)al aitoni])ts to persuade the 
offic(r noi lo ariv-t him. When at the 
iK)li(( <itinal l)o\. Patrolman Horan was 



Di 



a.MMcd 
also 01 
super\-isoi' at tin 

The pn-on. r 
11, and upon 
that his nail; 
years, single. 
He then refu- ; 
questions. I'lioii 
foimd to be caii\ 
and chisel. Hi 
a su.s-piciou- ])( 1 
and entoiing a h 



Raymond E. Wood. 
11. wlio was patrol 
I ime. 

■ removed to Division 
- I -■i.'i- 1 stated 
l is. 28 
I loston. 
: - : . ■ further 
>i iiii; -t arclicd. he was 
111 a lai>;i' M irw driver 
tas booked for being 
)n. to wii : lireaking 
Iding in tlir nighttime 
with intent to commit larceny therein, 
and he was held for further investigation. 
It was later ascertained through finger- 



prints, that the defendant's true n-ame 
was William E. Harkins, 28 years, of 14 
Michigan avenue, Mattapan, and that lie 
had a long and vicious police record, in- 
cluding three cases of as.sault and batten- 
on a police officer. 

On January 8. 1959, the defendant, 
William E. Harkins, appeared in the 
Dorchester Court before Judge William 
G. Lynch, charged with po.ssc>~sion of 
burglarious implements, and also attempt 
to break an(l enter a building in the 
nighttime with intent to commit larceny 
therein, at 358 and 360 Washington 
street. Dorchester, occupied bj- the 
Faneuil Hall Provision Company. The 
case was continued until Januarv^ 19, 
1959, and bail was set at S5,000 double 
surety. 

On January 19, 1959, the defendant ap- 
peared in the Dorchestei r(airi IkIoI' 
Judge John Crehan, the di n mi mt bi inii 
represented by Attorney Timothy 
Mur])hy. After hearing the facts in the 
case, the defendant was held for the 
Sufl'olk grtind jury in the same bail. 

The police commissioner is ]ika~(d to 
recognize the efficient work piiioiimd 
by Patrolman John P. Horan, who. !)>• 
his jilertness and keen observation, to- 
gether with his quick courageous action, 
brought al^out the apprehension of this 
felon. 

January 26. 
Gn,<ml Onlcr Xo. 370. 

The following-named officer having re- 
quested retiiemeni under the provisions 
of the Statin ni ls'J2, chapter 353, as 

amended, for i -on that he is in- 

capacitafeil. r i- m k by 

Ordi n d. II,- Ibmor I lie Mayor having 
appi()\'ii iIm -,iiii(\ that he be retired 
from ,ir;i\, i\ ice in the Police De- 
])arinient, effictu e \^'cdne.sdav, Januarv 
28, 19.59, at 7.45 o'<'lock A,M.:" 

William 1'. .Sniith, sergeant. Division 
IS. 39 years of service. 

Januaiy 26. 

Grnernl Order Xo. 377. 
The resignation of Patrolman Vincent 
R. Saia, Di\ision 13. having been pre- 
sentcnl, if is hereby accepted, to take 
(>ffp( t as of .Sunday, January 25, 1959, at 
12 o'clock midnight. 

January 26. 
Gcnerfd Order Xo. 37S. 

Effect i\e Monday, Febntaiy 2. 1959, 
;it 7.45 o'clock a.m., the Rules and Regu- 
lations of the Boston Police Department 
are amended as follows: 

Ri le 11. as most recently amended by 
Cieneral Order No. 333. dated November 
20. 1958. is hereby amended bv striking 
out section 26. Certain Work May Be 
Performed on Lord's Day, and inserting 
in place thereof the following new .sec- 
tion : 



I 14 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 31 



Coiiain Work Mnv Be I'frfonuod 



; 1{...„.^ llun.ui. arr 
I'V till- I'olici- Coni- 
i- li l< rm.-< and ronili- 
."ii^ I- ;jii> ilii'iii riMMilliililc-, lo iumtr 
|NTiiii(it for the |KTforniiiiiri< on ilic 
I Mtil"" (lay <if ni-o-jwjirk- wtirk or laltor 
in ihiir juilinni'nt <<iiili| not l>c 
iiicl im any otiicr day wiiiioiit 
-iifTi-rinK. loR-*, daniaiic or |iiil»Iic 
' Sni-li iH'nnil.i Mhall rover 
n oni' day and >liall ntil lie 
ilian MX days jirior »o rlic 
I'V 1 .1 tthii h it in i.stoird. 
A ii-i- of 92 .4iall he rharRfd to appli- 
ini.- f..r a jM rinit to pfrform work or 



Fire Appaniiiis J{<|r,iiniian Alton J. 
Fnllir. Maintenance Dl\i^ion. 

1 11 (' II ANCK I N AsSKiX M KN T OF 
Sw-OM) KxcilXKKK. 

llii followinK elianue in ussiKniiient, 
wliieli will l»e<-oiiie elTeetive at 8 A.M., 
\Ve.lnes«lay. January 28. 1959, i.s herohy 
announced : 

Fire FiKlilrr (Second Kn(iino<>r) (Joninl 
F. W.ilion. KnKine Company 47, to F'irc 
Fighter. 

IV. Tka.v.xkkh. 
Till- followinn transfer will become ef- 
fective at S A.M.. Woilnesdav, Jantiarv 
2S. 1959: 

Fire Figliter Cerard F. Walton, from 
Kintine Company 47 to Engine Comiianv 
22. 



l.dior <m the I.onl's day. 

I'nniiml.ereiJ Sunday work permit 
•Iwdl lie d< livercti lo apiilicant upon pay- 
ment of f(f. A re<-onl of .such (Mrmit 
will Ik< ke|>t on the corresjxmdinK jire- 
mimlMTe.1 Ntuh lo he retained in the 
hirs of the divi-.iim isMuinjf the |« rmit. or 
in the files of the Central Complaim and 
Records Bureau, when the permit i.s 
issu<ij \,y Mich liureau. 

Whenever any i^^niiit for Siindav work 
IS is^»ue<I l.y the captain of the Central 
Complaint and Keooids liure.m notifi- 
' ition will l,e made to the division con- 
< i mid for their information. 

.Vpplicalioik. for Sunday work jiemiits 
m.iy I.e receivitl at divi<ions on .iny 
wc kday and at the Centnd Coniplaiiil 
and Heron Is Bureau, fourth floor. Polic 
Meadipiarters. on ordinan" woekilnvs 
diiriiiK n-Kular IwiHinesM hours. Mondav.s 
'iirnimh Fridays. 

.VII money nceived from this .source 
i.«ether with the •'.Vpplicalion for Sun- 
>iiy Work Permit" (Form 129). Khali 
I.C delivered daily lo Uio < hi.-f clerk. wHio 
-hall rc-. ipt therefor in hook provi.led 
''ir the purpose. 



Ihe 
Kated 



I IkfE DEPARTMENT ORDERS 

JaiiuarA- 27. 
fiiiirrnl (tnlir .\n. .}. 
I. Rktirkment. 
The followin« retirement, in .irror.i- 
^.nce wrth .section 7. chapter 32 of the 
<.cnera| Laws, as amende,! hy »«x-tion 94 
-••»i«l chapt.r. whi.h will hivome ef- 
[••••ive at ,S A.M.. Fehniarv 1. 1969 is 
iH-rHiy announced: 

Fire Firf.i, r (Photoff-aH.er) Ravmond 
I '•'»'•' ritan. l ir.' Prevention Division 

l ire I-iKhter Lonencn wa.s appointed 
I" the .leparim.nit ,,„ January 29. 1947 
md he eaves the deparln.em with the 
>l < Wls|u-< of his ;i«csoci,i1, s. 

II. RlCSIi; NATION. 

follfm-inn resignation, whirh 

"f 5 P.M.. Thursiloy. 
herr^iy .announced : 



Til 

hecainc efTecl 
January 22, 1969 



TRAFFIC RULINGS 

'J'l iiijiiimri/ 
Tiatlic Commissioner iias ]>roimil- 
ihe followinK rulinjrs: 

Whrrram, If duriiiK the settiiiK of »le*l 
Ifirdent in the Metropolitan Transit Authority 
tunnel conn.Ttion to the Hiehland Kranoh of 
the HcMton A Albany Railroad. Ho.tton Proper, 
vehicle* were to be allowed in Heacon street 
conformably to the ruli-s and reKulations of 
the Knston Traffic Commission otherwise oper- 
ative, both such construction and also public 
travel would be substantially impe<led: and 

Whrrnt„. The Hoston Traffic C(.mmi.ssion h&s 
taken no action on the matter because notice 
of the precise method of the prosecution of 
the work of such construction was not re- 
reived in the Boston Traffic Department in 
time for a traffic eniiineerinK study of t*ie 
matter to be presented to the last meelinK of 
the Hoslon Traffic Commission; and 

H'*crca«. Such ^instruction is to be done 
on January 22. January 23. January 24. and 
January 26. 1959. between the hours of 9 a M 
and 4 P.M.; and 

Whrreas, A meetinit of the Boston Traffic 
Commission is not scheduled to be held before 
the commencement of such construction; now 
therefore 

Pursuant to the power vested in me as 
T"?.' the City of Boston 

^J-^'- "•^9. c. 26:j. s. 2B (as insert«l by St. 
19a«. c. 2o» 8. 5). I hereby promuleate the 
loliowin* rule and rejculation to take effect 
forthwith and to be operative only during the 
period heretofore described: 

Vi,r the period aforesaid, vehicles are ex- 
cluded from the followinK street when and 
»»'here official sliins are in place: 

Beacon Street. Boston Proper. 

From .Mountfort .street to Park Drive. 

IITifrro*. If durinit the period of the Aleppo 
snrine Temple Semiannual Ceremonial at the 
( ommonwealth Armory, vehicles were to be 
for"m.*^l street. Boston Proper, con- 

formably to the rules and rejtulations of the 
iioston Traffic Commission otherwise operative 
"l^ili '^'''^'"''"^'^ «"uld be substantially im^ 
peded; and 

WhrrroA. The Boston Traffic Commis.sion has 
taken no acUon on the matter because notice 
..r the precise meth.Ki „f the conduct of .such 
ceremonies was not received in the B<«t»n 
I raffle Department in time for a traffic enifi- 
neennir study of the matter to be presented to 
the last meet.nK of the Boston Traffic Com- 
mission; and 

H'/.rrro,. Such ceremonies „..- . 
Friday. January 2.'». 19.19. between the hr 
"'«*■»•• 10 P.M.; and 

KArrro*. A meeUnit of the Boston Traffic 
( ommission is not scheduled to be held before 
he commencement of such ceremonies; now. 



be held 



Pursuant to the power veste<l in me as 
Traffic Commissioner of the City of Boston 
by St. 1929. c. 263. s. 2B (as inserted by St. 
1957. c. 253. ». 5). I hereby promulgate the 
following rule and regulation to Uke effect 
forthwith and to be operative only 
the period heretofore described: 

For the period aforesaid, vehicles arc ex- 
cluded from the fi>llowing street when and 
where official signs are in place: 
(iaffney Street. Boston Proper. 

Krom Commonwealth avenue to the Bos- 
ton & Albany Kailroad. 

That as urgently required by considerations 
of pub.ic safety and convenience, the following 
temiHirary traffic regulations which were 
adopted Oct >ber 24. 195«. for the purpose of 
continuing the experiment which had been in 
effect since September 12. 195R. of re«tricting 
Temple place and West street to use by pedes- 
trian travel during parts of retail shopping 
days are hereby further extended from January 
II. 1959. to February 2. 1959. inclusive: 

Parking of vehicles is prohibited in the fol- 
lowing streets: 

Avery Street. Boxton Proper. 

Both sides, from Tremonl street to Wash- 
ington street. 24 hours. 
Temple Place. Boston Proper. 

Both sides, from Tremont street to Wash- 
ington street. 7 a.m. to 6 p.m 
West Street. Boston Proper. 

Southwest side, from Washington street 

to Tremont street. 24 hours. 
Northeast side, fnim Washington street 
to Tremont street. 7 a m. t3 6 p.m. 
Vehicles arc excluded from the following 
streets on all business daju from 11 a.m to 3 
P.M.. except that this exclu.sion shall not apply 
to commercial vehicles making deliveries to or 
collecti.ins from business premises in the area- 
Temple Place. Boston Proper. 

Fr.,m Tremont street to Washington street. 
West Street, Boston Proper. 

From Washington street to Mason street. 

That as urgently re<iuired by considerations 
Of public safety and convenience, the folkjwing 
temporary reguUtion .iccasioned by the com- 
pletion of cmstruction of the John F. Fitr- 
gerald Expressway to Kneeland street, which 
was adopted and was effective January 6. 1959 
for one (I) month is hereby extended for a 

j':nu"^ry.t'";?^^ '^'^ 

The following left turn prohibition is sus- 
pended : 

Stuart Street. Boston Proper. 
Into Tremont street, southerly. 

That as urgently required by considerations 
of public safety and convenience, the following 
temponao' traffic regulations occasioned by the 
construction of the John F. Fitzgerald Ex- 
pressway which were adopted October 17. 
19a8. to be effective October 20. 1958, for one 
(1) month and which were extended for a 
OcJ!.h %'r^»f. be sixty (60) days from 
J^,r » n t:, f*"-"'" ^tended 

jinLT^^ruT"^ 

The one-way rule in the following street is 
suspended and it is now a two-way street 

mPil^s^ ^^^"".^ "^""^ ^'""^ "-^ i" P>»«: 
Milk Street. Boston Proper 

Ti.'^^T'.i^""''''*''^ """^^ Federal street. 

The follow-iiig streets are one way in the 
direction ndicated when and where official 
signs are in place: 

Congress Street. Boston Proper 

vJi™"? i*''^'' Pui-ohase street. 

Federal Street. Boston Proper. 

From Milk street to Franklin street. 

BUSINESSMEN FOOT BILL 
-.i!,'"''"'"';" V"'"^'^*' "wnei^ in Denver, Colo- 
.^'''•cenTra'rt^rn«s"X.';i'cl'''af Tl^t 'o? 

"'"^ '■^'"'■ns from an area-wide 

pol indicating that businessmen favor a volJn! 
~.^.Jl l'"''"'^ through which each would 

contribute a prorated share based on front 

s^men. P'.''^'^ ^'"^ r>n>po.e^ a special as' 
sessment district. 



Jan. 31 



CITY RECORD 



I 1 5 



FIN. COM. SUPPORTS STATE AID 
FOR BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



.January 26, 1959. 
To the Legislative Committee on 
State Administration. 

The Boston Finance Commission 
wishes to be recorded in favor of 
House Bill No. 1358 and Senate 
Bill Xo. 392 which seek to secure 
additional financial support for ihe 
Boston Public Library. The Fi- 
nance Commission expressed a 
similar attitude in 1951 in a report 
to the Legislature. 

The Boston Public Library is 
more than just another department 
of the City of Boston. Its scope 
of service reaches throughout tlie 
metropolitan area and even extends 
throughout the state. It is vii-tu- 
ally impossible to measure and as- 
sess with any accuracy the use 
which is made of its facilities. This 
broad use arises from the fact of 
its extraordinary book collections. 
The policy of its administrators is 
to make such collections available 
to any and all who may desire to 
make use of them. Its very size 
and proportions and its cultural in- 
fluence and eminence long ago over- 
ran the municipal boundaries of its 
origin. 

Most of the library staff, which 
now approximates 600, are located 
in the Central Library, at Copley 
square, which houses the bulk of its 
treasures and is the heart of the 
administrative, business, circulat- 
ing, and reference phases of the 
system. The 30-odd branch librar- 
ies of the city may be said to serve 
the citizenry of Boston more or less 
exclusively; but the Central Li- 
brary houses the vast reference, 
rare book and manuscripts, prints, 
special collection, fine arts, music, 
science and technology, record and 
film collection sections which exert 
an appeal which is always metro- 
politan-wide. 

For many years the Library has 
served the needs of countless stu- 



dents of the many colleges in this 
area and as sucli has become an 
organic part of the great educa- 
tional pattern of (Jreater Boston. 
Thus mertiing into the cultural life 
cl {hv metropolitan area, it is as 
difficult to measure its influence a?- 
it is to control its patronage. 

In a special way, tiiis Boston 
Library problem is another facet 
of the metropolitan question, a sub- 
ject of discussion and debate for 
many years and several times 
treated in Finance Commission re- 
ports. The metropolitan character 
of <ucli services as water, sewer, 
and parks is quickly recognized: 
that of the Metropolitan Tiaii^it 
Authority has likewise in receni 
years arrived at that recognition. 
The metropolitan character of the 
Boston Public Library is less well 
known, but none the less a fact. 

Tlie Finance Commission feels 
that the Boston Public Library has 
long grown beyond the point of 
municipal control; that today it is 
comparable, in regional stature and 
sphere of attraction, to the Boston 
^Museum of Fine Arts; and that the 
situation poses a problem wliich 
commends itself to the iininediate 
;ittention of the Legislature. 

The ciuestion is how to square 
the unique conditions under which 
the Library operates with a fair and 
adequate basis of financing. These 
bills represent a step in the right 
direction. 

The Finance Commission. 
Anthony .1. Young. 

Chairman. 

Thomas J. ]\Ilrphy, 
Executive Secretary. 



TRAFFIC RULINGS 

Temporary 
The Traffic Conimi.*sion ha.s voted as 
follows: 

That as urgently required by considerations 
of public safety and convenience, the following 



temporary traffic regulation occasioned by con- 
struction of dormitories for the New England 
Conservatory of Music, which was adopte<l 
and was effective December 16, 19.58, for one 
(1) month, is hereby extended for a period 
estimated to be one ( 1 ) year from January 
9. 1959: 

Parking of vehicles is prohibited in the fol- 
lowing streets when and where official signs 
are in place: 

Gainsborough Street, Roxbury. 

Northeast side, from Huntington avenue 
to St. Botolph street. 
St. Botolph Street, Roxbury. 

Northwest side, from Gainsborough street 
to Public Alley No. 822. 



CLAIMS APPROVED 

Dr. Charles A. Girvan. Eliot Hotel, 370 Com- 
monwealth avenue, Boston, for compensation 
for personal injuries caused by a defective 
water gate box in the highway opposite 1096 
Boylston street, August 22, 1958, by payment 
of $285. 



Ethel C. Mullen, 455 Columbia road, Dor- 
chester, for compensation for personal injuries 
caused by a raised granolithic block in the 
sidewalk in front of 461 Columbia road, July 
19, 1958, by payment of $250. 



Mortality Report. 

For the week ending Jan. 24, 1959. 

Population_as of July, 1958, Ma.ssachusetts State 
f'cnsus, 724. 70l': population estimated July, 1956, 
I'nited States Census Bureau, 816,759: number of 
deaths (stillbirths excluded); Residents, 183; non- 
residents, 87; total, 270. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: All deaths, 
19.64; nonresidents deducted, 13.10. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: 

Last week, 20.15; corresponding week last year, 
16.92. 

Deaths by age periods, sex, etc.: Under one year, 
19; one year to four years, inclusive, 1 ; sixty years 
and over, 183. Total deaths: Males, 141; females, 
129; deaths in hospitals and institutions, 293 

REPORTABLE DISEASES: 
CASES AND DEATHS.* 



Dl3E.\9E8 


Cases and Deaths 
Reported Week 
Ended 
Jan. 24, 1959 


Cases and Deaths 
Reported Week 
Ended 
Jan. 24, 1958 


Cases 


Deaths 


Cases 


Deaths 


Anterior 










Poliomyelitis. . . 








1 


Diphtheria 










Encephahtis 




















Influenza 










Measles 


4 




25 




Meningitis 




















Pneumonia (lobar) 












11 




10 




Tuberculosis 










(pulmonari') . . . 


18 


2 


15 


1 


Childhood Type 










Tuberculosis . . . 










Tuberculosis 










(other forms) . . . 




1 






Typhoid Fever. . . 










Whooping Cough . 








1 



* Residents and nonresidents included. 



I I 6 



CnV RECORD 



Jan. 31 



nRPARTMENT CHANQES 

..r o/ AdminiMrnUvo Son'- 
'vctl (lie follo«->ii|c {trnwnncl 



Th.- ft»llt»« 
•IrUn: Mofikiur 



public hmlth 



HoartTAL DlTABTMCMT. 



> • <i( till- fullDWinfc ciiiplciy- 
II trrminalcd »in or prior to 



1 11. .. T\i.t-» of thr follfiwinK rtiiploy- 
. - . 1 n t<Tiiiintii<*«i on or prior to 

IVrM.Ar,..; Iris M. Clarkr. smior clerk 

.n.i i>i...! »*:'.:& . wcvk. 

TrmixTBrv Wllma Fallon. June Kelly, floor 
niir..^. an hour; John M. MiU-hcll. am- 

l...l.ncr .Irivcr. IM.It a wcvk. 

For ilir »<-<-k rn<lini( Januar>° 13: 

TIm- following wrrklv nunM>:< have boon 



AoituMa M Wc<>l>. •> 
\rir\ W.nrrll. fl.ior 



Chatigr of Tillr 

Thr Din rt.ir of Aiiniinisirativc Scrvirts 
li I- i|'pr<>\ > <| tile following: 

I- r..m Krvi.tfrnl Craduatc Nur»c fo CraHu- 

l(.v'-— I N.,--..- .I„|i,, Mnri.i.r.'t 

H. 11 . i . , . . . , . . 



i.aii. KliUil..th 
I'lttomon. Mary 
■n T. Sullivan. 
'I Wall. 
><'<1 ( Graduate NurM- 
Rc«ii<tcrCTl Numi 
Hnmdan. Klnrcnii 

lie Nunc t<i 
Kmma H. 
■I v Mahon 



SvmlM />iri«ion. 

WX'icr of {he followinK f^iij>loycr 
i.ij* bfvn trnninatcH : 



Sai*n(orium Oirimion. 
Mm. Kathcrinc HarrU. |>«rmanpnt clerk and 
lirpiil. hltr rr«iifn«-<l. 

Long Inland Hiritioti. 

Till- foliowini! < li:inK«-> liavt Im-ch iikkIc 
for ill' . k I ricliii(£ .laniiarv 6: 

Trmiinationn. -Vera V. Curtin. Georxe K. 
Sluddard. attendant nume*: (leorvr I. For- 
mtrr. Kobert I*. Murray, hoapiul houae work- 
era, rmenrcncy: Patrick T. O'Reffan. asoiiitant 
rrvident phyairian. 

The following rli.ingo have Ix i n made 
for ilic w«i k January 13: 

Terminatiuna. — William K. McGowan. prin- 
cipal hoapital kitchen wiirker ( meatcutterl : 
Henr>' T. Currie. hoiipital iruard: Paul R. 
Tracey. paintpr'a helper, ttroporao': Mary L. 
Cannala. Paul K. Kainr. honpilal huuite wnrk- 
em. emenrency: Alice T. McCarthy, aenior clerk 
and typiit. 

I.AW Detartmrnt. 

Tin- followinic :us.»iylant corporation 
<-oiin>« l>i rf>i(mo«l a.< of .I.iniian' 2(): 

William 1>. QuiKlo)'. Francis R. Dohrowitki. 
Daniel W. Came>-. Jtixpph S. Ayoub 

WEI.PARE OKPARTMENT. 

The following cinpioyccs services ha\ i- 
liTininattMi: 

Marjorie Fairhurst. permanent clerk and 
typiat: Robert Arnold, proviaional clerk and 
typiat: Charlin Krack. principal social work 
supervisor. 

The follcwinif employee was married and 
will appear on the records as follows: Myrtle 
I,. Greene, clerk and typist, now Myrtle L. 
Madison. 

SUFFOLK COUNTY. 
Fast Uoston Di.stbict Coibt. 
Approval ha« been Kranted for the appoint- 
ment of Pauline McKearney. lO.'iS lienninKton 
street. East Uoston. from temporary senior 
clerk to permanent senior clerk at $fiO 25 a 
week. 

Dorothy Salamone Leonard. 25 Gladstone 
• East Hoston. senior clerk, has resiKned. 



Appointments. 



AnnKsmsf, Department. 

Oliver W. Park. 4.14 Kine street. Chasset. 
executive director. »22S.7,'> a week. 

Robert W. Watts. 56 Wyman street. Jamaica 
Plain. rc~iearrh a.<uiistant. J69.75 a week. 

Marie Saponaro. 271 Webster street. East 
lliiHton. senior clerk-typist. |fi0.25 a week. 

Hin-niNi: Department. 
Ann M. Honran. 25.t Norfolk street. Dor- 
chester, clerk and typist. $47.75 a week. 

Fire Department. 
William H. Uouzan. 31 Fidelis W.-«y. Brich- 
' n. -!..'.k.-i-pcr. ffin.25 a week. 

Health Department. 
Hrnlth Pirinion. 
M irk H Rapapoit. 1077 Blue Hill avenue. 
Dorrhester. public health dentist. JX4.75 n 



Harbam A. Doherty. -<• Land.seer s 
St Roxbur>-. public health nurse. $72 



»e,-k. 

Patricia ,M. Hushes. R6 Glenellen road. West 
Ruxl.ur>-. public health nurse. $72.75 a week. 

Loon Krajew-^ki. 152A Huntinjrton avenue. 
IMiblic health dentist. $H4.75 a week. 

Krgitlry Dirinioii. 
Mary Noonan. 27 Bothwell road. Hrichton. 
clerk and typist. $47.75 a week. 

Ho.HprrAL Department. 

Main pirition. 
Bridirel O'Lou^hlin. .11 Myrtlebank avenue. 
Liorchester. honpiul medical worker, $52.75 a 



William T. Enitlish. :J7 Tower street, Ja- 
maica Plain, clerk. ?47.75 a week. 

Nancy Baker. SO Brooks street. East Boston, 
librarian. $67.75 a week. 

Anne McDonald. 11 East Newton atreet, 
lab<irato>-y assisUnt. $50.25 a week. 

KotMTt Alexander. 2'.I2 Princeton street. East 
Uoston. senior .X-ray technician. $62.75 a week. 

J.mephine F. DeDominici. IC Blakeville 
stritt. Dorchester, laboratory assistant, part 
time. $.19 a week. 

Bruno (Iraziano. 88 Orient avenue. East 
Boston, senior X-ray technician, $67.75 a week. 

Ann Moriarty, 14 Furnival road. Jamaica 
Plain, clerk and typist. $47.75 a week. 

Mary Dowlinir. 715 East Seventh street. 
South Boston, clerk and typii^t. $47.75 a week. 

Helen Davis. 1145 Dorchcater avenue. Dor- 
chester, clerk and typist. $47. 75 a week. 

/.on0 Inland DivUitm. 

Bessie Adamson. 124 Pembroke street, student 
practical nurse. $16.51 a week. 

Bertha Brown. 292 Ralph avenue. Brooklyn. 
New York, student practical nurse, $16.51 a 
week. 

Mary K. Canavan. IKO Morton street, Ja- 
maica Plain, student practical nurse, $16.51 a 
we»-k. 

Kathleen Doherty. 44A Pleaaant street. 
Charlestown, student practical nurse. $16.51 a 
week. 

Ira M. Farquharson. 507 MassachusetU ave- 
nue, student practical nurse. $16.51 a week. 

Jean B. Flaherty. 14 South street. Portland. 
Maine, student practical nurse. $16.51 a week. 

Lauza Marie Jeffrey. 10 Maple street. Stone- 
ham, student practical nurse. $16.51 a week. 

Ann Marie Nee. 1(*0 Morton street. Jamaica 
Plain, student practical nurse. $16.51 a week. 

Nancy Pope. 206 Hiith street. Waltham. 
student practical nurse. $16.51 a week. 

Clare Ryan. 12 Juliette street. Dorchester, 
student practical nurse. $16.51 a week. 

Blaine J. Schaffer. 6.! Arthur street. Quincy. 
student practical nurse. $16.51 a week. 

.Miintaret Stevenson. 24 Franklin street. 
Tewksbur>-. .student i>ractical nurse, $16.51 a 
week. 

Phyllis B. Thomashow, 965 Pleasant street. 
Worcester, student practical nurse. $16.61 a 
week. 

Rosemary Walsh, .'.a Newtowne court. Cam- 
bridKC. student practical nurse. $16.51 a week. 

Cora Could. 17s Rhoda street. Quincy. 
student practical nurse. $16.51 a week. 

Jane Welsh. 50 Commonwealth avenue, 
senior occupational therapist. $72.75 a week. 

Richard Murphy. 118 Keystone street. West 
Roxbury. attendant nurse, $47.75 a week. 

Francis M. Coleman. S Ernst street. Rox- 
bury, hospital kitchen worker. $47.75 a week. 

Walter T. Gallagher. 1 Melbourne street. 
Dorchester, hospital kitchen worker. $47.74 
a week. 

Miriam C. Johnson. 122.'5 Beacon street. 
Brookline. occupational therapist, $67.75 a 
week. 

Mary Cannata. 14 Granada park. Roxbury. 
hospital house worker. $47.75 a week. 

Paul E. Kaine. 26 Dunmore street. Roxbuo'. 
hospital house worker, $47.75 a week. 

Licensiso Board. 
Robert E. Ranire. 250 North Beacon street, 
Briirhton. principal clerk and typist, $70.25 
a week. 

Penai. lN.«iTm tion.-; Department. 

IloHsr of Corrrrtion. 
Gerald E. Crowley, 191 Marlboroueh street, 
correction officer, $72.75 a week. 

Pi BLic Works Department. 
nridgr-Tunnel Dirision. 
William Olzewski. 10 Lorraine terrace, 
Briehton. electrician operator. $72.75 a week. 
High u-ay-Lighting Divigion. 
James L. Flynn. lOA Westcott street. Dor- 
chester, eas-lamp service repairman. $70 a 
week. 

Elijah W. Newman. 9,1 Quincy Shore Boule- 
vard. Nort* Quincy. (tas-lamp clock and 
burner repairman, $100 a week. 



.Ian. 31 



CITY RECORD 



I 1 7 



Welfare Department. 
Central Office. 
James A. Sullivan, 115 Weld street, Roslin- 
dale, social worker, $70.2-5 a week. 

John G. Keating, 115 Eastwood Circuit, 
West Roxbury, social worker, $70.25 a week. 

Edward O'Malley, 93 Mt. Ida road, Dor- 
chester, third-class stationary engineer, $67.75 
a week. 

Doris .Mien, 63 Lawrence avenue, Dorchester, 
clerk and typist, $47.75 a week. 

SUFFOLK COUNTY. 
Municipal Court, City of Boston. 
For Criminal Business. 
Theresa M. Sullivan, 1515 Veterans of 
Foreign Wars Parkway, West Roxbury, clerk, 
$47.75 a week. 

East Boston District Court. 
Mary E. Goddard, 102 Webster street. East 
Boston, senior clerk, $60.25 a week. 

Reinstatements. 

Public Works Department. 
Sanitary Division. 
Ralph H. Francis, 48 Marion street. East 
Boston, laborer, $60.25 a week. 

Welfare Department. 
Central Office. 
Joan Henderson, 14 Highland street, Rox- 
bury, clerk and typist, $57.75 a week. 



Changes in Status. 

Assessing Department. 
Richard McDonough, 8 Bagnal street, AU- 
ston, from senior clerk and typist (temporary) 
at $67.75 a week to senior clerk and typist 
(temporary) at $65.25 a week. 

Auditing Department. 

Irving Siegfriedt, 18 Melvin avenue, Brigh- 
ton, from senior account clerk at $72.75 a 
week to principal clerk (temporaiT, 6 months) 
at $75.25 a week. 

Cosimo J. Vacca, 11 Bancroft street, Rox- 
bury, from senior account clerk at $70.25 a 
week to principal clerk (temporary, 6 months) 
at $72.75 a week. 

Fire Department. 
Julius W. Boris, 18 Gwinnett street, Hyde 
Park, from senior storekeeper at $84.75 a 
week to principal storekeeper (temporally, 6 
months) at $88.25 a week. 

Health Department. 
Healtii Division. 

Leo E. Diamond. 20 Bellevue road, Wake- 
field, from head clerk at $95.25 a week to 
director of Section of General Services (tem- 
porary) at $132 a week 

Mary M. Duffly, 175 Dartmouth street, from 
senior clerk and stenographer at $70.25 a week 
to principal clerk and stenographer (tempo- 
rary) at $72.75 a week. 

Josephine O'Farrell, 70 Hichborn street, 
Brighton, from principal clerk and stenogra- 
pher at $84.75 a week to head clerk (tempo- 
rary) at $88.25 a week. 

Mary A. Beavis, 909 Washington street, 
Dorchester, from principal clerk and ste- 
nographer (temporary) at $75.25 a week to 
principal clerk and stenographer (permanent) 
at $75.25 a week. 

Hospital Department. 
Main Division. 

James F. Flaherty, 1144 River street, Hyde 
Park, from hospital medical worker at $55.25 
a week to X-ray technician (temporary) at 
$57.75 a week. 

William P. Lane, 18 Haydn street, Roslin- 
dale, from senior X-ray technician (tempo- 
rary) at $70.25 a week to senior X-ray tech- 
nician (permanent) at $70.25 a week. 



Long Iiland Division. 

Mabel C. Whalen, 30 Taunton avenue, Mat- 
tapan, from clerk at $55.25 a week to senior 
clerk (temporary. 6 months) at $60.25 a week 

Thomas E. Murphy. 2 Parker Hill terrace,' 
Roxbury, from senior hospital kitchen worker 
at S65.25 a week to chef (temporary, 6 months) 
at $75.25 a week. 

John T. Caruso, 505 East Third street. 
South Boston, from senior hospital kitchen 
worker at $67.75 a week to assistant chef 
(temporary, 6 months) at $70.25 a week. 

Harold F. Warnock, Long Island Hospital, 
fron assistant chef at $75.25 a week to chef 
(temporary, 6 months) at $81.25 a week. 

Penal Institutions Department. 
Central Office. 
Cornelius M. Lanning, 24 Asheville road, 
Newton, from head clerk at $103.50 a week to 
executive secretary (temporary, 6 months) at 
$108.25 a week. 

Public Works Department. 
Sanitary Division. 
Mary K. Boyle, 323 Columbia road, Dorches- 
ter, from senior account clerk at $72.75 a 
week to principal account clerk (temporary) 
at $75.25 a week. 

Water Division, 
Arthur J. Rivers, 6 Bucknam street, Ro.n- 
buiT. from motor equipment operator and la- 
borer at $67.75 a week to senior engineering 
aid (temporai-y) at $75.25 a week. 

Traffic Department. 
Robert F. Drummond. 39 Vinson street, 
Dorchester, from senior civil engineering 
draftsman at $91.75 a week to senior traffic 
engineer (temporary, 6 months) at $113 a 
week. 

Lorraine C. Beaudoin, 224 Hillside road. 
North Andover, from telephone opei-ator at 
$67.75 a week to senior clerk and typist (tem- 
porary, 3 months) at $67.75 a week. 

Welfare Department. 
Central Office. 
Mary R. Hurley. 93 Melrose street, Arling- 
ton, from social worker at $84.75 a week to 
social work supervisor (temporary, 6 months) 
at $88.25 a week. 

Edward B. Ryan, 35 Asticou road, Jamaica 
Plain, from social worker at $84.75 a week to 
social work supervisor (temporai-y, 6 months) 

Honora Kelley, 189 Chestnut Hill avenue, 
Brighton, from social work supervisor at $91.75 
a week to piincipal social work supervisor 
(temporary. 6 months) at $95.25 a week. 



Transfers. 

Hospital Departjuent. 
Long Island Divisioti. 
Mabel C. Whalen, 30 Taunton avenue, Mat- 
tapan, from Welfare Department as clerk and 
typist at $55.25 a week to Hospital Depart- 
ment. Long Island Division, as clerk and 
typist at $55.25 a week. 

Public Works Department. 
Anthony Cerullo, 851 Sai-atoga street. East 
Boston, from Public Works Department, Sani- 
taiT Division, as motor equipment operator 
and laborer at $70.25 a week to Public Works 
Department. Sewer Division, as motor equip- 
ment operator and laborer at $70.25 a week. 



Leaves of Absence. 

Assessing Department. 
Robert E. McGovern, 108 Chittick road, 
Hyde Park, assistant assessor, $327.34 a month. 

Building Department. 
Anthony J. Gimilaro, 133 Eutaw street. East 
Boston, senior clerk and typist, $67.75 a week. 



Fire Department. 
Ralph W. Lewis, 70 Vallar road. East Boa- 
ton, storekeeper, $60.25 a week. 

Hospital Department. 
Main Division. 
Catherine F. Worley, 2050 Washington 
street, Roxbury, hospital house worker, $60.25 
a week. 

Kathleen H. O'Donnell, R.N., 710 Massachu- 
setts avenue, head nurse, $91.75 a week. 
Sanatorium Division. 

Elizabeth Rizzelli, 19 Charme avenue, Roslin- 
dale, hospital medical worker, $60.25 a week. 
Long Island Division. 

Mary A. Duggan. 14 Sterling street. South 
Boston, hospital house worker, $60.25 a week. 

Edward F. Wagner, 8 Centre street, Rox- 
bury, hospital laundi-y worker, $52.75 a week. 

Licensing Board. 
Walter J. Oakes, 85 Summer street, Hyde 
Park, principal clerk and typist, $75.25 a week. 

Parks and Recreation Department. 
Carmine A. Luongo, 47 North Margin street, 
laborer, $62.75 a week. 

Public Works Department. 
Highway Division. 
Henrv J. Coyne, 23 Wachusett street, Hvde 
Park, laborer, $60.25 a week. 



Step-Rate Increases. 

."Administrative Services Department. 
Administrative Division. 
John J. Scully, senior clerk-typist, from 
$62.75 to $65.25 a week. 

Purchasing Division. 
John T. Chunis, typewriter inspector and 
technician, from $72.75 to $75.25 a week. 

Assessing Department. 
John P. Doherty, executive secretary, from 
$141.50 to $165.25 a week. 



Building Department. 

Clifford T. Martell, interior electrical inspec- 
toi-, from $81.25 to $84.75 a week. 

Warren Fenlon, senior legal assistant, from 
$108.25 to $113 a week. 

Edward Coulombe, senior egress inspector, 
from $91.75 to $95.25 a week. 

Eleanor McDermott, principal clerk, from 
S77.75 to .'581.25 a week. 

Margaret Lennon, senior clerk-typist (tem- 
porary), from $62.75 to $65.25 a week. 

James P. Molloy, assistant executive secre- 
tary, from $127.25 to $132 a week. 

Rose K. Reynolds, senior clerk-stenographer 
(temporary) from $65.25 to $67.75 a week. 

Thomas G. Catavolo, building inspector, 
from $84.75 to $88.25 a week. 



City Planni.vg Board. 

John J. Coughlin, Jr., senior planner, from 
$117.75 to $122.50 a week. 

Robert C. Hansen, senior planner, from 
$117.75 to $122.50 a week. 

Fire Department. 

Ruth P. McDonald, principal clerk and ste- 
nographer, from $75.25 to $77.75 a week. 

James P. Maney, fire apparatus repairman, 
from $72.75 to $75.25 a week. 

Joseph G. Aldsworth. Jr., fire apparatus 
repairman, from $70.25 to $72.75 a week. 

Frank J. Cangemi. fire apparatus repair- 
man, from $70.25 to $72.75 a week. 

Alton J. Fuller, fire apparatus repairman, 
from $70.25 to $72.75 a week. 

Stanley F. Zuray, blacksmith, from $70.25 
to $72.75 a week. 

John J. Maguire, fire alarm operator, from 
$96.36 to $105.36 a week. 



I I K 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 31 



A rUrll and tirpUl. 

'k and timmn- 

HlanWr H Kovalrailrl. drpulr Mvlcr of 
.•lahu aiMl mmurM. frtmi IKI.ZA U> »M.Tt > 

Hu«rtT»L t>VABTMIMT. 

Marr V Urown*. rWrk and (rpUt. from 
mjl lo U7 TS a 

La«y T. l^urtaB. Mnlor cWrk and typUt. 
fruoi MT.Ti lo I70.3S a 

Noplut Mvdlral Worfcrni. 

Kroai To 

Mary B^U. Ii7.7&-»«0.18 

Ml ' \ I ■ .. 57. 7S 



\ hiMpital huuac worker, 

fron ■ wtwfc. 

Ma .•i .n» operator, from t6S.2S 

III »!>: . r. » 

Ju»r|<h t ri«k«-, itarUcnrr'a hriprr, from 167.75 
to 170. :.\ • wr»k 

Rnrm Farlno. flnlx-Uuu flrrtimn, from IK1.25 
lo l>>4 7& a wpvk. 

Ralph Qulclry, cl«rk of the work*, from 
IIM t.< II&&.7& a week. 

KHna Dorle. floor nuree, from t7S.2S to 
177 76 a wm4i. 

Vincrnt C. Kolan, clerk, from $47.75 lo 
l&O 2S a »«pk. 

KranrU Rockier, aenior honpilal kitchen 
worker, fn.m l«&.2& to 167.75 a week. 

June M. Kerrera. dielilian. from $S4.75 In 
lltN 2& a week. 



Thomaii K. Mahoney. hoapiul kitchen work- 
r. fn.m |ti.25 to 187.75 a week. 

Mirhacl Mrrrick. brwpital kitchen worker. 
r..m 1.'.: 7.% to »fin 2R a week. 

■ • i :f«l kitchen work- 

*' h.mpital kilchrn 

">'k .a week. 

.•ml.iilance driver, from 



Hoapiul Houne Workem. 

From To 
^ H-rd. »55.26— $57.75 

' -nn«n. 57.75— S0.2.', 

'">■• 57.75— SII.2.S 

57.75 - 60.25 
£7.78— 60.26 

^ • 55.28— 67.75 

J.*n Callaiher. .rni..r hoapital houac work- 
r. fr..m l«,'..25 lo $67.78 a week. 
*"Hrew fjHffln. aenior hoapiul houoe work- 
■ m $«6.28 to M7.78 a week. 

IToor Nura«a. 

Krotn To 
I78J6— 177.75 
72.75— 78.25 
78.28— 77.75 
., , „ 70.25- 72.75 

. . "v . " 70.26- 72.76 

•""'•Neil. 77.78- SI. 25 



Mary T. McCarthy. nura« inttnietor, from 

$»5 7'. to I'"- ■ wr,-k. 

v< \\ - tiif nurse-ad- 

nx a week. 

ir»e-ln»truc- 

!■ 

I ' nriician. from 

$• 

'.I. jnhalator equipment 

u. «'<1.25 a week. 

I .> <lio«raph technician, 

f, . i. week. 

k and ■lenoirrBpher, from 
$4 .veek. 

ornior clerk and typiat, 
t< 75 a week. 

< nior clerk and typiat, from 
». .v.ck. 

; iirincipal clerk, from $75.25 



Helen (iaITe)', head account clerk, from $91.75 
to $95.25 a week. 

Thoma" Cnwmen, clerk, from 147.75 to $60.25 

r.- 'M JafTarian. aenior clerk and typist, 

. • ■ : lo 170.25 a week. 
Ih .iH;.. Krily, caahier, from $72.75 to $75.25 
« «.-.k. 

Sara Ixwpie, principal clerk, from $76.2S to 
$77.75 a week. 

KniKie nianaky, aenior clerk and typiat, from 

!■ ,. Honyotiiki. senior clerk and typist, 

• <• . T , to $65.25 a week. 

M. ^ ^; I'umphret, clerk and typist, from 
>,•.■. .•.-, 1 , ?.',■>. 75 a week. 

Thomux A. Ryan, clerk, from $47.75 to $50.25 
a week. 

Jeasic Schiimburjr, clerk and typist, from 
$50.25 lo l,S2.75 a week. 

Manraret Slattor)-. senior clerk and typist, 
from $65.25 to $67.75 a week. 

Mar>- Wnxhintrton. clerk and typist, from 
$50.25 to $52.75 a week. 

Joaeph Vatalaro. hospital laundry worker, 
from JS0.25 to $52.75 a week. 

Hurnham L. Haskell, ambulance medical aid 
man. from $70.25 to $72.75 a week. 

Norman Brown, hoapital medical worker, 
from $17.75 to $.^0.25 a week. 

Sanatorium fUrition. 
Catherine Shaw, hospital Iaundr>- worker, 
from $57.75 to $60.25 a week. 

Park.s Asn Rbi-reation Depaktment. 

Mary D. Bibbey, senior laundo' worker, from 
$72.75 to $75.25 a week. 

Frank W. Clark. assisUnt civil enKineer, 
from $10.1.50 to $108 25 n week. 

Daniel A. CocuMo, assistant civil enfrineer, 
from $10H.25 to $11S a week. 

John P. Connjlly. laborer, from $55.25 to 
$57.75 a week. 

Harr>- Pamicella, assi$Unt civil engineer, 
from $10.1.50 to $10S.25 a week. 

Arthur A. English. Keneral superintendent, 
park maintenance, from $155.75 to $160 50 a 
week. 

David I. Fleming, laborer, from $62.75 to 
$65.25 a week. 

Edith E. Craham, matron, from $55.25 to 
$57.75 a week. 

Jiweph F. Halliaey, laborer, from $55.25 to 
*.'i7.75 a week 

KHlherine A. Kenefick, matron, from $67.75 
In $60.25 R week. 



Alexander Coomb*, assistant drawtondc 
from $70.25 lo $72.75 a weok 

Lawrence CunninKham, assisunt dra« 
tender, from $70.25 to $72.75 a week. 



James P. Revan, assistant draw-lender, from 
$70.25 to $72.75 a week. 

Francis J. Donahue, firat assisUnt draw- 
tender, from $72.75 lo $75.25 a week. 

Vini»ANH' Sesvu-es Department. 
John F. Kelley, veterans' services invesLi- 
iralor, frjm $70.25 to $72.75 a week. 



SUFFOLK COUNTY. 

Si'PERIOR COI'BT. 
H\uinc»m. 



Shehifp's Ofkice. 
Francis E. Killen, jail officer, from $75.25 



Pt aLir Works Department. 
liridgr l>iri»io«. 

tr^*l-^7^ »«*»t«nt drawtender. 

from $.0.25 tc $72.75 a week. 

fredcrick C. Blanchard. aasisUnt draw- 
tender, from $70.25 to $72.75 a week 



OVERTIME ALLOWED 

Tlie Mayor ha^ approved iho follow- 
inp riqnr.^t.<; 

Department of School Bi'ildincs. 
John G. O'Donnell, 16 hours at $3 an hour. 

HO.SPITAL Department. 
Thomas Bealh, chief electrician, 7 hours at 
$•! an hour: John Lcar>-, workine foreman- 
steamfitter. 4 hours at $.■} an hour; Edward 
Desmond, .senior clerk, 4 hours at $.3 an hour; 
Lawrenco'Mahong>-, Vinrinia Tubin, head clerks, 
4 hours each at $.1 an hour; .Anna Jordan, 
principal medical stenographer, 6 hours at $3 
an hour: Edna Chamberlin, Sarah Loonie. 
pnncipal clerk.s. 10 hours each at $3 an hour. 

Daniel Sullivan, boiler maintenance man, .>* 
hours at $3 an hour: Patrick Caffre>-, Robert 
Hansen, first-class steam firemen. S hours each 
at $3 an hour: Charles Lynch, third-chiss sU- 
lionary engineer. 8 hours at $3 an hour: 
Albert Bonnetti. second-class sUlionar>- engi- 
neer. 8 hours at $3 an hour: Thomas Regan, 
first-class steam fireman, 8 hours at $3 an 
hour: Duncan Thomson, third-class stalionar>- 
engineer, 8 hours at $3 an hour: Arthur 
Pearce, sccond-clas.s sUtionar>- engineer. 8 
hcur.^ at $3 an hour: C^rge Marks, third-class 
stAlionao- engineer. 8 hour, at $3 an hour: 
Waller Mailer, chief power plant engineer, 8 
hours at $3 an hour: Rocco Farino. first-class 
steam fireman, S hours at $3 an hour. 

Pi BLit- Works Department. 
.4 utomotire Division. 
Edward Bready. supervisor motor equip- 
ment assignment. 24 hours: John J. Crowley, 
general foreman-motor equipment repairman, 
19 hours: Coleman Earner, heavy trailer- 
wrecker operator. 7 hours: Edward Elmo, 
welder-foreman. 2S hours: Alvin Fisher, garage 
foreman, ,M5 hours: Thomas Flynn. principal 
account clerk. 11 hours: Frederick Harvey 
motor equipment repair inspector, 45 hours; 
Thomas Keating, motor equipment repair fore- 
man. 12 hours: Jo.«eph Marseglia, motor equip- 
ment repairman. 47 hours: Hcnr>- Marshall, 
working foreman. 4 hours: John Moran. work- 
ing foreman. 7 hours; Robert O'Brien, heavy 
motor equipment operator, 7 hours; William 
Pacitto, .senior storekeeper, 20 hours; James 
\1k J""*"" *<l"'P'"«nt repairman, 7 hours; 
/Mbcrt Tontodonato, machine maintenance re- 



Jan. 31 



CITY RECORD 



I I 9 



pairman, 6 hours; John Woods, garage fore- 
man. 9 hours: Anthony Zinna, motor equip- 
ment repairman, 7 hours. 

The following Public Works omplojccs 
have been added to the snow removal 
pay .schedule: 

Sanitary Division. 
Charles Smith, motor equipment operator 
and laborer. 

Seiver Division. 
Francis P. Harland. motor equipment oper- 
ator and laborer. 



VETERANS' RETIREMENTS 

The Mayor has approved the following 
veterans' applications for retirement : 

William Franklin Kinsman. 45 Chesbrough 
road. West Roxbury, motor equipment repair 
foreman. Traffic Department. 

Joseph G. Boyd. 3 Groom street, Dorchester, 
road roller operator. Highway Division, Public 
Works Department. 

Stephen Leo Cosgrove, 408 Beacon street, 
attendant nurse. Long Island Division, Hospi- 
tal Department. 

William Sinkiewick (also known as Vincis 
Senkevicius. William M. Sank, and William 
Seinkiewiez) . 28 Playstead road. Dorchester, 
motor equipment operator and laborer. Sani- 
tary Division, Public Works Department. 



WIDOWS' ALLOWANCES 

The Mayor has approved the follow- 
ing applications by veterans' widows for 
retirement allowances: 

Grace G. Driscoll, 9.3 Webster street, Arling- 
ton, widow of the late Francis J. Driscoll, 
former submaster in the Bennett District of 
the School Department. 

Agnes D. Woods. 12 Arborview road, Ja- 
maica Plain, widow of the late Thomas F. 
Woods, former supervisor of attendance in 
the School Department of the City of Boston. 



CONTRACTS AWARDED 

The Mayor approved the award of the 
following contracts to the lowest eligible 
bidder : 

Admixistrative Services Department. 
Purchasing Division. 
X=Ray Equipment 

Tumishing X-ray equipment to the Boston City 
Hospital, awarded to Westingliouse Electric 
Corporation, as follows: 

Item A, $34,595; Item B, S38.494; net total. 
$73,089. 

The bids were: 
Bid Request No. 1. To Be Based on M'ork Being 
Done Simultaneously or Concurrent! i/. 

General Electric Company.— Total for Items 
A and B complete, as per specifications. 879,410, 
less trade-in allowance, $1,810, total, with trade-in 
allowance, $77,600. 

Westinghouse Electric Corporation. — Total for 
Items A and B complete, as per specifications. 
$73,379, less trade-in allowance, $290, total, with 
trade-in allowance, $73,089. 

Bid Request .Vo. To Be Based on ^^^ork of and B 
Being Done at Different Times. 
General Electric Companj-. — Total bid for Item 

A, complete, as per specifications. S43,310, less 
trade-in allowance, $310. total, with trade-in al- 
lowances deducted, $43,000. 

Westinghouse Electric Corporation. — Total bid 
for Item A. complete, as per specifications, $34,735. 
less trade-in allowance. $140. total, with trade-in 
allowance deducted, $34,595.* 

General Electric Company. — Total Bid for Item 

B, complete, as per specifications, $42,000, less 



trade-in allowance on Item B3, $1..500, total bid 
for Item B. complete, as per si>ecifications, with 
trade-in allowance on B3 deducted, $I0,.')00. 

\V<stini;li<.u.sc Electric Corporation.— Total Bid 
for ItcMii H, ( c>iii|.li tc. as i)er s|jecifications. $58,644, 
less trad. -in nllouance on Item B3, $150, total bid 
for Item H. coniiilcte. as per specifications, with 
trade-in allowance on B3 deducted, $38,494.* 



• Contract awarded. 

School Com.mittee. 
Lumber 

The Husincss Manager of the School 
Coniniiltec h;is release*! the following 
conmiunication : 

Proposals for furnishing lumber for Boston 
public schools were opened on Monday, Decem- 
ber 1, 1958. at 12 noon. Bids were received 
from the following concerns: 

Neill & Spanjer, L. Grossman Sons, Inc., 
Cobb Lumber Company, Inc., Brodhead-Gar- 
rett Company, Holt & Bugbee Company, Gen- 
eral Builders Supply Company, Downes Lum- 
ber Company, Blacker & Shepard Company, 
Palmer & Parker Company, Rex Lumber Com- 
pany. 

Awards were made to the lowest responsible 
bidders, as follows: 

Holt & Bugbee Company, $16,270.40; L. 
Grossman Sons, Inc., $2,543.26; Neill & 
Spanjer, $1,856.37 

Awards on purchase orders were made to 
the following concerns: 

Brodhead-Garrett Company. $1,343.49; Cobb 
Lumber Company, Inc., $1,216. 

WITHOUT ADVERTISING 

The Mayor approved the award of 
contracts, without advertising, based on 
the following communications: 

Administrative Services Departme.nt. 
Purchasing Division. 
Drugs 
Dear Mb. Mayor: 

On June 30, 1958, your Honor approved a 
contract. No. 01-43-552, for Parke Davis & 
Co.. in the amount of $38,185.58 for the de- 
livery of drugs, as requested, to the various 
city departments until March 31. 1959. The 
contract amount plus the additional 25 per 
cent provided for has been exhausted. This 
office is now in receipt of several requisitions 
from the Boston City Hospital for the drug 
items awarded to Parke Davis & Co. 

It is therefore requested that authority be 
granted me to dispense with publicly advertising 
for prices and award a contract, without public 
advertisement, to Parke Davis & Co. for ap- 
proximately $18,000 of various drug items as 
manufactured by this company. Prices will 
be the same as those submitted by Parke Davis 
& Co. on the publicly opened drug bid of 
February 25. 1958. and included in contract 
No. 01-43-552. 

Total amount of contract will be $18,000, less 
2 per cent discount, time of payment. Delivery 
will be as requested until March 31, 1959. 
Respectfully yours, 

John V. Moran, 
I'urcliasing .Agent. 

Check Writing Machine 

Dear Mr. Mayor: 

This office is in receipt of a requisition from 
the Veterans' Services Department for one 
(1). only Model 32-16. Check and Payroll 
Writing Machine, as manufactured by the 
National Cash Register Company. Veterans" 
Services Department has spent considerable 
time evaluating operations of various makes 
of machines for its specific use and it has been 
established that the above machine is the 
most satisfactory for their use. 

Inasmuch as this machine can be purchased 
direct from the manufacturer, namely, the 
National Cash Register Company, it is my 



opinion that no advantage would be gained 
by publicly advertising for prices. Authority 
is therefore requested to dispense with publicly 
advertising for prices and award a contract, 
without public advertisement, to the National 
Cash Register Company for one (I), Model 
32-16, Check and Payroll Writing Machine, 
as per specifications as outlined be'ow: 

1. Machine to simultaneously write checks 
and prepare check registers of emergency pay- 
rolls. 

2. Machine to be equipped to provide the 
following: 

A. Typewritten name and address of payee 
on checlt register. 

H. Amount of check on check and check 
register. 

C. Number of check on check and check 
register. 

D. Automatic dating of check and check 
register. 

E. Single reverse key for voiding and cor- 
recting of checks. 

F. Total of daily payroll. 

G. Certification of authorization media. 

H. Price to include installation and train- 
ing of operators to the complete satisfaction 
of the Commissioner of the Veterans' Services 
Department. 

Delivery will be sixty (60) days from the 
date of order. Approximate total amount of 
contract will be $3,325, net. 

Respectfully yours, 

JoH.v V. Moran, 
Purchasing Agent. 

Perishable Food 

The Mayor, on Januai-j- 26, approved 
the following: 
Dear Mr. Mayor: 

For several years, your Honor has granted 
authority to this office to purchase perishable 
foods, including fruits, vegetables, meats, 
poultry, butter, fish and eggs, on a weekly 
basis and. in some instances, on a monthly 
basis. 

Inasmuch as purchases in this manner result 
in considerable savings to the city, authority 
is requested to dispense with publicly advertising 
for prices and award contracts, without public 
advertisement, to the following companies for 
the period from April 1, 1959, to March 31, 
1960, inclusive: 

Armour-Chamberlain, Division of Armour & 
Co.. 301 Southampton street. 

Beacon Fruit and Produce Company, Inc., 
13-15 Essex avenue. 

Morris Blinder & Co.. Inc.. 32 North street. 

Bornstein & Pearl Provision Company, Inc., 
196 Quincy street. Roxburv. 

Donald H. Chamberlain and William A. 
Chamberlain, a partnership doing business as 
H. W. Chamberlain & Sons, 21 Richmond 

Boston Bonnie Fisheries, Division of Genoa 
Fisheries, Inc., 295 Northern avenue. 

City Packing Company, Inc., 115 Newmarket 
square. 

Collins & Lee, Inc., 105 Suffolk street, 
Chelsea. 

Colonial Provision Company, Inc., 1100 
Massachusetts avenue. 

Cudahy Packing Company, 27 Fruit and 
Produce Exchange. 

F. DiBella & Sons, 109 Richmond street. 
Fulton Fruit and Produce Company, 3 Rich- 
mond street. 

G. Giovino Company, 19 Commercial street. 
Julius Jacobs, doing business as J. Jacobs 

& Co., 22 B & M Produce Market, Charlestown. 

T. F. Kinnealey Company, 20 Newmarket 
square. 

Irving Levitt Company, 30 Newmarket 
square. 

John Mantia & Sons Company, Inc., 254-258 
Northern avenue. 

Michael J. McCarthy, doing business as M. 
J. McCarthy & Co., 29-30 B & M Produce 
Market, Charlestown. 

Warren Fitch Company, Inc., 44 Fish Pier. 

Metropolitan Hotel Supply Company, Divi- 
sion of Swift & Co., 1000 Massachusetts avenue. 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 31 



MllWr Pruducv Companir. M Nrvourlirt 

-• .^-.r Cooipaay. Uc. Kl^ PUr. 
' ullrr Compaajr. lac. Itl Nrw- 



PLUMBINU PERMITS 

The HuildiiiK I><-|):irtinfnt liaj< isnuwl 
lti<- fiillouiiiK |NTiniti* for in- 

Kt.-ill.-ition of pliiiiifiinK iivtiircs fur the 
w't k cihliriK J.iiiuiirv J'i: 



Caoipanir. lae.. 70 ( 

I'acktns Companir, lac. 1140 Ct>- 

I r->b<>r Company, Inc. 38 South 

Uo llruUivr*. IHI 8UI« slrMt. 
y Klrh Cvmpanr. t Fisb Pivr. 

Kirharda Companr, lac. 23 Com- 

' ' . Inc. 2i Nurth Market itr«ct. 
< 'nda Company, ii Kront atrrvl. 

■r. dolnv buaincM *• Sam Shore 

Inc. 24 Ii * M Produce 

Inc. ISO Caiuvway atriK-t. 

^ ■' • ' . .1 -mpany. Inc. 460 E »tr«rl. 
.s.u:h lt.*'...r.. 

.Salft * Cu.. ON South Market atreet. 

Swift * Co.. doinR biuiniaa aa John P. 
Squire Company. I6i Gore street. Somerville. 

United Beef Company, 140 Newmarket 
•quare. 

Wlkon * Co.. Inc. 139 Waverly atrccl. 
Cambridsr. 

Kcvprctfully your*. 

John V. Mohan. 
I'urrhtuing Affrnt. 



TRAFFIC RULING 

Ttmporary 
riif Tnflir CominiHHioner has proiiml- 
iii(t rilling: 

■'ti the emer»enry created 
• In the Kneeland Street 
t that the ri>mi>letiiin of 
' John K Kitrserald Ex- 

" Mirily terminateil in the 

'i street, vehicle* were to 
! tti-..iit-'i H:irvnrd utreet. 

conform- 
The lt,»t.,n 
■ :i^e, public 
i.l'<-<k-d: and 
-tun Ti-uHii- Commimuin 
n <>r, the matter liecauKo 
■ ■f the prc«ent situation 
■ ii. attention of the Boston 
. iiMiii in lime for a traffic en- 
■ nly of the matter to be prmented 
Hcvlinit of the lloalon Traffic Com- 



I>. Ayle. 
W. Rikuiiiii 

I. . Itrau 
C. t*cr»i 
l>. Kuawi 

J. .MeNally 
.s. Adanu 
C, Serai 
W". foliMlla 
K Kaayrr 
V Adrenlmcli 
I'. Adrr-nbaeli 
P. .^iln-nharh 
I'. Adrrnbacli 
S. .Sliiilnian 
J. Hanntn 
H. .Sanyrr 
H. C-Ur>- 
.M. Capiito 

B. Porto 
H. f iirr> 
S. Un.laM 
S. Ijimlnii 

I,«n<laii 
I,anilau 
H. Kirby 

C. Zialla 

II. Smith 

A. .MeboKan 
H. Ij«f >ntra 
A. I .ifara 
.1. I .-nill.. 
H. IjiOntra 
H. WiitiihoMl 



H8 Peari ■! < 1 1 

M Province at ( 1) 



r.. i.. ,17 

90 08 Tremont at 

718 Beocli at (IRi 



17 II' «i. -■ J> 
4:\ lliidaun i>l Cii 

18 Lilbeow at (17) 
(Mil 6.11 Warren at 

I. '{'i7 Waahinxton at Cil 
« Ayr nl CJll 

J Beacon at (.'>> 
<4f)l Beacon at (.'•) 

II. j6 Cominonwealtb av 
ni PliilliiM Kt (.^1 

10 P.«t OHice »f| f.<i 
i»9 Bunker Hill at (2) 
I'lO Caljot at (111 
■J7 Allen at (.11 
HI Brinbton av (21) 
nr. Con-y rd (21) 
!»4_Stanif(>r<l si CJl 
■177 Wji^liington «t (.'t) 



«I.2.W 
l.JM) 
(10) 800 
."iOO 
10.000 
l.V) 
7.W 
100 

:»20 

•J.W 
I 2«0 
100 

I .700 

200 
1,200 
1.200 
1.200 
1.200 
400 
C.OOO 
400 
450 
.WO 
2.800 
2..500 
l.iO 
7.1 
.100 
) .M) 
400 
1.800 
1.2.10 
.1.800 
7.1 
(500 
600 
7.1 
100 



OAS FITTING PERMITS 

The Building Department has issued 
the followinR Kii." fitting permits for in- 
stallation of appli.anees for the week end- 
ing January 2.}: 

Note: Wards arc Indicated in parentheses 
(4). (16), etc., following name of street. 



(;»!.hit»:k 
N. Rubin 
N Rubin 
A. Il<b. ri 

.1. .^I|II|\HI1 

.1. .'^iilliMin 
W. Weloli 
J. Butler 
J. .McEll.inney 
.\. (iranrra 
J. I'rinripato 
A. Ilebirl 
n. Puoiwlo 
R. .McCall 
J. Principato 
I,. Rubinovitx 
R. Holnier 
K. f'arpy 
\. (iranam 
J Butler 
T. .Mathews 

.Adams 
J. Kopiano 
A. Kelleni 
R. nj|.«iren«o 
P. P.irk. r 
( .MrKone 
.1 RI|.■^ 



^ rom Harrison avenue to Huilson street. 



Location 
74.1 B«-eb St (181 
788 Beeeli st (I8i 
:<2 Bradlield st (201 
!• Clriyniont ter (Ifii 
KKK) Dorclii-ster av (Ifi) 
101)8 norrhesler av (I3» 
lUl liamilton st (l.li 
208 Hanover st Cii 
270 Hanover si Kli 
4«.t Hanover st (4i 
l.'tl llarrisliof st (12i 
124 .Maple rt (I2i 
lOO Saraloda st (I ) 
.■<0 S<tutli Marvin st CJ) 

9 South Market st V.it 

11 Speedwav av (22) 
4;t Tohin itl (20i 

1.1 I'nitv at 

.« Wealiriow at (16) 

22 AlUlon st (17) 

10 BlackHTll st (16) 
161 BenninKlon si (1 1 
44 r:iwn SI (19) 

.'<9 Huntinitton av (4i 
1.12 lluntinKlon av (4) 
26 JolinswiKMl rd (19) 

12 Minot st (16) 
1 16 ."vilem st CI I 
I7'.» .'vmtli SI (III 

:!7 West more nl (17) 
122 W.hhI av (I Si 
!M> BenninKt<in st (1 ) 
:t7 Chelsea st ( li 
89 l-Iaslon st (221 
81 Everell si (221 



Cost 
$60 



IHK) 
100 
4.1 

:,800 



GAnriTTKK 
.Sliuliiinn 
K. Sawv. r 
(;, Vallati 
W. Am ad 
J. Kn-edninn 
W. A«a<l 
II. Baron 
N. I)eiHscli 
.N. IK-utsrIi 
N. DiMilsrb 
N. D.-ut»cl. 
.N. Rskuwiu 
A. Nichinello 
S. Connolly 
J. Kre«^man 
J. I-'reednian 
J. Kreodnian 
J. Freed man 
I). Could 
S. Landau 
S. Landau 
S. I.Andau 
S. Landau 
S. landau 
Landau 
S. Landau 
C. .Mackin 
(i. .Mackin 
G. .Mackin 
(i. .Mackin 
C. .Mackin 
f;. .Mackin 
C. .Mackin 
(i. .Mackin 
c;. .Mackin 
(i. .Mackin 
C. .Mackin 
t;. Mackin 
C. .Mackin 
C. .Mackin 
Mackin 
(;. Mackin 
f ;. Mackin 
.Mackin 
C. .Mackin 
G. .Mackin 
C. .Mackin 
G. .Mackin 
G. .Mackin 
G. Mackin 
(i. .Mackin 
G. .Mackin 
(;. .Mackin 
G. .Mackin 
C. Mackin 
G. .Mackin 
.Mackin 
C. .Mackin 
(;. M ickin 
(;. Mackin 
G. Mickin 
G. Mackin 
(;. Mackin 
(;. Mackin 
G. Mackin 
G. .Mackin 
t;. Mackin 
(;. .Mackin 
Mackin 
G. .Mackin 
C. Mackin 
G. Mackin 
G. Mackin 
G. .Mackin 
C. .Mackin 
G. Mackin 
Xi. .Mackin 
(;. .Mackin 
G. .Mackin 
G. Mackin 
G. Mackin 
G. Mackin 
G. .Mackin 
G. .Mackin 

G. .Mackin 

H. Realiehe 
II. Ribick 
II. Ribick 
H. Ribick 

G. .Mackin 
P. Riely 
R. Riissol 
P. Cocoran 
C. .Meheuan 

H. Sellon 
J. rerullo 
E. .Mop l 
J. VoR.-! 



LOCATIO.N 
222 Koster si ( J2' 
17 ll"»letl 81 (20i 
7 Iowa st (11) 
104 Parsons st (22i 
2'.»'.I8 WasliinKlon si (III 
14 Waverly si (22i 
.'IS Cuiiiniinet m st (5i 
261 Kan Eaxle at (li 
120 Eveieit st (1 1 
276 Havre st (|i 
179 Paris si (I 
i;t6« Blue Hill av (14 i 
2a{ North Beacon st (22 
211 Regent st (I2i 
127 Crawford st (I2i 
.'(6 Kemptou SI (lOi 
214 Roxbur\- st (9' 
no Thornton st (111 
19 lluntinKlon av (4i 
4 Ayr rd (21 i 
490 ConiMionwealth av (. 
.112 Beacon st (.11 
1 1.12 Coninionwealth av 
1 1.16 Conimonw-ealth av 
1.11.1 Commonwealth av 
17 Gordon si (21 1 
1.18 Athens st I7i 
:192 Athena st (6) 
217 Bolton 81 (6) 

32 Covington st (7) 
139 D st (61 

1.12 I) st (6) 
162 E st (7) 
624 East Broadway (6) 
907 East Broadway (6) 
229 East Eielilh st (7) 
671 East EiKbtb st (6) 
426 East Fifth st (6) 
702 East Fifth st (6i 
.194 East Fourth st (6) 
842 East Fourth st (6i 
164 East .*M venth st (7) 
.12.1 E-i-.! Sevr nth st (7i 
- V ) .-■ .,'1, st (7i 

xl (6' 
■ w) 
- -1 (61 
l.,..-l il..r,i st (6) 
429 East Thiixl st (6) 
462 East Third st (6) 
26 Emerson st (7) 

33 f ; st (6) 
129 G st (7) 

19 Grimes st (6) 
100 H st (6> 

6 I st (7) 
39 I st (71 
162 I st (7) 
207 I st (7) 
221 K « (7> 
24 Lark st (7i 

.1 Linoln pk (7) 

7 Line iln pk (7) 
2 Lovis st (7) 
19 M st (6) 
1.10 M 8t (7) 
213 M 8t (7) 
224 M st (7) 

129 Marine rd (7) 
9 Mohawk st (7) 
83 Old Harbor st (7) 
132 P SI (7) 
2.1 Thomas pk (7) 
.10 Washburn st (7) 
86 West Eidhth st (7) 
178 West EiRhth st (7) 
171 West Fifth st (7) 
343 West F.urth st (7) 
44.) We.'<t F nirth st (7) 
17") West Ninth st (7) 
25).1 West .'v-cond st (7) 
162 West .'ieventh st (7) 
217 West Sixth si (7) 
288 West Third st (7) 
31 Walter st (20) 

8 Hudson st (3) 

I I Richfield SI (1.1) 
23 Woodrow av (14) 

3.1 Binnev st (4) 
31 Blakeville st (1.1) 
141 Briehton av (21) 
240 Cabot st (9) 

I I Chapman st (2) 
1 16 Corey rd (21) 
14 Noanct st (3» 
1081 River 8t (18) 



Cost 
$100 



10.000 
100 
100 
100 



Jan. 31 



CITY RECORD 



1 2 I 



BUILDING PERMITS 



The Buildiag Department has issued the following permits for the week ending January 16. 



Alterations 



.lue Hi: 
.:630 Blue HiUi 
. 60 Congress st . 
. 64 Dakota st . . 
29 Fottler rd . . 



Owner Location 

J. V. Knowles 74 BaUou av. . 

R. Abate 200 Bennington st. 

I. Roxnow 

Aldens, Ine 

A. W. Perry 

M. Lvnch 

D. Dodd 

S. Tringali 4:i Forest H.lls st 

H. Chassion 11 C;rew Hill rd 

J. Kelley 113 Greenbrier st 

A. & D. Kotock 17 Higligate st 

J. P. Pomerlgau 319 .Marlborough St. . 

H. Bassett 10 Moultrie st 

Rayco Auto Seatcovers Co 203 North Beacon st. 

M. Saba 713 Tremont st 

S. Fuller 786 Washington St . . . 

Murphy's Package Store 3999A Washington st 

.1. Marley 141 Weld st 

T. A. Manna 90 Woodrow av 

Dn?yfus Realty 661 Beacon st 

S. A S. Sansone 4 Billerica st 

S. & S. Sansone 6&8 Billerica st 

Mercantile Wharf Corp 88 Clinton st 

J. & M. Knapp 7.50 East Broadway. . 

S. Tringali 4.5 Forest Hills St.... 

E. P. Wood 10 fioodway rd 

.1. W. Mais 94 Huntington av . . . 

fiibbs Oil Co 57 Hvde Park av. . . . 

.1. Tweed 249 Hyde Park av. . . 

Bills Citv Transfer 66 Locust st 

K. A. Merrill 501 Shawmut av . . . . 

R. CoUing 29 Tilesboro st 

P. Gonis 9 -1 1 W. S. Kelley sq. 

S.W.Carter - - .. 

Harbor Motor Terminal.- 

M. Lutsema 

National Shawmut Bank 

F. Ferrara 

W. H. Carlson 26 Corona : 

S. Freedman 2009 Commonwealth av. 

Atlantic Refining Co 1442 Blue Hill av 

M. 1. T. Ii^stitute 97 Bay State rd 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co .50 Harvard av 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co 235 State st 

A. Applestein 101 Union Park st 

N. Applestein 103 Union Park st 

A. Applestein 105 Union Park st 



.V; Marlboro St. 

Xorthern av . . 
i7 W alworth st . . . 

() Water st 

133-935 Albany st. 









., 








on 






■? 


onn 










11 


1 


18 


.525 




4.300^ 


21 




17 


r-n 












1 -n 


■'n 






lo- 


Ti 


sm 








9^5 


3 


875 


3 


485 


fi 


400 


11 


1,275 


10 


980 


4 


100 


19 


500 


19 


365 


7 


6.50 


9 


250 


16 


50 


1 


475 


5 
6 


3.500 


20 
3 


50,000 




795 


^8 


100 




450 


18 


250 


5 


200 


18 


100 


3 


960 


8 


300 


8 


300 


8 


300 



Owner Location 
Applestein 107 Union Park st. 



C. Ferzoco 12 Vallaro rd 

.J. Janus 21 Annabel st 

New England Medical Centre, . . .37 Bennct st 

City of Boston Rear ID Don . , . 

V. Dimitre 25.", i: -t 

S. Andrews :i I ar m .■, 

S. Wadlan 22 M i,- m 

A. Berkman Sons, Inc 42 H. I .st . . . 

R. C. Haufler 11 Haverford st 

R. Larato 299 Savin Hill av. . . 

.1. Grammatic 634 Washington st . . 

P. L. Fuller 896 Washington st . . 

M. Gopan 1357 Washington St. 

P. Harrington 127 West Seventh st 

406 Corps 406 Boylston st 

Boston Real Estate Trust 276-288 Congress st . 

Mercantile Wharf Co 104-106 Clinton St. . 

B. J. Page 122 Gallivan Bouleva 

C. .T. Ciilman 83 Keystone st 

S. Hamburger 164 Lincoln st 

L. Sweeney 113 Lonsdale st 

Real Property 48 Ma' 



H. Coyle . 

H. P. McWalter 

M. Kaizer 

Miss .1. MeCormick 

A. W. Perry, Inc 

S. C. .Johnson 

Washington St. Realty Trust 



15 Mav 
626 Rive 
.'{0 Rockl 



Owner 



New Buildings 

Location 



HafTenreflfer Brewing Co 185-187 Boylston st . 

Kosciusz Ko Veterans .\ssoc 135 Buttonwood st . . 

T. J. McGreevey 803 La Grange st . . . 

Geraghty Brothers 166 Manchester St. . 

T. McGreevy 15 Park st 

American Sugar Refining Co 425 Medford st 



Buildings Removed 

Location 



Sherman Realty. 
Sherman Realty. 









linn 


IS 


1 am 


7 


1 nnn 








4jn 






20 


100 


14 


400 


8 




11 


900 


13 


100 


17 


300 


3 


9.50 


.'{ 


400 


6 


190 


.5 


4.50 


3 


5,000 


3 


490 


17 


1,.'J00 


20 


1,600 


3 


950 


16 


165 




960 


T 


990 






12 


750 


17 


1.50 


3 


2,.500 


9 


495 


3 


400 


ARD 


Cost 


11 


832,000 


7 


20,000 


10 


9,000 


17 


9,000 


20 


10,000 




4,000 


Vard 


Cost 


8 


S700 


8 


300 



DWELLINGS CONSTRUCTED DURING 1958 (BY WARDS) 

The following is a statement, by Wahds, of the number and established cost of new buildings for purposes of habitation for 
the erection of which applications were filed with the Building Department, City of Boston 

FOR YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1958 





1-Family 


2-Family 


4-Family 


Multi-Family 


Total for Year 


Ward 














































Number 


Cost 


Number 


Cost 


Number 


Cost 


Number 


Cost 


Number 


Cost 






S52,000 














5 


$52,000 


S 






1 


525,000 








$2,200,000 


2 


2,225.000 


6 


1 


10,000 














1 


10,000 


II 




23,000 
















23,000 


13 




12,000 








$15,000 








27,000 


15 












18,000 






I 


18,000 


16 


28 


291.100 














28 


291,100 


17 


20 


199,000 














20 


199.000 


18 


210 


1,912,.500 


6 


97,500 










216 


2,010,000 


19 


38 


337,000 














38 


337,000 


20 


116 


1,096,400 


2 


27,000 










118 


1,123,400 


22 


7 


66.000 














7 


66,000 


14 




10,000 














1 


10,000 


Total 


429 


$4,009,000 


9 


$149,500 




$33,000 




$2,200,000 


441 


$6,391,500 



CITY RECORD 



.Ian. 31 



DWELLINGS BUILT IN CITY (FIVE-YEAR PERIOD) 

T\f' folkiwiiiK »K » "tnH-mi-iit n|,owiiik huiiiImt of rii w hiiildinnK for j)ur|)<»H«'^ <»f hal)itati<>ii. tontthcr with (he number of 
armmmotinlioiiK pnivulitl ihrn-l.v. for tin- ••n-« lion ••f whUh appliraliotif w«n- fil«-<l with thi- Biiiidinn l)» |)iirtmc-nt of thr City of 
|t<»li>ii ■iiiriiit: 

FIVE CALENDAR YEARS ENDING DECEMBER 31. IMS 



•••• 

Nl MSUI or l-AHILI 






IMS 


I9S4 


f«mi l« KAril HI IL«.I>.. 


Familim 


Buildinci 


Farailia 


Buildini* 


FanuliM 




FBnuUea 


BuUdiiun 


Familiea 


1 { 429 




305 


3S5 


513 


513 


095 




095 


612 




B 


IS 


6 


10 


7 


14 


37 




74 


6 


IJ 






— 




2 


8 


1 




4 








148 


t 


■JO 


1 


3« 


6 




OS 


2 


23 






.■J74 


3«S 


523 


671 


739 


S42 


620 


647 


1 


i 
















■MlraatHraMorbouriacMMMUwlioii.l M;i9I^Vm 


SS.fl99.700 


S5.367.000 


S7 .507.200 


S6.04 


3.460 



DEMOLITION OF DWELLINGS (FIVE-YEAR PERIOD) 

Staii iiM -1 • \ iiiL' h inil.i r nf h:il>il :il ions taken down, together with the iiund>er of family .■ie<ommodation.« thereby eliminute<i 
diirinK the 

I IVE CALENDAR YEARS ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1958 





Nkmibb or Kamilt 


ISSS 


lfS7 


IMS 


l*SS 


1954 




Unm IM Each BriLoiMO 


BuiMmfi 


Familia 


BuUdinxa 


Familiea 


Buildinxs 


Families 


Buildings 


Families 


Build imcs 


• Families 






,08 


108 


90 


90 


81 


81 


15 


15 


7 




J 




I •-•7 


254 


lis 


230 


59 


118 


65 


130 




-11' 






Ma 


1.209 


318 


954 


249 


747 


91 


273 


24 


72 






1J9 


516 


34 


130 


27 


108 


32 


128 


7 


28 






20 


130 


3 


15 


4 


20 


5 


25 






6 

7 






12 


6 


86 


12 


72 


6 

2 


36 
16 










TBS 


2,229 


566 


1,461 


432 


1.146 


216 


623 


SB 


149 

















Aframmodalioaa etiminatMl t>y altrriiui and rpnicNlnlinit 


97 


08 


21 


21 




Total niini>M<r uf arcoinmiKUtinnK Hiniinatol . . 


2.2.30 


1,5.">0 


1.167 


644 




ArcommtxUtiniu provulml by nm rdrutnirlioii 


4-11 


307 


571 


842 




Ar«onim»UtN>ii« pntvMlrd by BlKrinc 


as I 


195 


300 


328 


4H 


Tout •ddiiiorutl ■roimmcMiatinnK |imvH|i-<| 


822 


502 


871 


1.170 




Ti niimbor of habhalioaa Md aeoomroodaUoio 














-358 


— 101 


•91 


♦523 


».V>I 




— 1.352 


—079 


—296 


•.526 


*<KK) 



— Denotes decrease 



.Tax. 31 



CITY RECORD 



I 23 



IMPROVEMENTS VOTED 

Tlie Mayor and Public Imiirovomrat 
Commission have approved the follow- 
ing: 

Private Way in Hyde Park 

Permission is hereby granted to Sevenel, 
Inc.. to open for public travel Mansur street. 
West Roxbury and Hyde Park districts, as 
constincted in accordance with the lines and 
grades shown on a plan by James E. Nicker- 
son. Civil Engineer, dated August 31, 1957, 
revised December 1.5. 1958, and on file in the 
office of the Suivey Division, Public Works 
Department. 

Gas Main Permit 

That permission be granted to Boston (las 
Company to lay and maintain an underground 
structure (155 feet of 4-inch intermediate 
pressure steel main) in Bowditch road. West 
Roxbury district, from the existing 6-inch 
main to 155 feet westerly, substantially as 
shown on a plan marked "Proposed Location 
of 4-Inch Gas Main in Bowditch Road, Ja- 
maica Plain, Boston Gas Company, December 
22. 1958," and on file in the office of the Com- 
missioner of Public Works. 



The Commissioner of Public Works is hereby 
authorized to issue permits for opening and 
occupying the street for constructing and 
maintaining said gas main, under the condi- 
tions set forth in the City Ordinances, and 
such other terms and conditions as the said 
commissioner may deem proper. 

The work of locating said main to be subject 
to the approval of said Public Works Commis- 
sioner, and the street above referred to is to 
be kept open for both pedestrian and vehicular 
traffic during the construction of said main. 

Dorchester Sewer 

(>rthr<(l. That 400 linear feet of 12-inch pipe 
sewer, one manhole, and two catch basins be 
constructed in Willow court, Dorchester dis- 
trict, from Boston street to Field's court, at 
an estimated cost of $6,200. 

Ordered, That this commission estimates that 
the undermentioned parcels of land situated on 
both sides of Willow court as shown on a plan 
marked "City of Boston, Plan No. 1517. Sewer- 
age Works, Willow Court, Dorchester, January 
5. 1959, James W Haley, Division Engineer, 
Survey Division, Public Works Department," 
and on file in the office of said department, 
will receive benefit or advantage, beyond the 



general advantage to all real estate in said 
city, from the improvement herein ordered, 
in the amounts hereinafter mentioned. 
Parcel. Amount. 

1. Wilfred A. Smith $355 87 

2. Banquer Realty Company, Inc 619 13 

3. City of Boston 975 00 

Total $1,950 00 



APPOINTMENT OF 
ACTING PURCHASING AGENT 

The Ma.Nor, on .Fanuar,\- 1."). ai)pro\( il 
tiic I'ollowinK: 

Dkau Mk. Mayor: 

Under the provisions of chapter 3. section 
22. Revised Ordinances of 1925. I designate 
Eugene K. Welsh, Assistant Purcliasing Agent, 
to be Acting Purchasing Agent of the Purchas- 
ing Division, from January 19, 1959. to Febru- 
ai-y 18. 1959, inclusive, in my absence at any 
time. 

Respectfully yours, 

John V. Moran, 
Purchaaing Agent. 



BUILDING PERMITS 



The Building Department has issued the following permits for the week ending .January 23 
Alterations 



Owner 

Berger Realty Co 

Homes, Inc 

M. Honisv 

J. O Toole 

J. E. Shannon 

T. Cianna 

Boston Five Cents Sa\ ings Ba 

W. McCarthy, Jr 

Waldorf System, Inc 

W. C. Jenkins 

J. Mickolas 

D. J. Herd 

State Street Trust Co 

Egyptian Theatre 

S. S. Kresege 

A. Harris 

Minot, Dubois & Maddison . . . 

M. Miller 

G. Mann 

Socony Mobil Oil 

.\shniont Supply Co 

E. F. Lawler 

Mrs. I. Taylor 

Boston Home for Incurables 

Rudolph Whitfield 

Manuel Pereira 

Leon Evan 

Federal Reserve Bank 

G. Gillen 

J. McCarthy 

S. Hurwitz 

S. Hurwitz 

S. Hurwitz 

H. Lawrence 

C. F. Connors 

C. Datol 

Sal's Launderette 

.1. Graham 

J. Graham 

Esso Standard Oil Co 

Giacomo Berardi 

Philip Leader Ins. Agency 

Mr. Lafucci 

S. Maple 

Philip L. Leader 

Fannie Kravitz 

Sydney Davidoff 

Richards Bldg 

Mrs. P. Hapey 

Arch Street Assoc. Cable 

Ashmont Supply Co 

Mick Murphy 

Peter Mackey 

John Hovestadt 

.loseph Conley 

M. and L. Pelligrini 

Coleman Curran 



Location 
onjii ess St . . 



18 SiiMiiner st 

i:i3 i^ydnoy st 

. :i 1 Temi>k'ton St. . . . 

.")1 Vocel st 

,216 Wasliin-ton st 
.326 Wasl]in-tc)n st 

479-491 Wasliin^'tdi 

2978 Washington st 
..■58 Went worth st . . . 

.321 Beacon st 

.323 Beacon st 

19.55 Beacon st 

309 Blue Hill av.... 

1 2 Dana av 

. 164 Dana av 

2049 Dorchester av . 
..'.-i Duntcath st 



20 



1 1.).) \\ a.shington St. . . 

60 West st 18 

68 Wlieatland av 14 

200 Bennington st ■.. 1 

27 Benton st 9 

29 Benton st 9 

1 420 Boylston st 21 

29-29A Chestnut av 10 

142 Dudley st 9 

.55 Endicott st 3 

63-65 Hancock st .5 

246 Huntington av 4 

620 Norfolk st 18 

20 Powellton rd 14 

114 State st 3 

104 Wilmington av 17 

101 Arch st 3 

339 Blue Hill av 12 

20 Banton st 16 

6 Bovd st 15 

11 Boyd st 15 

82 Central a v 18 

64 Chestnut Hill av 21 

55 Dunboy st 22 



Cost 
.?I,200 
250 
100 
1,900 
3,000 
300 
.500 
50 



1,000 
.500 
700 
200 
200 
500 
400 



400 
900 
600 
3.300 
600 
950 
200 
400 



Ow.vKR Location 

Raymond McLaughton 1 Hall pi 

Richard McLaughton 2 Hall pi 

Joseph Baliconis 204 I st 

John A. Olson 30 Mattakeeset st. . 

Alfred Presutti 8 Navillus ter 

Joseph Fanata 25 Regis rd 

Peter Falcon 1283 River st 

Ronald Anderson 369 Savin Hill av . . . 

Jay Risenian .5 StonchiU rd 

Est-ite of Rebecca Berly 1070 Trcniont st . . . 

Fete,- flurni 35 Wood av 

Miss Dora Brass 14 Wood row av . . . . 

1.. and ,S. Wolfe 1.5 Wcstiuo.e rd . . . 

Eileen F. Donoluie 7-11 Beaver pi, 

(Children's Hospital 1 Blackfan st . , 

Beacon Auto Radiator Co 110 Brookline av 

Ed (JIassman Rear 22 Chad" ick st 

Beacon Auto Radiator Co 31-37 .Jersey st 

Joseph B. Beatty 16 Sparhawk st , . 

James H, Triggs 9 Summer st 

Max Gupin 1857 Washington st. 

A & P Transport, Inc 20 Wyola pi 

Ruth Jackson 24 Alpine st 

K. J. VanEtten 60 Charles-atr W ( >l 

IiMiig Tanning Co 134 Bcac li .-i 



,45 Chart. 



-McLennan, Inc 60 Congress si 

Rcalt\- Co 275 Congress i 



ARU 


Cost 


11 


$493 


11 


256 


7 


1,400 


18 


661 


15 
18 


120 


18 


495 
275 


13 


256 


18 


376 


9 


475 


18 


485 


14 




16 


79.5 






4 


3.200 




4, .500 


8 


500 




600 


18 


4.50 


3 


8.500 


14 

12 


9(X) 




1 25 
250 


3 


75 


12 


.500 


.'i 


100 


3 


720 


3 


1 .200 



Buildings Removed 



Owner 
Cecelia Pesczatek. 
Cecelia I'esczatfk. 
Fannie ( ;..l.|iiiai. 
Sl,ivrk-\V,,IJ„i« 
Daval mill .M:m\ ( 
William L.-MH 
William Levin , , 
William Levin, Sr. 
William Levin . . . 
William Levin , . . 
Frank Cavalere . . 



Location 


Ward 


CO.ST 


12 Dennis st 


8 


S700 


10 Dennis st 


8 


700 


97 Devon st 


14 


1,175 


166 Pleasant st 


15 


200 


107 Spencer st 


17 




52- .54 Whittier st 


9 


1,500 


1177-1179 Tremont st 


9 


1,000 


1181-1183-1185 Tremont St. 


. 9 


1.500 


1187-1189 Tremont st 


9 


1.000 


56 Whittier st 


9 


1.000 


17 Chaucer st 


1 


575 



New Buildings 



Owner Locatio.v 

DeRo.sa. Inc 6 Birchland tf 

DeRoma. Inc 10 Birchland ' 

DeRoma, Inc 14 Birchland i 



F. DeRoma, 
Donald J. Corey 
New Eng. Tel. & Trl i 
Greendale Constnu tion ( d,. Inc 

Louis J. Cedrone 

Michael Caruso 

Greendale Construction Co., Inc. 



18 Birchland ter. , . 

741 Centre st 

.50 Harvard av , , , , 

,65 Lorna rd 

33 Nantasket av . . 
75-81 Salem st. . . . 
70 West Seldon st . 



Cost 
S8.000 
8,000 
8,000 
8,000 
18,000 
1.50.000 
10.00 
9,000 
20,000 
16.000 



24 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 31 



CINCINNATI LINDEROROUND QARAOC 



CITY or BOSTON. 



ASSESSING DEPARTMKNT. 

Amwho"" Notic-b to Taxpayos. 

City Haix Aknkx. 

lUWTON. Jani'AIIY I. 1959. 
R«Tl»NB Ml XT BB MAt.B ON OB BBPORB 

Jam'ARY .^1, 19S9. 
Particular »llcnlion 1« called to the A»- 
irmMon' notice punted upon City Hall and 
variou* other place* throuehout the city rel- 
ative In makinB retumii on pemonal property 
lubjrrt tu taxation. 

EAKI.K R. IlARNABn. 



(Ju. 10.17. 14. SI.) 



CITY OK BOSTON. 

Al.MINI.STHATIvV: SKRVICKS DKl'AKT- 
MKNT. I'l'KCHASINC DIVISION. 

rR..i-..^Ai.'< roK KrKM.-iiiiNr. Co.N. RETt: Ski - 

TIONAI. I.INKR)* ri'R CKMETERY IJIVI.SION. 
I'n>|«M.aW may 1m- .*t«ined at Room 5:1. City 
Hall. At thin nH>m the bids will be openi-d 
and read Monday. February 9. 1959. at 12 M. 
The bidder muxt leuve hi* proposal with a 
rerlinrd cheek for $100. payable to and to 
become the property of the City of B.w'ton 
if the pro|Mwal i» not carried out. A dupli- 
cate bid. without check. mu»t be left with the 
Auditor prior to the time for openinic bids. 
Knvekipeii containing bido to be steiiled and 
marked "Vropimal for C(mcrete Sectional 
I ,n. r, ■ Thi- HUCceiMtful bidder must furnish 
'formanee h<md for one half the 
■ 1 amount of the contract with 
. [•any authnrixed to do business 
M .Its. The rurchasinii Aitent re- 

.. HI-, -.hi iiifhl to accept or reject any and all 
bida. or any part of a bid. and to award the 
contract as he deems for the best interest* of 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES DEPART- 
MENT. PURCHASING DIVISION. 

I'Koi-osAi.H roK KrKM.-iMiNc; OrruiAi, Enve- 

l,oPIW roK TIIK I'KINTINi; SWTIOS. PlH- 

I'liAMN); Division. 

Propotab may be obtained at Room 63, City 
Hall. At thi* room the bidi will be opened 
and read Friday. February fi. 1'1.59. at 12 M. 
The bidder must leave his proposal with 
a certified check for $100. payable to and to 
become the property of the City of Boston 
if the proposal is not carried out. A dupli- 
cate bid, without check, must be left with the 
Auditor prior to the time for opening bid*. 
Envelopes containine bids to be sealed and 
marke<l -ProiMmal for Envelopes." The 
successful bidder must furnish a faithful 
performance bond for one half the total esti- 
mated amount of the contract with a surety 
company authorized to do business in Massa- 
chusetts. The Purchasing Asent reserves the 
riirht to accept or reject any and all bid.i, or 
any part of a bid, and to award the contract 
he deems for the best inlcresta of the city. 

John V. Moban, 

(.)an.:<l.) I'uTchating .Ijcnf. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



I'uTchanng Agent. 



1'HOI-O.XAI.K POK Fl KNI.SIIINC I'AKK Egi lPMENT 

(MoHKit.>s. Fairway CiniNr, Units, Hand 

TRIMMP.RM). 

PruposaU may be obt«ine<l at Room 53, City 
Hall. At this room the bids will be opened 
and rtvjd Thursday, February 12, 1959, at 12 M. 
The bidder must leave his proposal with a 
certified check for $100 payable to and to 
become the property of the City of Boston 
if the proposal is not carried out. A dupli- 
cate bid, without check, must be left with t<ie 
.\uditor prior to the time for openinK bids. 
Envelopes containine bida to be sealed and 
marked "Proposal for Park Equipment." The 
successful bidder must furnish a faithful per- 
formance bond for one half the total esti- 
mated amount of the contract with a surety 
company authorized to do business in Matwa- 
ehu.setts. The Purehasinit Aitent reserves the 
riirht to accept or reject any and all bids, or 
any part of a bid. and to award the contract 
as he deems for the best interests of the city. 

John V. Moran, 

(Jan. 31.) Purchasing Agent. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proposal.s por FrRNisiiiNG Ready-Mixed 
Concrete. 

Pro|K>sals may be obtained at Room 53, City 
Hall. At this room the bids will be opencfl 
and read Wednesday, February 11, 1959, at 12 M. 
The bidder must leave his proposal with 
certiiie<l check for $100, payable to and ti> 
become the property of the City of Boston 
if the proiMisal is not carried out. A dupli- 
cate bid. without check, must Ik- left with th. 
Auditor prior to the time for opening bids 
Enxekipes rontaininic bids to be scaled ami 
marked "Proposal for R™dy-Mixe<l Concrete." 
The successful bidder must furnish a faithful 
performance l>ond for one half the total esti- 
mated amount of the contract with a surety 
company authorized to do business in Massa- 
chu.setts The Purchasinit Aicent reser\'es th>- 
riirht to accept or reject any and all bids, oi 
any part of a bid. and to award the contract 
as he deems for the best interests of the city. 

John V. Moran, 

(Jan. 31.) I'urehaaing Agent. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



i'KoroSAI-S POR Fl'RM.SIIING IROS CaSTIS(..~ 

AND Bronze Fittings por the Sewer Di- 
vision, PiBLic Works Dei-artment. 
Proposals may be obtained at Room 53, City 
Hall. At this room the bids wiU be opene<i 
and read Thursday. February 12, 1959. at 12 .V 
The bidder must leave his proposal with 
a certified check for $100, payable to and !• 
become the properly of the City of Boston it 
the proposal is not carried out. A duplicatr 
bid. without check, must be left with the 
Auditor prior to the time for openine bids. 
Envelopes containing bids to be sealed and 
marked "Proposal for I ron Castinirs and Kron?.!- 
Fittinirs." The successful bidder must furnish a 
faithful performance bond for one half thi- 
total estimated amount of the contract with .i 
surety company authorized to do business in 
Massachusetts. The Purchasintr Aifent reserves 
the riirht to accept or reject any and all bids, 
or any part of a bid. and to award the con- 
tract as he deems for the best interests of th.- 
city. 

John V. Moran, 
(Jan. 31.) Purchasing Agmt. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES DEP,» RT- 
MENT. PURCHASING DIVISION. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proposals may be obuined at Room 53, City 
Hall. At this room the bids will be opened 
and read Wednewday. FeJiruary 11. 1959, at 12 M. 
The bidder must leave his proposal with a 
certifled check for $100, payable to and to 
become the property of the Cjty of Boston 
if •>!.■ i.r..p„«al is not carried out, A dupli- 
•h.«ut check, must be left with tl>e 
- to the time for openins bids. 
TitaininB bids to be sealed and 
p.-al for Crass Seed and Fcrtili- 
I I., -iiccessful bidder must furnish a 
faithful performance bond for one half the 
total evtimated amount of the contract with 
> •iirr'v ompany authorUed to do business 
\1 ' i^etu. The Purchasinit Agent re- 
k-ht to accept or reject any and 
• ny part of a bid. and to award 
i« he deems for the htmi interests 

John V. Moban, 

(Jan. 31.) Purchasing Agml. 



Proposaus por Fi'RNisHiNC. Sanp and Gravei, 
POR City Departments. 

Proitosaki may be obtained at Room 53, City 
Hall. At this room the bids will be opened 
and read Tuesday. Februao' 10, 1959, at 12 M. 
The bidder must leave his proposal with a 
certi(ie<l check for $100, payable to and to 
l>ecome the property of the City of Boston 
if the proposal is not carried out. A dupli- 
cate hid. without check, must be left with the 
Auditor prior to the time for openini; bids. 
Envelopes containinic bids to be scaled and 
marked "Proposal for Sand and Gravel." The 
successful bidder must furnish a faithful per- 
formance Uind for one half the total estimated 
amount of the contract with a surety company 
authorized to do business in Massachusetts. 
The Purchasing Agent reserves the right to 
accept or reject any and all bids, or any part 
of a bid, and to award the contract as he 
deems for the best interests of the city. 

John V. Moran. 

(Jan. 31.) Purchasing Agmt. 



Proi"osaij> for Ft RNisiiiN<; Porti.and Cement 
TO City Departments. 

Proposals may be obtained at Room 53, City 
Hall. At this room the bids will be openiii 
and read Tuesday, February 10, 1959, at 12 .v 
The bidder must leave his proposal with n 
certified check for $100. payable to and to 
become the property of the City of Boston 
if the proposal is not carried out. A dupli- 
cate bid. without check, must be left with th. 
Auditor prior to the time for opening bids 
Envelopes containing bids to be sealed and 
marked "Proposal for Portland Cement." Thi 
successful bidder must furnish a faithful per- 
formance bond for one half the total estimatol 
amount of the contract with a surety compan\ 
authorized to do business in Ma.ssachusett~ 
The Purchasing Agent reserves the right t" 
accept or reject any and all bids, or any par' 
of a bid. and to award the contract as h. 
deems for the best interests of the city. 

John V. Moran, 

(Jan. 31.) Purchasing .\gcnt. 



Cm OP Boston 
AOMINISTRATn-B Sehvicbs Dbpartment 
Pbintino i,T!n^ Section 



CITY RECORD 

Official Chronicle of Boston Municipal Affairs. 

Vol.51 Saturday, February 7, 1959 No. 6 

MAYOR EXPLAINS $7.5 MILLION BUDGET RISE 



Mayor John B. Hynes, in submitting liis 1959 
budget to the City Council on February 2, stated as 
follows: 

Gentlemen: 

Herewith submitted are the main City, County, 
and Income Department budgets for the year 1959, 
totaUng ?*;121, 669,421. 00. 

The amounts allowed in these budgets exceed the 
1958 allowances by S3, 120,369, which is a 2.6 per 
cent increase. To this amount must be added, how- 
ever, the sum of .14,365,000 for salary increases to 
the uniformed men of the Fire and Police Depart- 
ments, which appropriation was approved b}' your 
Honorable Body on January 5, 1959. The budgets 
submitted herewith, plus the amount already ap- 
propriated, represent an increase of $7,485,369 o\'er 
last year, or an increa.se of 6.3 per cent. Of this 
increase 3.6 per cent is by reason of the above- 
referred-to salary adjustment. 

The allowances as submitted arc •$7,797,993 less 
than the estimates submitted by City and County 
Departments. In some instances, department esti- 
mates have been so drastically trimmed that depart- 
ments will be forced to exercise extreme care to li\ e 
within the amounts allowed. Wherever possible to 
do so, estimates for improvements, though con- 
sidered necessary, ha^■e been entirely eliminated, and 
the improvements deferred. It is not, 1 submit, 
economical or good business to defer necessary im- 
provements. There is no other course to follow, how- 
ever, in the face of generally rising costs and income 
losses from decreasing A'aluations. 

Personnel costs continue to rise chiefly because of 
the referendum increase voted for fire fighters and 
extended to policemen. To this increase must also 



be added higher overtime payments, recjuired by 
law, and based on the higher rate of pay. 

In a continued effort to keep personnel costs at the" 
lowest possible point, 291 permanent positions have 
been eliminated. 

No pro\ isiou is made in the budgets as submitted 
for wage or salary increases to employees other than 
the imiformed men of the Fire and Police Depart- 
ments. This matter is still luider consideration 
while studies are being completed of wage rates paid 
by the Commonwealth and by other Massachu- 
setts cities and towns. 

Other than the personnel increase, the largest 
single increase in the budgets, as submitted, is found 
in the categories of aid to dependent children, and 
aid to the aged. Because of increased payments as 
promulgated l)y the state government as a conse- 
quence of higher living costs, the appropriations 
allowed for 1959 are some .$1,200,000 greater than 
in 1958. 

Other substantial budget increases over last year 
are because of repair needs both minor and struc- 
tural in the Hospital Depai tiuciit ; noncoutributory 
pensions and annuities; l\('scr\-c i'nnd: higher street 
ligliling rates; cost of printing ballots lor the coming 
municipal primary and election; new elevators and 
rewiring at Police Headciuarters and repairs to 
police stations; major repairs to Park Department 
buildings and structures; replacement of obsolete 
equipment in various departments; and traffic con- 
trol signals in various section of the city. 

Kditof's N(i(c. — A more dcUtilcd anali/.'iis uf 

ihr l,ii,lii<l irill itpputr in lliv Cilii Council 
ininiikis for Fvbruunj .1 to Im piibli.sliril in the 
''City Record" issue of February 14- 



INDKX TO 
CITY HALL 

Telephone I. A J 5100 

ADMIMHTIWTIVK 8KKVK K-^ 

.Ml. t'„. „ 

Adminwtralivo I>ivi»>«'i 

Hudfrl IhviMon 

I'monnrl Divinon 

I'urrhaioni Divtnon 

<MIirr Marhinr Up|iair 1 mi i 

AlDITINt; 

llllln «l>ij ArraunU 

CITY CI.KHK 2n.i llo.,r 

lloal Un-iim (C'ounril appr ) 
IkMlhUrk* (in 21 yn ) 
liuMnna ( Vrtihralr* 
CfWtrfv IVrmiU (Counril ii|>|)r ) 
( 'itv I >r>liiiniir<'* 
CUimn 

Kwhinx and lluiiliiiK l.inti«ni 
Ciun ( lull I.Mi niwB (Coutinl appr ) 
Jlllirv l.|rfli»ni (Colllirll »p|>r ) 
Npmrfm*. (Iti 21 vm ) 
HJtrll Kwh IVrmiU (Council appr.) 
Kunilay .S|Mirl» (0)unril appr.) 

CITY t:<)rNCII, nU floor 
Clerk of C«mmiH«* 
Counril (ximmittm 

(Hi-Kular Wrrkly MwliniP", .Moii<l»v», 
2 r.M.) 

CITY MlvSSKNCKU 4th floor 

Cily Documcnl* 

CITY |{i:C()IU) . :Jr<l floor 

COMPLAINTS DIVISION 2nd floor 

CUi:i)IT I NION :Jrd floor 

City lOmployrm 

MAVOH S OKKICK . 2nd floor 

mator'h orricr tclsi-hone I.A 3- IKK) 
I'ulilir Cvlrlirationii 2nd floor 

lOntrrtainmrnt Lironimi '.itxl floor 

NrwKtioya (ItoKton Common) 

I'UIXS Il(M)M .{rd fliwr 

KimilKMKNT HOAUI) . .Ud floor 

TKl ASfUV |)l\ ISIiiN iKl door 

CITY HALL ANNEX 

Telephone LA 3 SlOO 

.\SSI--SSIN(; . . 3rd floor 

Alntrmrnt IVtitiouK 
AiwMiora Ortifimtpn 
i ;\ri.«r Tiixi* 

HI ILDINC itlh floor 

ApiM-alK — ItiiiiiliMK C 



THE PRINCIPAL MUNICIPAL SERVICES 



Zoning I^w 
Huililinx lVrmili« A I'lanf 
Demolition IVrmilo 
KliTlrirnl In!<talliili<>ii« 
i:irvatc.r 0|M rntor> 
(•araKm. Liiliritoriiiiii' 
(!a» InMallalionx 
lleatinK Inftallation- 
Ojicn Air I'arkinR S|. i 
I'liiinliinK lix-l .11 i<i' : 

Ihihli. S;if.iv I . ..v., , 



I 
I 



COLI.K(TIN(i DIVISION 
Munirinal Ijenn 
Tax Collrrtinnii 

lOLIKTION 
VolinK Ortifiratm 
VnlinK UrKiiitmlion 

ri.NAI. INSTITI TIONS 



JM.ANNIN<; liOAKD 

tuning Adjuitmrnta 

ZoninK Map* 
IM HLIC WOIlKJi 

Aulomotivp Divinon 

Hndgf Divimij 

II.Kln 



Div 



CIcaninKA Itrpair* 
Sln-. t Oix-niriKu 
r. rmit Offir.- 4lh 
.sini i < ir< iipjinri<ii 
l'ri>j«Ttion» over Higbwaya 
.SidcKiilk Lirenwii 
Sanitary Diviwon Slh 
Carliorge A Kulibiiih Collerliona 



Se»er Diviaion 
S'wer l';iilranrf 
Stiikkt Li<iiiTix<; 

Survey Division 
Stm't Ac-reptaiii 
Street Line* 

Water Diviaion 
Meter lUwiing 



floor 
floor 

fliKir 

floor 



I'lililie Improvement Commiaaion 

4th floor 

UI;aL I'KOI'KIITV . 8th floor 

1'iinTltxn.tl Keal l'>tatc 
Murketa 

OIT-Stn'< t Parking 

Public Itiiildinga 
IIIXWSTKV DIVISION . 10th floor 

Hirtha. Deaths A Marriage 
( 'ertificatea 
WICICIITS A MICASL'IUCS lit floor 

MraaiinnR Devices 
WOHKMKN'S C()MPI:NS.\TI0\ 



OUTSIDE CITY HALL 

IVIC I.MI'UOVKMKNT COMMITTKIC 



LA 3-1100 
HI 2-3020 



LA 3 1 UK) 
LA 3-lf.22 



III 2- 



14 State Street 
CIVIL DKKKNSK 

11.5 Southampton Street 
DKMOLITION (Ceneral) 

14 State StrcL-t 

I I N ANCi: COM M ISSK )N 

24 School Strei-t 

II hi: 

11.') Southampton Street 
Klamniahle A Kxplosive Materials 
Kuel Oil Burners A Storage 
lii..<|H-ctions 

Kin- .Marm Ileadijuarlers 

.')'.» I'enway KIC 6 IKK) 

IIKALTII . CA 7 13(K) 

llaymarket .Sqiian' 
Uiirial I'ermits (.Nights, City Hospital) 
Dump Permits 
Frown Desserts Licenses 



CITY RECORD 



Publi»h«l WMkly 



TiioMAa F. O-Day. Editor. 

r. NicHoLAa PrreocnxL Auoelatc Editor. 

EurroaiAL Omcc. Room SS. Citr HalL 



Sutecnplion (In Adv>n») IS.OO I>«r jr»«r 
Sinsit Copin ... IS crnU 

STREET AGENCIES. 
OM Soutii tirwt Sund. Old Sooth nitrancf 
lo tubwajr. Alio Nrwi St«nd. dm door. Citr 
Hill Annii. 

Adverlisinir. 
A r«l» of 14 prr inch of 12 lino (wt (olid) 
Km brrtt ntebliihid for (uch advertiirmfnU 
u und»r th» law mual bt printed in th» City 
RKord. Advrrtivinr and other copy mutt hr 
in hand by S r.M. Wrdnnday of »ach week to 
n th« Saturday iufur. 



Funeral Director* Licenses 
(iarbage Transport Permits 
Hawkers A Peildlers I jcensee 
Health ICducalion I>aborator}- 
Health Statistics Milk License* 
Health I niU Motels 
HOSPITAL 

818 Harrison Avenue 
I Cast IJoaton Uelief Statii 

14 Porter Street 
Ixing laland Hospital 
Sanatorium 

24!) River Street 

iiorsi: OF couiuxTioN oc 3-2700 

liii-r laland 
IIOISINC ArTHOIUTV 

Ceneral Oflicea, ZiO Congress Street 
LI 2 «450 

Applications, 141 Milk St. LI 2-6450 



KE 6-8600 



LO 7-3000 
PR 3-1371 



BL 8-7900 



LA 3-6200 



LAW 

1 1 Ik^acon Street 
LIHHARY . . Ki: 0-5400 

Copley Square 

lici:nsinc. hoard . ca 7-2470 

24 Province Street 
Alcoholic Beverages 
Automatic .\muaement Device* 
liowling .MIeys 
Club Licenses 
Common Victuallers 
lOmployment Agencies 
Hotels 

lx)dging Houses 
Pool Room.s 
Shooting Galleries 
MORTIARV 

818 Harrison Avenue KE 6-6767 
KK 6-6768 

NKKHIBOKHOOD RKHABILITA- 

TION CO.MMITTKPX 

1 1 State Street . LA 3-1100 

PARKS A RKCRKATION CA 7-6940 
33 Beacon Street 

Beach and Pools 

Cemeteries (City-owned) 

(lolf Courses 

Parkways Occupancies 

Playgrounds 

Public Baths 

Trees 

POLICK KK 6-6700 

154 Berkeley Street 
Auctioneers Hackneys 
Bicycles Junk Dealers 

Dogs Pawnbrokers 
Firearms I'sed Cars 

Wagon A Hand Carts 

PRINTINC; SKCTION . LA 3-6.36:{ 
174 North Street (Street Books) 

RKDKVKLOPMKNT ACTHORITV 
73 Tremont Street RI 2-0500 

I'rban Renewal 

SCHOOL Bl ILDINGS, 
Board of Commissioners of 
26 Norman Street . CA 7-5750 
SCHOOL Ct).MMITTKK 

15 Beacon Street CA 7-5500 

Bootblacks. Newsliovs (12-16 year*) 
45 Myrtle Street " . . CA 7-5500 
TRAFFIC . . HI 2-7700 

1 12 Southampton Street 
Ixjading Zones Parking Meters 
Traffic Signals Parades 

VKTKRANS- C.RAVES . LA 3-4005 

14 Slate Street 
VCTKRANS' SKRVICF>! RI 2-4600 

18 Comhill 
Wr.LFARK . CA ,7-8320 

43 Hawkins Street 
.\id to Dependent Children 
Chardon Street Home 
('■eneral Relief 
Disability Assistance 
Old Age .\s!<i8tance 
Permits for Street Solicitations 



Fee 7 



CITY RECORD 



I 27 



HOSPITAL DEPARTMENT INAUGURATES 
I SIX-MONTH MANAGEMENT STUDY 



The Trustees of the Boston City 
I Hospital announced, on February 
2, that tlie firm of Cresap, [NlcCor- 
mick Paget, ^Management Con- 
sultants, New York City, lias lii-en 
engaged to ct)nduct a study d ^•ar- 
ious matters concerning the lln>i)i- 
tal Department of the City of Bos- 
ton. 

Yor five months the trustees have 
been engaged in a series of discus- 
sions with various outstanding 
firms of management consultants 
and with representatives of various 
civic and governmental agx'ncics. 
The proposal to conduct this study 
has received support from Mayor 
Hynes, from the Finance Commis- 
sion, the ^Nlunicijial Research Bu- 
reau, United Comnumity Services, 
the Committee on Civic Progress, 
and the Boston Clu^mber of Com- 
merce. 

Completed in Six Months 

The study is to lie comi)leted 
within six months. Its cost is not 
to exceed $35,000. The cost will 
be met by funds from ]:)rivatc 
philanthropic sources and from ac- 
cumulated income from various 
funds under the control of the 
Trustees of the Boston City Flos- 
pita 1. 

Included in the Ijroad scope of 
the projected study are such mat- 
ters as: the connaunity's needs for 
hospital services, present antl fu- 
ture; past and projected population 
trends in Boston; analysis of 
growth of hospital services pro- 
vided in Boston, including the num- 
ber of hospital beds a\-ailal)le oi' 
planned, the geographical ai-eas 
served, and the utilization of exist- 
ing facilities; analysi> oi |ir;i( i ices 
of payment for hospital M'r\ices 
and the impact on hospitals used 
by patients; analysis of the ad- 
ministrative structure of the Hos- 
pital Department, Boston City 
Hospital, including its South De- 
l)artment and the East Boston Re- 
lief Station, Long Island Hospital, 



and the Boston Sana! niiuiir, >tudy 
of the department's i il )]ert i \ o, in- 
chiding its top management oi'gan- 
ization down through departmental 
levels, and including stalling needs 
of the three hosi)itals. 

Study to Include Review 

Included also within the scoi)e 
of the study will he a review of 
previous studies made of various 
as]>ects of dei)artmental adminis- 
tration and ])i-()gress wliicii has Ijeen 
made on the recounnendatious 
which wvvc made; the management, 
l>asic policies, sei'vice ftmctions and 
volv of Boston City Hospital in the 
connmmity's health care and in 
teaching and reseai'ch, its I'elations 
with Boston's thi-ee medical schools 
and the (piality of stich related 
functions will he reviewed as will 
be the (piality and (piantity of 
treatment facilities, the number of 
beds to be operated as well as 
needed oi- j)roposed expansion or 
alterations progi'ams. 

The general maintenance needs 
and i^rogram of the hospital will be 
reviewed. The oi'iginal ol)jectives 
of the hospital will he examined to 
see if these ai'e still valid. The 
hospital's futiu'c role, administra- 
ti\'e organization and services will 
recei\'e study. Prol)lem< of decen- 
tralization of authority will be ex- 
amined. Various organizational 
and ftmctional aieas in personnel, 
adininistralion, to iu<'lude recruit- 
ment, ^election, assignment, train- 
ing, o\-er and under staffing and 
compensation of nm'ses, technicians 
and other emi)loyees will receive 
study. Ptu'chasing. accounting, 
budgeting and expenditure controls 
will be reviewed. 

Description of Study 

In general, the broatl oljjective 
of the study is to analyze with care 
the hospital's structure and opera- 
tions and to submit reconnnenda- 
tions designed to make possible 
high (luality ]iatient care on an 
economical and sound basis. 



The fii'iii of Ciesap, MeCor- 
inick Paget will assign several 
professional staff members to this 
study. Tho team will be composed 
of specialists in various areas of 
hospital management. The study 
will be under the general direction 
ol a partner of the firm. 

Cresa]), McCoi'inick Paget op- 
ei-ate a se])ai-ate di\-ision s|)ecializ- 
ing in the ])i'ol)lems of nonpi'ofit 
institutions, including hos])itals. 
More than 150 such client- ha\'e 
been served in I'ccem yeai's. Among 
these are Dai'tiuouth College, Yale 
University, the Ceorgetown Uni- 
A-crsity llosiiital, the New Yoi'k 
Hospi'tal, Lenox Hill Hosi)ital and 
Memorial Centei- for Cancer and 
Allied Diseases in New York, and 
the Beth Israel and the New Lng- 
land Center Flospitals in Boston. 



Mayor Further Explains 
Budget Rise Factors 

The Mayor, on February 2, stated 
as follows: 

City and town budgets will go 
higher and so will tax rates just so 
long as inflation continues to bring 
higher costs for everything a city 
or town does. 

Now income, fi'om a limited .sales 
tax, would offset and reverse rising 
tax rates. 

Boston certainly needs more in- 
come, especially since our main 
source of re\'enue, real property 
valuations, is diminishing. 

Boston would be greatly helped, 
too, if the MTA deficit were more 
equitably assessed; if Cotuity of 
Suffolk expenses were not borne in 
whole by the municipality; if the 
State would bear a share of general 
relief, veterans' relief, and library 
costs; and if State would take over 
the Boston Sanatoriimi. All of 
these costs bear heavily on Boston. 
We .should be relieved of them in 
whole or in part. 



I 28 



CITY RECORD 



Feb. 



FIN. COM. IN PLEA FOR LARGER 
STATE AID FOR SCHOOL BUILDING 



Jaiiuan- .H), 1959. 
/ i/i Mtiidnrx oj tin Lc[iiiilativt 
ComtiiUtcc on Education. 
The FitiHiifo (.'uiiiiiiiK^ion wipliiT- 
In Ixj recorikHi in favor of Hou^c 
Mill 187.J, a laariiiK un wliiili it; 
III Ix' hfltl oil Monday, IVbruarj- 2, 
1959. This bill .h-oL* to inmax.- 
the ininiiiiuin amount of finam-ial 
a.'w^ictanfL' to cities and towns in 
I 111- ronstruction of .^rhool build- 
ings from tilt' prcK-nt level of 20 
|HT cent to a new level of 37i 
jMT tint. 

State (irant Not a Clear (iain for 
Boston 

I irbt of all, it is essential to di.<- 
■ i a eoiuinon illusion. Boston rc- 
nives the present 20 per rent 
minimum construction grant. It is 
romnionly assumed that this 20 
ju r cent is a pure net gain. This 
is not .M). The fact is tliat the cost 
of the recjuireineiitj^ set by the 
J^tate as a e«»ndition for the grant, 
in tenns of facilities within the 
I'uildiiiir ami ojieii space adjacent 
tti the building, has cut substan- 
tially into the net assist-nnce. State 
standards. prea'(|uisites for the 
grant, are much more demanding 
than has been the prevailing prac- 
tii e ill Boston scIkkiI building coii- 
-t ruction. 

This is understandable in a city 
where land is at a premium and 
c(Uistruction ct»st.s are relatively 
h.igh. 

The value of the grant is further 
reduci-d by the fact that the pay- 
ment of the grant by the State 
is spread over a i>eriod of 20 years. 

Inequities in the Operation of the 
(irant Formula 

KaiMiig the niiiiiiuuiii to 37.5 
per cent, as provided in House No. 
1875, will help to retluce the in- 
••(luities inherent in the present 
lormula of grant. 

Tlie underlying theor\' of the 
formula is. apparently, that the 



."ize of the pupil population repre- 
sents the cost to the community, 
and the valuation of the eom- 
iiiuiiity repiesents it.s financial ca- 
pacity. The valuation per jmpil in 
a given community is then com- 
pared to the valuation per pupil 
a^ a State-wide average. The 
higher the iormer, the lower the 
grant, rnlortunatc-ly. the figure 
of valuation applied to a given 
community is that spelled out in 
chaiiter 559 of the .\cts of 1945; 
this was an act establishing the 
basi.s of appctrtionmeiit of State 
and County taxes. This latter act 
is used in lieu of an "equalized 
\aluation" in the formula of grant. 
Chapter 645 of the Acts of 1948 
which originally set up the formula 
(»f grant provides " 'The Equalized 
Valuation' shall be established by 
the (Jeneral Court for the purpose 
of this Act or. if no such valuation 
has been made, the last ])receding 
valuation made for the purpose of 
apportioning the State tax" (shall 
be used). No new "e(|Ualized 
valuation" has been determined; 
the anti<iuated and unnalistic 
valuations found in chapter 559 of 
1945 are still used. 

The eflfect of this foniiula is to 
work a hardsliij) on a city like 
Boston in which the valuation has 
a« (ually been declining. The ulti- 
mate result is that Boston is al- 
lowed the minimum i:r;int of 20 
per cent. 

Equalized Valuation 

The valuation pattern of the 
se\eral metropolitan areas in the 
State. j)articularly in the Boston 
iiietnvpolitan area, has changed 
>ubstantially in the past fifteen 
years, or since the 1945 ■"eciual- 
ized" valuations were determined. 
Values lost by the inner core cities 
have been absorbed by suburban 
communities; new values have been 
added to the entire base with new 



• oii>tructioii and new highways. 
These new area-wide \ alues which 
laise the total valuation of the 
State woulii make the ratio of 
Boston's valuation to the whole 
even smaller. Clearly, any lor- 
mula which purports to be ba.^ed 
on cfiualized valuations or com- 
munities should be brought up to 
date by recognizing the present 
situation; anything else is uiiieal- 
i.-tic. 

Cities Hardest Hit 
The >maller >uliurbaii cuiuinuni. 
lies fare well enough under the 
present operation of the formula 
The relation of their increasiiit: 
I)upil population to the unchanged 
valuation ascribed to the com- 
munity re.<ults in a low figure oi 
Naluation per pupil. This, in turn 
means a larger percentage of grant 
under the formula. Cities liki 
Boston are not so fortunate; yet 
it is in the older cities that new 
school construction is needed to 
leplace so many ancient and out- 
moded school buildings. Every 
study made of the situation con- 
firms this necessity. Boston has 
undertaken a school building re- 
j)lacement program of heroic pro- 
jKirtions. 

In simple justice, an assistaiic( 
formula should be u.<e<l which will 
render reasonable assistance. 

Clearly. :i study of the adequacy 
.•md ejjuity of the ju-esent grant 
tcrmula should be made, in tiie 
light of all that has been said 
above. 

In the meant iiiie. schools iiiu;-l 
be built and ('([uity in assistance 
(sbserved. There is only one way 
to do this — the minimum percent- 
age of grant must be raised. 
House Bill No. 1875 achieves this 
immediate objective. 

Respectfully submitted. 

A N Til ox V J. YoVNG. Chairman, 
H. W. D WIGHT Ili nn. 
RoCiKR J. Abiz.vu). M.U.. 

The Finance Commission. 
Thom.vs J. Murphy, 
Executive Secretary. 



7 



CITY RECORD 



129 



MEDICAL AND INSTITUTIONAL ADMINISTRATION AND COSTS 



Administration of hospitals and 
medical programs was the topic of 
i>i!(^ of the six seminar panels at the 
Tliird Annual Conference on AIu- 
luripal Administration held at the 
HiwTon Public Lil)rarv, November 
20 21. 1958. 

Theodore W. Fabi.sak, Director 
lit the Division of Ho.spital Costs, 
Commonwealth of ^Massachusetts, 
was the moderator. 

The panelists and the subjects 
they discussed were as f ollo\\ s : 

David S. Sherman, M.D., A.^- 
sistant Superintendent, Sanatorium 
Division, City of Boston; subject, 
"Present and Future Xeeds for Tu- 
bercular Treatments." 

John R. ]McGillivray, Superin- 
tendent, Long Tsland Hospital, City 
of Boston; .subject, "Present and 
Future Care of the Chronic Sick." 

John F. Conlin, ALD., Superin- 
tendent, Hospital Department, City 
of Boston; subject, "Present and 
Future Xeeds for a Alunicipal 
Hospital." 

Dean A. Clark, :\LD., General 
Director, Massachusetts (leneral 
Hospital; sulijcct, "Major Costs in 
the Operation of a Privately-Owned 
Institution." 

REMARKS OF MODERATOR 
By Theodore W. Fabisak 

It is indeed a privilege to serve 
as moderator of this panel discus- 
sion on "Medical and Institutional 
Administration and Costs." 

As Director of the Division of 
Hospital Costs and Finances, and 
Chairman of the State Employees 
Group Insurance Commission, I am 
well aware of tlie ever-increasing 
cost of providing hospital and 
medical care. 

In 1953 the Legislature stutiied 
the problem of hospital care pur- 
chased by 17 agencies of the Com- 
monwealth from approximately 210 
hospitals, infirmaries, and public 
medical institutions. 

Their findings indicated that 
each agency was making its own 



This is the complete report of 
the fourth of six panel discus= 
sions at the Third Annual Mu= 
nicipal Conference. 



arrangements with hospitals and 
Aarious rates were being paid for 
tiic same type of service. 

There was no uniform method of 
purchasing hospital care. Prepaid 
medical and hospitalization insur- 
ance purchased by public-aided pa- 
tients was not being fully utilized. 

The need for coordination in the 
method of purchasing hospital care 
by the various agencies of the Com- 
nionwcalth, based upon a uniform 
>ysteni of accounting and cost re- 
porting was htiix'rative for econ- 
omy in go\-ernment. 

List of Responsibilities 

As a result of these findings, the 
Division of Hospital Costs and 
Finances was established. It was 
charged, in part, with the follow- 
ing responsif)ilitics: 

1. The est;d)lislunent of a uni- 
foiiii system of hospital account- 
ing and cost reporting. 

2. The annual determination of 
rates to be paid by the various 
agencies of the Commonwealth 
purchasing or reimbiu'sing cities 
and towns for the purchase of hos- 
pital care rendered to public-aided 
jjatients. 

3. The annual determination of 
the rates to be paid to all hospitals 
for the hospitalization of industrial 
accident ca-cs. 

4. The annual approval of all 
care purchased by Blue Cross 
under its contracts with hospitals. 
The magnitude of this problem 
may be partially indicated by the 
fact that over 54^ millions of dol- 
lars was paid by Blue Cross to 
liospitals last year. 

5. The annual determination of 
tlie rates to be paid by the state, 
cities, and towns, for care rendered 



to public-aided patients by approxi- 
mately 650 nursing and convales- 
cent homes. 

System Now Uniform 

Our Division of Hospital Costs 
and Finances has worked diligently 
during the past five years to carry 
out these responsibilities. Today, 
all of the 190 voluntary hospitals 
in the state have a uniform sys- 
tem of accounting based upon the 
recommendations of the American 
Hospital Association, and imple- 
mented by this division. Similarly, 
they all are required to keep uni- 
form statistics for cost allocation 
purposes. 

Massachusetts is the only state 
in the Union where hospitals file a 
single cost report annually that 
serves all governmental agencies' 
needs and Blue Cross require- 
ments. 

Furthermore, all hospitals are 
audited each year by my staff and 
our audit program is considered by 
c xperts to be the best in the nation. 

The problem of financing hospi- 
tal and medical care is a national 
one. In this regard Massachusetts 
again leads the nation through the 
medium of group insurance for 
state, county, city, and town em- 
ployees and their dependents. 

State Hospital Coverage 

Chapters 32A and 32B of the 
(Seneral Laws enacted in 1955 will 
ultimately provide hospital and 
medical protection for more than 
160,000 governmental employees 
and their dependents. One of the 
outstanding features of this pro- 
gram is the provision for coverage 
of retired employees. Heretofore, 
retired employees were a forgotten 
group insofar as hospital and medi- 
cal protection was concerned. 
Under the State Employees Group 
Insurance Program, the reg-ular 
state employees subsidize in part 
the premium cost of hospital and 
medical care of retired employees. 



I i u 



C I I Y R L C O R D 



Fkb. 7 



Thi- iniiko it |M»,>^j'il»lc- for n'tirwJ 
tjnplnyM'!» to rarr>- niicquiite pro- 
ti rtion Ht a time win n tliry mt'<l 
It iii(»!»t. Till!*, ill my ttpinimi, is n 
-ttp 111 tin- riitlit ilir»Mtinii Hiwanl 
linaiu inn tlu- ro-t «»l i lininic- lari' 
at a miiiiniuin fxponst* to the tax- 
payiT. 

i liavr tri»«l to pn>i-nt a Rcncral 
-uiiiiiiary «»l the- s^tatt's ri's|)onM- 
Wility III t niiiuM ti«iii with the <l< t< r- 
iiiiiiHtion oi lu)n|)ital costs appli- 
vi%\t\v to puhlir-ai<U'<l patiints in- 
(lustriftl ac<i(U'nt c-ascs. an<l Hliu- 
( 'rosH. 

Tlii~ lias hvi'n arc()inj)lisli('<l 
ilinmiili till- ««M»pcrativc cfTorts ol 
llir individual hospitals, the Massa- 
rhasi'tts Hospital Association and 
iho Division of H<»spital Costs. 

I have alM> iiiciitioncd the Stair 
(iroup In^uraiiif I'mnnniH hc- 
causi- tlicM- pronraiii> make it pos- 
sible for KoviTiiiiK'ntal i-mployiM's 
to sharp in the cost of sudden and 
i:n(Xi)c(tcd ho>|)itMl mid incdical 
hilK. 

IJOSTON SANATORIl M 
|{> Dr. [)a\id S. Sherman 

In present inn a few fads and fig- 
ures relative to the hospitalization 
of tnhennlons patients in the City 
iif Uostoii. we have none hack al- 
most forty years. 'Ha* innnediate 
postwar years. P.M9 and 1*.»4(). and 
the last year on which W(> have 
coinplel*' statistics. li»')7. are pre- 
.s<'rit<Hl. The po.stwar years were 
<'ho.s<>n hecauso. iirst. the incidence 
of tuhereulosis was high, and .sec- 
ondly, costs of hospitalization were 
inflated. Despite the inllalionary 
treials of I'.tl'.t and Wm. the dollar 
value wtis far greater than we found 
it in 1957. 

I^'t us ef)inparo the cost of .sala- 
ri«'s. We all know that wapes hav(> 
soarinl. liul how much' Xinety- 
st'vvu thousand dollars, or 41 per 
cent of our hudnet in 1".)19. to 
S442.(K)(). or 4".t p(>r cent in HMti. 
oiilv an H |)er ci nt ri.se; hut in I'.t")?. 
east wjus !<I,6()7.()(K). or 70.:« per 
cent of the annual hudnet. I'ochI. 
while the actual expen<lilure in dol- 
lars is uteater. the per c»sit of the 
annual hudKot went from 32 per 
cent to 27 yn'v cent t(» almost 1 1 per 
cent. Medical .supplies, hack in 
lltp.) and in MMti. there were no 



oxlruordinary ( xp<'n.s<'s ineurre<l in 
this calcKory in the treatment; hut 
.shortly nftor l*»4(). the antitiihereii- 
lous driiK>* made their influence felt. 
Then lhora<i.' surgery came to he 
an integral weapon in the therapy 
of tulKTculosis. Drugs, expensively 
maintaine<l spi-cial ojierating .suites, 
and specially trained personnel 
heeame necessary. Kven thf)iigh 
drugs, etc., I're inde<Hl expensive, in 
the year of lito7. they amounted to 
only 3.") per cent of the annual 
litidgel . 

Sharp Budget Hike 

The total liudgel has gone from 
S2:i().(MM» to S2.2S.-).(MK) in forty 
vears. Total per diem costs per 
patient are .'<1.74 to s.=i.4o to .'<12.<>0 
in Hlo7. I'aw food costs jier day 
have .soared from 4S cents to .'<l.02 
to SI. 17. 

Roeniic 

()\-er the year.>, the City of Hf)s- 
toii has home the greatest share of 
the costs incurred in maintaining a 
hospital for its own tuberculous 
patients, ["or the mo.st part, only 
Boston .settled case.s can he ad- 
mitted. There are special instances 
when state .settled persons can be 
admitted, but. unfortunately, these 
have always been relatively few in 
number. State legislation governs 
the amount of revenue which can 
be as.ses.sed and re<'(>ive(l. .V chief 
source of our small amount of 
revenue is derived from the state 
subsidy for Boston .settled eases 
with proven tuberculosis. This .sub- 
sidy law was enacted in 1912. giving 
71 Cents a day on all cases with 
a po.sitive .sputum. In 1920, this 
law was liberalized to include nega- 
tive sputum cases which had been 
in the ho.spital for more than thirty 
days. .\nd, while costs have .soared 
and criteria for .subsidy mad(> a 
little ea.sier, the subsidy payment 
remains static. Repeated attempts 
to induce the Legislature to be more 
generous have be(>n in vain. 

We can see that in 1919. this 
state .subsidy of Boston .settled ease.s 
reimburs(Ml us 40 per cent of our per 
diem costs; in 1946. 13 per c(>nt and 
in 19"i7. only n.n per cent. 

Other State Revenue 
In sharp contrast, there is a 
second .source of revenue from the 
state from the State Department 



of I*ul)lie Welfare for non.settled o 
state ea.sos. Due to pressure ><■ 
both private and public hospital- 
the rates of payment have keji 
pace with the times. 

In 1919, their reimbur.sement !■ 
^\.oi) a day for the state .settl( 
cases e(|ualle(l S4 per cent of our pi 
diem costs; in 1946. the payment m 
So a day e(|ualled 92 per cent of our 
per diem costs; in 1957. this depart- 
ment paid a total cost not exceeding 
.«I4 a day. or 1(K) per cent. 

The striking fact that our person- 
nel co.sts now take a huge 70 per 
cent of our annual budget is worthy 
of .some explanation. In the past 
thirty years many benefits for our 
hospital personnel have been en- 
acted by the State Legislature. We 
have progressed frcnii a .seven-day. 
sjilit-shift week, to a six-day we<'k; 
then to a five-day week; and 
finally to an eight-hour in nine, five- 
day week. We must now pay over- 
time for holidays and time worked 
in exce.ss of forty hours, and time 
and a half must now be paid for all 
work in excess of an eight-hour day. 

Following the inauguration of the 
forty-hour week, the State Depart- 
ment of Health raised its minima! 
re(|uirements for personnel in tuber- 
culosis .sanatoria 50 per cent. These 
recpiirements take no cognizance of 
the effect of the eight-hour in 9 rule, 
which does not generally prevail in 
state and county in.stitutions. 

Results Impressive 

For all the.se va.st sums expended, 
what are the results? 

In 1919, there were 312 deaths; 
in 1946. 206; in 1957, 68 deaths. 

Total mimber of discharged pa- 
tients (alive and dead) were 714. 
571, 471. 

In 1919, only .seven patient.s or 
1 per cent of the discharges could 
return to his home. In 1957. 157 or 
33' per cent. Remember that in 
19i9, as now, .some 60 per cent of 
our admissions are far advanced 
eases of tuberculosis. 

What of the future? In Boston, 
there is still a tremendous amount 
of work left to be done in the field 
of tuberculosis. Many .sanatoria 
throughout the country have 
shrunken their facilities or closed 
down entirely. In my opinion, 



Feb. 7 



CITY RECORD 



131 



those sanatoria which at this mo- 
ment are functioning will continue 
to do so. Doctor Feldman of the 
National Tuberculosis Association 
.savs that we have already seen the 
decline at its lowest point, find that 
the trend in tuberculosis is again 
upward. Our partial 1958 figures 
seeni to bear this out. 

The Sanatorium is still considered 
the cornerstone of treatment. It 
well may be that there may be a 
tendency toward earlier treatment 
on an out-patient basis. If so, then 
this work should be carried out by 
the Sanatorium group. 

Patients 



It has been forecast by the ex- 
perts that the problem of resistance 
will make the treatment of tubercu- 
losis more difficult. 

Our elderly persons in Boston, as 
well as our large numbers of alco- 
holics, will contribute to a continued 
high incidence of tubercidosis. 
These classes of patients must be 
provided for. 

And, if by some chance the pa- 
tient census does become low, then 
one can envision a chest hospital, 
one similar to one in San Francisco, 
that cares for all types of pulmonary 
and respiratory ailments, acute and 
chronic, as well as tuberculosis. 
Statistics 



Year 



Number of Deaths 

Number of Discharges (Alive and Dead) 

Number of Arrested or Inactive Cases 

Per Cent of Arrested or Inactive Cases to Total Discharges . 



Per Cent 
Deaths 



Cases Treated . . . • 
Cases Discharged. 



977 

21% 



Expenditures 





Year 


1919 


1946 


1957 






Cost 


Per Cent 


Cost 


Per Cent 


Cost 


Per Cent 


Salaries 




$97,000 


41.17 


8442,000 


49.20 


$1,607,000 


70.33 






76,000 


32.22 


249,000 


27.33 


243,000 


10.63 




5,900 


2.49 


20,000 


2.22 


81,000 


3.54 




57,100 


24.12 


187,400 


20.85 


354,000 


15.50 






100.00 


8899,000 


100.00 


$2,285,000 


100.00 






SI. 74 




So. 45 




$12.90 




Cost 


Per diem raw food 


0.48 




1.02 




1.17 





Revenue 





Cost 


Per Cent 
Per Diem 
Cost 


Cost 


Per Cent 
Per Diem 
Cost 


Cost 


Per Cent 
Per Diem 
Cost 


State 
Boston 


Dept. of Public Health 
at 71 cents per day 

Dept. of Public Welfare 
at $1.50 per day 


.867,000 
19,400 


40 
84 


$91,500 
1,926 


13 
92 


8114,956 

17,934 
2,152,190 


5.5 
100.0 




149,600 




795.574 





LONG ISLAND HOSPITAL 
By John R. McQillivray 

I will endeavor to trace for you 
the history of Long Island Hospital 
up to the present and give you a 
few hopes for the future. I will talk 
on past, present, and future with 
pertinent facts regarding expendi- 
tures and income. 

I wish to thank the committee, 
through Larry Costello, for extend- 
ing me this invitation to participate 
in this discussion. Also, Jerry 
Mahoney, Head Administrative 
Clerk at Long Island Hospital, who 
produced many old records for me 
and to Frank Guiney, Finance 
Officer at the Hospital, who assisted 
me in e\'aluating the records. 

The history of hospitals began 
centuries ago in the almshouse. 
People were either rich or poor; the 
rich were treated for their physical 
disabilities and ailments in their 
home, the poor when unable to 
work were sent to the almshouse. 
Boston's first almshouse was in 
what later became the fashionable 
section of the city, Park and Beacon 
streets. As time progressed it was 
evident that both the rich and poor 
needed better medical facilities— 
therein lies the beginning of better 
care for the patient with subsequent 
higher costs. ]\Iassachusetts Gen- 
eral Hospital was built and soon 
after Boston City Hospital was 
opened to care for people who 
needed hospitalization. 

Sometime around 1887 all the 
Boston almshouses were moved to 
what is now Long Island Hospital. 
In 1893 the first hospital at Long 
Island was built to take care of the 
sick patients in the almshouse. (I 
have here the October 16, 1958, 
issue of Hospitals, the magazine of 
the American Hospital Association, 
in which there is an article by Dr. 
Herbert Natkin. He states that the 
almshouse is the chronic hospital of 
the future.) It is amazing to think 
that some cities in 1958 are only be- 
ginning to do what the City of Bos- 
ton began in 1895. I think this is a 
tremendous credit to the medical 
profession, the hospital societies, 
and to the men in public life in Bos- 
ton, who have been 60 years ahead 



132 



C ir V RECORD 



Feb. 



i»f other parlH of the roiiutry in the 
•loiiiK away with the alinshoii.sc and 
tiiriiiiiK it into a i-hri)iii(- h<).spital. 

Ill WXY.i (tire for the poor wa.s 
Ki'tliiiR U'tter hut it wan not k(xx1 
eiiouKh aeeordinn to the standard 
M'f hy a risiiiR yoiiiiR alderman. In 
what niight Ik* calleil "The Kirst 
Hurrah," Alderman James Miehael 
Curley made a s|MH'( h in the Boston 
City ('ouneil almut tlw meals that 
were s<»rvi*d to the patients at Lonp; 
Island Ilo.>*pital. I'arts of this 
s|KH'rh Itecame widely us<'d hy 
imitators «if James .Michael Curley, 
the famous "They liaxc Cod I'ish 
for Hreakfast. ('(kI l ish for Dinner, 
and Co<l I'ish for Supper." 

Hospital's Chief Friends 
It nuRht lie said that there are 
two men in Boston's history who 
had niore to do with the rising eost 
of hospital rare at Long Islancl than 
any others, hut their hlame is not to 
their shame, their blame is rather to 
their fame. James Michael Curley, 
who in the past, and John B. Hynes, 
in the jirescnt. (leveIo|)ed J>onp; 
Island IIo.><pital from a poorhouse 
to one of the finest municipal 
chronic hospitals in the country. 
Xo longer is it classifietl as a chari- 
table institution because over oO 
per cent of the patients pay for all 
or part of their care from resources 
of their own. 

During the years prior to 1920 
the fo(Kl budg<*t for the ho.spital was 
larger than the personnel budget. 
This was true even though the food 
was le.ss selective than it is today. 
The rea.son was it took fewer 
people to prepare and .serve the 
meals to the patients. At present 
the Long Island Hospital personnel 
budget is four times the amount of 
the fcKxI budget. 

A comparison study of the ho.s- 
pital salaries in 1937 to the pre.spnt, 
reveals the following facts: 





Sfilarv 


Present Salary 




l'.t:C 


after ^ Vejirs 


I'oHITlns 


\\(t'k 


W.-ek 


Waitress 


. $f>.(M\ 




Head Nurse. . 


Zi 0\ 


SI 7.5 


Sinff Nurw 


. IS II 




Tfl. OiM-ratnr . 
Social \N"nri«>r . . 


. II SI 


-1 


. 28 77 




Ijitxtror . . 


I.T.I2 


(12 fr! 


('ool< 


ll..*tl 


(fci"> 2."> 



The coniparistm of the.se salaries 
indicates that the 1958 .salaries are 
f<»ur times higher than thev were in 
1937. 

A comparative fo(Ml price study 
shr)ws: 

i'.Ki:{ i«ii2 I'.i.^s 

roiiriij Pound l'oun<l 
.Meat .SO 20 $(142 fO fw 

Hutter !.'> ..{I 7(1 

.Milk rm V 10 • 27 

("off»'«' Hi M) Sd 

• Qu.art. 

There will be no culback in sala- 
ries, foml prices or ('(luipment 
costs, therefore, it is impo.ssible to 
.see how hospital costs can be kept 
down any more than taxes or the 
cost of living can be cut down. 
I'nion endeavors, hospital associa- 
tions, and labor legislation have 
brought the pay of hospital workers 
from below substajidard to an even 
substandard. These gains in pa- 
tient care are not going to be 
sacrificed at the cost of poor service 
to the sick or to the loss of a life that 
might be saved. 

The number of employees nece.s- 
.sary to take care of the patients 
will increase rather than decrea.se. 
Why? Because the medical profes- 
sion is discovering ways and means 
to keep people alive longer. Here 
are the ages of .some of the patients 
at the ho.spital: 

.\Ke Ciroup under .50 10% 

.iO to W) 22% 

Of) to 70 25% 

70 to 80 27% 

SO f n (to tV: over 16% 

100% 

Although in many ca.ses the hearts 
of men and women are beating, 
other parts of their bcxiies begin to 
break down. This means more pa- 
tients who need to be fed. more 
bodies that need to be bathed, more 
lineJi that needs to be w ashed. This 
means more rather than less person- 
nel. 

We are all familiar with that 
school of thought that keeps prod- 
ding, " We don't need to do that, we 
never did it before. " I think a good 
example in answer to that type of 
thinking is the millions being spent 
on the MDC project that will clear 
Boston Harbor of all sewerage 
di.sposal. It is almost unbelievable 



to think that in this age of di.sea.M 
prevention that we are only nov 
getting around to clearing the h:ii 
bor of pollution. In the da\ 
B. I". «\: S. (before I'lorida aiM 
Scituate) people of my generatio: 
spent their summers at Savin Hi 
and Tenean Beaches. There w;. 
no ma.ss epidemic that was known 
to be cau.sed by the polluted waters 
but for years the Health Depart- 
nieiit officials often wondered if they 
should close the beaches. So true is 
the ho.spital. the medical profession, 
and the hospital per.soiuiel con- 
tinually are fighting against infec- 
tion, whatever the cost to wage thi.s 
fight it is infinitesimal to the life 
that is saved. 

Long Island Bridge 
^^'hen Mayor John B. Hynes con- 
structed a liridge to Long Island 
there was a tremendous impetus 
given to the care of the patients at 
the ho.spital. One of the programs 
started under his admini.'stration 
and has reached international stat- 
ure, is the Alcoholic Rehabilitation 
Program that takes place in the 
dormitory section of the ho.spital. 
Here is a cost that is a hidden .sav- 
ing, because instead of these people 
who had a drinking problem being 
.supported by the city for the re- 
mainder of their lives they are 
rehabilitatetl and become supporters 
of themselves and their families. 
AMien the.sc people obtain work and 
temporarily live on the Island they 
|)ay a fee for their room and board 
that pays the salaries of the em- 
ployees who operate the program. 

The present per diem rate at 
Long Island Hospital is .'=58.26. This 
rate would be per day if it 
were not for the 200 dormitory 
patients who perform work in re- 
turn for their care. 

The pre.sent income at Long 
Island Hospital is 81.500.000 per 
year, made up from Social Security 
benefits, public and private pen- 
sions, Old Age Assistance, and Di.s- 
abilitv Assi.staiice. The 1958 budget 
for tlie hospital is .<i2.449.500. Fifty 
per cent of this expenditure by the 
hospital is returned to the City 
Treasurer in income. 



; Feb. 7 



CITY RECORD 



133 



Some RecommendatiDns 

The recommendations I woukl 
nake regarding costs at Long Islantl 
Hospital are as follows: 

1. Because there is in existence a 
plant, the replacement value of 
which is over S25.000.000, Long 
Island Hospital should be further 
developed as the city's long-term 
care hospital. The adjunct of the 
dormitory section of the hospital 
makes it' possible to save .'<400,000 
per year in personnel costs because 
of the work these dormitory pa- 
tients perform. 

2. Retain a well-organized social 
service staff, such as we now have, 
that will explore every possible 
source of income for each patient. 

3. Obtain some revenue from all 
concerns who have research per- 
formed for commercial purpo.ses. 
If a company tests a drug that they 
feel will make an alcoholic see white 
rather than purple — People Eaters 
—the hospital should be reimbursed 
because the company will make a 
profit on the sale of this drug. 

4. Philanthropic foundations 
j must be encouraged to make grants 
( to tax-.supported hospitals as well 
j as other hospitals. 

5. Teaching and research sub- 
sidies must come from either 
government or private sources espe- 
cially for tax-supported hospitals. 

Taxpayers today who cannot 
afford to send their own children to 
college are actually paying taxes 
which are assisting in the training 
of others. 

Whether dependent or independ- 
ent, sick persons should recei\ e the 
best possible care and it is better 
economy and one of the Corporal 
Works of ^lercy to insist that the 
standard for Long Island Hospital 
should be as good as that of any 
other. 

PRESENT AND FUTURE NEEDS 
FOR A MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL 
By Dr. John F. Conlin 

It is somewhat late in the da}' to 
consider the wisdom of the action 
of the General Court of the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts wliich 
in section 1, chapter 113 of the Acts 
ni 1858 legislated as follows: "The 



City of Boston is hereby author- 
ized to erect, establish and main- 
tain a Hospital for the reception of 
jicrsons who by misfortune or pov- 
erty may require relief during tem- 
porary sickness." 

It is, however, certainly timely in 
this centennial year to take a long 
look at the community's present 
and future need for a municipal 
general hospital. Indeed the Trus- 
tees of Boston City Hospital, the 
Boston Mvniicipal Research Bureau, 
the Coniniiltce on Civil Progress, 
and the Boston Finance Commis- 
sion (in aproximately that order) 
have proposed surveys dealino- with 
the Hospital Departmciit. its insti- 
tutions, their relations with the 
community, size, staff, financing, 
])lant, equipment, personnel, quan- 
tity and quality of treatment and 
service facilities, costs, charges, in- 
come, appropriations, financing, 
teaching and research, and so on 
through a lengthy category of pos- 
sible survey areas. 

The cost of such a survey should 
not exceed $50,000. The money 
would be a budget item unless the 
design of the survey were to attract 
grant or foundation funds. 

Future Prospects 

For the purpose of the present 
discussion I am asking you to as- 
sume that the Boston City Hospital 
is to continue in its present location 
for the foreseeable future as a mu- 
nicipally operated general hospital. 
That assumption is not my person- 
al decision. I am too close to tlie 
])roblems and too jiersonally in- 
volved to render a valid judgment. 
If the hospital had closed four 
years ago I would be at least ten 
years younger right now. 

The present problems of the hos- 
liital are many. Most of these 
problems can be resolved (and some 
solved) in terms of dollars. Briefly 
stated, we are now conducting a 
hospital offering a fairly high level 
of care for patients. ()ur inobleni 
is to further improve that care and 
to do more and better things for 
more iicoiile, using fewer people 
ancl expending fewer dollars to do 



it, and to increase charges and col- 
lected dollars while doing it. 

Financing Medical Care 

Progress in financing medical 
care in the j)ast twenty years and 
particularly in the last decade has 
been dramatic. Programs have been 
developed by hospital groups, by 
medical societies, and by i)rivate 
insurance agencies. These have been 
profit anfl nonprofit, industry or 
labor sponsored and have offered 
comprehensive medical care or var- 
ious combinations of diagnostic, 
ambulatory, out-patient and in- 
liospital medical care. There have 
been "hasic" and "major" benefits 
offered Ijy ])lans. There have been 
service and indenniity programs. 
Coverage has l)een ])rovide(l l)y 
Workmen's Compensation, by var- 
ious student health pi'ograms and 
by various governmental programs 
for the indigent and by govern- 
ment programs such as ^Medicare, 
among others. These jn-ograms will 
grow. Their coverage and degree 
of coverage will increase. They 
will have a very direct effect on 
financing part of the care furnished 
by Boston City Hospital. 

Since I have assumed that a gen- 
eral hospital is to be operated it 
follows that only one kind of a 
general hospital can be operated 
and that is a good one. In a med- 
ical center such as Boston there 
can be no compromise with proper 
standards of care. The hospital 
must meet standards of licensure, 
of the Joint Commission on Ac- 
creditation of the Council on Med- 
ical Education and Hosiiitals of 
the American Meilical Association, 
and of state and national nursing 
approA-al autlioritics. 

Excellent Reputation 

There are relatively few iiriA'ate 
l)atients at Boston City Hospital. 
In order to attract and hold a staff 
of visiting physicians of the caliber 
of the present 500 something more 
than a dollar motivation must be 
present. This is found in the pres- 
tige of faculty membership on one 
of the three affiliated medical 



134 



CITY RECORD 



Feb. 7 



TAX ABATEMENT DECISIONS RENDERED BY THE BOARD OF 
ASSESSORS lOR THE WEEK ENDING JANUARY 2 

. , n ., I H,. ,, I <. Ml, ni. tit • llU-nal aiiwunnu'iit ('hiipU-r 5'.»-5 

,7'" , j J'****'""""'^ = ChapU r 58-8 

I , . ' I .. ..ml of AwwworH x Flood 



Kiiirn("-r«. Nml'i 



|i.Tiunn. Walter, rl el. 
IWriiinn, Waller, al. 

IkTiiiali \V il-' T ' t nl 



nl. .. 
Inc. . 
Inr 
- Inc 



|yM-alion of rmi>prty 



I,, 111..-. . ■ .■M9.V1 

, I , , ■ :t I9.M 
.t l».>l 

, : . :t m.S4 

.1 I'l.VI 

,■■1 I ■ .•{-I'.t.Vl 

.111.1 \, »l,i,r\ >i -y-VJ-A 

.40 t liarlcji »t .i-lO.VJ 

. 282 Ncwburj- si ."i I9.">4 

. 6 1 WMt Cedar »t .i 1 954 

.400 Beacon »t '> 1954 

Coinnionwcolth BV ."»-I9o4 

.-.'Jovet .'V-19.>l 

Vnciint lot. 4 Newbury at., .'i I9.>l 

.Vacant lot. 6 Newbury at.. .VI9.V1 

.«38 Dudley St 8-19.VI 

. 39 Linwood st 9- 19.>J 

. 1 104 Trcmont st 9- I9."i4 

.803 Shawmut av 9-19.">4 

.IirCodarat Il-Ilt.Vl 

.116 Cedar at 11 M'.Vi 

.l33C«darat ll-l'.t.-.l 

.110 Cedar at 11-1U.-.4 

.02 Cliff st I-' I'.t Vt 

. 107 Blue Hill a%- 12-19.>4 

.->1 Humboldt av 12 19,>4 

.53 Humboldt av 12-19.54 

.5.5 Humboldt av 12-19.54 

.57 Humboldt av 12-19.54 

.50 Cliff st 12 19.54 

.58 Cliff st 12 19.51 

000 Centre st 19 19.54 

H.5.5 llrncon st 21-19.54 

1 1 17 Commonwealth av. . . 21-19.54 

..5:{ HnK>ks st 22-1954 

.21(> .Miiin Bt 2 19.55 

.86 Itodford st 3 19.V. 

.184 Higlist 3 19.55 

.174 High st 3 19.55 

270 Commercial st 3-1 955 

•7.' ( uMi.prcialBt 3-19.V. 

X . ...reialst 3 19.55 

, rt 3 1955 

M . t 3-19.55 

.1 3-19.55 
3 19.55 
.{19.55 
.< 19.55 



Amount for 
of Tax .\batc- 
Tax AbatnJ nieol 



Braniantr, I><>miiii'' 



• I Newhurj- 

• t'l Ncwburj- 
. ■ : .iiwcalth av.. . 

( <inKtTWi st 



» I. .575 0(1 
1,570 0<) 
1.070 (M) 
1.707 .50 
.3.53. 50 

3.V1 . .50 
4.242.00 
1.020.10 
919.10 
1.000. .50 
3..535 00 
919.10 
1.131 .20 
I, .5.55 40 
1.047.00 
1.745 00 
349.00 
.349.00 
340.00 
481 62 
4.188 00 
1.. 390. 00 
.5.9.33 00 
1.849 70 
1.884.60 
5.2.35 00 
1.047.00 
2.094 . 00 
4.188 00 
2.931.60 
5,863 20 
3.280 60 
1..3<.»6 00 
279 20 
1.180.60 
3.4!»0 00 
300.14 
.300.14 
349 00 
.300.14 
907 40 
3.001.40 
628.20 
628 20 
.523. 50 
.349.00 
907.40 
!W7 40 
1.116.80 
I. .535. 60 
5,.584.00 
963.24 
1.047.00 
1.745.00 
10,121.00 
.5.683 80 
349.00 
.383.90 
349.00 
349.00 
349.00 
349.00 
795.72 
1.396.00 
10,470 00 
5,933.00 
907.40 
1,186.60 
•W7.40 
1.819.70 
1.884 60 
5,235 00 
1.047.00 
2,0'.t4 00 
2.931.60 
628.20 
5.863 20 
3.280 60 
4,188.00 
1,047.00 



«441 00 

4.30 tiO 
467.00 
494.90 
.35 .35 
.35 35 
.35 35 
848 40 
282 80 
212 10 



212.10 
200.40 
488.60 
34.90 
34.90 
.34.00 
105 44 
8.37.60 
279 . 20 
1,745.00 
251.28 
279.20 
1,047.00 
104 70 
.349 00 
698 00 
314.10 
977 . 20 
488 60 
349.00 
48.86 
69 80 
5.58 40 
.55 84 
.55 84 
09.80 

104 70 
349.00 
90.74 
1.30.60 
!K).74 
20.94 
104 70 
104 70 
209 40 
209 40 
608.00 
265.24 
209.40 
488.60 
2.094.00 
698.00 
- 104.70 
34.90 
34. IH) 
34.90 
.34.90 
34.00 
3.55.08 
279.20 
2,443.00 
1,745.00 
69 80 
279.20 
209 40 
251.28 
270 . 20 
1,047 00 
104 70 
340.00 
314.10 
69.80 
977.20 
488 60 
698.00 
349.00 



sclitHils, Bu!»ton University, Har- 
vard, t»r Tufts. This is a stimulat- 
ing and rewarding incentive. Tlien 
is a liigli level of etliioal c()iiii>eti- 
titin to excel existing between vari 
ous teacliing liosjiitals in Bostoii 
From this and from the high levt 
services re(|uired for approval fn 
teaching, the patient is the din ( . 
heneficiary. 

The co.<t of this valuable level of 
l»atient care is difficult to deter- 
mine. We are attempting to isolate 
elements solely attributable to edu- 
cation of the staff of house ])liy>i- 
cians but so far the very major por- 
tion of the costs determinable is at- 
tributable to |)atient care service- 
I ho|ic there will never come a tin:< 
when we will have to justify tin 
operation of a "teaching lios])itar 
liy a direct comparison witli tin 
type (»f care available in the saiiK 
hospital when it is not or was not ; 
teaching hospital. 

One of our greatest needs now 
and in the future is for a stead> 
dependable supply of well-trains; 
nurses. We are not competiiiL; 
favorably with other hospitals ai 
present because of our neiglilx'i- 
liood and the tibsolescent buildiiig> 
housing our student nurses. Even 
with a $2.5 per month subsidy for 
student nui^es at a time when other 
hospitals are charging them for 
their education, wc are unable to 
attract an adequate number of 
(|ualified candidates to our school. 

Need "Crash Program" 

We need a "crash program" lur 
a 500-room nurses' home and school 
and an all out selling i)rograin to 
solve this vexing problem once and 
for all. It is ab.solutely impossible 
to furnish adequate bedside nursing 
care without an adequate number 
of competent, devoted nurses. The 
cost of the school? In excess of 
§5,000.000. The source of the 
funds? Borrowing, federal loan and 
federal grant. 

Pressing Needs 

Our plant is in very bad shape. 
Buildings are old, deteriorated, neg- 
lected, costly to maintain and 



Feb. 7 



CITY RECORD 



1 35 



fdstly to modernize. Three million 
dollars has been devoted to extraor- 
dinary repairs in the past four 
vears. The Shepley Survey stated 
about $5,000,000 would be" needed 
t(i continue this program. Last Oc- 
tober we started a drive to get 
S3. 000.000 of this for work which 
.-hould be underway now. A nearly 
constant effort has been made to 
get this money and we still do not 
have it, nor, do we know if and 
when we will get it. 

Among the needs which this 
money is intended to meet are ex- 
tensive revisions in the Dowling 
(our newest i Building costing more 
than §700,000. These will modern- 
ize our operating rooms to meet 
present approval recjuirements, im- 
prove our recovery room and blood 
bank facilities, build a new emer- 
gency services entrance, construct 
an overnight observation ward, etc. 

Seven units of eight beds each 
are to be constructed for intensive 
care of patients. These will cost 
over §100,000 but will group our 
dangerously ill patients needing 
special nursing services to keep 
them alive. This will also substan- 
tially reduce our present $500,000 
yearly cost for special nurses. 

Other Programs 

Other programs awaiting these 
funds are an all-out effort to cope 
with institutional infections, to 
modernize our delivery rooms and 
build a Caesarean section operating 
room, and a milk formula room. 
About $950,000 must be spent on 
the second and completion phase 
of our D.C.-A.C. power conversion 
program. About $400,000 must be 
used to match available federal 
grant funds which will soon lapse 
unless we do match them. The 
pharmacy must be modernized at 
$35,000, employee and nurse cafe- 
terias must be done over, and so on. 

The capital improvement pro- 
gram will probably lag somewhat 
until the proposed survey is decided 
upon and completed. Funds are in 
hand for a $250,000 addition to the 
Administration Building to provide 

(Continued on next page.) 



TAX ABATEMENT DECISIONS RENDERED BY THE BOARD OF 
ASSESSORS FOR THE WEEK ENDING JANUARY 2.— Continued. 

LEGEND 

* Appellate Tax Board Settlement *i Illegal assessment i| Chapter 59-5 

t Appellate Tax Board Decision § Duplicate assessment = Chapter 5S-S 

i Overvaluation Settlement by Board of Assessors x Flood 

Reason 
Amount for 
Ward of Tax .\bate- 

r Tax .\bated nicnt 



! of Person Assessed 



Location of Property 



Ocnoff , Lillian 1480 Columbia rd 7-1955 

Friedberg, Jacob 638 Dudley st 8-1955 

Berman, Walter, et al 1194 Tremont st 9-1955 

Herman, Walter, et al 12 Highland av 9-1955 

Berman, Walter, et al 39 Linwood st 9-1955 

Berman, Walter, et al 388 Northampton st 9-1955 

Berman, Walter, et al 384 Northampton st 9-19.55 



Berman. Wa 
Hershenson, David N . 
Back Bay Apartments, Inc. 
Back Bay .\partments. Inc. 
Del ^'ecch^o, Filonten. 



.386 Northampto 
.803 Shawmut av 
. 394 Riverway . . . 
. 390 Riverway. . . 
.782 Huntington i 



Del Vecchio, Filomen 780 Huntington av 

Del Vecchio, Filomen 778 Huntington av 

Del Vecchio, Filomen 776 Huntington av 

Del Vecchio. Filomen 774 Huntington av 

Del Vecchio, Filomen 772 Huntington av 

Del Vecchio, Filomen 766 Huntington av 

Berman, Tillie 117 Cedar st. 

Berman. Walter, et al. 



9-1955 
9-1955 
10-1955 
10-1955 
10-19.55 
10-1955 
10-1955 
10-1955 
10-1955 
10-1955 

10- 1955 

11- 1955 

,115 Cedar st 11-19.55 



Berman, Walter, et al 123 Cedar st 

Berman, Walter, et al 119 Cedar st 

Berman, Walter, et al 323 Warren ! 

Berman, Walter, et al 337 Warren ! 

Berman. Walter, et al 329 Warren i 

Berman, Walter, et al 315 Warren s 

Berman. Walter, et al 313 Warren ) 

Berman, Walter, et al 311 Warren i 

Berman, Walter, et al 317 Warren s 

Berman, Walter, et al 1 Haynes pk 

Berman, Walter, et al 2 Haynes pk 12-1955 

GusenofT, Joseph D 150 Warren st 12-1955 

Jacobson, Donald, et al 62 Cliff st 12-1955 

Palmer. James A 51 Bower st 12-1955 

Palmer, James A 49 Bower st 12-1955 

Prentiss Apartments, Inc 107 Blue Hill av 12-1955 

Standard Apartments, Inc 51 Humboldt av 12-1955 

Standard Apartments, Inc 53 Humboldt av 12-1955 

.Standard Aparts., Inc 55 Humboldt av 12-1955 

Standard Aparts.. Inc 57 Humboldt av 12-1955 

White Citv Aparts -56 Cliff st 12-1955 

White City Aparts 58 Cliff st 

Libman, Annie 54 Harwood St. 

Rossman, Annie 38 Mascot st . . . 

Rossman, Sarah 42 .Mascot st. . . 

Slotnick. Marian, Trustee 19 Livingstone ; 

Stern, Rose 25 Donald rd . 

Verrochi, Joseph 259 Quincy st. . 

Wigderovitz, Minnie 21 Frontenac st 

Wigderovitz, Minnie 1127 Blu. 

Foster. Ida 31 Elmhi 

Jenney Mfg. Company 600 Cent 

Quereco. Ellen 167 Wachusett st 

Fluster. Henry 



12-1955 
12-1955 
12-1955 
12-1955 
12-1955 
12-1955 
12-1955 



12-19.55 
14-19.55 
14-19.55 
14-1955 
14-19.55 
14-1955 



1117 Commonwealth ; 



-1955 



19-19.55 
19-1955 
21-1955 



Taunton Savings Bank 855 Beacon st 21-1955 

Bohigian. Harry, et al 53 Brooks st 22-1955 

Bangs, H. N.. & Sons 1140 Saratoga st 1-1956 

Carmen. Sarah 116 Brooks st 1-1956 

Ciampi. Armando L 119 Barnes av 1-1956 

DeFlorio. J., et al 2 McKay pi 1-1956 

Neptune Motors, Inc 615 Saratoga 1-1956 

Neptune Motors., Inc 270 Paris st 1-1956 

Sherzi Charles D 87-89 Liverpool st 1-1956 

Staples Coal Co Lot C, Border st 1-1956 

Caso, Gaspere 56-58 \A arren st 2-1956 

Caso, Gaspere 54 Warren st 2-1956 

Flickinger, Ida M 89 Cambridge st 2-1956 

Lindart Realty Corp 216-220 Main st 2-1956 

Main Street Package Store 143^-145 .Main st 2-1956 

Schrafft. W. F., <fc Son 529-543 Main st 2-1956 

Al\ State Plumbing Co 49 Purchase st 3-1956 

\11 State Plumbing Co 27-33 Purchase st 3-19.56 

All State Plumbing Co 47 Purchase st .3-1956 

Bank of New York. Trustees 338-340 Washington st. . . . 3-1956 

Beane, Walter L 43 and 44 North Market st . 3-1956 

Bellar. Marion 14 ScoUay sq 3-1956 

Berger Realty, Inc 562 .Atlantic av .3-1956 

Berkson. Max L 20-24 East st 3-1956 

Fiduciary Trust Co 336 Washington st 3-1956 

Gatti, Louisa, et al 10-12 North Bennet St. . . . 3-1956 

Goldberg. M., et al 1409 Washington st 3-1956 



S509.,54 SI 95. 44 
1.396.00 349.00 
1,186.60 69.80 



279 . 20 
342.02 
300.14 
300.14 
3.490.00 
5.095.40 
5.235.00 
453.70 
432.76 
439.74 
4.53 . 70 
453.70 
432.76 
1,535.60 
300.14 
300.14 
349 . 00 
300.14 
1,165.66 
321.08 



51. 
558.40 
558.40 
558 . 40 
1,207.54 
1,361.10 
1,361 .10 
1,675.20 
907.40 
279 . 20 
279.20 
3,001.40 
628 . 20 
628.20 
523 . 50 
349 . 00 
907.40 
907.40 
.572.36 
698 00 
698 . 00 
1.047.00 
663 . 10 
2.024 . 20 
1.047.00 
3.141.00 
.502 . 56 
1.116 80 

5,584' 00 

1,535.60 
963 . 24 

1,. 574. 00 
472 20 
472 . 20 
472.20 

3,777.60 

I, 608.48 
299.06 

8,224.15 
330.54 
236.10 
338.41 
1,180.50 
684.69 
141,660.00 
629 60 
889.31 
653.21 
21,249.00 
2,990 . 60 
3,305.40 
15,078.92 
7,083.00 

II, 018.00 
826.35 

3,541.50 



.55.84 
.558.40 
139.60 
174.50 
104.70 
83.76 
76.78 
90.74 
83.76 
62.82 
349.00 



69.80 
55.84 
153.56 
41.88 
342.02 
69.80 
69.80 
69.80 
160.54 
104.70 
104.70 
349 . 00 
104.70 
34.90 
34.90 
349.00 
90.74 
139 . 60 
90.74 



174.50 
118.66 
209.40 

698 00 
209.40 
265.24 
1.57.40 
39.35 
78.70 
78.70 
314.80 
157.40 
78.70 
6,059.90 
78.70 
78.70 
62.96 
236.10 
236.10 
13,772.50 
236.10 
393.50 
236.10 
2,722.00 
236.10 
550.90 
2.754.50 
393 . 50 
2,990.60 
118.05 
393.50 



1 i 



CITY RECORD 



Feb. 7 



TAX ABATEMENT DECISIONS RENDERED BV THE BOARD OF 
VSSESSORS FOR THE WEEK ENDINO JANUARY 2. Continued. 

ij;(;i:nd 

' ., 1 I'. • . M' • III. L' ll !iw»«'(i«mc>nt i Chapter 59-5 

,, I itc ii)4nc8smcnt = Chapter 58-8 

.rs X Flood 



I^>ralinn of Property 



Reason 
Amount for 
of Tax Abate. 
Tax Abated raent 



8»-«l Hanover at. .. . 

«3-«6 Hanover at.... 

... i.„K to Hanover at 

43 Warrenton at 

,. g-14 Shawmut av. . . 

l,y" " &-5A Hudaon at 

r~' . ' Vacant lot. Savoy at. 

^niatM 100-102 Salem at 

47-49 Green at 

46rroaaat 

pa' 046 WaahinirtOD at. . . 

" 658 Waahinston at. . . 

y .'.; 169-175 Piirchaae at. 

,iliMn 19 Green at 

732 Waahinston at. . . 

. _ 40-4'2 Harriaon av. . . 

, J 128 Tremont at 

•reet Corp 270 Franklin at 

rnard 97-97 A Salem at 

\ 5 .\8liburton pi 

199 Wcat Newton at, 

,ttn" 360-3C0A Ma»». av. . 

,,n 358-358A Maaa. av. . 

Inr 204 Hemenway at . . . 

367 Maanaohuaetts av 

202 Went Newton at. 

43 Rutland a<i 

647 Tremont at. 

669 Tremont at. 



Inc. 



n. \<-r« .\Iae 

Wnltor. et al . . 
. \\inue Realty. 



I Ten Cr. . 
M:iaa. Corp. 



118 .Newbury at 

.303-303 A New bury St 

.122 Brtmkline av 

.328 Commonwelath av 

.137-139 Arlington at 

.40 Charles at 

.74) Pinrkney at 

. 192 Commonwealth av. . . . 

.412 Boylston at 

.182 Myrtle at 

.282 Newbury at 

.220 Marlborough at 

.1, ,„,, i„, 61 Urookline av 

Kn»«tV, Antonma 70 Middlesex at 

Krnwof. Anionmn ftSH .Middlesex at 

I,. I)..„..„, SonsCo .13 Exeter St 

Munafi. ni' nt Realty I'aul st 

MrCnriliv Julia 106 Chestnut St 

N. «. ll Dorc yC 61 West Cedar at 

< >iiM»n. William. Trustee .123 Stuart at 

Kill ( nrli.in Hotel 8 Commonwealth av 

Ititi Ciirlton Itotcl 10 Commonwealth av 

H'«>- IW rtha C 400 Beacon at 

Sunriw Iti-iliy Co 18 Newbury at 

Sun SiKitii, Inc Lindall pi 

Taft. Edwarxl A 6 Walnut st 

White. (;<Milard M 103 Revere at 

W vner. Ivlward N 4 Newbury at 

W vnrr. E.<l»Brd N., et al 6 Newbury at 

W'vnrr. KxNurd N.. et al 2 Commonwealth av 

Atlas IVrminal. Inc 308 Congress at 

I ;Ml>-srriBn. Papken Vacant lot. West Broadway 

.2 City Point ct 

. 193 Boston st 

708-714 Dudley at 

. 1480 Columbia rd 

. Reed tcr 

. Reed ter 

. Reed ter 

.Reed ter 

Reed ter 

1 •!!..■. l.-nd ct 



ntorical Society. 



3-19.VJ 
3-I9M 
3 1936 
3-1936 
3-1936 
3-19.'>6 
3-19.56 
3-19.'j6 
.3-19.70 

.1-19.V1 
3-1H.50 
3-I9.Vi 
3 19.56 
3-19.56 
.3-19.56 
3-19.50 
3-1950 
3-19,56 

3- 19.50 

4- 19.56 
4-1936 
4-1936 
4-19.56 
4-1956 
4-19.56 
4-19.56 
4-1950 

4- 19.50 

5- 1956 
.5-19.56 
.5-1956 
5-1956 
5-1956 
5-19.56 
5-1956 
5-1956 
5-1956 
5-19.56 
5-1956 
5-1956 
5-1956 
5-1956 
5-19.56 
5-19.56 
5-1950 
5-19.50 
5-1950 
5-19.56 
5-19.56 
.5-1956 
5-19,56 
5-1956 
5-19.56 

5- 1956 

6- 1956 
5-1956 
5-1950 

5- 19,50 
0-19,56 

6- 19.50 
0-1950 

7- 1956 
7-1950 

7- 1950 

8- 19.56 
8-19.56 
8-1956 
8-1956 
8-19,56 
8-19.50 
8-19.V5 
8-19.56 
8-19.56 



Itcrman. W alter, ct al 1194-1198 Tremont st . 



$2,361.00 
1 ,907 .50 
2,754. 50 
1,196.24 
1.723.53 
2.7.54 50 
897.18 
2.Y54 50 
393.50 
2.518 40 
5.902, 50 
31,480.00 
2.7.54 . .50 
1.. 574 00 
2.203 00 
11.805 00 
18.101 00 
6,089.00 
1, ISO .50 
2,7,M ^0 
.•?,54 15 
1.023. 10 
1,023.10 
0.290.00 
787 00 
2.408.22 
787.00 
1,. 3,37. 90 
1.023 10 
5.115 50 
2,083.53 
17.707.50 
2.046.20 
865 70 
2.124.90 
983.75 
11.490.20 
11.568.90 
1,180. .50 
5,902, 50 
3.9,35.00 
19,075.00 
,5.50 90 
,5.50 90 
18.888.00 
02.96 
1.101.80 
1,180. ,50 
2,911.90 
1.574.00 
1.. 574. 00 
2.361.00 
7,083.00 
377.76 
3,148,00 
708.30 
6.010.80 
3,098.90 
4.722.00 
27,151.50 
157.40 
590.20 
912.92 
3.,541.50 
574.51 
94.44 
70.83 
86.57 
70.83 
70.83 
472 . 20 
3,305.40 
1.574.00 
1.. 574 00 
0,610 80 
2.75-1..50 
5,036 80 
236 10 
417.11 
.148.00 



9-1930 1,337 



»590 25 
78.70 
983.75 
118.03 
118.05 
236.10 
401 37 
1,57 40 
118 03 
.393 ,50 
1.180 .50 
4,722 00 
787 00 
314.80 
393 .50 
3.148 00 
5,509 00 
1 ,967 . 50 
472 20 
2,36 10 
78.70 
78 70 
78 70 
472.20 
78 70 
.598.12 
118.05 
314 80 
2.36.10 
1.731 40 
283 32 
2.7.54.50 
2.36.10 
157.40 
314 80 
314 80 
1.2.59.20 
350.90 
236.10 
787.00 
787.00 
1,967. 50 
78.70 
78.70 
1,967.50 
31.48 
78 70 
118 03 
393 30 
1.57 40 
157 40 
393 50 
393.50 
Ml. 06 
5.50.90 
78.70 
4.101.80 
,5.50.90 
787.00 
1., 574. 00 
,55 09 
78.70 
393 . 50 
787.00 
220.36 
47.22 
47.22 
47.22 
47.22 
47.22 
196.75 
,393. 50 
118.05 
.5,50.90 
1.. 337. 90 
393. 50 
1.101 .80 
.55 09 
181.01 
629.60 
78.70 



PANEL 4 . . . 

(Continued from previous page.) 

urgently needed .•<i):ue for cuiix)!!- 
(lati(Mi and efficient ojx'ration of tlie 
liospitalV busine^'^ functions^. Tlii- 
j)roject ha.s been delayed several 
months because of a decision that 
a needed Clerk of the Works for 
the job may not be employed at a 
trustee determined figure but must I 
be held to a ridiculously low $20 
per day, to super\ise the perform- 
ance of multiple trades, most of 
whom arc earning at least $3 per 
hour. 

Funds are in hand for a very 
ipuch-needed plant shops and ware- 
house building t<j cost in excess oi 
? 1,000,000. This project will fol- 
low a site study which is now near- 
iiig completion. Other capital im- 
provement projects have been men- 
tioned in the Shepley Report and 
some have been presented to the 
Planning Board previously. Among 
these are a 500-bed minimum care 
facility to replace the present South 
Department and other obsolescent 
patient areas. This discussion will 
omit these projects since their in- 
clusion and priority will be affected 
by the >urv('y under consideration. 

Equipment Inadequate 

The present status of eciuipment 
at the hospital shows frightening 
areas of inadecjuacy. Nearly all of 
the hospital's 1,500 beds need re- 
placement with modern adjustable 
lieight beds for efficient care of the 
bed patient and safety of the pa- 
tient who is allowed out of bed. 
Seven of the hospital's ten ambu- 
lances urgently need replacement. 
We need mechanical wall washing 
machines to reduce infections and 
reduce labor costs; equipment for a 
new bacteriological laboratory (at 
a cost of $.50,000 to aid in produc- 
ing $350,001) new revenue yearly I ; 
tlislnvashing machines for wards at 
a cost of $50,000 to confomi with 
sanitation code requirements to 
save labor and to reduce the possi- 
bilitv of infections; new vacuum 



Feb. 7 



CITY RECORD 



137 



cleaners at $20,000 to cope with 
dust and infections, and so on. 

A single item of approximately 
.^30.000 worth of equipment is a 
matter of paramount urgency to 
j)ut our se\-eral limes delayed re- 
vised charge and billing system in- 
to operation. Revenue for the hos- 
])ital in 1958 will exceed that of 
1^^.57 by at least $500,000. An esti- 
mated increase of $1,000,000 is 
made for 1959 if the new equip- 
ment is available in time. 

At the present time a loan order 
for $1,000,000 to purchase this des- 
perately-needed equipment is on its 
way through the City Council for 
the second time in recent months. 
This tour started four days ago. In 
thirty more days the required 
tliirty-four days will be complete. 

The Budget 

Out of a total budget of $14,- 
400,600 for 1958 personnel costs 
will account for $11,155,000. We 
have come a long way from the 
concept of cheap help and patron- 
age at low wages in large numbers 
at a low proportion of the total 
budget. Selection, ability, health, 
attendance, supervision, and prop- 
er performance with greater output 
from fewer people at lower cost are 
absolutely necessary. Discharges 
of "permanent" employees with 
chronic absenteeism continue. The 
rolls are slowly but steadily being 
cleared of the unwilling and the 
unable. Contrary to an impression 
you may have received from a 
Boston Herald editorial on Sunday, 
'November 16, 1958, City Hospital 
had cut its personnel quota by 100 
iobs prior to October first. 

It is not generally realized but 
the govei-nment of Boston City 
Hospital for the past four years 
has literally been "by emergency." 
Rarely hav(> we been free to choose 
courses of action and to spend 
proiicr time in planning, training, 
l)uilding an administrative staff es- 
tablishing priorities, etc. Power 
plant failures, breakdowns of utili- 

(Contlnued on next page.) 



TAX ABATEMENT DECISIONS RENDERED BY THE BOARD OF 
ASSESSORS FOR THE WEEK ENDING JANUARY 2.— Continued. 

LEGEND 

* Appellate Tax Board Settlement ?f Illegal as.sessment || Chapter 59-5 



t Appellate Tax Board Decision § Duplicate assessment 

i Overvaluation Settlement bj^ Board of .' 



Chapter 58-8 
X Flood 



Name of Person Assessed 



Location of Property 



Reason 
Amount for 
of Tax Abate- 
Abated ment 



Herman, Walter, et al 12 Highland av 9-1956 

Herman, Walter, et al 39 Linwood st 9-1956 

Berinan, Walter, et al .388 Northampton st 9-19.56 

Herman, Walter, et al 384 Northampton st 9-1956 

Herman, Walter, et al 386 Northampton st 9-1956 

Frank, Philip H 572 Shawmut av 9-1956 

Frank, Philip H 40 Camden st 9-1956 

Hershenson, David 803 Shawmut av 9-195G 

Hurlov Edward F., Trustee 14 Bartlett st 9-1956 

Jenkins, Oscar R 25 West Dedham st 9-1956 

One Sixty Ipswich 255 Northampton st 9-1956 

Rittenberg, Nathan 827 Shawmut av 9-1956 

Troupe, Lecretia C 414 Massachusetts av 9-1956 

Back Bay Aparts 394 Riverway 10-1956 



Back Bay Aparts . 



Del Vecch 
Del Vecchio 
Del Vecchio 
Del Vecchio 
Del Vecchio 
Del VeccI 
Del Vecc: 



. .390 Riverway. 



0-1956 
0-1956 
0-1956 
10-1956 
10-1956 
9.56 



I'ilomena 782 Huntington av. 

Filomena 780 Huntington av. 

Filomena 778 Huntington av. 

Filomena 776 Huntington av. 

Filomena 774 Huntington av. 

Filomena 772 Huntington av 10-1956 

_ Filomena 766 Huntington av 10-1956 

Eisenberg, Leo, et al 15 Frawley st 10-1956 

Eisenberg! Leo, et al 19 Frawley st 10-1956 

Herman, Tillie 117 Cedar st 11-1956 

Berman! Walter, et al 115 Cedar st 11-1956 

Herman, Walter, et al 123 Cedar st 1 1-1956 

Herman, Walter, et al 119 Cedar st 11-1956 

Capodilupo, Silvano 5 Cleaves st 1 1-1956 

Capodilupo, Silvano 7 Cleaves st 

Capodilupo, Silvano 9 Cleaves st 

Capodilupo, Silvano 11 Cleaves st 

Capodilupo, Silvano lo C eaves st 

Capodilupo, Silvano 17 C eaves st 

Capodilupo, Silvano 16 C eaves st Jl^Jn-^ 

Capodilupo, Silvano 14 C caves st 

Capodilupo, Silvano 12 C eaves st 

Capodilupo, Silvano 10 Cleaves st 

Capodilupo, Silvano 8 Cleaves st 

Capodilupo, Silvano 6 Cleaves st. 

Adams & Co., Inc 10 Hollander st 2- 956 

Adams & Co., Inc 8 Hol ander st 

Adams & Co Inc 6 Hollander st 12-19o6 

\dams & Co Inc ■ ■ ■ ... - 4 Hollander st 12-1956 

Ball A. Dans 60 Cliff st 12-1956 

Berman Walter et'al 337-339 Warren st 12-1956 

BllZn. Waiter; aL ! ! 1 ! ! . ! . . . .329-335 Warren st.^ 12-1956 

Berman, Walter, et al ^lro}?•^ Jo^Jotc 

Berman Walter et al 313-313A W arren st 12-1956 

Berman Walter' It al 31 1-311 A Warren st 12-1956 

Berman; Walter et al 317-327 Warren st 12-1956 

Herman; Walter, et al 323-327 Warren st }2-1956 

Berman, Walter, et al 1-7 Haynes pk Jo'lotc 

Herman, Walter, et al 2-8 Haynes pk JH^tc 

Block, iSIax 215 Blue Hill av }?-^t^ 

Diutsh, Louise, et al 68 Crawford st }o~!q?a 

Goldin, Anna T 34 Hartwe st ll'lt^J? 

Goldin \nna T 32 Hartwell st 12-1956 

Gus>noff. .Joseph D' 150-150A Warren st 

Itchcovitz, Helen ,. . .25 Wayne st. H^a-r 

Jacobson, Donald Deckard st }o"}q?2 

Jacobson, Donald 28 Deckard st Jo" intft 

Jacobson, Donald 62 Cliff st. lo'lntfi 

Jordan, Ormie A l.> Harold pk Jo iqIa 

Levin. Pauline 24 ^ ]t\t^t 

T pvin Pauline 22 Savin st l.i-190b 

Lev-!"; Pauline:; ::;:; 80Clifford st 12-1956 

Miller. Eliot 49 Bower st H~\l-t 

Miller Eliot 51 Bower st 12-19.d6 

M • Is,..;; 489 Blue Hill av 12-1956 

X • : ■ : , V ■ et ki ■ ; ; 58 Edgewood st 1 2-1956 

i ' 107 Blue Hill .IV 12-19.56 

51 Humboldt av 12-1956 

- 53 Humboldt av 12-19.56 

L;,;,,„|.,,,l \,,ni.c .55 Humboldt a V 12-19.56 

57 Humboldt av 12-1956 

56 Cliff st 12-19.56 

58 Cliff st 12-1956 

Block. Ada lg?-A^^^ ^T^y ll'llla 

Block, Ada 171 Qumcy st 13-19ob 



Standard .-Vparts. . . 
White City .\parts. 
White City Aparts . 



$.346.28 
314.80 
385.63 
338.41 
338.41 
999.49 
1,101.80 
3,935.00 
1,574.00 
432 . 85 
1,810.10 
4,462.29 
5.50.90 
4,722.00 
4,722.00 
511.. 55 
487.94 
495.81 
511 .55 
511.55 
487.95 
1,731.40 
3,148.00 
3,148.00 
338.41 
338.41 
393 . 50 
338.41 
550.90 
550.90 
550.90 
550.90 
550.90 
550.90 
550.90 
550.90 
.550.90 
550.90 
550.90 
550.90 
708.30 
708 . 30 
708.30 
708.30 
1,023.10 
1,282.81 
1,290.68 
629 . 60 
629.60 
629.60 
1,361.51 
1,314.29 
1,534.65 
1,534.65 
1,731.40 
708.30 
629 . 60 
629.60 
1,888.80 
2,124.90 
2,361.00 
2,361.00 
1,023.10 
550.90 
330.54 
314.80 
472.20 
314.80 
314.80 
5,902.50 
432 . 85 
3..384.10 
708 . 30 
708.30 
.590.25 
393 . 50 
1,023. 10 
1,023.10 
472.20 
393.50 



$70.83 
55.09 
62.96 
62.96 
62.96 
212.49 
157.40 
787.00 
236.10 
78.70 
393 . 50 
920.79 
78.70 
787.00 
787.00 
118.05 
94.44 
86.57 
102.31 
94.44 
70.83 
393 . 50 
157.40 
157.40 
62.96 
62.96 
78.70 
62.96 
55.09 
55 09 
55.09 
55.09 
55.09 
55.09 
55.09 
55.09 
55.09 
55.09 
55.09 
55.09 
78.70 
78.70 
78.70 
78.70 
157.40 
212.49 
220.36 
78.70 
78.70 
78.70 
181.01 
173.14 
118.05 
118.05 
1.57.40 
39 . 35 
102.31 
94.44 
393 . 50 
275.45 
196.75 
196.75 
118.05 
78.70 
39.35 
39.35 
15.74 
236.10 
39.35 
787.00 
78.70 
393 . 50 
102.31 
K57.40 
102.31 
23.61 
112.05 
118.05 
39.35 
39.35 



138 



CITY RECORD 



Feb. 



TAX ABATEMENT DECISIONS RENDERED BY THE BOARD OF 
ASSESSORS f OR THE WEEK ENDING JANLARV 2. Continued. 
I.KCKND 

• Ai>p«'Uiit4- Tii\ Bcmr.l S ttl. iiu iit ' nJ«<c«fmPiit ('haptt-r 5'.»-.') 

t .\p|M'lliit<> I'ltx Itiiiinl Di-i irton j Diipliciit*' luwMmi'nt = C;haptpr 58-8 

I Ovfrviilualion S'ttli-im-nt l.y Bonnl of AswiworM x Flood 

Reason 
Amount for 
Wart of Tax Abate- 

Location of Property Year Tax Abated ment 



Blork. A<la 




Hlork. Alia 




Tr«|Mi.i.k> . William 




Tr>|>auiiky. William 




(Minutrnr. i'liili|. 




.Mrlnnw. .Man A 




Al>r«l»iii. Nirlmliu 




Al,r»l,«i.i N..l..il«. 




Kin.a l<™ll> <•.. 




lTi.-.)l«n.l. ( V|i« 




f rinlUnil. (Vila 




J A. Itrally Co 




I.ihnian. Annto . . 




I.urrn.kv Itrally Co. . . 




NalKinal riiimtiinjt and ilpatinx 


U.Mman. Annie 




Hiiuman. .Saruli 




Huhin. Anna (; 




Sluinirk. .Manan . 




Stem. Idiw 




Tillman. Alfml K 




\'rrn»rlii. Jiwrph 




Wi-uImtk. Willinni 




W. i*)mtk. William 




Whitr Cily .\[«nrlii 
Wiit.lrr.iMH. Iiuinr 






Wigd.r..viti. .Minnie 




W,,lKrr..viti. I«uir 




K»|.|«n. .Mum. oi al 




.Sulrll. .M.illi.- 




Soarti, (M-orm- 




Dil.illi... FVIwnrd 




KrI.lman. Kow . 




Freeman. Joaepli. Truatee. 


.Mrl)<inii<iKh, Fxjward.. 




William.. Fre.! I 




Kodter. Ida. . 




WiiluliDvin. .Stanley 




Fjutem .\tilo I'arUi 




Jenney .Mfg. Co 




1,1'vin, I'a.iline. . 




I.«>vin. Pauline. . 




I.evine. C. R.. el nl 




O-Connell. J.ilin T 




q„vrvn>. VMi-n 




1 .■»«» Com|>any. The. . 




William.. F. B.. cl al . 




J. nn.y .Mfg. C. 




ri.|e«aler Oil Co 




• inffin. (Jertnide B, . . 




Hub A|*ru.. Inr 




lliih A|>arU.. Inr 




Hub .\|iaru.. Inc 




I.eeder. Celia 




l-e<-der. Celia 




l.iiry. Tliomaa 




KefiorK Corj' . The . 




.'irlimarU. .S. et al 




I nivemily Building Cr 




Itoliigian. Marry, rt al 




Di.Matlia. A., el al 




<iou,|ey(;um Co.. Tlie 




Hiihliina llarrx- el al 






Wi.l.ine .Motiim. Ine. 


\e|)|iine Nlniiini. Ine. 




.Slierii. Clin rill O 




Flirkmgrr. I.I.1 .M 




Flirkingrr. Win. II 




Flirk.ni-.- W,., 11 
.Mnin . < 
W 1 


.ire. 


All- 1 
AINt . :i 

All.T;... ; - 


lie. Co..; . 


lira Co 

lie* Co. . . 



Ari-I, < Inr ... 

IVan.- Wnller L 

Hi rgiT Ri-aliy. Inc. . . . 
Berger Realty. Inc . . . . 

Berka-in. Ma» I. 

Hanover Elm Buildinil. 



173 Quiocyat 

17.1 Quiney at 

17 Spring Carden at ... . 
lU Spring Carden at 
".180 IVirrlieater av 
4.'> 4» Stoiiglilon at 

4.14 Blue Hiltav 

4l-> Blu- Ilillav 

'11 F'-smond «t 

.-.II) Blue Mill av 

.VU Blue Hill av 

Howard av 

.V» Howard av 

16 .\ngell at 

HA Cieneva av 

.18 .Maaeot at 

4:.' .Maacol at 

1108 Blue Hillav 

. 19 Livingatone at 

l'.> Donald rd 

4.) WilroBC St 

. -'59 Quiney at 

!M Columbia rd 

<K) Columbia rd 

■JOO Columbia rd 

1 1 F'ronlcnac at 

. F'mnlenac at 

1127 Blue Hillav 

19.1 .\<lam« St 

.39J Columbia rd 

141)3 Uorclieater av 

.\slimonl St 

. 173.') Dorchester av 

1686 Dorchester av 

291 301 .\dani8 »l 

423 Nei>onset av 

31 Elmhurst st 

189 Norwell st 

4192 Washington st 

,600 Centre st 

.30 John \. .\ndrew »t. . . 
28 John A. .Andrew st. . . 

4196 Wasliington st 

r, .Mo.ss Hill nl 

.167 Wachusett st 

.4139 Washington st 

.676 South st 

.709 V. F. W. Parkway. . 

. 172 Belgrade av 

879 Beacon at 

6 Buswell st 

.24 Buswell st 

22 Buswell st 

. 1 13.5 Commonwealth av. 
. 1 131 Commonwealth av. 

463 Park Drive 

2.5Biiiek8t 

1.30 Brighton av 

1665 Commonwealth av. 

■IS 59 Brooks st 

82 Perlluihire rd 

. 52 Everett st 

.525 Washington st 

. 1 19 Barnes av 

.615 .Saratoga at 

.270 Paris st 

87 Liven>ool at 

89 Cnint. ridge st 

;M R..lan,l st 

40 Roland al 

143 J .Main »t 

529 .Main st 
49 Purchase st . . 

. 27 Purcliase st 

.47 Purchase at 

.93 Arch st 

.43 North Market st . 

.562 Atlantic av 

.556 Atlantic av. . . . 

.20Eaatst 

.59 Hanover st 



13-1956 
13-1956 

13- 19.16 
1.3-1956 
13 I9.'>6 

13 19,56 

14- Ht.ie 

14 19.16 
14 19.16 
14 19.16 
14-19.16 
14-19.16 
14-19.16 
14-19.16 
14 19.16 
14-1956 
14-19.16 
14-19.16 
14-1956 
14-19.16 
14-19.16 
14-19.16 
14-1956 
14-19.16 
14-19.16 
14-19.16 
14-19.16 

14- 19.Hi 
1,1-19.16 
1.1-1956 

15- 1956 

16- 19.16 
16-19.16 
16-19.16 
16 19.16 

16- 19.16 

17- 19.16 
17-19.16 
19-19.16 
19-19.16 
19-1956 
19-19.16 
19-19.16 
19-1956 
19-19,16 
19-19,16 

19- 19,16 

20- 19.16 

20- 19.16 

21- 19,16 
21-19,16 
21-19,16 
21-1956 
21-1956 
21-1956 
21-1956 
21-1956 
21-1956 

21- 1956 

22- 1956 
22-1956 
22-1956 
22-19.16 

1-19.17 
1-19.17 
1-1957 

1- 1957 

2- 1957 
2-1957 
2~l<t.")7 
■-' l'.i.-.7 



$393.50 (39.35 

393 .50 .39 .35 
39 35 
39.35 
629 60 
1.17 40 



1957 
1957 
19.17 
1957 
19.17 



275 4 5 
283.32 
2.361 00 
3.148 00 
2.361 00 
2.384 61 
3,54 1 .10 
5.509 00 
5,509.00 
2,345 . 26 
645 23 
629.60 
708 30 
787.00 
787 00 
3..14 1 .10 
1.180 50 
747.65 
629.60 
2.282 30 
2,.197 10 
2..197.10 
2.7.14, 10 
1.180 .10 
1,180 50 
3,541.50 
4.328 50 
1,720 00 
2.518 40 
.362 02 
I, .174 00 
1., 174 00 
2.518.40 
4.100 27 
.166.64 
424.98 
1.495.30 
1 ,259 . 20 
314.80 
314 80 
2.361.00 
834.22 
464.33 
2.046 20 
I. .174 00 
1.180. .10 
1.967.50 
3„14l.,10 
4. 328. 10 
3.935.00 
3,935.00 
3. .141.. 10 
3,54 1 .10 
3.935.00 
25.184.00 
13, 772. 10 
2,990.60 
1.086 06 
.1.10.90 
4.328.50 
1.731.40 
516.00 
4.128 00 
1,754.40 
326.80 
369.80 
6.880.00 
5,160 00 
748 20 
.14.800.00 
688.00 
971.80 
713 80 
8.600 00 
3.268.00 



16.47 



60 



17.922 40 
7.740 00 
2.580 00 



.49 



472.20 
692. 16 
.39.35 
78 70 
78 70 
78.70 
78 70 
787.00 
78.70 
78.70 
236 10 
393. 10 
236 10 
236 10 
.1.10.90 
78.70 
78.70 
196.75 
393 .10 
.393. 10 
1.17.40 
86. 17 
275 45 
236 10 
157.40 
558 77 
1.33.79 
31 48 
78.70 
236.10 
39 . 35 
102.31 
.1.10.90 
62.<t6 
70 83 
314.80 
1.17 40 
78.70 
3.14 15 
1.17.40 
.393. 10 
393.50 
.393. 10 
1.17.40 
1,17.40 
1,17.40 
'2,7,14, 10 
2.361 00 
314 80 
299 06 
78.70 
787 00 
314 80 
86 00 
.344 00 
172 00 
86 00 
68.80 
1,720 00 
1.720.00 
2.18.00 
19.350 00 
172.00 
249 40 
172.00 
3.010.00 
2,18.00 
3.870 00 
4.730 00 
430.00 
1.290.00 



F'ANEL 4 . . . 

(Continued from previous paee.) 

tics .services and of equipment, 
\arious "crash program.s" necessary 
to life ami safety have been our 
rule rather than the exception. 

We arc at the turning point right 
now. We Ix-lieve we are moving 
well away from breakdowns and 
lights out and fires and thefts and 
the nightmare of infant diarrhea 
and death. We believe we are ar- 
riving at an era of proper planning 
I'.nd management We need all of 
the constructively critical intelli- 
pent advice and help we can get 
We can get along without some of 
the misrepresentation, uninformed 
sideline coaching, and apple-ba- 
nana compari.sons we have been re- 
ceiving. Kit her we know our job 
and know what's needed and are 
making an all-out effort to get the 
job done right or you had better 
get rid of us and import some new 
management . 

This brief repoit only scratches 
the surface of the job being done 
und remaining to be done. There 
is no mention of our new and de- 
\ eloping psychiatric service, vari- 
ous other new projects, our de- 
veloping Diagnostic Clinic and 
Dut-Patient Department. This is 

large story and we feel our house 
i.'- in shape to permit the start of 
its telling. We will tell our story 
publicly. 

We at tlie hospital are quite 
familiar with Boston's financial 
picture and present plight. "We arc 
well aware that the hospital is a 
large drain on the community 
purse. I'luil we are told to close we 
will bend our every effort to con- 
tinue improNements and economies 
underway. We promise a detli- 
cated effort to bring the best jkis- 
sible business management methods 
available to full focus on one of the 
most unbusinesslike activities in 
the world — that of saving human 
life. 



Feb. 7 



CITY RE CORD 



139 



MAJOR COSTS IN OPERATION OF 
PRIVATELY=OWNED HOSPITAL 
By Dean A. Clark, M.D. 

It is an honor to liave been in- 
vited to take part in this panel 
today, and I am delighted to have 
the opportunity to talk about hos- 
pital eosts, always an absorbing, if 
sometimes painful, topic. Whether 
there is anytliini; specific that can 
be contributed to the discussion of 
costs by a privately-owned liuspi- 
tal that is materially difftiont innn 
the experience of a iiubliciy-owned 
institution I rather doubt. On the 
income side, the problems of the 
two are ciuite different, although 
both have plenty of problems. On 
the cost side, however, our prob- 
lems must be much the same. 

To begin with, we must agree 
upon how to measure hospital costs. 
The usual method, which is in 
terms of cost per patient day, is 
unsatisfactory in many ways. First, 
it doesn't really represent the 
amounts which must be paid by or 
on behalf of individual patients be- 
cause it takes no accotmt of the 
length of stay. Cost per admission 
would be a better method of meas- 
urement, perhaps, and measured in 
this way, hospital costs have gone 
up less sharply in recent years be- 
cause, as per diem costs liave been 
going up, the average length of 
stay has been going down. 

Occupancy Rates 

But both cost per day and cost 
per admission are unsatisfactory 
as they are so profoundly affected 
by a factor over wliich hospitals 
have relatively little control, name- 
ly, occupancy rates. Possibly, we 
ought to imitate our colleagues in 
public health who, in comparing 
death rates in two population 
grouj^s, always calculate the age- 
specific death rates of each group 
and then adjust the over-all rates 
to reflect a i)opulation of standard 
age distribution. In other words, 
we might try comparing hospital 
costs per day or per admission for 
a standard rate of occupancy. This 
is all highly theoretical, however, 

(Continued on next page.) 



TAX ABATEMENT DECISIONS RENDERED BY THE BOARD OF 
ASSESSORS FOR THE WEEK ENDING JANUARY 2.— Continued. 

LEGEND 

\ppellate Tax Board Settlement \ Illegal asses.sment |i Chapter 59-5 



t Appellate Tax Board Decision § Duplicate assessment 

t Overvaluation Settlement by Board of Assessors 



= Chapter 58-8 
X Flood 



Name of Person Assessed 



Reason 
Amount for 
of Tax Abate- 
Tax Abated ment 



Hanover Elm Building, 
ilanover Elm Building. 
Hudson Builduii: Trust 



.63 Hanover s 
.69 Hanover : 

.75 Knfclanri 



Eisonberg, Leo. Trustee. 
Eisenberg, Leo, Trustee. 
Eisenberg, Leo, Trustee. 
Eisonberg. Leo, Trustee. 
Eisenberg, Leo, Trustee. 

Finn, David A 

KotTman, Xatlian 

Koffman, Xatlian 

Museum VUla, Inr . . . 
Par.^ions. Mo.ses E., Trust 

Snider, Ellis L 

St. Botolph Holding Co. 

Bartevian, Vera M 

Berman, Walter, et al. . 
Blender, Edith. 
Brt 



Cliadbou 
C'odman, 
ro<huan. 



Realty 



al. 



Hundred Tc 



flainev. W.i 
(;aine\- W 
Cerald C.u 
(;ulf Oil C.ii' 

Heller, Elizabetli 

L. Damons Sons Co 

Xewell, Dorcey C, et al . . 
Oxman, William, Trustee. 

Ritz-Carlton Hotel 

Ritz-Carlton Hotel 

Rose. Bertlia C 

Rosen Max, et al 

White. fJoddard .M 

Wyner. Edward X 

Wyner, Edwa.d X 

Wvner. Edward X., et al. . 
Atlas T.-iniiii:,I Stores. Ine 



(;ellar. PhilUiJ 

Hunt S|)iller.AHg 

Ocnoff, Lillian 

Cable, Fannie 

Cable, Fannie 

Cable, Fannie 

Cable, F'annie 

Cable, Fannie 

Cobb, Frances 

Cowan Lumber Co 

Cowan Lumber Co 

Friedberg, Jacob 

Friedland, Celia 

.\merican Oil Co 

Berman, Walter, et al. . . 
Berman, Walter, et al. . . 
Berman, Walter, et al . , . 
Berman. Walter, et al . . 
Berman, Walter, et al, , . 
Berman, Walter, et al . . 

Dongusenoff, Joseph 

Frank, Philip H., Estate. 



19 Green St. . . . 
.5 .-ishburton pi. 
7.3L' Washington 

46 Beach st. . , . 



270 Franklin M 

2. -) Knei-lund st 

3o3 Massacli.isetts av. . 

3. ").) Massachusetts av. . 
:iy.) ^lassachusetts a\ . . 
361 Massachusetts av. . 
.363 Ma.s.sachusetts av. 
365 Massa.-hiis.-lts av. . 
367 Massarhus.-trs av 
199 West XcHton st 
360 Ma.s,sarhii.s.'tts a\ . . 
3.58 Massachusetts a ■, , . 
204 Hemenwa\- st 
204 West Brooklinr st. 

41 West land av 

202 West Xewton st , . 

1 18 Xewburv st 

303 Xewburv st 

1.32 .Myrtle st 

122 Brookline av 

326 Commonwealth av. 

40 Charles st 

74 Pincknev st 

408 Bovlston st 

234 Beacon st 

113 Commonwealth av. 



West Cedar st 

.220 Marlborough St. 

33 Exeter st 

,61 West Cedar st. . . 

123 Stuart st 

8 Commonwealth av 

10 Commonwealth a 

400 Beacon st 

43 Revere st 

103 Revere st 

4 Newbury st 

6 Newbury st 

2 Commonwealth av 
,308 Congress st , . . . 

.West Second st 

,314 West Second st. 

307 West First st. . . 

,2 City Point et 

,708 Dudley st 

.353 Dorchester av. . 
.383 Dorchester av. . 
. 1480 Columbia rd . . 

.7 Reed ter 

.Reed ter 

. Reed ter 

. Reed ter 



214.S Wa.liillL'ton St. 

Roxburv st 

1194 Tremont st . . . 

12 Highland av . . . . 

.39 Linwood st 

.388 Northampton st 
,384 Northa.mpton st 
,386 Northampton st 
.1887 Washington st. 
. 572 Shawmut av . . . 



3-1 



3-19.57 
.3-1957 
.3-19.57 
.3-19.57 
3-1957 
3-19.57 
.3-19.57 
3-19.57 
.3-19.57 
-1957 
19.57 
.3-19.57 
.3-1957 
3-19.57 

3- 19.57 

4- 1957 
4-1957 
4-1957 
4-19.57 
4-1957 
4-19.57 
4-19.57 
4-1957 
4-19.57 
4-19.57 
4 -19.57 
4-19.57 
4-19.57 

4- 1957 

5- 1957 
.5-1957 
5-1957 



,5-19.57 
.5-19.57 
.5-1957 
5-1957 
.5-1957 
.5-1957 
.5-1957 



5-1957 
.5-1957 
.5-1957 

5- 1957 
.5-1957 

6- 1957 
6-1957 
6-1957 
(5-1957 

6- 1957 

7- 19.57 
7-1957 
7-1957 

7- 1957 

8- 1957 
8-1957 
8-1957 
8-1957 
8-1957 
8-1957 
8-1957 
8-1957 
8-1957 

8- 1957 

9- 1957 
9-1957 
9-1957 
9-1957 
9-1957 
9-1957 
9-1957 
9-1957 
9-1957 



.52,1.50.00 
3.010.00 
62,.350.00 
980.40 
3.010.00 
6.4.50.00 
34,400 00 
3,010.00 
1,720.00 
3,010.00 
2,408.00 
12,900.00 
18,060.00 
7,310.00 
33, .540. 00 
860.00 
860.00 
860.00 
860.00 
860.00 
860.00 
860.00 
387 . 00 
1,118.00 
1,118.00 
6,880.00 
5.59.00 
10,320.00 
2,631.60 
5,.590.00 
2,279.00 
1,290 00 
19..350.00 
2,2.36.00 
2, .322. 00 
1.075.00 
12,642.00 
3,870.00 
3,870.00 
6,450.00 
1,892.00 
4, .300. 00 
20.640.00 
1,290.00 
3,182.00 
1,720.00 
1,720.00 
2,.580.00 
860.00 
774.00 
7,224.00 
4,042.00 
5,160.00 
25,800,00 
1,247.00 
12,.5.56.00 
7,034.80 
645.00 
3,870.00 
1,075.00 
45,1.50.00 
627.80 
103.20 
77.40 
94.60 
77.40 
77.40 
516.00 
3,612.00 
3,010.00 
1,720.00 
7,224.00 
3,360.00 
1,462.00 
378.40 
344.00 
421.40 
369 . 80 
369.80 
3,483.00 
1,092.20 



S860.00 
1.290.00 
3,440.00 
438.60 
430.00 
1,290.00 
5.160.00 
860.00 
.344.00 
258.00 
430.00 
4, .300. 00 
6.020.00 
2,.580.00 
2,.580.00 
86.00 
86.00 
86.00 
86.00 
86.00 
86.00 
86.00 
86.00 
86.00 
86.00 
516.00 
86.00 
860.00 
653 . 60 
1,892.00 
309.60 
258.00 
3,010.00 
258.00 
344.00 
344.00 
602.00 
430.00 
430.00 
860.00 
2.58.00 
860.00 
2,150.00 
129.00 
430.00 



.00 



172.00 
430.00 
43.00 
86.00 
1.204.00 
602.00 
860.00 
1,720.00 
387.00 
3.620.20 
2,734.40 
86.00 
860.00 
86.00 
8,600.00 
240.80 
51.60 
51.60 
51.60 
51.60 
51.60 
215.00 
430.00 
430.00 
602.00 
1,462.00 
688.00 
86.00 
77.40 



68.80 
430.00 
232.20 



I 40 



CITY RECORD 



Feb. 



TAX ABATP.MrNT DHCISIONS RFNOrRrD BY THE BOARD OF 
ASSESSORS lOR THI. UF.F.K ENDINd JAM ARV 2. Continued 
I.KCKM) 

Tii\ H...II.I S. lilrm. iil • Ill.-Riil :LHM-ism.-iit ( l.aptvr .V.I 



♦ VpiK-lliil*- Tii\ llo.ird iJrrlMiili i I)iilili<iil< 

• ( »\. r\ ■.lii.iti.iii S<Mll< iii. iii l.\ Mo ir.l of .\i«M-.»«irK 



I'.^Hinrtlt 



1. .M., 
1. M., 
. ,1. I. 



W all.- 



U|...k Mii\ 
I ioliliti. Anna I 
( ;<p|<lin. Ann» T 
i :nm-n..a. J.M.-I.I. 1>. 

||r|,.-.,Ml( llr|.-n 

.1,.. >'),.'>n l>..iiuM 



W«ni 

• mm of Property Ye«r 



.IVJ Un.r*ll> HI I'.l.iT 

■.{'Ml Kn.r*ii.v I" I''"'" 

7NJ llMnlinitton a\ H' I'-''"" 

7h<» lliiniinuli.n a\ 10 l'''>7 

778 lliinlinRlim a\ 10 l'.'">7 

776 lliintinRtiin nv 10 I'.t.'i7 

774 Huntington in 10 r.t.')7 

77J il<intinitt«n av 10 l'.».'i7 

766 HiintiDittaD av lo I'.i.'i' 

15 Frawley .1 10 l'.<.-.7 

ig Frmwicy at 10 I'.'.'w 

Bumpy at 10 I'.i.'.T 

11.-, {-.•.larct 11 \:ir,7 

1 17 <'«lar Kt. II r.'.'>7 

l.'.l (-...lar Kt II I'.'.'w 

IIW (•^^lBr Hi 11 l'."'>7 

18 Robraon at II \'>'>' 

15 Cleaves St 11 l'''>7 

17 Cleave* at 11 l'.f.7 

16 Cleaves It 11 l'''>7 

5 Cleaves St II I'l'w 

7 Cleaves St 11 l'.''>7 

.0 Cleaves St H I '.'•">" 

II Cleaves St II l'.t')7 

UCIeaveast 11 l'.»'>7 

.12 Cleaves St 11 l'.' '>7 

10 Cleaves St 11 l'''>7 

.8 Cleaves St 11 I "'■'•7 

fi Cleaves at 11 r.''>7 

f) Valrntine at 11 l'.i')7 

.17(Ml WiwIiiDBton at 11 I'.t'i" 

CO ClilT M II' I<.».">7 

.l.'.l W iirn-n at \ J l!t.'>7 

,t:(7 :<.i't Warron St I-' lil.->7 

:».•«.•. Wnrrc-n at 1 L' Ht.'>7 

:tl.-. :n:.A Wnm-n Kt .11' I".i.-i7 

:u:» :ti:tA Wani-n at IJ lil.->7 

:ill :U 1 A Warren at 1-' l'.l.->7 

:»17 Warrrn at 1-' l!l-^>7 

1 llaym-s |>k 12 W:,7 

J lliivnc.i pk K'-I!l.'>7 

.•I.-, m.io llillav l-'-l<).".7 

:M llnrtwi'llst 1L'-19.57 

:»J MnrtwHIat 12-1957 

l.'>0 Warren at 12-1957 

Wavni- at 12-19.i7 

■JH IVrkanl at 12-1957 

IWkaril at 12 19.57 

li-' Clifl St 12 19.57 

I7;i T.mnscnd at 12 19.57 

1.5 lliiriiM pk .12 19.57 

.' I Siivin St 1.' r.1.57 

HO {•jilTor.i St 12 I '.1.57 

489 m.i.- Ilillnv IJ :',i.,7 

.58 EdBowiMxJ at IJ I' .7 

107 Blue Hillav I j | i.-.7 

61 Htiinbuldt av I.' I'"."i7 

."kI lliimboMt av 1 J PL.T 

.57 ll.iint...llt av IJ | i.-.7 

.5.5 ll<iii.l.ul,|t iiv 1-' l'>.-.7 



Keinhrr«rr. Hklar 





( hn M 








Chll M 










i:i 








i:< 








i:< 


l'.i.57 






i.'i 


1H57 




i l">'.- 1, I .'.v 


i.» 


19.57 






1.1 








i:< 


1957 






M 


19.57 




lll.,tt..M lllll ..1 


14 


1957 




l-Ulnonil St 


.... 14- 


19.57 


1 1 


Harvard at 


.... 14- 


19.57 



= ("ha|>l<T5S-8 

Reason 
Amount for 
oi Tax .Abatc- 
Tax Abated nient 



1 1.204 00 
4. .300 00 
1.720 00 
2,1.50 00 
473 00 
4.878 20 
002 (X) 
.5.100 00 
5.160 00 
.5.59 00 
.*« 20 
541 80 
.V59 00 
.559 00 
.5:13 20 
1.892 00 
3.440 00 
3.440 00 
223 00 
309 80 
.309.80 
4.30 (K) 
.369 80 
774 00 
002 00 
r,02 00 



602 00 
002 00 
602 00 
602 00 
602 00 
602 00 
.387 00 
498 80 
1.118 00 
1.4.36 20 
1.401 80 
1.410 40 
r.88 00 
688 00 
688 00 
1.487.80 
1.677 00 
1.677.00 
1.892.00 
088 00 
688.00 
2.064.00 
2.322 00 
2..580 00 
2..580.00 
1.118 00 
645 00 
602 00 
361 20 
344 00 
516 00 
6.4.50 00 
473 00 
3.698 00 
774 00 
774 00 
4.30 00 
645 00 
1.118 00 
1.118 00 
516 00 
4.30 00 
4.30 00 
430 00 
2..580 00 
3.440 00 
3.956 00 
688 00 
137.60 
3.870 00 
2.562.80 



tl72.00 
800 00 

2.58 00 
4.30 00 

m OtI 
l.OtW 20 

86 00 
860 00 
860 00 
129 00 
103 20 

94 00 
111 80 
103 20 

77 40 
4.30 00 
172 1)0 
172 00 

60.20 



68.80 
8«i 00 
68 80 
172 00 
60 20 
60 20 
60 20 
(K) -20 
60 20 
60 20 
60 20 
60 20 
60 20 
60 20 
60 20 
60 20 
43 00 
1.54 80 
172 00 
189 20 
232 20 
240 80 
86 00 
86 00 
80 00 
197.80 
129 00 
129 00 
172 00 
111.80 
103.20 
430.00 
301.00 
215.00 
215 00 
129 00 
129.00 
86.00 
43.00 
43.00 
43.00 
860 00 
86.00 
430.00 
111 80 
172 00 
25 80 
111 80 
12<).00 
129 00 
43 00 
43 00 
43 00 
43.00 
430 00 
172.00 
946 00 
258 00 
51 60 
860.00 
7.56.80 



PANEL 4 . . . 

(Continued from previous page.) 

a> no one, to my knowledge, ha- 
trifil tt) do this and .•«». for purposi ~ 
of this (hscussioii wi- sliall have i 
use what farts we have and thr>i 
unfortunately, are virtually all n 
terms of cost per patient day. 

Rising Costs 

By this measure, eosts of penei . 
hospitals in the I'liited States ha- 
risen hy 170 per cent since 194i. 
from $10 to $27 per jiatient day. 
In New Eufjland. the second hipii- 
est re.^ion (to the Pacific! in the 
ctmntry, the latest fifjure ( 19.57 i is 
about $31. Now the really inter- 
esting!; thing is what makes up tiiese 
costs. Looked at in one way. they 
are composed of two main items: 
wafjes or .salaries, and supj)lies. Ap- 
proximately two thirds of these 
costs are for wages and salaries, or 
$20 per patient day in New Eng- 
land, and one third (or $10) is fori 
sujiiilies. Since there are, on the 
average, about two and one half 
8-hour per day employees jier oc- 
cupied bed in general hospitals, the 
wage bill works out at about $1 an 
hour, which can hardly be con- 
sidered an excessive rate. Do we 
need this many employees? It's 
very difficult to say. but I will have 
.some comment on that point a lit- 
tle later on. 

Another View 

Looked at in another way, hospi- 
tal costs may be divided into three 
categories according to types of 
service concerned. These are, first, 
"h o t e I costs", administration, 
housekeeping, repairs and mainte- 
nance, laundry, de]>reciation, and 
fixed charges. These hotel costs 
are about 27 per cent of the total, 
or about $8.30 per day in New Eng- 
land. Again nothing to be very 
much ashamed of. The second cat- 
egory, which you might call "gen- 
eral hospital services" includes 
nursing care, food, interns and resi- 
dents, medical records, social serv- 
ice, and the like. These, surpris- 
ingly enough, comprise .')2 per cent 
of general hospital costs, or $16 per 



L 



Feb. 7 



CITY RECORD 



(lay I almost twice the "iuitel 
costs") in Xcw England. The final 
category of hospital costs might he 
(ailed "'special hospital services'" 
and they include such items as 
l)harmacy, laboratories, X-ray, op- 
crating rooms, delivery rooms, and 
other such special services, amount- 
ing to 21 per cent of the total, or 
al)out $6.50 per patient day in New 
England. Looked at in this way, 
the costs of each item do not, per- 
haps, seem too luireasonablc and 
maybe we ought to begin billing 
our jiatients on this basis. For 
these breakdowns and the New 
England figures, I am indebted to 
Dr. Madison Brown of the staff of 
the American Hospital Association. 

Other Items 

One more item of interest to New 
Englanders, also obtained from Dr. 
Brown, bears only indirectly on the 
cost problem but important to the 
privately-owned hospital, nonethe- 
less, is the fact that in this region, 
the average cost per admission in 
general hospitals is $243 while the 
average payment by or on behalf 
of the patient is less than $217, or 
a loss of more than $26 on each ad- 
mission, twice as much as the next 
region (^Middle Atlantic), where 
the loss per admission is about $13, 
and practically eight times as much 
as the lowest region ( Upper IVIid- 
west) whose loss is but $3.40 per 
admission. 

Some Reasons 

Well, so much for figiu'cs which 
are fairly dull to listen to and don't 
tell too much of the story, anyway. 
What is the rest of the story? It 
is the reasons for these sharp rises 
in hospital costs, especially in this 
region. There are, I believe, five 
principal factors in this rise. Two 
of these, the general rise in the 
price level and higher pay plus 
shorter hours for employees, hospi- 
tals have in common with the rest 
of the community ( except that hos- 
pitals had until the war much 
lower wages and much longer hours 
than the rest of the community and 
therefore had a longer distance to 

(Continued on next page.) 



TAX ABATEMENT DECISIONS RENDERED BY THE BOARD OF 
ASSESSORS FOR THE WEEK ENDING JANUARY 2. Continued. 

ij:gi:xd 

* ApiK'llato T;ix Board Settlement * Rlegal as.sessmcnt |; Chapter 59-5 

= Chapter 58-8 
X Flood 



t Appellate Tax Board Decision § Duplicate as.sessment 

I Overvaluation Settlement by Board of Assessors 



\ame of Person Assessed 



Ward 

Location of Property Year 



Reason 
Amount for 
of Tax .Abate- 
Tax Abated ment 



Friedland, Celia. 
Friedland, Celia. 
Leonard. M< r!i> 
Libman, Ann i 
Liirenskx !: 
National i :i : . ■ 
Rossi.ia.i, Ai.iii. 



.534 Blue Hill av. 
510 Blue Hill av. 
Harvard ."st.. 



\ViKdero\ itz. L 
Wigderovitz. I. 
Kaplan. Mina, < 
St-ir Realty Tn 
DiTdllii,, E,lwa 
Frecinan, 
MfI)..iin,,L'l; i:. 



Tidf. 



er Oil Cr 
Henry. . 
Corin, Harrv X. 
Ciorin, Harry X. 
Holden Apar;s. 
Ldoy. Thomas. 
Schwartz. Saiuu. 



)iMa 



llin 



Kul.l.llLs. Jla.ry .1. n al 
Trow. Donald W.. < t al. . . 
Boston & Lockport Bluck (\ 

Coiiiifliaro, Antonio 

Lee. Ha If dan. et al 

.McLaiieldin, C. A., et al . . , 
.McLanKhlin, C. A., et al. . . . 
.McLaujrhlin, (J. A., et al. . 
MrLauyhiin. C. A., et al. . . . 

I'arl-.iii-.n !< H.. et al 

i; ( \ I . !,M-lion of Boston . 



AIa>cot St 14- 

4.' .Ma,soot St 14 

.1108 Blue Hill av 14 

. 19 Livingstone st 14 

25 Donald rd 14 

. 2.59 Quinev St 14 

.94 Columbia rd 14 

.90 Columbia rd 14 

.200 Columbia rd 14 

.11 Frontenae st 14 

. 21 Frontenae st 14 

.1127 Blue Hillav 14 

. 19.5-207 Adams st 15 

1403 Dorchester av 15 

Aslmiont st 16 

liiSi; Dorcliester av 16 

iiill Adams st . . . . 

i7;^5 Dorchester av 16 

.31 Elmhurst st 17 

.189-191 Norwellst 17 

.600 Centre st 19 

.30 John A. Andrew st 19- 

.28 John A, Andrew st 19- 

.4196 Washington st 19 

.4139 Washington st 19 

10 Neillian Crescent 19 

.709 v. F. W. Parkway 20 

. 1826Centrest 20- 

. 172 Belgrade av 20 

.1117 Commonwealth av. . . 21 

1135 Commonwealth av. . . 21- 

. 1 131 C'ommonwealth av, . . 21 

96 Mountfort st 21 

463 Park Drive 21 

. 1.30 Brighton av 21 

. 1665 Commonwealth av. . . 21 

82 Perthshire rd 22 

.52 Everett st 22 

525 Washington st 22 

. 1 1 Shanlev st 22 

. 140 Condor st 1 

. 968 Saratoga st 1 

.404 Border st 1 

Sumner st 1 

25 Lewis st 1 

. 1 1 Lewis st 1 

20 Marginal st 1 

70 Horace st 1 

.Ford st r,„. Whi'hv st . . . 1 



-19.57 
-19.57 
-19.57 
•1957 
-19,57 
-1957 
-1957 
-19.57 
19.57 
-19.57 



Booth. W ! ' < 
Boston I : - ' 
Boston ( .a- I < 
Creen, Kal la rinc .\L . . . 
fJreen. Katlierme .^L . . . 
Cireen, Katherine .M. . . . 
Clreen, Katherine M. . . . 

Michand. Ellen C. 

Murphy John F., Jr. 
Powers, CJrace, et al. 

Zukor, Evelyn 

.\dams, Luther H. O. D 
Anderson, '^^'^If '{ | 
Boston FiuatiiiL: Ilospit:: 
Chandl r i Co.. Lu- . 
Chandl-r i Co.. Inc. 
Chinese Christian Churc 

Cook. Sydney D 

Elmwood Investment C^ 

Equitable Life 

Equitable Life 



.J'.m; Medford st 2- 

.40 Park st 2- 

310 Bunker Hill st 2- 

73 Baldwin st 2- 

.424 Washington st 3- 

. 263 Friend st 3- 

. 199 Cambridge st 3- 

. 1-3 Nassau st 3- 

. 150 Tremont st 3- 

. 149 Tremont st 3- 

.56 Harvard st 3- 

.24 Winter st 3- 



-19.57 
-19.57 
19.57 
19.57 
1957 
1957 
■19.57 
-19.57 
1957 
19.57 
1957 
1957 
-1957 
-19.57 
-19.57 
-1957 
-1957 
-1957 
-19.57 
-1957 
-1957 
-1957 
-19.57 
-1957 
-1958 



1958 
19.58 
19.58 
1958 
19.58 
19.58 
-19.58 
19.58 
1958 
19.58 
19.58 
1958 
19.58 
19.58 
1958 
19.58 
1958 
1958 
1958 
1958 
■19.58 
1958 
1958 
1958 
1958 
19.58 
19.58 
-19,58 
19.58 
19.58 
1958 
1958 
1958 



705. 
774.' 



1.720 
619. 
464. 

1,376. 
344 
344 



3.956. ( 
2,1.50. 
6,880. 
3,870 
3,870. 
4,300. 
4,300.1 
12,900. 
3,612. 

602 . 1 
4,730. 



44,175 
0,854 
583,575 
.35,805 



S688.00 
688.00 
516.00 
43.00 
86.00 
86.00 
86.00 
86.00 
430.00 
86.00 
86.00 
4.30.00 
2.58.00 
258.00 
602.00 
86.00 
86.00 
4.30.00 
430.00 
172.00 
94.60 
2.58.00 
172.00 
301.00 
146.20 
.34.40 
258.00 
111.80 
111.80 
688.00 
344.00 
86.00 
86.00 
4.30.00 
387,00 
860.00 
172.00 
172.00 
645.00 
258.00 
2,580.00 
172.00 
86.00 
860.00 
00 344.00 
00 215.00 
.90 4,212.90 
. 70 83 . 70 
00 7,905.00 
00 1,581 .00 
00 6,696 . 00 
.90 1,329.90 
00 279.00 
.40 27.90 
50 251.10 
.30 102. 30 
10 251.10 
10 1.58.10 
.50 7,161.00 
.00 7,905.00 
60 18.60 
00 744 . 00 
.20 18.60 
70 27 . 90 
.50 139.50 
.90 83 . 70 
.00 186.00 
.00 465.00 
. 70 46 . 50 
.00 186.00 
. 00 930 . 00 
.00 9.30.00 
.70 4.826.70 
.00 372.00 
00 6.975.00 
00 11,625.00 
30 102.30 
00 9,300.00 
10 2,204 . 10 
00 132,060,00 
00 930.00 



CITY RECORD 



Fkb. 7 



TAX ABATEMENT DECISIONS RENDERED BY THE BOARD OF 



ASSESSORS FOR THE WEEK ENDING JANUARY 2. 

LKC'.KND 

Api- ' • ! r inl S«>ttli'm<'nt • Illogal a»n<'»wm<-nt 
Ap: irci Dorinioii J Dnpii'""'*' !«-'*'^*'*^ni«'nt 

((\. Mi tm tit liv Hoani of .\!*«*.«s<ir« 



Continued. 



ChapUT 5«>-5 
= Chapter 58-8 
X Flow! 



Loration oi Property 



..f M., 
..f Ml) 
..f Ml) 
..f M.) 



l .iiiivFr It. 
■ 1. r..,n .t.. 

'!< rniin (t. . 



">n St. 
">n mt. 

■■■n It. 



s II .1 KM 

I I Norili Itfiinpt »t. 

■» North Bcnnpt pi.. . 
. I l»no vpr »l 

t'rinrf anil N. Bennpt atii. 
Tn-iimnt iit 

.'.■> Knn-land at 

148 HurriiMin av 

I7H Harriwin av 

.M llnrvanl «t 

87 llawl.y M 

4 J hVnway 

7 f 'imrorri *<| 

ft'i IVaronraa rd 

Wiitglpsworlli at 

WiimUnworlli St 

\ViKKl<<swi>rth St 

W iwileawortli st 

. WiKKlpaworth st 

. IxinKwood av 

Gn.5 HiintinKton av. . 

L'<i7 St. Botolph St. . . 

jmt St. Bfitolph Bt . . 
. *7 f •Hin<*lMmHiKh st . . 

'J*J i •iiiim>>on>iii;h st . . 

'A\ ( tain.ttHtroiijth st . . 

33 ( ininxImroiiRli st. . 

JSJ llunlinKton av.... 

.V.»7 Treiiiont st 

112 Norway st 

.'(Ittt Tn'niont st 

4A4 HiintinKton av. . 

.30 48 Evans Way. . . 

78 Broadway 

138 Nowbiiry st 

118 ^'pwbury St. . . ! . 
. 126 Newbury st 

143 B<>artin st 

04 Beacon st 

.03 Villagp st 

«.5 Villaite at 

374 ('onimonwealth • 

33 Exeter kI 

13 Rrv. n. .1 

.'114 IV hcii ,t. 

til Mvrtl- -t 



|{<Mtua Wltarl < 



3-1958 
3-1958 
S-IQ.W 
3 1H.58 
3 IH.IS 
3 IW.'iS 
3 19.58 
3-1U.18 
3-1058 
S-IO.'M 
3-1958 
3-1058 
3-1958 
3-1958 
3-1058 
3-1958 
3-19.58 
3-19.-.8 
3-10.58 
3-19.58 
3-19.58 
3-10.58 
3-19.58 
3-19.58 
3-10.58 
3-19.58 
3-19.58 
3-19.58 
3-19.58 
3-19.58 
3-19.58 
3-10.58 
3-19.58 

3- 19.58 

4- 10.58 
4-19.58 
4-19.58 
4-19.58 
4-19.58 
4-19.58 
4-19.58 
4-19.58 
4-19.58 
4-10.58 
4-10.58 
4-19.58 
4-10.5S 
4-1058 
4-19.58 
4-19.-8 
4-19.58 
4-19.58 
4-1958 
4-19.58 
4-10.58 

4- 19.58 

5- 10.58 
5-10.58 

5- 10.58 

6- 19.58 

5- 19.58 

6- 1058 
6-10.58 
6-19.58 
5-19.58 
5-10.58 
5 19.58 
5 10.58 
.5 10.58 
5 19.58 
.5-19.58 
.5 19.58 
5-19.58 
5-19.58 
5 10.58 
5 19.58 
5-10.58 
n- 10.58 
n 10.58 
B-I9.58 
n- 19.58 



«37.1.'00 00 
165.075 00 
27 .000 00 
.53.475 00 
4I.H.50 (N) 
2.790 00 
2,325 00 



1.860 00 
1 .305 00 
204 60 
186 00 
186 00 
260 40 
l*i 00 
24 1 80 
.30.225 00 
1.58. KM) 00 
306 90 
I8.6fW 00 
6.975.00 
.37.200 00 
7. 161 00 
3.720 00 



00 



4.464 00 
9..3(K) 00 
18.600.00 
.36.270 fX) 
3.069 00 
3(ri >H) 
111 60 
79.050 (H) 
1.674 (K) 
465 (X) 
3.7f>«> .50 
186 00 
186 (HI 
2il4 60 
213 90 
232 50 
3.468 90 
1. 116 00 
744.00 
744 00 
744 00 
744 00 
0.30 00 
9.30 00 
4,029 00 
651.00 
6.045 00 
651 .00 
6.696 00 
26.970 00 
4.185 00 
5.115 00 
1.090 20 
6.045 00 
6.075 00 
1 .767 00 
2.883 00 
260 40 
1.39 .50 
.30.990 00 
22.320 00 
9.30 (h) 
15.810 m 
1..395 00 
1..302 00 
120.0(M) (X) 
604 50 
651 00 
2.7!tO (X) 
1.674 00 
15.810 (X) 
7 . 5.33 00 
1.9.53 00 
9.765 00 
1.395 00 



Rnaaon 
.\niount for 
of Tax .\batc- 
Abatod nient 



S930.00 
930 00 

930 00 
9.30 00 
0.300 (X) 
1..395 0.) 

9.30 00 
1 ,305 00 
0.30 00 
186 00 
465 00 
20